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Scientific Empiricism - Scientific Empiricism In 1513, Nicholas Copernicus, composed a brief theory that stated that the sun is at rest and the earth is in rotation around the sun. In 1543, just days before his death, Copernicus published this theory in On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres. This theory was meant to dissolve the long lived belief in Ptolemyís theory which stated, "The earth was at the center because it was the heaviest of objects(Kagan331)." This was a common belief at that time, which supported the religious beliefs that the earth was the center of the universe and God in the heavens were surrounding the earth....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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The Gravitational Slingshot - The Gravitational Slingshot The gravitational slingshot is a way that scientists have truly harnessed the gravitational pull of a planet by using it to launch satellites and other useful projectiles towards their desired locations. This method was developed through the use of Newton's Laws of Gravity and Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion. When these ideas of gravity and the shape of a planet's orbit were brought together piece by piece, this new theory changed how a projectile traveling through space could simply cross an orbital pattern, which would in turn change the path of the moving object....   [tags: Scientific Research ]
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1563 words
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Differentiating the Renaissance Period and Middle Ages Era in Europe - The Renaissance was a time of change and prosperity. The decision was made depending on the difference of two eras. Unlike the Renaissance, the Middle Ages were a thousand years of ignorance and superstition. The Renaissance men were leaders in an era of rebirth and learning looked to the Ancient Greeks and Romans for models of advance. Many historians felt that the Middle Ages and the Renaissance were one era. The debate centers around whether the Renaissance was a unique age or a continuation of the Middle Ages....   [tags: European Renaissance Essays] 1003 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Influence of Religion on European Politics and Human Culture - Man has consistently feared two things throughout history: change and the unknown. During the 16th century the church became the direct and indirect authority on multiple levels affecting the everyday lives of all citizens. So in a strange way for all the good religion is responsible for such as stability, cohesiveness, harmony, uniformity and overall guidance; the same could be said concerning all of the misery created. It is fair to say the church is responsible for civil wars, revolutionary wars, impeding the progress of science, political, social, cultural gains and murder until the era of Enlightenment....   [tags: Power or Fear] 856 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Impact of the Scientific Revolution Upon the Enlightenment - The age of Enlightenment was a progression of the cultural and intellectual changes in Europe that had resulted from the scientific revolution during the sixteenth and seventeenth century. The scientific revolution and the discoveries made about the natural world would ultimately challenge the way people perceived the world around them. Scientist found real answers, by questioning flawed ancient beliefs that were widely held and maintained by the church. Ultimately, these discoveries and scientific advancements would evolve and effect social, cultural, and political developments in Europe over the course of time....   [tags: European History] 985 words
(2.8 pages)
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Reflections on the Scientific Revolution, Deism, and Religion - Constantly on opposite sides, science and religion both espoused to define the meaning of man's existence and purpose. From the dawn of human cognition, religion seemed to have an important influence in daily lives. On the other hand, the purpose of science was to support theological dogma, and if possible, enforce them. By the 15th century, a pattern of divergence from solely subordination to theology emerges. Why was this possible. Looking at the characteristics of science and theology, the aims of the former is positivistic and the latter is normative....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1539 words
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Spectroscopy: The Search for Extraterrestrial Life - Throughout history humanity has been fascinated by the existence of extraterrestrial life. Today such ventures are in the development process and the discovery of life beyond our solar system, no matter how primitive, may soon become a huge(important?) scientific breakthrough. The three basic things that are required to consider a place even remotely habitable are water, a source of energy, and organic materials. Habitability also depends on other factors that must also be taken into consideration such as how close the planet is to its star (in the case of our solar system, the sun), how long the water and organic materials existed there, and the size and mass of the planet....   [tags: Astronomy Essays]
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Is There Anyone Out There? - Earth is small. Many people find it hard to believe, but when one thinks of earth in its context, amongst billions of galaxies, stars, planets, and an infinite universe, earth is a mere grain of sand on the beach that is space. With this in mind, one may, quite understandably, find it hard to believe that earth is the only planet that sustains life. With today’s advanced technology and science, extensive evidence has been found suggesting a great likelihood of life on other planets. The discovery of life on other planets has huge implications for humankind, as it would likely give a more thorough understanding of what human life is, how it came to be, and possibly even insight into why human...   [tags: Astronomy]
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The History of the Telescope - For centuries, mankind has always pondered upon the wonders that is beyond our planet, the Earth. The invention of the telescope has vastly improved our view of the skies, sharpening our perception of the universe and penetrating ever deeper, to the furthest edges of time and space. The underlying roots to the invention of the telescope is vague and thought to have started around during the 13th century. An accidental discovery made by a glassmaker during this era, resulted in the development and defined the early beginnnings of spectacles....   [tags: Important Inventions, Technological Developments]
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The Renaissance as a Distinct Period of Time - The Middle Ages was a time in history where everyone was faithful to religion as well as others. Also, in the Middle Ages, people were encouraged to always try their best; they were encouraged to strive for the highest achievement possible and to never give up. The Renaissance, however, was more focused on becoming matured and finding a way to be successful at everything one does. During this era, people strived to become all-sided men, also known as; renaissance men. This means they are not only successful in one type of art but in all types of art, as well as math, science, and literature....   [tags: European Renaissance Essays] 634 words
(1.8 pages)
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Sir Isaac Newton's Law Of Universal Gravitation - Gravity if one of the four fundamental forces in the universe. Though the fundamental principles of it eluded scientists until Sir Isaac Newton was able to mathematically describe it in 1687 (Eddington 93). Gravity plays a serious part in everyday actions as it keeps everything on the ground; without gravity everything would be immobile unless a force was applied (then it would move infinitely because there would be no force to stop it). Perhaps, the best place to start then would be with such a simple item as an apple (after all it is what "sparked" Newton's creativity)....   [tags: Law of Universal Gravitation Essays]
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The Theory of Scientific Theories - The Theory of Scientific Theories Sir Popper's piece, "Science: Conjectures and Refutations," reaffirms the scientific methods currently in use. No scientific theory is ratified without serious consideration and careful observation. Science is the pursuit of what can be proven false and the resulting assumptions of what must be true. The problem that plagues Sir Popper is the clear definition of science and pseudoscience. Though the empirical method is common to both, the level of inferential data varies greatly....   [tags: Science: Conjectures and Refuations Essays] 863 words
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The Enlightenment - During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the scientific revolution brought about a slow change in societies’ thinking regarding math, earth science, physics, and astronomy. Early on, new ideas about our universe were not widely accepted, especially from the church. This soon changed due to the hard work and perseverance of several scientists and philosophers who unbeknownst to them brought about an era known as the Enlightenment. The Enlightenment, which eased into existence in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries created a new way of thinking based on rationality....   [tags: European History] 1013 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Influence of the Science Revolution on the Enlightenment - Discoveries and innovation during the science revolution played a very important role that turned out to be very beneficial to the Enlightenments early stages. During the seventeenth and eighteenth century the educated classes of Europe followed a strict religious foundation of values. The Europeans would soon change their world view to a primarily laical and scientific-based contrast. The development of scientific knowledge was the key cause of this intellectual change. Most would say the push that triggered the scientific revolution began with the Greek philosopher and scientist Aristotle....   [tags: Religious Traditions, Innovations]
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A History of Curvature and Applications of Hyperbolic Space - While the study of curvature is an ancient one, the geometry of curved surfaces is a topic that has been slowly developed over centuries. The Ancient Greeks certainly considered the curvature of a circle and a line distinct, noting that lines do not bend, while circles do. Aristotle expanded on this concept explaining that there were three kinds of loci: straight, circular, and mixed (Coolidge)Then in the third century B.C. Apollonius of Perga found that at each point of a conic section there is exactly one normal line (Coolidge, 375-6)....   [tags: geometry, ancient greeks, einstein]
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The Natural Phenomenom of Newton's Law of Gravity - What is Law of Gravity. According to Wikipedia, Gravitation, or gravity, is a natural phenomenon by which all physical bodies magnetize each other. It is most commonly experienced as the agent that gives weight to objects with mass and causes them to fall to the ground when dropped from a height. Newton's equation first appeared in the Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, July 1687. It verbalizes about how the apple fell from the tree. Whether or not that apple genuinely landed as some stories would retain it, this equation describes why you stay rooted to the ground, what locks the Earth in orbit around the sun and was utilized by Nasa engineers to send men to the moon....   [tags: magnetization, apple, earth] 886 words
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Creation Stories of the Universe in Different Cultures - No one is exactly sure how but the universe was created billions of years ago for some unknown reason. Every culture from around the world at one point starts to wonder where did it all come from. Who or what created the world we know today. The story of the creation of our world has been repeatedly told in a variety of religion, folklore, mythology and science as well. Although told in different languages and separate parts of the world similarities arise as all of the creation stories attempt to answer the great mystery of life “Where did we come from?” Stories of our creation of the world create a spiritual and mystical bond that unites people together....   [tags: Religion, Science, Myths]
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The Elizabethan Era- The Rebirth of England - It all began with the travesty that is it bubonic plague. Transported by fleas on rodents, thousands of people’s lives were lost before it was all over. After the plague, Western Europe went through a period of “rebirth”- called the Renaissance. This time period was ruled by the esteemed Queen Elizabeth I and is also called the Elizabethan Era. As the Elizabethan Era was an age of great chance, much advancement was made in the fields of science and mathematics, exploration, industry, culture, and the arts, all of which were implemented by rulers of that time....   [tags: bubonic plague, exploration, industry]
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883 words
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The Elizabethan Era: The Rebirth of England - It all began with the travesty that is it bubonic plague. Transported by fleas on rodents, thousands of people’s lives were lost before it was all over. After the plague, Western Europe went through a period of “rebirth”- called the Renaissance. This time period was ruled by the esteemed Queen Elizabeth I and is also called the Elizabethan Era. As the Elizabethan Era was an age of great chance, much advancement was made in the fields of science and mathematics, exploration, industry, culture, and the arts, all of which were implemented by the rulers of that time....   [tags: copernicus, galileo, bubonic plague]
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885 words
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The Scientrific Era and Its Great Theories - The Scientific Era brought out the greatest theories, ideas, and experiments that have transformed science itself. Budding new scientists with fresh minds, and a heart for science, wanting to give it a new beginning. A new beginning that would change the processes, the thought, and the experimentation. The first scientist that lit this spark, was Francis Bacon. He devised a logical procedure for gathering information and testing theories. Francis created the scientific method. This new order of steps was the building blocks that made new scientific discoveries possible....   [tags: science, experiments, process, advances] 759 words
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Edmond Halley: The Man Behind the Comet - The year is 2061. Ordinary astronomy enthusiasts and seasoned astrophysicists alike flock to the darkest, most obscure corners of the Earth to witness the return of what is arguably the most famous near-Earth object in history. This celebrated occurrence is known as the perihelion of Halley’s Comet, and though its observance dates back to at least 239 B.C., the man responsible for accurately analyzing its repeated occurrences and calculating its seventy-five year orbit is no other than Edmond Halley....   [tags: solar system, astronomy, constellation]
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The Big Bang Theory and Christian Cosmology - To more fully understand the Big Bang theory and the evidence on which it progressed from, an overview of its earlier development over many centuries is needed. Present day ideas concerning the Big Bang theory can be seen as having first originated within modern European science. However before these ideas were developed, most explanations concerning the origins of the universe were based on religious themes and concepts, the primary tradition being Christianity. These Christian origin stories explain the appearance of the universe as being the work of an all powerful and omnipresent God....   [tags: bible, ptolome, universe] 1052 words
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The Enlightenment Period and Napoleon's Rule - The time of the Enlightenment was a time of great change, reform, and the emergence of great minds such as Isaac Newton, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and even Copernicus. These men cleared the path to thinking in a new way and brought about the change necessary for the Scientific Revolution. The Enlightenment allowed people to think more critically and even was the time in which the “Experimental Method” was consolidated by Galileo Galilei (1564-1642, Buckler, J., Crowston, p.592 para. 6). It allowed people to begin to think “out of the box” if you will....   [tags: European History, French History]
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Thomas Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions - The aim of this essay is to provide a summary and critique of Thomas S. Kuhn’s groundbreaking thesis ‘The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.’ This will be done by analyzing his concepts of ‘paradigm’, ‘normal science’ and ‘scientific revolutions.’ Following the overview I will present the example of ‘The Copernican Revolution’ to empirically show a paradigm shift. The rest of the essay is concerned specifically with critically examining Kuhn’s notion of a paradigm and the incommensurability between them....   [tags: Book Review]
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Baroque Period (1600-1750) General Background - Baroque Period (1600-1750) General Background The years between 1600 and 1750 were full of contradiction, change, and conflict in Europe. The future would be shaped by the far reaching consequences of war. These conflicts pitted mainly the northern countries (Belgium, Germany, England, Sweden) against the Catholic kingdoms of the south (France, Spain, Austria), and further accentuated the pre-existing cultural differences between Northern and Southern Europe. However, tremendous scientific, philosophical, and artistic accomplishments that constitute the practical foundation of modern civilization flourished side by side with continual warfare, political instability, and religious fervor, bor...   [tags: World History] 876 words
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The Contributions of Isaac Newton - It was a period in which there was an epidemic of a genius virus in Europe for scientists, explorers, inventors of many things including mathematics. Among them was Isaac Newton (1642-1727) who co-invented calculus, discovered the Binomial Theorem, and formulated a theory of universal gravitation (Smith). Newton has been regarded for almost 300 years as the founding exemplar of modern physical science, his achievements in experimental investigation being as innovative as these in mathematical research....   [tags: Sir Isaac Newton Essays]
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The Habitable Zone outside Earth - ... Such planets follow most expectations of being a possible proxy to Earth. Gilese667Cc was declared the most earth-like planet outside of the solar system, even more similar than Kepler-22b (Wedemeyer-Bohm “Gilese667Cc”). The host star’, GJ667Cc, HZ is at a distance of .11 to .23 AU. Luckily Gilese667Cc, located at .12 AU, does reside inside the HZ (Wedemeyer-Bohm “Gilese667Cc”). If Earth lived in the place of Gilese667Cc then Earth would be a frozen, but GJ667Cc is a much smaller star compared our Sun....   [tags: living in outer space, life on other planets]
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The Revolution in Scientific Thinking - The period between 1300 and 1600 was a time of great change in Europe. The Renaissance and many religious reformations occurred, along with many arts that transformed people’s views of the world, causing people to ask new questions. While many revolutions were taking place, another was being introduced. They called it, “The Scientific Revolution,” and it wasn’t just an ordinary revolution, it was unique because it brought a diverse new age, an age that would permanently change the way we see things in the physical world we live in....   [tags: astronomy, experimentation, gravity]
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How Knowledge Acquisition Affects Beliefs - All humans are born with curiosity. It is all too common to see a baby shoving a fistful of something found on the ground into its tiny little mouth, no matter how disgusting. Babies, toddlers and little children all posses an eagerness to explore the unknown and try new things. Children ask the honest questions, the odd questions, the questions the rest of us choose to ignore. People’s beliefs are changed when the inquisitive nature they are born with leads them in the pursuit of knowledge that has the ability to dismantle the current ideas and ideals preached by authority....   [tags: renaissance, church, curiosity] 695 words
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Life of Isaac Newton - Isaac Newton built a fundamental of physics. He is an English physician, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, alchemist, and theologian. He is superior in many ways. He invented a reflecting microscope, so he developed a theory of color, which is proved by prism. He published ‘Philosophiea Naturalis Principia Mathematica(Lantin for “Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy” usually called the Principia)’ in 1687. It became a masterpiece with just published. This great book includes a theory of gravity and the Newton’s three laws....   [tags: Biography of Isaac Newton]
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Cosmology and the Bible - As one grows older, he begins to question life and how the universe was made. Therefore, it is vital that he has a solid worldview. This worldview has its foundation in cosmology. Cosmology is defined as the branch of science concerned with origin, structure, changes, and the final destiny of the universe. Therefore, the importance of origins/cosmology in a worldview is that it shapes how one sees the universe. Without studying cosmology, one would not have a firm foundation for his worldview because he would not understand how or why the universe was formed....   [tags: cosmology, universe]
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The Discovery of Kepler-186f - The discovery of Kepler-186f is a huge venture to discovering planets like our planet Earth .This planet is named Kepler-186f and it is one of five planets that have hitherto been caught by NASA's Kepler space telescope in circle about the star Kepler-186. This star is more diminutive and cooler than the Sun, of a sort called a M-dwarf or red dwarf, and all it’s referred to planets are little too, with sizes short of what 1.5 times the measure of Earth. The planet Kepler-186f is the most modest, being inside 10% of the measure of Earth and circles farthest from the host star, inside the habitable zone....   [tags: red dwarf, planets] 584 words
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Breakthroughs in Astronomy and Medicine in the 16th and 17th Centuries - Breakthroughs in Astronomy and Medicine in the 16th and 17th Centuries It was during the 16th and 17th centuries when man's view of the unvierse and himself changed drastically. This came after a millenium of repetition and stagnation in the development of science. People finally began questioning what they were told, and they went out to find proof rather than assuming on the basis of authority and common sense. These advances in astronomy and medicine came about in the same era, and were not unparallel in their development....   [tags: science] 973 words
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The Development of the Ideas Needed to Create an Atomic Bomb - The Development of the Ideas Needed to Create an Atomic Bomb I. Introduction Where did the atomic bomb come from. In this paper, I will look at the development of the ideas needed to create an atomic bomb. Specifically, what did scientists need to know for them to theorize that a cataclysmic explosion would result when a critical mass of certain elements undergo a chain reaction of nuclear fission. However, I will only look at scientific ideas generally, as they progressed towards fission. This development of ideas was propelled by genius, persistence and tenacity, coupled with flashes of insight into the nature of the universe....   [tags: Atomic Bombs Weapons Physics War Essays]
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The Revoluational Aspects of the Scientific Revolution and the Reformation - The Revoluational Aspects of the Scientific Revolution and the Reformation What does it mean to be revolutionary. To be revolutionary is to be, as defined by dictionary.com as “markedly new or introducing radical change”. It is my educated opinion to believe that the scientific revolution and the reformation were both revolutionary without a doubt. A revolution involves change, mass amounts of change which affects nearly everything. It’s not a change of wardrobe, or a new car, it is much, much greater than that....   [tags: Science Reformation] 1483 words
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Sir Isaac Newton's Role in the Enlightenment - Isaac Newton had a huge impact on the Enlightenment, he influenced it scientifically in many ways and he influenced faith and reason in a tremendous way. He was known more for his scientific achievements then his religious works.His background and education affected when he made these great achievements. Isaac Newton born on December 25,1642 in Woolsthorpe, England grew up, he was the most important physicist and mathematician of all time.1 Newton attended Cambridge where he studied mathematics....   [tags: Contributions of Isaac Newton]
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The Origins of Modern Science - The origins of modern science date to the seventeenth century, a period so marked by innovative thinking that it has been called the `century of genius.'...Breaking free of the bonds of tradition, these sixteenth-century thinkers developed the scientific method, a means of understanding based on a systematic observation of natural phenomena and experimentation regarding causes and effects (Merriman, 311). The ideas of many scientists, and philosophers, such as Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, and Francis Bacon, flew in the face of the 16th century intellectual orthodoxy....   [tags: European History] 2475 words
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Renaissance Dinner Party - The invites had been sent; the RSVPs had come in. I was waiting patiently for the guests to arrive. The party took place at a super-secret location in Hawaii. I had chosen the top-secret location so that surveillance would be unlikely. Furthermore, each guest would have to pass through state-of-the-art weapons and biological warfare detectors. William Shakespeare arrived first. “Hi,” I said. His response. “Good morrow.” What a strange greeting. I ushered him through the scanner. Of course William Shakespeare hadn’t carried any weapons....   [tags: Creative Writing Examples] 969 words
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Religion and State - Thomas Jefferson in his letter to Nehemiah Dodge said “The legislative powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions ... thus building a wall of separation between Church and State.”(Jefferson) The concept of the separation of religion from state has been battle that has endured through the furnace of time. While some may argue that religion and state should not be merged, a presumable equal population will agree that religion and state should not be separated. This paper will reflect on the history of religion and the State using the church as its point of reference....   [tags: Religion ]
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The Scientific Revolution - There were three major revolutions at work during the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, the scientific revolution, the enlightenment revolution and the political revolution. All of these revolutions have shaped western thought and ideals to this day and continue even in this age to shape western thoughts and ideals. What brought us to our thinking of today. Which, if any of the three, were the most important in shaping our thoughts on science, politics, and our social structures. Or were each an independent revolution without consequences on the others....   [tags: Enlightenment, Political Revolution]
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How Chemistry and Physics Affect Every Part of the World - An idea that has both perplexed and intrigued me is the concept of how science, in my case chemistry and physics, directly impacts every single part of the world. I have always been puzzled by the secrets of what the world is composed of and how exactly everything works in the world. However, it wasn’t until recently in high school that I began to grasp the basic fundamentals of how the world actually does operate. In order to understand the origin of this desire to attain more knowledge and discover more about the way life works, I must provide a small anecdote from last year in my AP chemistry class....   [tags: fundamentals on how the world works] 522 words
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The Roots of The Enlightenment - The Roots of The Enlightenment In its essence, the Enlightenment is the product of a shift in the the way society was organized. This shift was the result of many different factors and periods of time, among them being the Scientific Revolution, the Reformation, and the Renaissance. The key and perhaps the most important change in the Enlightenment was the shift from religion-based government to reason-based government. This can be seen mainly as the result of the Scientific Revolution. Before, religion was the basis of government because it provided a set of morale codes for people to follow and it helped explain the unexplained....   [tags: Scientific Revolution, Reformation, Renaissance] 613 words
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The Scientific Revolution - The Scientific Revolution When comparing the views presented by both Aristotle and Copernicus, one must consider the circumstances under which these men lived to understand the differences. The most obvious of these is the time in history. Aristotle came almost 2000 years earlier in the astronomy field. While Copernicus had set out to glorify the great religion of his time, Aristotle's views came 200 years before Christ was even born. Although the book gives the impression nothing of significance in astronomy happened in the time between Aristotle and Copernicus, professional astronomy was a developing institution during that time....   [tags: Papers] 1172 words
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Solar Physics - The star we call the Sun has a number of small objects circling around it. Many other stars in our Galaxy have objects orbiting them too and astronomers have recently discovered a few of these other systems already. The largest members of the Sun's family are called planets, and one of these we call home. That planet, Earth, has many unique characteristics that enable life to exist on it. What are the other planets like. We have learned more about our solar system in the past few decades than probably any other field of astronomy....   [tags: solar physics] 1517 words
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The Life and Mind of Jerry Garcia in Conjunction with Howard Gardner's Model of Creativity - The Life and Mind of Jerry Garcia in Conjunction with Howard Gardner's Model of Creativity "We always though of the Grateful Dead as being the engine that was driving the spaceship that we were traveling on."-Ken Babbs, a former Merry Prankster "Daddy is sleeping. Don't touch the guitars." -Heather Garcia In his Creating Minds, Howard Gardner states the purpose of his book as an examination of the "...often peculiar intellectual capacities, personality configurations, social arrangements, and creative agendas, struggles, and accomplishments" (6)....   [tags: Howard Gardner Jerry Garcia Paperes]
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Cosmic Teleology and the Crisis of the Sciences - Cosmic Teleology and the Crisis of the Sciences ABSTRACT: This paper analyzes recent work from within the physical sciences which argue for the emergence of a new paradigm capable of unifying the sciences and demonstrating the ultimate meaningfulness of the universe. I argue that while there is powerful evidence for cosmic teleology, the works in question do not represent a new paradigm and neither unify science nor adequately accommodate the evidence in question, but rather attempt to "put new wine in old skins." As Aristotle demonstrated, only teleological argumentation offers a complete scientific explanation, and authentic teleology is effectively ruled out by the hegemonic scientific...   [tags: Philosophy Theology Metaphysics]
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Calculus and Its Use in Everyday Life - Ever wonder how scientists figure out how long it takes for the radiation from a nuclear weapon to decay. This dilemma can be solved by calculus, which helps determine the rate of decay of the radioactive material. Calculus can aid people in many everyday situations, such as deciding how much fencing is needed to encompass a designated area. Finding how gravity affects certain objects is how calculus aids people who study Physics. Mechanics find calculus useful to determine rates of flow of fluids in a car....   [tags: essays research papers] 1302 words
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student - The earliest known measurement from the earth to sun was in 200 B.C. Aristarchus of Samos, a man of astronomy and Mathematics, made this discovery. He believed the Earth revolved around the Sun. Aristarchus of Samos used what is known today as right-angle trigonometry. By connecting Earth to Moon, Moon to Sun, and Sun to Earth, one forms a right triangle as shown below. The measure of angle “a” is 90°; an observer on Earth can then measure the angle measure of “b”. Then for one to find the distance between Earth and Sun simply find the sine of angle “c.” Aritarchus of Samos would have expressed this a little differently for the sole fact of modern Trigonometry had not yet been discovered....   [tags: essays research papers] 446 words
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HIstory of Astronomy and Neptune - Science is and has become a necessity to know just to keep up with the tremendous advancements of today and tomorrow. Basic things, such as how the universe was suspected to be started or who Ptolemy and Galileo were and what they did are just things that need to be known to fully understand what is happening in the world around you. These things are what you need to know, if you’re a scientists, to a grocery shop bagger. Ptolemy was a Greek man who became the man to set the future for astronomy....   [tags: essays research papers] 2599 words
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The Contributions of Isaac Newton - "Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night: God said, let Newton be. And all was light." - - Alexander Pope The Enlightenment characterizes a philosophical movement of the 18th century that emphasized the use of reason to analyze and scrutinize all previously accepted traditions and doctrines. Through this application of scientific method to all aspects of life, the role of science gradually replaced the role of religion. Sir Isaac Newton, quite possibly one of the most intelligent men to exist, played a key role in the development of the enlightenment....   [tags: Sir Isaac Newton Essays]
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Descartes and New Science - Descartes and New Science The new view of the world comes from new developments in the sciences. The new views and developments contradicted some of the most fundamental ideas that were held in the world at the time. The philosophers associated with this new view of the world are Copernicus, Kepler, Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Locke, etc. Copernicus tried to resolve the problems of the motions of the planets by placing the sun as the center of the earth. He did make it simpler however, it wasn’t until Newton who cleaned it up and answered some of the key questions that riddled the Copernican theory....   [tags: Papers] 1169 words
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A Rhetorical Analysis of Michael Lind's "Human Spaceflight Should End" by Wyatt Cheney - Michael Lind is an author, a columnist for Salon.com, and a policy director at the New America Foundation. In the article “Human Spaceflight Should End,” he favors unmanned spaceflights, arguing that robot space probes have been so successful in space exploration, that human lives should not be risked (Lind, Michael). In my opinion, robot space probes are better suited for space exploration because they do not require oxygen and if the probes get destroyed, there is no emotional attachment. With the closing of the human spaceflight program, many people would argue that this decision is a disgrace to America and its space program....   [tags: Space flight, Robots, Probes]
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Haley's Comet is Only Comet Visible from Earth with Naked Eye - A comet is a small icy body that travels in an elliptical orbit around the sun. Halley’s Comet, or 1P/Halley, is the most well-known “periodic” comet that orbits the solar system and returns to Earth’s vicinity approximately every seventy-six years. It is one of the only comets that can be seen from Earth that is visible to the naked-eye, and can appear twice in one’s lifetime. The comet’s last visit was in the year 1986, and it is calculated to return mid-2061. Halley’s Comet has been sighted and recorded for thousands of years by humans....   [tags: orbit, astronomy, solar system] 899 words
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Copernicus’ Action Packed Life Revealed in Copernicus’ Secret by Jack Repcheck - Copernicus’ Secret is a biography of an astronomer and a cleric who established that the earth was never the center of the cosmos. The author, Jack Repcheck, explores the action-packed last 12 years of Copernicus’s life that altered the track of western history. The main aim of the author is to give a precise in-depth human explanation of the events that led to the scientific revolution. He also tries to bring this scientific genius to life in a manner, which has never been achieved in the past....   [tags: science, cosmology, planets] 1060 words
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Copernicus and the Lack of Freedom of Speech Before 1791 - Freedom of Speech, Assembly, Petition, Press and Freedom of Religion was granted to us on 1791, but what about the time before that. What were people’s rights, did they even have any. Nicolaus Copernicus was one of the many people who lived through the early Reformation. During that time the Catholic Church controlled the people. Anyone who disobeyed the Catholic Church was either put into prison or even sentenced to death. The major concept that the Catholic Church held was the geocentric theory, that the Earth is the center of the universe....   [tags: Copernicus, human rights, Catholic Church] 1223 words
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The Changing View of Man, The Cosmos and His Place - Throughout the middle ages, people have viewed the cosmos as a basis for the social order here on Earth. The celestial layers were representations of the medieval society and the church. The hierarchy of the Kings and Pope over their subjects was justified by the hierarchy of the heavenly bodies; it was considered natural and no one questioned it because it has been like that for so long. Medieval life was centered on God, abiding by the doctrines of the Catholic Church, and the strengthening of faith....   [tags: 15 and 16 Century, Literature, Science, Art] 1360 words
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The Big Bang Theory of the Origin of the Universe - INTRODUCTION Since the beginning of time, people have wondered about why we are here, how we got here, and where we came from. Although many of these questions have not been answered, the question of where the universe we see today came from has been answered, or at least answered as well as possible with the technology available. Currently the leading theory for the origin of the universe is the Big Bang theory. Although some scientists still dispute this model for the development of the universe, the vast majority of scientists accept it as truth....   [tags: Origin of the Universe]
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What did The Scientific Revolution Bring to the European World? - Scientific Revolution has not only widened our eyes towards new inventions but it has also unlocked our brains to question and intellect to rationalize. In fact, Scientific Revolution in seventeenth century is the period of a new change in World History. Renaissance, a revolutionary period in which people developed the study of arts, their new thinking skills become the leading cause of scientific revolution. Europeans gave importance to learning and application of knowledge which gave birth to new scientific theories and revolution....   [tags: world history, scientific method]
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History of Prague: Travel and Tourism Guide of Prague - History of Prague Although historians aren't certain exactly when Prague was founded, the city as we know it today is speculated to have begun in the 8th century AD, founded by the Czech dutchess Libusa and her husband, Premysl. By 800 AD, construction of a main fort around Prague had been completed, and by 885, the first stones of Prague castle were laid down. This area later became the seat of Czech government, hosting dukes and kings alike. The city was also an important trade center, with merchants from all of Europe settling inside its walls....   [tags: travel and turism]
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How The Invention of the Camera Changed the World - ... As a child, Eastmen bought and collected photography equipment as a hobby. Soon Eastmen was in business, and he began to prepare dry-plates for professional photographers in the New York area (Cox). Eastmen introduced the Kodak camera in 1888. The camera came with pre-loaded film and an option of a film development service. The company’s slogan became “You push the button, we do the rest!” Ten years later, Eastmen came up with the Brownie. While the Kodak camera was $15, the Brownie was a portable, $1 or less, camera just five inches long and three inches high....   [tags: capturing a moment in time]
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The Age of Enlightenment and Rebellion against Authority - The Age of Enlightenment saw many great changes in Western Europe. It was an age of reason and philosophes. During this age, changes the likes of which had not been seen since ancient times took place. Such change affected evert pore of Western European society. Many might argue that the Enlightenment really did not bring any real change, however, there exists and overwhelming amount of facts which prove, without question, that the spirit of the Enlightenment was one of change-specifically change which went against the previous teachings of the Catholic Church....   [tags: Age of Enlightenment, history, religion, ] 1011 words
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Analysis of Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky - One of the aspects of Crime and Punishment that stands out is that it is much more than a simple crime story. It is in fact a great study of the mind of a murder. Raskolnikov is a terrifying but sympathetic main character precisely because he is just twisted enough, just ill enough, for the reader to believe anyone is capable of such atrocities. The jumping off point for Raskolnikov is his idea of extraordinary and ordinary people. Looking at his theory and applying it as a tool for analysis of Raskolnikov himself leads not only to a deeper understanding of this idea but also of Raskolnikov....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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The Role of Tools in the Scientific Revolution - Up until the 17th century, everything was believed to be of a certain way: apples fell from trees, theologians knew everything and most importantly, the Earth was the center of our solar system. Although this belief stems back to the grasp that theology held on the expression of new intellectual thought, there were great strides being made through the 16th and 17th centuries that would force a change of the geocentric belief. It is the argument of this paper that the Scientific Revolution, whereby the shift from a geocentric to heliocentric model, was necessitated by the tools and socio-cultural conventions developed in response to emerging intellectual thought....   [tags: History, Scientists, Theories] 1001 words
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A New Form of Music: The Baroque Period - The Baroque period was “one of the most brilliant periods in history, standing squarely at the crossroads between medieval and modern times, this was an age of real achievement, strong hope, and vigorous actuality” (McKinney 270). The term Baroque comes from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning a pearl of irregular shape (Smith 31). Beginning in Italy, the Baroque period was known for its “grandiose concepts” and “magnificent effects”. The grandiose concepts were basically concepts that were grand and over the top....   [tags: handel, vivaldi]
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Science Revolution: Separating Modern Science With Theological Speculations - During the 17th century, European philosophy and religion was challenged with the introduction of the scientific revolution. Through the three factors that incorporate science: a body of knowledge, a system of inquiry, and thinkers to support their findings (494); old and new worldviews were being questioned. While some thinkers of the era were not intentionally trying to separate religion and science, their ideas created controversy, which in some areas slowed down the growth of scientific experimentation and knowledge....   [tags: scientific experimentation, planets, sun]
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Impossible or Imporbable: Life Outside Our Solar System - The two greatest faults of mankind are our assumption that what we do is the right, normal way, and our labeling of the improbable as impossible. Those flaws have led to the dismissal of the idea of life outside our solar system. Extremists, scientists, programs such as NASA’s SETI, and the everyday dreamer have kept their head up to the stars to catch a glimpse of any organism, “intelligent,” or not. Skeptics, however, have tried to abolish this idea due to the absence of proof. Any lack of “official” evidence does not terminate the possibility of extraterrestrial life; the mathematical probability, existence of life sustaining planets, and the unlikely prospect of life on Earth is enough...   [tags: existence of extraterrestrial life]
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Big Data and the Use of Personal Information - The issue of the collection of big data and how it impacts privacy of the individual is a prevalent concern to many. Many use big data including the government, business, and scientists. It can be argued that there are many benefits of big data, but there are many concerns about its use as well. To start, it is important to know what big data is and what the sources of it are. Big data is simply put, data of a very large size. It goes beyond conventional data and is capable of reaching beyond traditional structured databases....   [tags: Technology, database] 955 words
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Creative Writing: The Gruhanis and Their Planet Gruhan - Gruhan, a planet 12.78x10^7 km far from Earth. The Gruhanis are the most advanced civilization in technology, and second most powerful planet next to Earth among all the other planets. Gruhanis want to make Gruhan the superpower of all the planets. Although human are the second most advanced civilization in technology, they are more advanced in thoughts, emotions, literature, music, art, and all aspects of life. Gruhanis are basically high technology robots with brain which is 9^10 times advanced than humans....   [tags: technology, robots, testing] 1026 words
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Confirming the Character of a Teleological System - Confirming the character of a teleological system is to assert that the system evolves for a purpose he knows and because research from the outset, it has been designed with this purpose. In this way, we can say that all the instruments designed by humans have a life or teleological teleonomic. A calculating machine was designed from the start to calculate. Computing capacity is not born of chance which would have presided over the assembly of its parts. The teleological principle takes on added meaning when applied to biological evolution or the evolution of the universe....   [tags: Science] 778 words
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The Influence of Religion on Scientific Advancement - Religion is an intricate part of society. It has existed since the beginning of civilization and continues expanding today. This physical organization of personal beliefs has created wars and revolutions; nations and constitutions. In a subject as controversial as that of faith, it is often difficult to discern if it has benefitted humanity. One especially relevant issue today is religion’s influence on science. Throughout history, it is evident that religious movements have occasionally impeded scientific discovery; however, there is also evidence that scientific progression has been aided by religious ideology....   [tags: Religion]
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Methods and Latest Progress on Planet Detections - When we look up into the night sky, we as humans are amazed by the vast unknown of the Universe. We can see thousands of glowing stars and other objects, but there are billions more that we cannot see. Many might wonder, with billions of stars and planets, are we the only living beings in this Universe. Along with many other questions. These answers do not come that easy. The only way for our questions to be answered is to allow astronomers and planet hunters to do their jobs. The processes and research that they use to find new planets and study ones that have already been found is very complex....   [tags: astronomy, extrasolar planets]
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Correlation between Baroque Music and Cool Jazz - ... Monteverdi, the composer who defined prima and seconda practica is known for using the seconda practica in his compositions. He believed that seconda practica with its unconventional dissonances, and unanticipated harmonies, was a more affecting and emotional style. In Baroque composition one of the most important creations established early on was the concept of contrast in volume and tempo. The use of harsh dissonances and unusual harmonies ties back in with the Theory of Affections. In the Baroque era one of the most important establishments was the concept of contrast....   [tags: structure, improvisatory, analogous, jazz] 1994 words
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Types of Supernova and Dying Stars - Supernova (Stellar Explosions) When people look up to the sky at night time, they will probably see bright sparkling stars. These stars might look peaceful and innocent from earth, but in reality they’re the opposite. Stars are one of the brightest and hottest objects that the human race has found. They are known to be one of the most destructive objects in the universe. Interestingly enough, they are at their most destructive stage when they are close to death. (Supernova-Stellar Explosion). When a star dies it is called a supernova....   [tags: Stellar Explosions, Milky Way, Galaxy]
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To What Extent is Knowledge Provisional - Knowledge has a preliminary definition which is that it is justified true belief. Due to its dynamic nature, knowledge is subject to review and revision over time. Although, we may believe we have objective facts from various perceptions over time, such facts become re-interpreted in light of improved evidence, findings or technology and instigates new knowledge. This raises the questions, To what extent is knowledge provisional. and In what ways does the rise of new evidence give us a good reason to discard our old knowledge....   [tags: theory of relativism, science, laws]
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Hipparchus, Menelaus, Ptolemy and Greek Trigonometry - Hipparchus of Nicaea (c. 190 – c. 120 B.C.) was a Greek astronomer, geographer, and mathematician of the Hellenistic period. Many credit him as the founder of trigonometry. Hipparchus was born in Nicaea, Bithynia (now Iznik, Turkey) and most likely died on the island of Rhodes. He flourished during 162 to 127 B.C. as a working astronomer and is considered by many to be the greatest ancient astronomical observer and, by some, the greatest overall astronomer of antiquity. Utilizing the observations and mathematical techniques accumulated over the centuries by the Babylonians and other Mesopotamians, he was the first person whose quantitative and accurate models for the motion of the Sun and Mo...   [tags: Mathematics, astronomy, circle,triangle]
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The Process of Encountering a Planet - There are three phases in the process of encountering a planet with a spacecraft, the launch phase, the cruise phase, and the encounter phase. The launch phase is primarily preparation for the actual launch of the spacecraft, choosing the correct location and time. The cruise phase consists of primarily experiments and slight alterations to the trajectory. The encounter phase consists of any flyby or surface encounter, both are most often designed to conduct experiments and gather data. Prior to launching a spacecraft, extensive knowledge of gravitation, mechanics, interplanetary trajectories, and planetary orbits, is needed....   [tags: gravitation, mechanics, trajectories, attraction]
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Avoid Paying Taxes with Black Economy - I took an interest in this topic after a recent visit at a local flea market. I noticed that some of the vendors at the market collected sales taxes while others did not when I made purchases. Some of the items I purchased were goods that could be purchased in stores where sales tax would have been charged. A friend of mine is a regular vendor at the flea market who provided some interesting details to many of the vendors he encounters each week. There are vendors who are on disability, others who are unemployed, and even seniors, all of whom are there for the same reason – to supplement their income....   [tags: underground, cash, government] 963 words
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The Life of Sir Isaac Newton - Sir Isaac Newton Sir Isaac Newton’s life follows the quote, “Good is the enemy of great,”-Jim Collins. Isaac Newton started from ground zero and decided to work his way up in life to being good at anything he wanted to. During a period of 1669 to 1687, Sir Isaac departed on the most prolific period of his lifetime which changed his thought process to being great. His last period and longest period of his life was the expansion to a new position and the continuation of being great. Sir Isaac’s life defined the ideas of how someone can have a poor start in life and recover....   [tags: solar system, gravity, cambridge, ] 1123 words
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A Plea for Applied Science - It is often remarked that spring is the most delightful of seasons, but this is a sore done boon as our appreciation should truly lie under the harvest moon. Just as Mother Nature requires the rest of winter and the ripening of fall for the budding of spring, science requires practical applications on which to build pure theories. Through her application, science more truthfully reveals her mysteries. It is not necessary to look forward to see the outcomes of science as they are upon us now. In physics, the advent of electricity has been awarded with the blossoming of an incandescent light bulb....   [tags: Science] 851 words
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Biography of Sir Isaac Newton - Isaac Newton is considered by many to be one of the most influential people in human history. Born on January 4th 1643 (New Style calendar, December 25th 1642 on the Old Style) at Woolsthorpe Manor in Woolsthorpe-by-Colsterworth, Isaac Newton was involved in the fields of physics, math, astronomy, among other fields. Best known in the Physics community for his three laws of motion as well as his description of universal gravitation, he was also responsible for much during his life. Born three months after the death of his father, a farmer also named Isaac Newton, he was born prematurely....   [tags: Sir Isaac Newton Biography]
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