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Your search returned 200 essays for "jane eyre":
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Jane Eyre - ane Eyre is a story filled with many forms of abuse and bad customs. In this essay I will bring you close to these. I will point out tyrants and abusers that Jane faces throughout her life. Jane Eyre Is also filled with hypocrisy and I will expose that. The suffering that Jane endures will be discussed. The book Jane Eyre starts out very powerful. Our first meeting of Jane is at Gateshead. Jane is an orphan who is being taken care of by Mrs. Reed her aunt by marriage. There is no love for Jane here; not only that the only thing here for Jane is abuse....   [tags: Free Jane Eyre Essays] 3036 words
(8.7 pages)
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Jane Eyre - To fully know one’s self and to be able to completely understand and interpret all actions and experiences one goes through is difficult enough. However, analyzing and interpreting the thoughts and feelings of another human being is in itself on an entirely different level. In the novel Jane Eyre, its namesake makes a decision to reject her one true love in favor of moral decency. Certain aspects of the novel discredit the validity of Jane’s choice. The truthfulness of Jane’s reason to leave Mr....   [tags: Jane Eyre's love story] 810 words
(2.3 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre and I - Jane Eyre and I For me reading Jane Eyre was no mere intellectual exercise; it was an experience which served to reflect a mirror-image of what I am. Jane's rainbows and cobwebs are mine; we are one. I think that she would be as engrossed in reading an account of my life as I was in reading hers. I see her reading Ruth Rosen on a stormy night, covers up to her chin, with candlelight flickering and wind whistling across the heath. I read hers tucked into bed, as wind rattled the windows and bellowed through the caverns of Trump Village....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1074 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Inspirational Jane Eyre - The Inspirational Jane Eyre Jane Eyre is the main character in the novel named Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. She is but a fictional character, and in our hearts she will stay. This incredible lady in her beloved story has carried on through the centuries to inspire all its readers. Jane is a cherished woman with whom everyone can find a bit of themselves in. The captivating character of Jane Eyre was created in the mid 1800's by an awe-inspiring writer by the name of Charlotte Bronte....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 480 words
(1.4 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - There are many stages throughout the book in which the reader can feel sympathy for Jane Eyre; these include when she is locked in the Red Room, when Helen Burns dies at Lowood, and when she and Mr. Rochester are married the first time. The situation when Jane in locked in the Red Room occurs because she has retaliated against John Reed hitting her and the fact that she is being punished for doing so. The mere fact that she is being locked in the Red Room can already accumulate sympathy within the reader because she is seemingly being very unfairly punished whereas her cousin John has attacked her already and managed to escape any punishment whatsoever....   [tags: Bronte Jane Eyre] 1347 words
(3.8 pages)
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Quakerism in Jane Eyre - Quakerism in Jane Eyre   Quakerism is mentioned many times in Jane Eyre. Beyond the explicit descriptions of Quaker-like appearances or behaviors, many parts of Quaker lifestyle are also used in a less obvious manner in Jane Eyre. Quakerism would have been known in the Yorkshire moors where Charlotte Bronte grew up and near where Jane Eyre lived, especially since that is where the religion began (Moglen 19; Barbour and Frost 27). As a more moderate approach to denying the self than Evangelicalism, Quakerism seems to be embraced in the novel....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
968 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jane Eyre's Life - “In what way is social class preventing Jane Eyre of living a life of equality and freedom, and how is this related to feminism?” Jane Eyre lived in the time of the Victorian Era, which Queen Victoria reigned. The way of life of women in Victorian England has a great impact on how Jane was brought up. This is because of their system which “defined the role of a woman” and every woman had a customary routine for their respective class. If one were to take on the standards of another, it would be considered as a serious offense....   [tags: Jane Eyre Writer] 1029 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Oxford Movement and Jane Eyre - The Oxford Movement and Jane Eyre   The Victorian period from the mid to late 1800's was a time of internal religious turmoil for England. In the Anglican Church there were many different groups competing to define the doctrine and practice of the national religion. The church was politically divided in three general categories following: the High Church, which was the most conservative; the Middle, or Broad Church, which was more liberal; and the Low Church, which was the Evangelical wing of the Anglican Church....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1449 words
(4.1 pages)
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Travel as Experience in Jane Eyre - Travel as Experience in Jane Eyre In his essay "The Progress of Error" William Cowper writes: Returning he proclaims by many a grace, By shrugs and strange contortions of his face, How much a dunce, that has been sent to roam, Excels a dunce, that has been kept at home. (Buzard 99) In the novel, we are presented with the tale of Jane Eyre and her travels around the English countryside. What she has seen and done are not considered extraordinary but rather common to a woman of her social standing....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1319 words
(3.8 pages)
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Portrayals of Prostitution in Jane Eyre - Portrayals of Prostitution in Jane Eyre   Bronte paints many parallels between the characters in the novel and the trade of prostitution. One of the main characters that Bronte attributes poverty to is the character of Jane. Jane’s poverty is intrinsically important to the plot of the novel because Bronte uses Jane’s poverty to allow the reader to picture Jane as a virtuous woman, such as when Jane flees from Thornfield to escape the entrapment of Rochester. The reader is urged to feel sympathy for Jane as she adheres to her strict, virtuous moral codes and does not allow herself to succumb to temptation....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
2147 words
(6.1 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre "There was no possibility of taking a walk that day....I was glad of it; I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed." So goes the opening to the novel 'Jane Eyre' by Charlotte Bronte. We are immediately brought into the story; the scene has been set and feelings exposed....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays] 3045 words
(8.7 pages)
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The Bluebeard Reference in Jane Eyre - The Bluebeard Reference in Jane Eyre   Within Jane Eyre lies an explicit reference to the tale of Bluebeard. When first exploring the dark hall of Thornfield’s third floor Jane tells us, "I lingered in the long passage to which this led [. . .] with only one little window at the far end, and looking, with its two rows of small black doors all shut, like a corridor in some Bluebeard’s castle" (114; ch. 11). This allusion is not a casual one, for the plot of Jane Eyre has much in common with the tale of Bluebeard....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1818 words
(5.2 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Miss Temple's Influence on Jane Eyre - Miss Temple's Influence on Jane Eyre "Jane Eyre" is set during the Victorian period, at a time where a women's role in society was restricted and class differences distinct. A job as a governess was one of the only few respectable positions available to the educated but impoverished single women. Not only is "Jane Eyre" a novel about one woman's journey through life, but Brontë also conveys to the reader the social injustices of the period, such as poverty, lack of universal education and sexual inequality....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 929 words
(2.7 pages)
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Analysis of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Analysis of Jane Eyre In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte portrays one woman's desperate struggle to attain her identity in the mist of temptation, isolation, and impossible odds. Although she processes a strong soul she must fight not only the forces of passion and reason within herself ,but other's wills constantly imposed on her. In its first publication, it outraged many for its realistic portrayal of life during that time. Ultimately, the controversy of Bronte's novel lied in its realism, challenging the role of women, religion, and mortality in the Victorian society....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1190 words
(3.4 pages)
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Violence in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Violence in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte uses violence in several scenes throughout the novel. The violence in the novel is not fatal to anyone, it is just used to catch the readers eye. This novel consists of many emotional aspects. For example, the violence in the scene where Mr. Mason gets attacked. The attack really upsets Jane and Mr. Rochester. In the novel Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte uses several acts of violence to create suspense, mystery, and characterization. This scene is probably the best one to create the suspense of the novel....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 366 words
(1 pages)
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Passion in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Passion in Jane Eyre It is believed that we are born with a predestined personality. Our spiritual individuality is just as much a product of our genetic makeup as the color of our skin or our eyes. With our soul firmly planted, we can then build upon this basis as we are educated of the world. The social climate and cultural atmosphere shape our personalities, however, it is the people in our lives who have the greatest influence. Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre reveals this idea by the development of the protagonist....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1216 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Themes of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Themes of Jane Eyre In the beginning of Jane Eyre, Jane struggles against Bessie, the nurse at Gateshead Hall, and says, I resisted all the way: a new thing for me…"(Chapter 2).  This sentence foreshadows what will be an important theme of the rest of the book, that of female independence or rebelliousness. Jane is here resisting her unfair punishment, but throughout the novel she expresses her opinions on the state of women.  Tied to this theme is another of class and the resistance of the terms of one's class.  Spiritual and supernatural themes can also be traced throughout the novel....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1103 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Maturation of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The overriding theme of Jane Eyre, is Jane's continual quest for love. Jane searches for love and acceptance through the five settings in which she lives: Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, Moor House, and Ferndean. Through these viewpoints, the maturation and self-recognition of Jane becomes evident, as well as traceable. It is not until Jane flees from Rochester and Thornfield, and spends time at Moor House, that her maturation to womanhood is complete. At this point, Jane is able to finally return to Rochester as an independent woman, fully aware of her desire to love, as well as to be loved....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays Bronte]
:: 1 Works Cited
995 words
(2.8 pages)
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Laying the Last Minstrel in Jane Eyre - Laying the Last Minstrel in Jane Eyre To find one work quoted multiple times in a novel, as is the case in Jane Eyre with The Lay of the Last Minstrel by Sir Walter Scott, should suggest to a reader that this quoted work can serve to shed some light on the work in which it is found. In this case, Charlotte Brontë alluded to Scott’s work at appropriate moments in the novel, both because of similarities in the plots at those moments, but also, more importantly, because of the theme of The Lay of the Last Minstrel....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
2127 words
(6.1 pages)
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Masculinity in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Masculinity in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Throughout the novel 'Jane Eyre' we meet 5 male characters. Immediately we can notice that the number of female characters outweighs the number of male characters. It feels as though Brontë is trying to tell us that overall women will come out more influential and powerful than men. Indeed power is what our male characters have in common. Their power however alters from character to character. This is the common version of masculinity portrayed by Bront throughout 'Jane Eyre'....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays] 1120 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Maturing of Jane in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Maturing of Jane in Jane Eyre When a caterpillar hatches from its mother's egg, it enters this world as an innocent, pure creature. As time passes by, it unwraps its cocoon and goes through metamorphosis. Once the caterpillar grows into a fully developed butterfly, it has lost its innocence and purity forever. Jane was an inexperienced caterpillar but her stay at Lowood and her challenging time at Thornfield with Mr. Rochester has changed her into an independent, matured butterfly....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 575 words
(1.6 pages)
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Perspectives of Marriage in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Perspectives of Marriage in Jane Eyre Many novels speak of love and indulging in passion, but few speak of the dynamics that actually make a marriage work. Jane Eyre is one of these novels. It doesn't display the fleeing passions of a Romeo and Juliet. This is due entirely to Bronte's views on marriage and love. The first exception to the traditional couple the reader is shown is Rochester's marriage to Bertha. This example shows the consequences of indulging in passion. The opposite side is shown through another unlikely would-be couple, Rosamund and St....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
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Morals And Psychological Aspects in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Morals And Psychological Aspects in Jane Eyre Jane Eyre takes the idea of a fairy tale a step further by adding psychological aspects to the story. Jane did the right thing in regards to marrying Mr. Rochester because "what is [considered] morally wrong cannot be psychologically right." In other words, Jane's moral values told her what Mr. Rochester had done wrong. Because of this she cannot "psychologically" go along with it as if nothing was wrong. Psyche and morals both are products of the mind....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 375 words
(1.1 pages)
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Independence and Love in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Independence and Love in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Throughout Jane Eyre, Jane searches for a way to express herself as an independent person who needs help from no one, yet she also wishes to have the love and companionship of others. Often times, Jane finds that she can have independence but no one to share her life with, or she can have the love of another at the loss of her independence....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre] 1336 words
(3.8 pages)
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Nature Imagery and Themes in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre -     Charlotte Bronte makes use of nature imagery throughout Jane Eyre, and comments on both the human relationship with the outdoors and human nature.  The Oxford Reference Dictionary defines "nature" as "1. the phenomena of the physical world as a whole . . . 2. a thing's essential qualities; a person's or animal's innate character . . . 4. vital force, functions, or needs."  We will see how "Jane Eyre" comments on all of these.         Several natural themes run through the novel, one of which is the image of a stormy sea.  After Jane saves Rochester's life, she gives us the following metaphor of their relationship: "Till morning dawned I was tossed on a buoyant but unquiet sea ....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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2006 words
(5.7 pages)
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Importance of Setting in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Importance of Setting in Jane Eyre Jane Eyre is a novel, written in the Victorian era by the author Charlotte Bronte.  Bronte uses different setting in order to show what the characters are feeling.  The setting is often a reflection of human emotion.  The setting also foreshadows certain events that are going to occur.  A use of setting to portray a character's emotion is essential to a novel.  It gives the reader more of a feel for what is going on. An example of this is when Rochester proposes to Jane.  Jane is dazzled and excited about the idea.  The setting echoes her excitement.  "A waft of wind came sweeping down the laurel-walk and trembled through the boughs of the chestnut....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 456 words
(1.3 pages)
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A Tale of Two Hearts in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - A TALE OF TWO HEARTS While an artist uses a variety of colors and brushes to create a portrait, Charlotte Bronte used contrasting characters and their vivid personalities to create a masterpiece of her own. In her novel Jane Eyre, Bronte uses narration and her characters to portray the struggle between a society’s Victorian realism and the people’s repressed urges of Romanticism. In order to discern between the Victorian and Romantic themes, Bronte selects certain characters to portray the perfect stereotype of each theme....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1170 words
(3.3 pages)
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Unrealistic Images of Women in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Unrealistic Images of Women in Jane Eyre     Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte, is the story of an orphan named Jane. It describes the life of a young girl. The book begins in Gateshead Hall where Jane lived with her aunt and her cousins. She is very much the unwanted child---- a burden to the entire Reed family. Infact she is mistreated and abused in that house. Her Aunt and her cousins both physically and emotionally abuse her. After a while her Aunt sends her off to a charitable institution, Lowood....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1382 words
(3.9 pages)
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The Real Rochester in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Real Rochester in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre   John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester was one of the most infamous rakes from the Restoration period. While Wilmot’s debauched lifestyle was well recorded, his deathbed conversion became even more popular. Through these early biographies and the poetry written by Wilmot, Charlotte Bronte became familiar with this historical figure. Bronte modeled her character of Edward Rochester on Wilmot. There are many instances in the novel Jane Eyre that link the two figures....   [tags: Jane Eyre essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1227 words
(3.5 pages)
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Roles of the Housekeeper and Nursemaid in Bronte's Jane Eyre - Roles of the Housekeeper and Nursemaid in Bronte's Jane Eyre   Just as servants played an essential role in Victorian England, they also played an essential role in the novel Jane Eyre. Bronte uses servants in a variety of ways. For example the housekeeper is used to bring terror and utter rejection on Jane. The nursemaid is used to teach Jane to love and nurture without neglecting discipline. The housekeeper was most often a widow, working for her kin (Hill 119). Mrs. Fairfax falls under the category of the widowed older lady working for her kin (107; ch....   [tags: Jane Eyre essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1248 words
(3.6 pages)
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Use of Weather in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Use of Weather in Jane Eyre In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, good weather is Bronte’s tool to foreshadow positive events or moods and poor weather is her tool for setting the tone for negative events or moods. This technique is exercised throughout the entire novel, alerting the readers of the upcoming atmosphere. In the novel, Jane’s mood is, to a degree, determined by the weather mentioned. For example, after Jane was publicly and falsely accused of being a liar by Mr. Brocklehurst, an upcoming positive event was predicted when Jane described her surroundings, “Some heavy clouds swept from the sky by a rising wind, had left the moon bare; and her light streaming in thro...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 557 words
(1.6 pages)
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Thornfield Manor in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Thornfield Manor in Jane Eyre Thornfield Manor is but one stop in Jane's journey to freedom from her restraints and her stay there begins in a comfortable manner. Although it begins warm, Thornfield becomes a haven of boredom, restlessness, and discontent for Jane. To free herself from the boredom, Jane goes out to mail a letter and unknowingly encounters Mr. Rochester. Jane finds that "...the frown, the roughness of the traveler set me at my ease:"(Bronte 105). Through her past experiences, Jane knows how to deal aptly with Mr....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 448 words
(1.3 pages)
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Roman Allusions in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Roman Allusions in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre The references to Roman figures in Jane Eyre are few but very effective. Charlotte Bronte uses allusions to Nero, Caligula, and Messalina that on the surface appear to be quite simple. However, with further investigation and analysis, it is very clear these simple references are anything but. The first Roman allusion occurs in chapter one in reference to John Reed. Comparing him to Nero and Caligula serves many functions. First, it illustrates just how cruel he is in the eyes of Jane....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre]
:: 3 Works Cited
1916 words
(5.5 pages)
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Minor Characters in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Minor Characters of Jane Eyre All the minor characters who appear in the novel, Jane Eyre are only sketched in, so to speak. They are "flat"; not developed in the way that the central three characters are developed. All of them are conventional; behave and speak conventionally, and do not develop at all. They are set merely as foils for the central characters, and they tend to be extremes or stereotypes, behaving very predictably and not surprising us with any unexpected reaction....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 524 words
(1.5 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre – A Story of One Abused Child - Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre – A Story of One Abused Child According to Alexandria’s daily newspaper, The Town Talk, approximately 34,910 cases of suspected child abuse were reported in Louisiana alone last year (Crooks). Charlotte Bronte tells of one victim of child abuse in her novel Jane Eyre. In Jane Eyre, Bronte chronicles the life of Jane, a notoriously plain female in want of love. After being abused, Jane portrays many characteristics which other victims of abuse often portray. Throughout the novel, Jane is reclusive, pessimistic, and self-deprecating....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
3617 words
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Childhood in To Kill A Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë - The Theme of Childhood in To Kill A Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë 'To Kill A Mocking Bird' by Harper Lee and 'Jane Eyre' by Charlotte Brontë are two very different books written in different periods of history. There are, however, similarities in the themes and background. For example, both books were written during times of great social upheaval and strife. In 'To Kill A Mocking Bird', the world was still very racist and it was not until some twenty years after the book was written that men like Martin Luther King and Malcolm X started to bring about real reforms....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1406 words
(4 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Confronting Repression, Achieving Progression - Jane Eyre: Confronting Repression, Achieving Progression Jane Eyre tells the story of a woman progressing on the path of acceptance. Throughout her journey, Jane encounters many obstacles to her intelligence. Male dominance proves to be the biggest obstruction at each stop of Jane's journey: Gateshead Hall, Lowood Institution, Thornfield Manor, Moor House, and Ferndean Manor. As she grows, though, Jane slowly learns how to understand and control repression. Jane's journey begins at Gateshead Hall....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 951 words
(2.7 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre vs. Boyz n the Hood - Jane Eyre vs. Boyz 'n' the Hood When people are making choices sometimes they don't think of how they could affect someone else. In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane chooses to leave Mr. Rochester. In the movie Boyz 'n' the Hood Tre decides not to participate in a shooting spree. He result of some choices could have a bad aftermath, which not only affects the person deciding, but also the people around them. The choices that Jane makes has different reactions, such as when she left Mr....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 581 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Search for Happiness in Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë - Jane spends her first 10 years of her life at Gateshead Hall, a lavish mansion. She lived with her Aunt, Mrs Reed, and three cousins, Eliza, Georgina and John. During her time in the mansion she wouldn't dare argue with the mistress, and fulfilled every duty. Jane is deprived of love, joy and acceptance. She is very much unwanted and isolated. "Eliza, John and Georgiana were now clustered round their mama in the drawing-room... Me, she had dispensed from joining the group" (chapter) Mrs Reed keeps Jane only because of a promise she made to her husband on his deathbed....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 729 words
(2.1 pages)
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Unconscious in James Joyce's ‘Dubliners and Charlotte Bronte's ‘Jane Eyre - Unconscious in James Joyce's ‘Dubliners and Charlotte Bronte's ‘Jane Eyre Although the notion of a human unconscious preceded Freud, his work is certainly most useful for explaining what it actually is. With an understanding of a human unconscious we can apply some of its characteristics to the literature studied thus far. Much of Freud's work on the unconscious is contained within his book ‘The Interpretation of Dreams' but a concise definition is hard to come by. Essentially Freud believes that the unconscious is the ‘part of the mind that is beyond consciousness which nevertheless has a strong influence on our actions' ....   [tags: Dubliners Jane Eyre Joyce Bronte] 1927 words
(5.5 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Passion and Responsibility In the novel Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses Jane Eyre as her base to find out how a character confronts the demands of a private passion that conflicts with her responsibilities. . Mistreated abused and deprived of a normal childhood, Jane Eyre creates an enemy early in her childhood with her Aunt Mrs. Reed. Just as Mrs. Reeds life is coming to an end, she writes to Jane asking her for forgiveness, and one last visit from her. “Will you have the goodness to send me the address of my niece, Jane Eyre, and to tell me how she is....   [tags: essays research papers] 608 words
(1.7 pages)
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Jane Eyre - “The passions may rage furiously, like true heathens, as they are; and the desires may imagine all sorts of vain things: but judgment shall have the last word in every argument, and the casting vote in every decision.”1 Such powerful words were found in the famous romance novels of Charlotte Bronte. Through her novels Jane Eyre and The Professor Bronte’s life experiences were reflected by her main characters as they sought independence, conceived images as symbols of important events in their lives, and they exhibited commitment to their goals....   [tags: essays research papers] 1106 words
(3.2 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre Jane’s arrival at the Thornfield Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre displays three types of relationships possessing different purposes. These connections are established at Thornfield after Jane becomes a governess and accepts the position at the estate. The first relationship is the one that forms between Mrs.Fairfax, the housekeeper, and Jane. Another relationship that begins upon arrival at Thornfield is the one that Jane possesses with Adele, her pupil. The last and most important relationship that begins is that of Mr....   [tags: essays papers] 494 words
(1.4 pages)
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Jane Eyre - In Charlotte Bronte’s, Jane Eyre, Jane goes through numerous self-discoveries, herself-realization and discipline leads her to a life she chooses to make her happy. Jane Eyre has a rough life from the start. Forced to stay with people who despise her, Jane can only help herself. Jane must overcome the odds against her, which add to many. Jane is a woman with no voice, until she changes her destiny. The novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte consists of continuous journeys through Jane’s life towards her final happiness and freedom....   [tags: essays research papers] 1462 words
(4.2 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre When Jane Eyre is introduced to Reverend St. John Rivers, she has already had a lifetime of experiences, but she still does not have a good sense of self. By the time that Jane leaves St. John, she is a newly self-assured woman who knows what she wants in life, and is determined to achieve her goals. When St. John is first introduced in the book, he finds Jane completely destitute with nowhere to go and no one to rely on for help. Despite her refusal to reveal her true identity, St....   [tags: essays papers] 574 words
(1.6 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre is the main character in the novel Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte. She is a fictional character along with the book. The book takes place in the mid 1800’s. Jane lives in five different places which greatly affect her life. The first place Jane stays is Gateshead Hall. She then goes to live at Lowood School. From Lowood Jane proceeds on to Thornfield Hall. She then advances on to Moor House. Finally, Jane reaches her final home at Ferndean. All of this happens within two decades and the novel is told in first person, which is Jane Eyre....   [tags: essays research papers] 1651 words
(4.7 pages)
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Jane eyre - Jane Eyre By Charlotte Brontë Chapter Summaries Chapter I- We learn that Jane Eyre is an orphan who lives with her cruel aunt Mrs.Reed. A bully John throws a book at Jane Eyre and her suppressed anger from over the years explodes in a rage attacking the bully. Chapter II-Jane gets locked in the red room where Mr.Reeds’ brother died. Chapter III-The last chapter ended with Jane knocked out and she woke up very confused and terrified. Chapter IV-In this chapter Jane finds the courage to stand up to her cruel aunt....   [tags: essays research papers] 1714 words
(4.9 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre A. Setting: England, Early 1800s B. Point of View: First person C. Jane Eyre, the main character, is sent out of the drawing room by her Aunt, Mrs. Reed (Jane’s parents had died while she was very young and her Uncle took her in. After he died Mrs. Reed kept Jane although she despised her.). Jane then retires to the library, where she hid by the window-sill, behind the curtain. A few minutes later her cousins John, Eliza, and Geneva come in. While Eliza and Geneva watch, John orders Jane to show herself....   [tags: Essays Papers] 720 words
(2.1 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre Jane and Rochester Belong Together The overriding theme of Jane Eyre is Jane's continual quest for love. Jane searches for love and acceptance throughout the book. The intelligent, honest, plain-featured girl is forced to contend with oppression, inequality, and hardship. Jane's meets with a series of individuals who threaten her autonomy, but she maintains her principles of justice, human dignity, and morality, as well as her values of intellectual and emotional fulfillment. As a governess though, she is subject to economic and gender enslavement....   [tags: essays papers] 1184 words
(3.4 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre Social class distinction is very evident in Victorian England. This distinction is found not only in society, but also within the Anglican Church and its clergy. In Jane Eyre we are introduced to three Anglican ministers who represent different social classes. They are Jane Eyre’s father; the Reverend Brocklehurst, the administrator of Lowood Institution; and Reverend St. John Rivers, the curate of a small country parish at Morton and owner of Moor House. Comparing the way these clergyman are viewed by society establishes the adherence to the same social class structure within the church as is evident outside the church....   [tags: Literature Books Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
2293 words
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Jane Eyre - In the two stories, Jane Eyre and The Yellow Wallpaper, the main characters are faced with various encounters with authority. Jane and the Narrator are the central characters that are faced with these authority figures, and an external as well as an internal relationship is developed with the figures that have power over them. These two women also display a unique use of authority to benefit themselves at various points in the stories. Jane and the Narrator are first alike in the way that they outwardly express their feelings about the situations they are in by the use of actions and words....   [tags: essays research papers] 2547 words
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte 2. End of Chapter Ten My favorite character at this time in the novel, is Jane Eyre. A new chapter in her life was about to begin when she was accepted for the position as a governess, for a small child at Thornfield Hall. She has come a long way from her days abandoned by her cruel aunt and treated poorly by her cousins. After her school days at Lowood, she wanted a brighter and more independent life for herself. She has had the strength to be strong and confident through it all....   [tags: essays research papers] 1656 words
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre What do you learn from Jane's arrival at Thornfield and her first meeting with Mr Rochester. When Jane first arrives at Thornfield she is greeted by Mrs Fairfax, she receives a warm welcome and an inquiry into whether she is cold and a subsequent offer to warm by the fire. This something Jane is not used to, in the past at the Reed's house, Gateshead, and certainly at Lowood her reception had been quite cold and harsh. At Gateshead Jane was treated badly and received no love. Bessie the servant was the only person who even showed some sort of interest in her....   [tags: English Literature]
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, is the story of Jane, an orphan girl with a harsh upbringing. During a time when women were condemned for learning more than custom pronounced necessary, Jane becomes educated intellectually, socially, and spiritually. In the course of growing up she travels to many places as she battles to learn more about herself and about the world. In the following paragraphs you’ll see how Bronte establishes that money and power do not make a person. Mrs. Reed, Mr....   [tags: essays papers] 704 words
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre Throughout history in literature achievements of widening popularity always seem to create tension. In Charlotte Bronte's novel, "Jane Eyre," the pursuit of dependence and self-fulfillment is confronted by her romantic characteristics in a Victorian age. "What makes Victorians Victorian is their sense of social responsibility, a basic attitude that obviously differentiates them from their immediate predecessors, the Romantics"(Landow 1) who are more open-minded, much like Jane. Although her romantic qualities simply identify herself , they create tension between the Victorian idea's of gender, status, realness, passion and emotion....   [tags: essays papers] 2049 words
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre, a novel written by Charlotte Bronte is far more than a love story. It is also a test of Jane’s own moral principles in her emotional search for happiness, independence, equality and freedom. It is through her journeys from Gateshead, to Lowood School, Thornfield, to Moor House, and finally to Ferndean that she is able to find self-fulfilment without sacrificing her integrity. Jane Eyre’s early childhood years were partially spent at Gateshead. Here, her wealthy Aunt Sarah Reed and her cousins, treated her with cold-hearted cruelty thus leaving Jane feeling alone, alienated and longing to belong somewhere, to feel equal and to know what it is to truly be happy and loved....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte] 1436 words
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre was taken in by her Uncle Reed at a young age. He loved her and cared for her which made his wife very jealous. When Mr. Reed died, he requested that Mrs. Reed raise Jane as if she were her own child. She agreed by treated Jane very badly. Jane, being of strong character, endured the endless hours of beating from her evil cousin John and the relentless insults from her aunt and cousins, Georgiana and Eliza. One day Mrs. Reed found a way to finally get rid of Jane, she sent her to the Lowood School for girls....   [tags: essays research papers] 596 words
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre   St. John Rivers makes some very intriguing choices in Jane Eyre. He is constantly faced with difficult decisions to make. Whether it be refusing his true love or moving to India to give his life serving others, there is always an interesting twist where St. John is concerned. His importance in the novel may be evident to readers, but they may not always understand his decisions and his actions. The choices he makes are exemplary of a man who has given his life to serve God and His people....   [tags: Literature Religion Papers]
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Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre In the time of Jane Eyre, an aristocratic gentleman’s education did not end with secondary schooling. The final step in such an Englishman’s education was to take a Grand Tour of Europe. Thomas Nugent, an influential travel writer, describes the Grand Tour as "a custom so visibly tending to enrich the mind with knowledge, to rectify the judgment, to remove the prejudices of education, to compose the outward manners, and in a word form the complete gentleman" (Buzard 98). Throughout the novel, Rochester makes countless references to his travels and conquests on Continental Europe....   [tags: Literature Literary Papers]
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The Writers Craft in Jane Eyre - GCSE English/ English Literature Coursework An Examination of the Writers Craft in Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre was not merely a piece of 19th century fiction. It was a prototype in so many different ways. Charlotte Bronte was a revolutionary in the way she chose a female lead and the intimacy of first person narration. What was more abnormal was the fact that Charlotte Bronte was writing at all. During the period when she lived it was almost unheard of for a woman to do anything other than get married or become a governess....   [tags: Free Essay Writer] 2521 words
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Jane Eyre By Charlotte Brontë - Jane Eyre By Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë was published in 1848, under the name of Currer Bell. Although the novel is over 150 years old, there are still themes that we can relate to today, such as bullying, prejudice and hypocrisy. In this essay, I am going to discuss the three themes mentioned and also consider admirable characters from the novel; the authors narrative technique and the part that I found appealing. The first issue that I will discuss will be on the bullying that Jane received at Gateshead Hall: the home of her Auntie and cousins....   [tags: English Literature] 1497 words
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Jane Eyre, Hamlet And Keats - To convey a sense of argument, imagery and perspective, authors use various types of language, syntax and vocabulary to achieve this. An extract from Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, a soliloquy from Hamlet, by William Shakespeare and Ode to Autumn, by John Keats all have a number of striking similarities between them, as well as a few differences, which will be analysed to show. Unlike Hamlet and Autumn, the extract from Jane Eyre, doesn’t have any particular argument, but the use of language is similar to that of Keats and to some extent Hamlet....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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A Critical Evaluation of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - A Critical Evaluation of Jane Eyre Although Jane Eyre grows and matures, Margaret McFadden-Gerber views her as a relatively emotionally stable young feminist. Through the duration of the novel, Jane demonstrates her "self-love" that is often an influential emotion leading to drastic and hasty reactions. In the very opening few chapters, Jane takes a stand for herself and presents her bruised ego, pride and maturity. Sara Reed, her aunt, dismisses her place in the family as Jane is physically and emotionally removed from her "family's" activities....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 569 words
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Jane Eyre: Charlotte Bronte in Leeds Point - In Stephen Dunn’s 2003 poem, “Charlotte Bronte in Leeds Point”, the famous author of Jane Eyre is placed into a modern setting of New Jersey. Although Charlotte Bronte lived in the early middle 1800’s, we find her alive and well in the present day in this poem. The poem connects itself to Bronte’s most popular novel, Jane Eyre in characters analysis and setting while speaking of common themes in the novel. Dunn also uses his poem to give Bronte’s writing purpose in modern day. The beginning of the novel starts out with a picture of a peaceful home that is very similar to the Moor House Jane lives in while visiting her cousins....   [tags: stephen dunn, jane eyre, charlotte bronte] 562 words
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The Theme of Misunderstanding in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea - The Theme of Misunderstanding in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea In both classical novels Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte a Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys the theme of misunderstanding is represented very widely. Both Victorian era dramatical romantic fictions have some impact in them from their respective authors. Bronte's lonliness is transformed into Jane Eyre's Character whom mostly all characters in the novel misunderstand her until they truly get to recognize her which is towards the end of the novel....   [tags: Literature Analysis, Jane Eyre, Wide Sargasso Sea] 877 words
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Jane Eyre - In Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre, the main character faces many struggles. One of the struggles she faces is the temptation to run away with the man she loves and be his mistress or to marry a man who offers her the contrary where it would be a legal and highly respectable marriage but with no genuine love. Jane Eyre returns to Rochester because she values love and passion more than reason and when she hears his mysterious voice calling for her, she is also sure that Rochester and her share a spiritual link....   [tags: essays research papers] 843 words
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Jane Eyre - "You think I have no feelings, and that I can do without one bit of kindness; but I can not live so: and you have no pity." (p.45) A prevailing theme of Jane Eyre is Jane's ceaseless search for love and acceptance. Jane journeys throughout England in search of love, which she has been deprived of at Gateshead. As a young girl of eight, she plainly seeks comfort and care, but following her departure from Lowood, her maturation creates her desire for love. Jane's plight is her lack of love which drives her to restlessly search for it, during her journey's through Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, and Marsh End....   [tags: essays research papers] 632 words
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Jane Eyre: Sympathy for Jane - How does Brontë create sympathy for the character of Jane in her novel, ‘Jane Eyre’. In the novel, ‘Jane Eyre’ Charlotte Brontë focuses on the life of Jane, an unwanted orphan who can’t do anything right in the eyes of her aunt. When she is about nine she is sent to Lowood Institute where she is also treated as inferior by Mr Brocklehurst. Although Jane is treated so cruelly and unfairly all her life she proves everyone wrong in the end by making something of herself. There are many parts of the book where we feel sympathy for Jane....   [tags: Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë] 809 words
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Victories of Jane Eyre - The Victories of Jane Eyre All people live by their own codes of conduct. Everyone, be they male or female, young or old, has their own sets of values, which they adhere to and which are unchanging even in the face of personal or societal pressures and conflicts to give them up. In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane is tempted many times to acquiesce to others' wishes and, thereby, give up her own moral standards and beliefs. Yet Jane remains steadfast in adhering to her personal code of conduct, namely to maintain feelings of high self-esteem, not to let herself be used and abused by others, and never to give up her religious convictions....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 927 words
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Character of Jane Eyre - The Character of Jane Eyre          What we learn of the central character is considerable. Throughout the novel her dealings with those around her reveal her characteristics. As a child at Gateshead Hall we see that she is impulsive, often alarmingly so, but that she also can be sullen and withdrawn. Thse around her do not find her an easy child - she gives very little of herself away, especially to the Reed family, although there is a slight intimacy with the servant, Bessie. She is intelligent and precocious, preferring the make believe world of books to the harsh and often unsympathetic world of reality....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 881 words
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Religion and Evangelicalism in Jane Eyre - Religion and Evangelicalism in Jane Eyre   When orphans of the nineteenth century were able to receive an education, it usually came from a charity instution. These charity institutions were founded on a basis of religion. This is the case in Jane Eyre for Mr. Brocklehurst is a clergyman who owns and overlooks the Institution that Jane became a part of. Jane's conversation with the newly met Helen Burns exposes this to the reader. Jane asks the question, "Who was Naomi Brocklehurst?" The reader finds out that she was the lady who built the new part of the Institution....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Jane Eyre: Brontë's Mother Affected Jane - Would a person describe the personality and acts of their mothers as loving or nurturing or quite possibly witty with her words. When one thinks of a Mother, be it their own or another, one would usually describe them as caring, affectionate, protective; however, with her mother having died when she was a young age of five, Charlotte Brontë never had the chance to understand how essential those traits were to a child and grew up under the care and teachings of her father; which was what helped lead to her strong and virtuous independence: the lack of a mother's love and guide....   [tags: Jane Eyre]
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Dangers of Secrets In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, the characters come to learn that secrets do more harm than good through Edward Rochester’s secrecy after the fire in his room, Mrs. Reed not telling her about the letter from her uncle, and Edward Rochester’s secret marriage with Bertha. First, Rochester, who really knows what happened during the fire in his room, refuses to tell Jane the full truth so as to not hurt her. Secondly, Mrs. Reed and Jane do not have the best relationship; the hiding of the letter only strains this relationship further....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Jane Eyre, Characters]
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Reflection on Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Reflection on Jane Eyre "That strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit." This was the painful reaction of young Jane Eyre to her own horrifying ten-year-old reflection in the mirror . This reflection illustrates the harsh and fearful childhood of a strong-willed girl in the beginning of Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte. Set in the mid-nineteenth century on the English countryside Jane Eyre tells the story of one orphan's troubled childhood and her yearning to belong to someone somewhere as she matures into an adult....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 621 words
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The Self-confidence of Jane in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - In the Webster's online dictionary, self-confidence is defined as confidence in oneself and in one's powers and abilities. A famous quote by Jim Loehr says, "With confidence, you can reach truly amazing heights; Without confidence, even the simplest accomplishments are beyond your grasp." Confidence in yourself does not come without effort. One must believe in themselves, and not let someone change their beliefs. In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane shows self-confidence throughout the novel, by possessing a sense of self-worth, dignity, and a trust in God....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 601 words
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The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre      In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë clearly demonstrates the relationship between sexuality and morality in Victorian society through the character of Bertha Mason, the daughter of a West Indian planter and Rochester's first wife. Rochester recklessly married Bertha in his youth, and when it was discovered shortly after the marriage that Bertha was sexually promiscuous, Rochester locked her away. Bertha is called a "maniac" and is characterized as insane....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Role of Faith in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Role of Faith in Jane Eyre       In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte's inspirational novel, religion is embraced through a series of spiritual explorations. Bronte portrays Jane's character and zest for religion by revealing Jane's transitions from Gateshead to Lowood, Lowood to Thornfield, and Thornfield to Moor House. Each location plays a significant role in the development of Jane's perspective on religion. Jane struggles to acquire true faith in God, which will help her overcome the obstacles of her itinerant life....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Gender Role Limitations in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Gender Role Limitations in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre The nineteenth century Victorian era woman needed wealth or position to avoid a life of drudgery.  Women were viewed as trophies or possessions men owned.  They were not permitted to develop nor expected to, and even venturing out on their own was considered inappropriate.  During the era in which Jane Eyre was published the home and family were seen as the basic unit of stability in society.  At the middle of this foundation stood a wife and mother representing the sum total of all morality - a Madonna-like image.  This image was reinforced by social institutions such as mainstream religious and political beliefs.  Women were steered...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Reason and Passion in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Reason and Passion in Jane Eyre     In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses various characters to represent aspects of reason and passion, thereby establishing a tension between the two. In fact, it could be argued that these various characters are really aspects of her central character, Jane. From this it could be argued that the tension between these two aspects really takes place only within her mind. Bronte is able to enact this tension through her characters and thus show dramatically the journey of a woman striving for balance within her character....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Fire and Ice in the Characters - Fire and Ice in the Characters of Jane Eyre Two of the main characters in Jane Eyre have a sense of fire and ice in their personalities, which is displayed through their emotions and their actions. Although, Edward Rochester seems cold and icy in the beginning of the book, his true trait of fire is reveled throughout the book as we get to know him better. St. John Rivers, who isn't introduced until the late chapters of the book, plays a important role of contrasting Rochester by way of ice....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 706 words
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