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Your search returned over 400 essays for "hurricanes"
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Hurricanes, Tsunamis, and Flooding - Weather can affect agriculture in many, many different ways. From tornadoes, to tsunamis, to floods, any type of weather can and will affect agriculture. When agriculture is affected by weather conditions, not only are the crops affected, but so are the people who grow and consume them. If you think about it, that is pretty much everyone. So no matter what severe weather condition it is, everyone is going to be affected by it in some way. Hurricanes, also known as tropical cyclones, are tropical storms that can last for two or more weeks....   [tags: tsunamis, tornatoes, hurricanes]
:: 6 Works Cited
924 words
(2.6 pages)
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When the Hurricane Came - The trip that take seventeen hours all because I had other things to do before I could leave town, the job played a big part in my delay. Setting up the hospital unit for incoming staff to stay, and helping discharging patients so they could be with they families are some of the things were needed to be done. The time I stay at work is very important for the patients, but it put a delay in my departure. Packing non licensed drivers was not a good ideal and most all not getting rest before I left....   [tags: hurricanes,] 1319 words
(3.8 pages)
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Natural Disasters- Hurricanes - Hurricanes Hurricanes occur all over the world, at different times, but commonly through June first and late November. However in late August 2005 a catastrophic hurricane struck. This was Hurricane Katrina. With winds traveling over one hundred miles per hour making it a category five on the Saffir- Simpson Hurricane Scale it was said to have cause billions of dollars’ worth of damage. Hurricane Katrina flooded nearly forty thousand homes, and killed at least two thousand people (“Hurricane”)....   [tags: Hurricane Katrina, Deaths, Disasters]
:: 5 Works Cited
1668 words
(4.8 pages)
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Levee Break during Hurricanes in New Orleans - Louisiana is known for being an area prone to hurricanes, and millions of dollars of damage have been caused in this state almost every year. A major concern for a way to prevent future and major damage then started in the early 2000’s. The levees were designed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and they had to decide how to build these levees to withstand hurricane forces. Although they were built for hurricane forces, it could not stand up to Katrina in 2005, when they broke and flooded the entire city....   [tags: levee, hurricane katrina, louisiana]
:: 1 Works Cited
862 words
(2.5 pages)
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Hurricane Andrew: The King of Destruction - ... Hurricane Andrew formed off the West Coast of Africa as a storm on the 14th of August 1992. From there, the tropical storm moved northwest, moving dangerously close to the Bahamas and the continental United States. It was recognized as a Category 3 hurricane on the 22nd of August. On August 23rd, 1992, Hurricane Andrew hit the Bahamas. But this monster was not done, and continued northwest to hit Florida with the upsetting consequences as a full blown, Category 5 hurricane. The day after, the hurricane barreled through the Gulf of Mexico as a devastating Category 4 hurricane....   [tags: hurricanes, hurricane andrew, natural disasters]
:: 6 Works Cited
844 words
(2.4 pages)
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Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina - According to the “The handy weather answer book” by Kevin Hile a hurricane is defined as a tropical storm formed in the Atlantic Basin. Winds reach speeds of 74 miles per hour or more. Frequently, hurricanes occur during the months of summer. This allows energy to build from the warm surface of the ocean. Wind speeds, clouds, and the Coriolis Effect all contribute to the formation of a hurricane (123). Hurricanes are a vital motive in nature. Douglas explains, “Whirling energy beasts are the atmosphere’s automatic pressure-relief valves, comparable to an integrated thermostat; they also dispense essential rains, restoring supplies and soil moistures’ (108)....   [tags: hurricanes, sandy, katrina, tropical storms]
:: 8 Works Cited
1791 words
(5.1 pages)
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Hurricanes' Effects on Society - Hurricanes' Effects on Society Hurricanes are one of nature’s most natural occurrences and intense phenomenal storms. Yet, as phenomenal as they are, they are still one of the deadliest and disastrous natural occurrences that continue to plague costal residents with fears of their homes being destroyed, their towns wiped out, and loved ones either disappearing or dying. Roger A. Pielke Jr. and Roger A. Pielke Sr. in their book Hurricanes: Their Nature and Impacts on Society, state that the hurricane is a member of a phenomena called cyclones, which refers to “any weather system that circulates in a counterclockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere and in a clockwise direction in the So...   [tags: Nature Storms Weather Hurricane Essays Paper]
:: 5 Works Cited
1409 words
(4 pages)
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Taking a Look at Hurricanes and Tornadoes - ... (youtube) Unlike a hurricane that is form in the ocean a tornado is form on flat land. When cold and warm airs from different direction collide with each other they form a huge thunderstorm called a super cell. When air from two different altitudes begin to go at two different speeds they begin to form a funnel in between called a wind shear. (eo.ucar) When a part of the wind shear gets caught in the super cell upper draft, the speed of the upper draft will make the column go much faster curating a funnel cloud....   [tags: weather phenomena, natural disasters]
:: 2 Works Cited
632 words
(1.8 pages)
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Taking a Look at Hurricanes - ... The fourth stage is called a Tropical Depression. A tropical depression is a medium- pressure storm with winds approximately 38 mph or less. These storms are one of the first stages when meteorologists are studying a certain storm forming. The fifth stage is called a Tropical Storm. These storms are very common because they are the final process until the final Hurricane stage. The tropical storm is a storm with maximum sustained winds gusting from at least 39 mph - 74 mph. There are many tropical storms that form but don’t have the energy or winds to form into a hurricane....   [tags: weather phenomena] 633 words
(1.8 pages)
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Problems with Hurricanes by Victor Hernandez - ... However, in some rare, unexpected scenarios, for example, a hurricane, the beautiful things can become the danger. The campesino points this out when he references flying fruits being deadly amidst the winds of a hurricane. “A mango smashing/ [someone’s] skull/ or a plantain hitting [their]/ temple at 70 miles per hour,” are his examples of the fruits causing death (Cruz 786, 20-23). The fruits he mentions, mangoes and plantains, are symbols of all sweet, beautiful things with their flowering blossoms and vibrant colors....   [tags: the campesino, poem analysis] 655 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Scientific Definition of Hurricanes - ... Also, when the hurricane passes over land it is most likely going to dissipate. Not only do they lose their energy source, but the presence of the land creates a friction which causes the surface winds to decrease and disrupt the storms equilibrium. Most of the damage caused by hurricanes occurs from massive flooding as well as debris displaced by the high speed winds. The high winds of a hurricane have the ability to generate extremely high waves ranging from ten to fifteen meters high. These waves then move outward from the storm and would often carry far ahead of the storm, bringing warning of the approaching hurricane days before it actually arrived....   [tags: intense storm, origins, conditions, destruction] 1281 words
(3.7 pages)
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Increasing Frequency of Hurricanes - One of nature’s most destructive forces is the Hurricane. Hurricanes that impact the United States mostly occur in the Atlantic and travel into the Gulf of Mexico. With winds up to 190 miles per hour, nothing can stand in the way of the most extreme category 5 hurricanes. Hurricanes destroy cities, homes, agriculture and anything in their way due to their high winds and intense rains. Recently, scientists have been supporting the idea that an increase of annual hurricane numbers has been tied to global climate change....   [tags: Natural Disasters, Causes] 1106 words
(3.2 pages)
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Research Paper on Hurricanes - I have always found the ocean to be a very intriguing part of the Earth. There are infinitely many discoveries that have yet to be made about it. My fascination with the ocean sparked the idea to do my class paper on hurricanes and what they are along with their effects. I remember hearing about all the damages from Hurricane Katrina after it hit the coast near New Orleans. The only information I really know about them is what is briefly covered on the news. I thought it would be interesting to discover the true effects they can have on not only people that endure them, but also the environment as it gets ripped to shreds by the plethora of winds and water....   [tags: Personal Research Paper]
:: 8 Works Cited
1578 words
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Natural Disasters: Horrendous Hurricanes - According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a hurricane is “any storm or tempest in which the wind blows with terrific violence.” Hurricanes only form over warm waters; wind is pushed in from surrounding, high pressure areas towards the low pressure center. The storm grows and forms an eye as it moves faster and faster (“How Do Hurricanes Form?”). If a colossal hurricane was approaching your community, what would you do. How would you prepare. In a survey I conducted of 12 people who have endured one or more hurricanes, about 92% prepared by buying extra food and water (Colosimo)....   [tags: warm waters, katrina, andrew, tornados]
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1407 words
(4 pages)
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Description of Hefty Hurricanes - Hurricanes can be good for the environment with the rain, but they can also destroy a life. Hurricanes can topple buildings, uproot trees, tear down power lines, and create floods. Hurricanes create powerful winds and a substantial amount of rain. Large amounts of water can create mold, which can be extremely dangerous. Hurricanes, or any large storm, affect many countries and families. Hurricanes are immensely unsafe and unpredictable, both because of their own power and the fact that tornadoes can materialize from their circular speeding winds....   [tags: tropical storm,tropical depression,meteorologists]
:: 5 Works Cited
1140 words
(3.3 pages)
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Deadly and Destructive Hurricanes - ... If the temperature of the water gets up to or more than 81 degrees Fahrenheit, the winds get stronger, and cumulonimbus clouds are formed. The whole process keeps getting bigger and rain starts to fall. When the wind speed is up to 74 MPH, the storm is called a hurricane (Gibbons 4-5). Hurricanes are classified with the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Sale. This scale was created around 1970, when Herbert Saffir and Robert Simpson invented it so meteorologists could warn people about hurricanes (Gibbons 9)....   [tags: natural disasters, storm, damages] 595 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Formation of Hurricanes - The Formation of Hurricanes Hurricanes begin as tropical storms over the warm moist waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the equator. (Near the Philippines and the China Sea, hurricanes are called typhoons.) As the moisture evaporates it rises until enormous amounts of heated moist air are twisted high in the atmosphere. The winds begin to circle counterclockwise north of the equator or clockwise south of the equator. The relatively peaceful center of the hurricane is called the eye....   [tags: Papers] 928 words
(2.7 pages)
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Problems with Hurricanes by Victor Hernandez Cruz - ... The passage How would your family feel if they had to tell The generations that you got killed by a flying Banana. (“Problems” 9-13) makes me believe that using humor Cruz is stating that even in a highly serious situation you still have to watch out for the unexpected things or unsuspected things in all situations. In the next passage however the campesino begins talking about honor or dishonor in death. Cruz writes Death by drowning has honor If the wind picked you up and slammed you against a mountain boulder This would not carry shame (“Problems” 14-18) Which is could be saying that fighting to stay alive in an emergency situation and failing gives you...   [tags: maraca series, humor]
:: 4 Works Cited
721 words
(2.1 pages)
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Extreme Natural Disasters: Hefty Hurricanes - Hurricanes can be good for the environment with the rain, but they can also destroy a life. Hurricanes can topple buildings, uproot trees, tear down power lines, and create floods. Hurricanes create powerful winds and a substantial amount of rain. Large amounts of water can create mold, which can be extremely dangerous. Hurricanes, or any large storm, affect many countries and families. Hurricanes are immensely unsafe and unpredictable, both because of their own power and the fact that tornadoes can materialize from their circular speeding winds....   [tags: tornadoes, rain, environment]
:: 10 Works Cited
1944 words
(5.6 pages)
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Rainfall Due to Hurricanes in the Northern Hemisphere - ... Another way the precipitation of the storm can be enhanced is by the interaction with landscape such as the Appalachian Mountains which was in Hurricane Irene's path. The study that was analyzed utilizes a Geographic Information System (GIS) to characterize the spatial patterns of rainfall produced by Irene and to classify other tropical cyclones that took the same track as Irene over the United States. A GIS is a system that is designed to capture, store, maneuver, examine, manage, and present all types of geographical data....   [tags: weather consequences, metereology] 1293 words
(3.7 pages)
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Hurricanes - Hurricanes Hurricanes summer is over and fall has arrived but many people to the south of us are observing another season hurricane season. According to the Montshire Museum of Science, hurricanes usually occur in the North Atlantic from June to November, with most of them in September. On average, between six to eight hurricanes form in the North Atlantic or North Pacific each year (Montshire), however, as many as 15 have occurred in the Atlantic in a single year. Hurricanes are powerful, whirling storms that measure several hundred miles in diameter....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 2 Works Cited
1118 words
(3.2 pages)
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hurricanes - Hurricanes are one of the deadliest and most expensive natural disasters around. They are more common in areas of humid yet moist weather so they are very foreign to certain places. But to the places were hurricanes are the norm, the people take them extremely seriously because they kill people and ruin countless amounts of property. Hurricanes can attack and harm people in so many ways they can kill people, leave them homeless, it leaves children orphaned and disable them. On the west coast of the United States and other places hurricanes aren’t taken as seriously as other more common disasters, such as, earthquakes and volcanoes yet the hurricane can be a lot more damaging that both...   [tags: essays research papers] 558 words
(1.6 pages)
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Hurricanes - INTRODUCTION The term “hurricane” is a name given to violent storms that originate over the tropical or subtropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or North Pacific Ocean. Hurricanes need warm tropical oceans, moisture and light winds above them in order to maintain themselves active. Those storms other than the ones considered typhoons are known as tropical cyclones, which is the general name for all such storms including hurricanes and typhoons. Hurricanes are named based on certain aspects and location of where they first originate....   [tags: Natural Disasters Storms essays papers] 1414 words
(4 pages)
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Hurricanes and the Coriolis Effect - Hurricanes and the Coriolis Effect Hurricanes have been an active weather phenomenon throughout history. Thanks to our modern equipment, they are easy to track, yet still difficult to predict. Their destructive force causes millions of dollars in damage each time they hit land. We use male and female names to name them. They begin as many storm clouds over warm water and begin to form a tropical storm when enough of them gather. The rotating earth sets the storms in motion. The Coriolis Effect, which is the apparent deviation of an object, greatly influences the path of a hurricane, and must be taken into effect when trying to predict its path....   [tags: Papers] 1505 words
(4.3 pages)
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Hurricanes - Hurricanes A natural hazard is when extreme events which cause great loss of life and or property and create severe disruption to human lives, such as a hurricane. Editor Philip Whitefield brings up an important point in ‘ Our Mysterious Planet’ when he comments; ‘At a time when we know how to aim a space probe directly at Mars and trigger the gigantic forces of nuclear power, we are still at the mercy of hurricanes and volcanoes.’ It seems peculiar how we can be at such an advanced stage technologically yet we are unable to completely stop a natural hazard from causing loss of life and damage to existing constructed resources and infrastructures....   [tags: essays research papers] 1580 words
(4.5 pages)
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A Short Overview Of Hurricanes - Hurricanes are powerful atmospheric vortices that are intermediate in size. Hurricanes are unique and powerful weather systems. The word “hurricane” comes from a Caribbean word meaning “big wind”. Views of hurricanes can be seen from a satellite positioned thousands of miles above the earth. Hurricanes originate as tropical disturbances over warm oceans with trade winds. The tropical turbances intensify into tropical depressions, and eventually into a tropical storm. They only originate in the tropical trade winds because the ocean temperatures are quite warm there....   [tags: essays research papers] 1068 words
(3.1 pages)
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Management of Hurricanes in the USA - Management of Hurricanes in the USA What does FEMA stand for. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is an independent agency of the federal government, reporting to the President. What is its mission. " to reduce loss of life and property and protect our nation's critical infrastructure from all types of hazards through a comprehensive, risk-based, emergency management program of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery." When was it created. It was created in 1979 but it can trace its beginnings to 1803, when the first disaster legislation was passed, to provide assistance to a New Hamphire town following an extensive fire....   [tags: Papers] 933 words
(2.7 pages)
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Natural Hazards affecting Australian Communities - Natural Hazards affecting Australian Communities Cyclones Geography   Tables of contents- Contents of page Page number Title 1 Table of contents 2 Q1, Q2, Q3 3 Q4, Q5 4 Q6 5 Bibliography 6 Stimulus material 7 Stimulus material 8   Natural hazards affecting Australian communities- Cyclones Q1.identify the type of natural hazard you have selected. The natural hazard that I have selected is Cyclone also known as Hurricanes in the USA and typhoon in Asia. Q2. Describe in detail the physical geographical process associated with the hazard....   [tags: cyclones, hurricanes]
:: 12 Works Cited
1403 words
(4 pages)
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Superdome Hurricane Fail - During the two previous hurricanes that made their way onto the New Orleans coast, the Superdome was also used for a shelter during these times. The use of the building as a sanctuary then, even in the face of much lesser hurricanes, was nothing short of a disaster. In Hurricane Georges and Ivan, supplies and planning were not evident. Reports were made that during Georges, citizens were stealing items from the dome and damaged much of the Superdome which cost the city thousands. This shows the lack of attention to patterns in the Superdomes’ past and It was also very difficult during Georges to get the supplies they did have to citizens inside the dome....   [tags: New Orleans Coast, Hurricanes, Natural Disasters]
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1676 words
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Hurricanes the Tropical Cyclones - Hurricanes the Tropical Cyclones What is a hurricane. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that has a maximum sustained wind of at least 75 mph. The primary energy source for tropical cyclones is the latent heat released when water vapor condenses. Only extremely moist air can supply the energy necessary to spawn and maintain tropical storms, and only very warm air contains enough moisture. Tropical cyclones, therefore, form only over oceans with water temperatures of at least 80 deg F. After they have formed, such storms tend to intensify when passing over warmer water and weaken when passing over colder water....   [tags: Papers] 726 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Effects of Hurricanes in Bananas Plantation - After receiving alarming news from the Cavendish Distilling Company or CDC, about their delicious Banana Elixir. It seems after Hurricane Floyd they lost the majority of their bananas’ and are now in need of an alternative source for a banana flavoring, to avoid bankruptcy. Luckily for the CDC, there is a known way to get the chemical that can be used in place of the oil from a banana. That chemical in this experiment will be known as isopentyl acetate. Isopentyl acetate is an Ester, an Esters are usually created from reacting a carboxylic acid with an alcohol, along this an acid catalyst....   [tags: Isopentyl acetate, banana elixir, destillation]
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991 words
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Exploring Hurricanes - Exploring Hurricanes Introduction: A hurricane is a server tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Mexico or in the eastern Pacific Ocean. They have different names. They are called hurricane (in Atlantic ocean), typhoons (in Indian ocean) and cyclone (in pacific ocean). Hurricanes gather heat and energy through contact with warm ocean waters. Evaporation from the seawater increases their power. Hurricanes are the most devastating things on the planet....   [tags: Papers] 651 words
(1.9 pages)
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Hurricanes A-level - Ø The Caribbean region and the South Eastern United States of America are regularly subjected to the impact of tropical hurricanes; (A) Briefly outline characteristics of such hurricanes. The hurricanes that occur over the Caribbean region and the United States of America usually eventuate between August and October. For these hurricanes to occur the surrounding ocean temperatures must be minimal, also there must be a prolonged spell of equable temperature, pressure and humidity in the lower troposphere in conjunction with anti-cyclonic conditions in the upper troposphere....   [tags: essays research papers] 893 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Impact Of Hurricanes On The Physical and Human Environment - The Impact Of Hurricanes On The Physical and Human Environment A tropical cyclone is a low-pressure system that forms in the tropics. Hurricane is the name given to fully developed tropical cyclones that are found in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the North Pacific Ocean east of the International Date Line. When local residents of an area refer to a hurricane, they are speaking of the violent, stormy weather system that brings torrential rains and destructive, high velocity winds of over 74 miles per hour....   [tags: Papers] 993 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Devastation of Hurricanes, Some Facts About Hurricane Katrina - In August of 2005, a category 5 hurricane struck land along the Gulf Coast. This storm was given the name Hurricane Katrina. The United States Department of Commerce reports in its October 2005 technical report, Hurricane Katrina, A Climatological Perspective, that this was the most costly disaster to devastate the US since September of 1928 and that this was the strongest storm to hit the US within the past 100 years. Hurricane Katrina caused widespread, massive destruction throughout many central Gulf Coast states including Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi....   [tags: category 5, destruction, government failures] 1890 words
(5.4 pages)
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El Nino, La Nina and Hurricanes - El Nino, La Nina and Hurricanes How does the change in climate affect the frequency and the path of those powerful hurricanes and tropical storms in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Global warming has a profound vast impact on the Earth. Besides landmasses, ocean is warmed unevenly. Additionally, unexpected changes in ocean current will aggregate the uneven distribution of water temperatures along the globe. Warmer or cooler than normal sea surface temperatures occur along the Tropical Pacific will provide good indications of the future climatic change....   [tags: Global Warming Climate Change] 464 words
(1.3 pages)
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Tropical Storm? I Think Not. - Hurricanes are the most destructive natural disaster known to man. They are very powerful and violent storms, mainly associated with strong winds and heavy rains. A storm is classified as a hurricane when the speed of wind reaches seventy-four miles per hour. They usually start stirring up over warm seas, near the equator, and are accompanied by fierce winds, flash floods, mudslides and huge waves. The cause of this all has to do with two basic ingredients: warm air and water. Once these natural disasters strike, they not only affect physical parts of the world, but even the economy....   [tags: Tropical Storms, hurricanes, ] 695 words
(2 pages)
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Natural Disasters and Community Warning Systems - Natural Disasters Natural Disasters caused many people to have problems over the years and killed many people. There have been a tremendous amount of different disasters that destroy multiple things. We need to have more people that are willing to help, not just the people made, when a disaster strikes. We also need everyone to come together as “one” so we can make it through the problems. As a society, we need to make sure that we have government support, school emergency plans, community warning systems, and we need to know how much money the damage will cost....   [tags: FEMA, emergency plans, hurricanes]
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1002 words
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The effects of Sea-Surface Temperatures on North Atlantic Hurricanes - The effects of Sea-Surface Temperatures on North Atlantic Hurricanes Graphics missing Abstract: Is global warming causing an increase in the number or the intensity of hurricanes. This is a question that has been on many people’s minds the past several years. Many studies have been conducted to look at the potential effects of global warming on hurricanes. This review attempts to examine three studies that all compare past changes in sea-surface temperature with changes in hurricane numbers, intensity, and power....   [tags: Global Warming Environmental Essays Papers]
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Mother Nature's Devastating Destruction - ... Depending on the geographic location, regions which suffer high intensity hurricanes would require larger arrays of wind turbines in order to reduce the devastating effects. 2. The massive farm containing nearly thousands of wind turbines would have to operate very efficiently on days with average weather conditions in order support the costs. 3. Transportation of power would require large number of Power Lines connecting the offshore wind farms and the main storage facility, also associated with these power lines are a variety of losses....   [tags: wind, turbines, hurricanes]
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Causes of Natural Hazards - Hazards are possible sources of danger. Types of hazards are those such as hurricanes, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. A cause is what makes something happen and is a reason for it happening. The two types of hazards I will be outlining the causes for are hurricanes and earthquakes. A hurricane and tropical storms are cyclones. When the winds reach a constant speed of 74 miles per hour or more, it is called a hurricane. A hurricane is caused when a large mass of air is warmed up and the warm humid air begins to rise....   [tags: hurricanes and earthquakes] 1071 words
(3.1 pages)
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US Corps Preventing Floods & Hurricanes in New Orleans - Introduction In settling the area of New Orleans, the French built on high ground with a natural levee made of silt from the river. The French built levees to protect from river flooding. Landowners continued to build levees. The coastal swamp acted as a natural buffer against storms. With recurrent flooding on the Mississippi, Congress created the Mississippi River Commission. The Army Corps of Engineers were put in control. The Corps did not really have any flood experience and decided levees would be enough to control the river....   [tags: Engineering, Branch Method]
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685 words
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Hurricane Sandy : A Center of Destruction - The annual season of devastation to coastal regions everywhere. Hurricanes cause destruction to human life, but, we are often quick to neglect each other, let alone local wild life. Hurricane Sandy caused demolition all around our shore region called the East Coast. Hurricanes are becoming more common, and even the animal protecting agency is neglecting the care of the environment. It is common to wonder how this has occurred and how a society built on power, and need, let the world crumble. The ecosystem surrounding the Sandy destruction sites, has been torn apart and in some areas forced to restart itself....   [tags: Hurrucanes, East Coast, Natural Disasters]
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892 words
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Comparisons Between Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina - According to the “ The handy weather answer book” by Kevin Hile a hurricane is defined as a tropical storm formed in the Atlantic Basin. Winds reach speeds of 74 miles per hour or more. Frequently, hurricanes occur during the months of summer. This allows energy to build from the warm surface of the ocean. Wind speeds, clouds, and the Coriolis effect all contribute to the formation of a hurricane (123). Hurricanes produce fierce winds. Nonetheless, it is the water that creates the most harm. “They can raise tides as high as 20 feet, and dump as much as 20 inches of rain inland,” (Douglas, 107)....   [tags: hurricane scale, tropical cyclone, storm]
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976 words
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The Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900 - Once there was, as never before, a hurricane of great might and strength. As never before, there once was a hurricane of many names: storm, cyclone, tempest, typhoon, and flood. Yet it has lived on in history as the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900. Humanity has glorified and immortalized the hurricane. The Great Galveston Hurricane has been the subject of numerous articles, novels, plays, and poems, as well as four major nonfiction studies (Longshore). It is truly one of hurricane lore’s greatest of storms....   [tags: Hurricane, Storm, Texas] 2635 words
(7.5 pages)
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How to Help the Poor in During Natural Disasters in the Guide to Enhance Risk Communication Among Low-Income Population - ... The article was quite interesting and had many supporting details for the approaches concepts discussed but it was also very radical. A very brief history was provided on how African Americans are more susceptible to injuries and flu mortalities than Caucasians. A few more examples of minority susceptibility would’ve made a stronger case than the sole commitment on the outcome of Hurricane Katrina. The background on risk communication was in depth and clearly explained. It created a picture on how the grassroots system could be beneficial....   [tags: grassroots, health, hurricanes] 559 words
(1.6 pages)
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Sea Surface - Introduction: Hurricane Katrina was the costliest hurricane to make landfall in the United States of America. An estimated 80% of New Orleans was underwater and authorities reported a total of $125 billion in property damage. The storm made landfall as a category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson scale (Figure 1) with 127 mph winds on August 29th, 2005. Storm surge reached 20 feet, toppling the levees that were meant to protect New Orleans and exposing structural inadequacies. Sadly, 1836 people lost their lives as a result of the storm and more than 250,000 people were displaced from their homes (Hurricane Katrina, Graumann et al.)....   [tags: climate, hurricanes, natural disaster]
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1432 words
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Bush Giving Relief to those Victimized by the Hurricanes - It was perhaps the biggest breakthrough in a day of progress in the ravaged city. Also on Friday, President Bush visited Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, saying there was still a lot of work ahead for the federal government. And after returning to Washington, Bush signed a $10.5 billion disaster relief bill. The amount includes $10 billion in supplemental funds for the Federal Emergency Management Agency and $500,000 for the Pentagon for its hurricane relief work. (Full story) Earlier in the day, Bush termed the money a "down payment" and said it was just the beginning....   [tags: essays research papers] 804 words
(2.3 pages)
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How To Minimize Hurricane Flood Damage - Hurricanes are destructive and dangerous forces of nature that exist because of a long process involving heat, wind, and vapor. When sea water heats, it creates vapor that rises in the atmosphere as time passes. These vapors become strong winds and are classified as a hurricane when they are greater than seventy-four miles per hour (Emily, Helen, and Mohamed). According to John Roach of National Geographic, these conditions have occurred very frequently since 1995 due to an increase in the temperature of the ocean, which created more vapor, heavy rainfall, and serious hurricanes....   [tags: Hurricane Damage Essays]
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2058 words
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Different Types of Hurracanes - ... The center of a hurricane is call the “Eye of the Hurricane” and is about 20-30 miles wide (32-48 kilometer wide). The eye is the calmest part of a hurricane and surrounding the eye is something call the “Eye Wall”. When a hurricane makes a landfall, it often produces a strong storm surge that can reach 20 feet (6 meters) long and spread 100 miles (161 kilometers).Hurricanes cause catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles in land. Hurricanes can produce winds exceptional to 155 miles per hour as well as tornadoes and microbursts....   [tags: swirling tropical storms, winds] 528 words
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The History of Hurricane Katrina - The History of Hurricane Katrina On August 29, 2005, the third strongest and biggest hurricane ever recorded in American history hit the Gulf Coast at eight o’clock a.m. The interaction between a tropical depression and a tropical wave created a tropical storm later referred to as Hurricane Katrina (FAQS, 2013). Forming over the Bahamas, Hurricane Katrina gradually strengthened as it moved closer and closer to the Gulf of Mexico. Recorded on August 28th, 2005, Katrina jumped from a category three storm to a category five storm with maximum sustained winds up to 160 miles per hour....   [tags: Natural Disaster, Hurricane, New Orleans]
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1811 words
(5.2 pages)
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Realistic Hurricane Testing for Resilient Energy Infrastructure - 1. SUMMARY Economic and resilient designs of energy infrastructure require accurate estimation of hurricane-induced loads. Hurricane wind, rain and wave loads are governing design parameters for resilient energy infrastructure. While the current direction for seeking energy resources pay attention to clean and renewable energy, for instance, wind energy and solar energy, the technology is not yet widely spread in Louisiana because of the construction cost and the risk of damage by aggressive hurricanes....   [tags: energy, wind, hurricane] 1665 words
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The Wrath of Mother Nature: Disaster Management of Hurricane Katrina - Mother Nature is a force that can bring both great and terrible things upon humanity. Humans live out their lives in tranquility; living in environments that have stable climates suitable to raise a family or pursue careers. The Earth is truly a great place to live however, occasionally Mother Nature will show her ugly side. This ugly side just happens to be the natural disasters that affect the many people that populate planet Earth. Hurricane Katrina was one of the worst natural disasters ever recorded....   [tags: FEMA, hurricane katrina]
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1351 words
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The Great Hurricane of 1938 - The Great Hurricane of 1938, or known to many as the Long Island Express, was known as one of the most disastrous hurricanes to hit New England. It wasn’t the high winds, heavy rain, and high waves/storm surge that gave this hurricane its title in history. The Great Hurricane had a fourth deadly weapon; the element of surprise. It was the beginning of September, a time where many packed up their summer clothes, boarded up their houses, and left to return back to the real world leaving their summer homes behind....   [tags: Natural Disasters Hurricane Detection] 1578 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Consequences of Hurricane Katrina - Hurricane Katrina hit the southern coast of the United States on August 28, 2005. The center of Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans on the morning of August 29, 2005. The devastating effect of this hurricane resulted in more than 1,800 citizens losing their lives, as well as more than an estimated $81 billion dollars in damages occurred. By August 31, 2005, eighty-percent of the city became submerged under water because the storm surge breached the city's levees at multiple points. If the levees are damaged massive water will flood Louisiana from the Gulf Coast, the Mississippi River, and other surrounding bodies of water....   [tags: Hurricane Katrina, USA, informative] 2310 words
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How to Track a Hurricane - How to track a hurricane Hurricanes, also known as cyclones or typhoons, are huge, devastating tropical storms that can be up to 600 miles wide. They have strong, forceful winds that spiral inward and upward circling around the “eye” of the storm. Inside the eye, there are clear skies and light winds, however, surrounding the eye wall there are bands of wind and rain that spread out for over hundreds or thousands of miles. Hurricanes begin as tropical disturbances over warm ocean water (27°c or 80°F) and gathers heat and energy as it moves across the ocean....   [tags: huge, devastating tropical storms]
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Comparisons between Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina - ... Coast Guard and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Manuel, 2013). Though fatalities were low in comparison to Hurricane Katrina, according to the National Hurricane Center, Hurricane Sandy resulted in “the greatest number of U.S. direct fatalities related to a tropical cyclone outside of the southern states since Hurricane Agnes in 1972” (Blake, et al., 2013). Property Damage Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Katrina caused over $200 billion worth of property damages total. This made Hurricane Katrina “the mostly costly hurricane to ever hit the United States” (Ahrens & Sampson, 2011)....   [tags: weather catastrophies]
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1844 words
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Effects of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans - ... In 2003 the Bush administration reformed FEMA and it was moved under the umbrella of the DHS. With that, the merger changed the mission of FEMA, from its primary focus of disaster response to counter terrorism. Removing FEMA from an independent agency which handled disaster response, and merge with DHS which responded to counter terrorism, according to Adamski, the merge sparked concerns that the coverage of natural disasters would be diluted. Adamski quotes James Witt, former FEMA director commenting, “I’m extremely concerned that the ability of our nation to prepare for and respond to disasters has been sharply eroded” (Adamski, p4)....   [tags: hurricane, storm, relief] 931 words
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The Consequences of Hurricane Charley - Hurricane Charley was a hurricane that occurred during the 2004 Atlantic hurricane season. In the United States Hurricane Charley first impacted the state of Florida. “Hurricane Charley made landfall on the southwest coast of Florida new Cayo Costa, just west of Ft. Myers around 3:45 p.m. EDT on August 13, with maximum sustained surface winds near 150 mph.” (Johnson) Hurricane Charley continued to travel across the Florida peninsula. Hurricane Charley traveled into the Atlantic Ocean and turned towards the north and again made landfall in north western South Carolina....   [tags: natural disasters]
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Hurricane Andrew: Storm of the Century - Imagine that a family is sitting at home watching a calm game of baseball, when suddenly they realize that a massive wall of water is approaching the neighborhood. Where did this flash flood come from, a reader might ask. The wall of water was made by the raging winds and immense power of Hurricane Andrew. Hurricane Andrew was the second most expensive storm in history that destroyed over 250,000 homes in the states of Florida and Louisiana alone. Hurricane Andrew was not predicted to make landfall, so when it did many civilians did not have any ideas that the Hurricane was coming until it was almost too late....   [tags: Disaster Preparedness]
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2104 words
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The Effects of Hurricane Andrew - In the six years that I live in the United States, I have never seen a hurricane. In my country, Peru, hurricanes are not known. Although I have heard a lot of them, I do not have really an idea of how it is a hurricane. All I know about the hurricanes is what I have seen on TV or have read in books. According to historians, Christopher Columbus wrote the first known report of a hurricane, after he sailed into the storm in 1495 on the second of his voyages to the Americas. Probably the most frequently mentioned hurricanes are the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, and Katrina of 2005, but Andrew of 1992 is much known too, because they say, was in its time the most tragic and costly of all the stor...   [tags: personal reflections and experience] 976 words
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Taking a Look at Hurricane Ivan - ... “Classical long lives Cape Verde Hurricane” is what most people call it because Hurricane Ivan has been declared as one of the most powerful hurricanes to ever hit the North Atlantic Ocean with wind speeds topping in at 165 MPH. These high winds caused horrific damage and destruction to much of the area. Orange Beach, Alabama, was one of the many areas devastated by the storm. The destruction it left in its wake caused tourism in the Area to decrease, thus affecting the economy on both the city and state level....   [tags: natural disasters and phenomena] 987 words
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A Brief Biography of Rubin "Hurricane" Carter - One, two, three. The Hurricane gets the Knockout. Rubin “Hurricane” Carter was an African American boxer whose name was spoken over well-known media programming throughout the country. Rubin Carter got the nickname of “the Hurricane” because of his fierce left hook. A New Jersey promoter by the name of Jimmy Colotto gave him this nickname when he saw him box and it has stuck with him ever since (Company). He won 21 matches in his career and overcame immense racial prejudice to achieve his life-long dreams and goals....   [tags: Biography, African American Boxer, The Hurricane]
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Looking Back at Hurricane Sandy - ... (CNN)Category 2 hurricanes are winds from 96 to 110 mph. The storm surge is generally 6 to 8 feet above normal. The damage with a category 2 would be roofing material, door and window damage to buildings. Also trees and shrubbery will have damage with some trees blown down. Damage to signs, mobile homes and poorly constructed piers would also have considerable amount of damage. Coastal and low lying escape routes may flood 2 to 4 hours before the arrival of the hurricane’s center. Hurricane Sandy then hit Haiti, killing 51 people....   [tags: natural disasters and catastrophies] 727 words
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Hurricane Katrina: Two Disasters - Hurricane Katrina: Two Disasters From the Frontline Film, The Old Man and The Storm, the life of Herbert Gettridge was followed after he returned to the 9th Ward of New Orleans to rebuild his home after it was destroyed in Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. After Hurricane Katrina, 500,000 families were displaced, 200,000 homes were destroyed, and 600 congregations were demolished (The Old Man and The Storm). This was a natural disaster of monumental proportions. Ironically though, a mock scenario was created by Louisiana State University’s Center for the Study of Public Health: Impacts of Hurricanes and FEMA, called Hurricane Pam in July of 2004....   [tags: National Disaster]
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What Was Hurricane Katrina? - ... We all hugged in the dark. Some of us were in tears. It did not get any better. Water crashed through the windows downstairs. Waves gushed into the house in a surge of seawater and junk from the streets. We tripped upstairs in the blackness. We scrambled to get our emergency supplies into the attic. But the water kept crawling up the walls. It was as if the house was sinking. Now, we are all huddled together on the roof. We even rescued a man who was drowning in our street. He swam out of his bedroom window when the storm flooded his home....   [tags: natural disasters, catastrophies] 688 words
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Hurricane Katrina: The New Orleans Levee Failures - Most of the destructions from the events of August 29th 2005, when Katrina Hit the City Of New Orleans, were not only caused by the storm itself; but also, by failure of the engineering of the levee system protecting the entire infrastructure of the city. The years of poor decision making and avoidance of the levee system led to one of the most catastrophic events in the history of the United States. Throughout our research, we have identified three key players in charge of the levee system design, construction and maintenance....   [tags: Hurricane Katrina Essays]
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Looking Back at Hurricane Katrina - In certain areas of the world hurricanes are a part to life and although Katrina looked as if it was going to be a rough and dangerous storm many people who live in the gulf thought they would be able to handle what was storm had to offer. The storm itself, while although dangerous and cause damage it was the infrastructure and the levy the really ended up turning this disaster to the magnitude it ended up being. Hurricane Katrina provided to be a storm that not only the citizens were not able to handle but also the government was ill prepared for....   [tags: storm review]
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The Great Galveston Hurricane - A hurricane, formally known as a tropical cyclone, is the most dangerous storm on this planet. Hurricanes only form over warm oceans near the equator. When humid, mild air ascends, it causes less air pressure below. Because of this, other high pressure parts try to equalize pressure with the low pressure area. This air also becomes humid, and mild and rises. This cycle continues, and the water in the air makes clouds. All the clouds spin and get bigger, fueled by the ocean’s heat and water evaporating to the surface....   [tags: tropical cyclones, dangerous storms]
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Hurricane Ike - Disasters are often followed by reports of damages to the built environment—the cost of buildings, roads, bridges, electricity lines, stores, schools and hospitals. These of course follow the death toll and economic and social impacts of citizen’s lives. It was not different with Hurricane Ike whose 20 feet surge left one of the hugest damages ever. The stories of how it impacted other things for the benefit do not make much of the well-known histories. For Gene Straatmeyer a resident of Bolivar Peninsula— which was most hit by the storm, the story is not just about how destructive it was: “When I saw my house three weeks after the storm, I was glad it stood but I knew it was time for chan...   [tags: Hurricane Ike Essays]
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PTSD and Hurricane Katrina - ... This style of living meant for closure to the outside world, but when the waves of hurricane Katrina came crashing on their doorsteps, those who truly loved the city stayed to endure the storm. Little did they know, what lied for them after the storm is what has come to be psychological stress. According to the journal of urban health, they stated, “The prevalence of symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of PTSD was 19.2%” (145 DeSalvo). The trauma for these victims did not stop there. Looking over to Marilyn Elias from USA TODAY, she states that, “The big surprise: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which typically goes away in a year for most disaster survivors, has increased: 21%”...   [tags: post traumatic stress disorder]
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An Analysis of the Hurricane Catrina Relief Effort - In a state of national emergency, the United States government is expected to be efficient and organized. When Hurricane Katrina struck on August 25th, 2005, the United States government was not readily prepared for such an immense disaster. The mismanagement of relief efforts by the U.S. government led to a lack of adequate assistance to U.S. victims along with a prolonged restoration period for those in need. Had the government accepted more foreign aid and further prepared for the storm, hurricane Katrina may not have proved such a disaster in our nation’s history....   [tags: foreign aid, hurricane, new orleans, storm]
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The 1900 Hurricane in Galveston, Texas: The Storm's Influence on Current Hurricane Forecasting Techniques - Hurricanes are known to be one of the most destructive natural forces on the planet Earth. On September 8, 1900, a massive hurricane came roaring out of the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall on the bustling island city of Galveston, Texas. This unprepared city and citizens were battered by gale-force winds and tremendous swells until it was completely destroyed by dawn of the next morning. This carnage preserved this storm’s place in American History and earned it the name The Great Storm of 1900....   [tags: weather, meteorology, american history]
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Hurricane Katrina: Causes, Effects, and Aftermath - Every year many natural disasters happen around the world. In New Orleans, and several other states, a devastating hurricane struck. High speed winds and major flooding caused many people to lose their homes and even their lives. Many people have heard of hurricane Katrina, but not everybody knows what caused it and the affect it had on the United States. On early morning of August 29th, 2005 on the Gulf Shore near New Orleans, a devastating hurricane struck. It wrecked havoc, demolishing anything in its path....   [tags: natural disasters, New Orleans]
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Defining a Hurricane - Defining a Hurricane A hurricane is a tropical storm that has winds of 74 miles per hour or more. The winds can sometimes reach up to 155 miles per hour. Another characteristic of hurricanes is their massive size that measures from 200 to 300 miles in diameter. In the center of each storm there is what is called the eye of the storm (Image to Right). The eye of the storm is usaually between 20-30 miles and is the calmest part of the storm. Winds here may only be 74 miles per hour....   [tags: Papers] 902 words
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The Impacts of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans - ... The waves in the ocean was at least 40 feet tall. Katrina affected about 90,000 square miles of land in the United States. There was about 20 feet of water on the streets and over houses after the storm was over. 80% of New orleans was covered in water. Hundreds of flights were cancelled or diverted. Many people were impacted during and after Hurricane Katrina. People don't realize how much it can impact them until it happens to them. Hurricane Katrina is one of the biggest storms that has been recorded in the past 100 year....   [tags: natural disasters, acts of God] 791 words
(2.3 pages)
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Government Interaction after Hurricane Katrina - ... Even through Hurricane Katrina was the most anticipated disaster yet to hit America, many agencies claim to be uninformed for up to two days after the incident. The FEMA says that to be effective, they need to know how many need supplies, what supplies are needed, and where they are needed. How can this be effective when none of the victims are able to provide this information. This means that numbers will be inflated, supplies will be over collected, and corruption will be investigated in the state branches....   [tags: natural disasters, slow actions & reactions] 1770 words
(5.1 pages)
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9/11 and Hurricane Katrina Disaster Evaluation - There are numerous resources available to treat and assist victims of a disaster, these resources are available at all three levels of government, and for the most part they are easily accessible. One valuable resource found at the federal level to assist victims is the Homeland Security: 9/11 Victim Relief Funds. This fund was established in response to 9/11 terrorist attacks. It was created to assist the victims 9/11 with much needed financial support. The donations coming in were donated to over 250 charitable organizations and this made the funds easily assessable to the victims who needed them....   [tags: 9/11, Katrina, FEMA]
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1881 words
(5.4 pages)
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Government Involvement During Hurricane Katrina - The storm many are aware of called Katrina was devastating to property, finances, and families and left many people clinging to life with only hope of assistance. No one seemed well prepared for a storm of this size and many people didn’t evacuate. The government had gotten something right by calling for a mandatory evacuation of New Orleans, Louisiana. FEMA, federal Emergency Management Association, was partially to blame for the slow reaction and help after the storm. Those elected to run our nation and protect the people were also delayed in their efforts to support the people caught in the storm....   [tags: Property, FInances, Families, Natural Disaster]
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1532 words
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Does Global Warming Effect Hurricane Frequency and Intensity? - In order to even begin to answer the question posed by the title of the paper we must first explore what a hurricane is and how it is formed. We must also examine what is meant by the term global warming. Firstly hurricanes are formed over warm ocean waters of at least 26.5ºC through depths of at least 45m where there is a high Coriolis Effect such as there is just north and south of the equator. (Moran, 2011) Hurricanes begin as smaller storms called tropical disturbances, if there is sufficient loss in surface air pressure coincided with a strengthening sustained wind the storm is then considered to be a tropical depression....   [tags: Environment ]
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