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Your search returned over 400 essays for "hurricanes"
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Hurricanes, Tsunamis, and Flooding - Weather can affect agriculture in many, many different ways. From tornadoes, to tsunamis, to floods, any type of weather can and will affect agriculture. When agriculture is affected by weather conditions, not only are the crops affected, but so are the people who grow and consume them. If you think about it, that is pretty much everyone. So no matter what severe weather condition it is, everyone is going to be affected by it in some way. Hurricanes, also known as tropical cyclones, are tropical storms that can last for two or more weeks....   [tags: tsunamis, tornatoes, hurricanes]
:: 6 Works Cited
924 words
(2.6 pages)
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When the Hurricane Came - The trip that take seventeen hours all because I had other things to do before I could leave town, the job played a big part in my delay. Setting up the hospital unit for incoming staff to stay, and helping discharging patients so they could be with they families are some of the things were needed to be done. The time I stay at work is very important for the patients, but it put a delay in my departure. Packing non licensed drivers was not a good ideal and most all not getting rest before I left....   [tags: hurricanes,] 1319 words
(3.8 pages)
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Levee Break during Hurricanes in New Orleans - Louisiana is known for being an area prone to hurricanes, and millions of dollars of damage have been caused in this state almost every year. A major concern for a way to prevent future and major damage then started in the early 2000’s. The levees were designed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and they had to decide how to build these levees to withstand hurricane forces. Although they were built for hurricane forces, it could not stand up to Katrina in 2005, when they broke and flooded the entire city....   [tags: levee, hurricane katrina, louisiana]
:: 1 Works Cited
862 words
(2.5 pages)
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Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina - According to the “The handy weather answer book” by Kevin Hile a hurricane is defined as a tropical storm formed in the Atlantic Basin. Winds reach speeds of 74 miles per hour or more. Frequently, hurricanes occur during the months of summer. This allows energy to build from the warm surface of the ocean. Wind speeds, clouds, and the Coriolis Effect all contribute to the formation of a hurricane (123). Hurricanes are a vital motive in nature. Douglas explains, “Whirling energy beasts are the atmosphere’s automatic pressure-relief valves, comparable to an integrated thermostat; they also dispense essential rains, restoring supplies and soil moistures’ (108)....   [tags: hurricanes, sandy, katrina, tropical storms]
:: 8 Works Cited
1791 words
(5.1 pages)
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Hurricanes' Effects on Society - Hurricanes' Effects on Society Hurricanes are one of nature’s most natural occurrences and intense phenomenal storms. Yet, as phenomenal as they are, they are still one of the deadliest and disastrous natural occurrences that continue to plague costal residents with fears of their homes being destroyed, their towns wiped out, and loved ones either disappearing or dying. Roger A. Pielke Jr. and Roger A. Pielke Sr. in their book Hurricanes: Their Nature and Impacts on Society, state that the hurricane is a member of a phenomena called cyclones, which refers to “any weather system that circulates in a counterclockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere and in a clockwise direction in the So...   [tags: Nature Storms Weather Hurricane Essays Paper]
:: 5 Works Cited
1409 words
(4 pages)
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Increasing Frequency of Hurricanes - One of nature’s most destructive forces is the Hurricane. Hurricanes that impact the United States mostly occur in the Atlantic and travel into the Gulf of Mexico. With winds up to 190 miles per hour, nothing can stand in the way of the most extreme category 5 hurricanes. Hurricanes destroy cities, homes, agriculture and anything in their way due to their high winds and intense rains. Recently, scientists have been supporting the idea that an increase of annual hurricane numbers has been tied to global climate change....   [tags: Natural Disasters, Causes] 1106 words
(3.2 pages)
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Research Paper on Hurricanes - I have always found the ocean to be a very intriguing part of the Earth. There are infinitely many discoveries that have yet to be made about it. My fascination with the ocean sparked the idea to do my class paper on hurricanes and what they are along with their effects. I remember hearing about all the damages from Hurricane Katrina after it hit the coast near New Orleans. The only information I really know about them is what is briefly covered on the news. I thought it would be interesting to discover the true effects they can have on not only people that endure them, but also the environment as it gets ripped to shreds by the plethora of winds and water....   [tags: Personal Research Paper]
:: 8 Works Cited
1578 words
(4.5 pages)
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Natural Disasters: Horrendous Hurricanes - According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a hurricane is “any storm or tempest in which the wind blows with terrific violence.” Hurricanes only form over warm waters; wind is pushed in from surrounding, high pressure areas towards the low pressure center. The storm grows and forms an eye as it moves faster and faster (“How Do Hurricanes Form?”). If a colossal hurricane was approaching your community, what would you do. How would you prepare. In a survey I conducted of 12 people who have endured one or more hurricanes, about 92% prepared by buying extra food and water (Colosimo)....   [tags: warm waters, katrina, andrew, tornados]
:: 21 Works Cited
1407 words
(4 pages)
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Description of Hefty Hurricanes - Hurricanes can be good for the environment with the rain, but they can also destroy a life. Hurricanes can topple buildings, uproot trees, tear down power lines, and create floods. Hurricanes create powerful winds and a substantial amount of rain. Large amounts of water can create mold, which can be extremely dangerous. Hurricanes, or any large storm, affect many countries and families. Hurricanes are immensely unsafe and unpredictable, both because of their own power and the fact that tornadoes can materialize from their circular speeding winds....   [tags: tropical storm,tropical depression,meteorologists]
:: 5 Works Cited
1140 words
(3.3 pages)
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The Formation of Hurricanes - The Formation of Hurricanes Hurricanes begin as tropical storms over the warm moist waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the equator. (Near the Philippines and the China Sea, hurricanes are called typhoons.) As the moisture evaporates it rises until enormous amounts of heated moist air are twisted high in the atmosphere. The winds begin to circle counterclockwise north of the equator or clockwise south of the equator. The relatively peaceful center of the hurricane is called the eye....   [tags: Papers] 928 words
(2.7 pages)
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Extreme Natural Disasters: Hefty Hurricanes - Hurricanes can be good for the environment with the rain, but they can also destroy a life. Hurricanes can topple buildings, uproot trees, tear down power lines, and create floods. Hurricanes create powerful winds and a substantial amount of rain. Large amounts of water can create mold, which can be extremely dangerous. Hurricanes, or any large storm, affect many countries and families. Hurricanes are immensely unsafe and unpredictable, both because of their own power and the fact that tornadoes can materialize from their circular speeding winds....   [tags: tornadoes, rain, environment]
:: 10 Works Cited
1944 words
(5.6 pages)
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Hurricanes - Hurricanes Hurricanes summer is over and fall has arrived but many people to the south of us are observing another season hurricane season. According to the Montshire Museum of Science, hurricanes usually occur in the North Atlantic from June to November, with most of them in September. On average, between six to eight hurricanes form in the North Atlantic or North Pacific each year (Montshire), however, as many as 15 have occurred in the Atlantic in a single year. Hurricanes are powerful, whirling storms that measure several hundred miles in diameter....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 2 Works Cited
1118 words
(3.2 pages)
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hurricanes - Hurricanes are one of the deadliest and most expensive natural disasters around. They are more common in areas of humid yet moist weather so they are very foreign to certain places. But to the places were hurricanes are the norm, the people take them extremely seriously because they kill people and ruin countless amounts of property. Hurricanes can attack and harm people in so many ways they can kill people, leave them homeless, it leaves children orphaned and disable them. On the west coast of the United States and other places hurricanes aren’t taken as seriously as other more common disasters, such as, earthquakes and volcanoes yet the hurricane can be a lot more damaging that both...   [tags: essays research papers] 558 words
(1.6 pages)
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Hurricanes - Missing Works Cited INTRODUCTION The term “hurricane” is a name given to violent storms that originate over the tropical or subtropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or North Pacific Ocean. Hurricanes need warm tropical oceans, moisture and light winds above them in order to maintain themselves active. Those storms other than the ones considered typhoons are known as tropical cyclones, which is the general name for all such storms including hurricanes and typhoons....   [tags: Natural Disasters Storms essays papers] 1414 words
(4 pages)
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Hurricanes and the Coriolis Effect - Hurricanes and the Coriolis Effect Hurricanes have been an active weather phenomenon throughout history. Thanks to our modern equipment, they are easy to track, yet still difficult to predict. Their destructive force causes millions of dollars in damage each time they hit land. We use male and female names to name them. They begin as many storm clouds over warm water and begin to form a tropical storm when enough of them gather. The rotating earth sets the storms in motion. The Coriolis Effect, which is the apparent deviation of an object, greatly influences the path of a hurricane, and must be taken into effect when trying to predict its path....   [tags: Papers] 1505 words
(4.3 pages)
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Hurricanes - Hurricanes A natural hazard is when extreme events which cause great loss of life and or property and create severe disruption to human lives, such as a hurricane. Editor Philip Whitefield brings up an important point in ‘ Our Mysterious Planet’ when he comments; ‘At a time when we know how to aim a space probe directly at Mars and trigger the gigantic forces of nuclear power, we are still at the mercy of hurricanes and volcanoes.’ It seems peculiar how we can be at such an advanced stage technologically yet we are unable to completely stop a natural hazard from causing loss of life and damage to existing constructed resources and infrastructures....   [tags: essays research papers] 1580 words
(4.5 pages)
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A Short Overview Of Hurricanes - Hurricanes are powerful atmospheric vortices that are intermediate in size. Hurricanes are unique and powerful weather systems. The word “hurricane” comes from a Caribbean word meaning “big wind”. Views of hurricanes can be seen from a satellite positioned thousands of miles above the earth. Hurricanes originate as tropical disturbances over warm oceans with trade winds. The tropical turbances intensify into tropical depressions, and eventually into a tropical storm. They only originate in the tropical trade winds because the ocean temperatures are quite warm there....   [tags: essays research papers] 1068 words
(3.1 pages)
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Management of Hurricanes in the USA - Management of Hurricanes in the USA What does FEMA stand for. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is an independent agency of the federal government, reporting to the President. What is its mission. " to reduce loss of life and property and protect our nation's critical infrastructure from all types of hazards through a comprehensive, risk-based, emergency management program of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery." When was it created. It was created in 1979 but it can trace its beginnings to 1803, when the first disaster legislation was passed, to provide assistance to a New Hamphire town following an extensive fire....   [tags: Papers] 933 words
(2.7 pages)
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Natural Hazards affecting Australian Communities - Natural Hazards affecting Australian Communities Cyclones Geography   Tables of contents- Contents of page Page number Title 1 Table of contents 2 Q1, Q2, Q3 3 Q4, Q5 4 Q6 5 Bibliography 6 Stimulus material 7 Stimulus material 8   Natural hazards affecting Australian communities- Cyclones Q1.identify the type of natural hazard you have selected. The natural hazard that I have selected is Cyclone also known as Hurricanes in the USA and typhoon in Asia. Q2. Describe in detail the physical geographical process associated with the hazard....   [tags: cyclones, hurricanes]
:: 12 Works Cited
1403 words
(4 pages)
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Hurricanes the Tropical Cyclones - Hurricanes the Tropical Cyclones What is a hurricane. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that has a maximum sustained wind of at least 75 mph. The primary energy source for tropical cyclones is the latent heat released when water vapor condenses. Only extremely moist air can supply the energy necessary to spawn and maintain tropical storms, and only very warm air contains enough moisture. Tropical cyclones, therefore, form only over oceans with water temperatures of at least 80 deg F. After they have formed, such storms tend to intensify when passing over warmer water and weaken when passing over colder water....   [tags: Papers] 726 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Effects of Hurricanes in Bananas Plantation - After receiving alarming news from the Cavendish Distilling Company or CDC, about their delicious Banana Elixir. It seems after Hurricane Floyd they lost the majority of their bananas’ and are now in need of an alternative source for a banana flavoring, to avoid bankruptcy. Luckily for the CDC, there is a known way to get the chemical that can be used in place of the oil from a banana. That chemical in this experiment will be known as isopentyl acetate. Isopentyl acetate is an Ester, an Esters are usually created from reacting a carboxylic acid with an alcohol, along this an acid catalyst....   [tags: Isopentyl acetate, banana elixir, destillation]
:: 2 Works Cited
991 words
(2.8 pages)
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Exploring Hurricanes - Exploring Hurricanes Introduction: A hurricane is a server tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Mexico or in the eastern Pacific Ocean. They have different names. They are called hurricane (in Atlantic ocean), typhoons (in Indian ocean) and cyclone (in pacific ocean). Hurricanes gather heat and energy through contact with warm ocean waters. Evaporation from the seawater increases their power. Hurricanes are the most devastating things on the planet....   [tags: Papers] 651 words
(1.9 pages)
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Hurricanes A-level - Ø The Caribbean region and the South Eastern United States of America are regularly subjected to the impact of tropical hurricanes; (A) Briefly outline characteristics of such hurricanes. The hurricanes that occur over the Caribbean region and the United States of America usually eventuate between August and October. For these hurricanes to occur the surrounding ocean temperatures must be minimal, also there must be a prolonged spell of equable temperature, pressure and humidity in the lower troposphere in conjunction with anti-cyclonic conditions in the upper troposphere....   [tags: essays research papers] 893 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Impact Of Hurricanes On The Physical and Human Environment - The Impact Of Hurricanes On The Physical and Human Environment A tropical cyclone is a low-pressure system that forms in the tropics. Hurricane is the name given to fully developed tropical cyclones that are found in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and the North Pacific Ocean east of the International Date Line. When local residents of an area refer to a hurricane, they are speaking of the violent, stormy weather system that brings torrential rains and destructive, high velocity winds of over 74 miles per hour....   [tags: Papers] 993 words
(2.8 pages)
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El Nino, La Nina and Hurricanes - El Nino, La Nina and Hurricanes How does the change in climate affect the frequency and the path of those powerful hurricanes and tropical storms in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Global warming has a profound vast impact on the Earth. Besides landmasses, ocean is warmed unevenly. Additionally, unexpected changes in ocean current will aggregate the uneven distribution of water temperatures along the globe. Warmer or cooler than normal sea surface temperatures occur along the Tropical Pacific will provide good indications of the future climatic change....   [tags: Global Warming Climate Change] 464 words
(1.3 pages)
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Tropical Storm? I Think Not. - Hurricanes are the most destructive natural disaster known to man. They are very powerful and violent storms, mainly associated with strong winds and heavy rains. A storm is classified as a hurricane when the speed of wind reaches seventy-four miles per hour. They usually start stirring up over warm seas, near the equator, and are accompanied by fierce winds, flash floods, mudslides and huge waves. The cause of this all has to do with two basic ingredients: warm air and water. Once these natural disasters strike, they not only affect physical parts of the world, but even the economy....   [tags: Tropical Storms, hurricanes, ] 695 words
(2 pages)
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Natural Disasters and Community Warning Systems - Natural Disasters Natural Disasters caused many people to have problems over the years and killed many people. There have been a tremendous amount of different disasters that destroy multiple things. We need to have more people that are willing to help, not just the people made, when a disaster strikes. We also need everyone to come together as “one” so we can make it through the problems. As a society, we need to make sure that we have government support, school emergency plans, community warning systems, and we need to know how much money the damage will cost....   [tags: FEMA, emergency plans, hurricanes]
:: 4 Works Cited
1002 words
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The effects of Sea-Surface Temperatures on North Atlantic Hurricanes - The effects of Sea-Surface Temperatures on North Atlantic Hurricanes Graphics missing Abstract: Is global warming causing an increase in the number or the intensity of hurricanes. This is a question that has been on many people’s minds the past several years. Many studies have been conducted to look at the potential effects of global warming on hurricanes. This review attempts to examine three studies that all compare past changes in sea-surface temperature with changes in hurricane numbers, intensity, and power....   [tags: Global Warming Environmental Essays Papers]
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2340 words
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Causes of Natural Hazards - Hazards are possible sources of danger. Types of hazards are those such as hurricanes, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. A cause is what makes something happen and is a reason for it happening. The two types of hazards I will be outlining the causes for are hurricanes and earthquakes. A hurricane and tropical storms are cyclones. When the winds reach a constant speed of 74 miles per hour or more, it is called a hurricane. A hurricane is caused when a large mass of air is warmed up and the warm humid air begins to rise....   [tags: hurricanes and earthquakes] 1071 words
(3.1 pages)
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US Corps Preventing Floods & Hurricanes in New Orleans - Introduction In settling the area of New Orleans, the French built on high ground with a natural levee made of silt from the river. The French built levees to protect from river flooding. Landowners continued to build levees. The coastal swamp acted as a natural buffer against storms. With recurrent flooding on the Mississippi, Congress created the Mississippi River Commission. The Army Corps of Engineers were put in control. The Corps did not really have any flood experience and decided levees would be enough to control the river....   [tags: Engineering, Branch Method]
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685 words
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Comparisons Between Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina - According to the “ The handy weather answer book” by Kevin Hile a hurricane is defined as a tropical storm formed in the Atlantic Basin. Winds reach speeds of 74 miles per hour or more. Frequently, hurricanes occur during the months of summer. This allows energy to build from the warm surface of the ocean. Wind speeds, clouds, and the Coriolis effect all contribute to the formation of a hurricane (123). Hurricanes produce fierce winds. Nonetheless, it is the water that creates the most harm. “They can raise tides as high as 20 feet, and dump as much as 20 inches of rain inland,” (Douglas, 107)....   [tags: hurricane scale, tropical cyclone, storm]
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Sea Surface - Introduction: Hurricane Katrina was the costliest hurricane to make landfall in the United States of America. An estimated 80% of New Orleans was underwater and authorities reported a total of $125 billion in property damage. The storm made landfall as a category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson scale (Figure 1) with 127 mph winds on August 29th, 2005. Storm surge reached 20 feet, toppling the levees that were meant to protect New Orleans and exposing structural inadequacies. Sadly, 1836 people lost their lives as a result of the storm and more than 250,000 people were displaced from their homes (Hurricane Katrina, Graumann et al.)....   [tags: climate, hurricanes, natural disaster]
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How To Minimize Hurricane Flood Damage - Hurricanes are destructive and dangerous forces of nature that exist because of a long process involving heat, wind, and vapor. When sea water heats, it creates vapor that rises in the atmosphere as time passes. These vapors become strong winds and are classified as a hurricane when they are greater than seventy-four miles per hour (Emily, Helen, and Mohamed). According to John Roach of National Geographic, these conditions have occurred very frequently since 1995 due to an increase in the temperature of the ocean, which created more vapor, heavy rainfall, and serious hurricanes....   [tags: Hurricane Damage Essays]
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2058 words
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The History of Hurricane Katrina - The History of Hurricane Katrina On August 29, 2005, the third strongest and biggest hurricane ever recorded in American history hit the Gulf Coast at eight o’clock a.m. The interaction between a tropical depression and a tropical wave created a tropical storm later referred to as Hurricane Katrina (FAQS, 2013). Forming over the Bahamas, Hurricane Katrina gradually strengthened as it moved closer and closer to the Gulf of Mexico. Recorded on August 28th, 2005, Katrina jumped from a category three storm to a category five storm with maximum sustained winds up to 160 miles per hour....   [tags: Natural Disaster, Hurricane, New Orleans]
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1811 words
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Bush Giving Relief to those Victimized by the Hurricanes - It was perhaps the biggest breakthrough in a day of progress in the ravaged city. Also on Friday, President Bush visited Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, saying there was still a lot of work ahead for the federal government. And after returning to Washington, Bush signed a $10.5 billion disaster relief bill. The amount includes $10 billion in supplemental funds for the Federal Emergency Management Agency and $500,000 for the Pentagon for its hurricane relief work. (Full story) Earlier in the day, Bush termed the money a "down payment" and said it was just the beginning....   [tags: essays research papers] 804 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Wrath of Mother Nature: Disaster Management of Hurricane Katrina - Mother Nature is a force that can bring both great and terrible things upon humanity. Humans live out their lives in tranquility; living in environments that have stable climates suitable to raise a family or pursue careers. The Earth is truly a great place to live however, occasionally Mother Nature will show her ugly side. This ugly side just happens to be the natural disasters that affect the many people that populate planet Earth. Hurricane Katrina was one of the worst natural disasters ever recorded....   [tags: FEMA, hurricane katrina]
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The Great Hurricane of 1938 - The Great Hurricane of 1938, or known to many as the Long Island Express, was known as one of the most disastrous hurricanes to hit New England. It wasn’t the high winds, heavy rain, and high waves/storm surge that gave this hurricane its title in history. The Great Hurricane had a fourth deadly weapon; the element of surprise. It was the beginning of September, a time where many packed up their summer clothes, boarded up their houses, and left to return back to the real world leaving their summer homes behind....   [tags: Natural Disasters Hurricane Detection] 1578 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Consequences of Hurricane Katrina - Hurricane Katrina hit the southern coast of the United States on August 28, 2005. The center of Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans on the morning of August 29, 2005. The devastating effect of this hurricane resulted in more than 1,800 citizens losing their lives, as well as more than an estimated $81 billion dollars in damages occurred. By August 31, 2005, eighty-percent of the city became submerged under water because the storm surge breached the city's levees at multiple points. If the levees are damaged massive water will flood Louisiana from the Gulf Coast, the Mississippi River, and other surrounding bodies of water....   [tags: Hurricane Katrina, USA, informative] 2310 words
(6.6 pages)
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How to Track a Hurricane - ... Radars translate pulses of energy from incoming precipitation and calculate the energy that is returned through a radar receiver. There is to different ways to use radar, slow scanning mode and precipitation mode. When it comes to these slow scanning mode and precipitation mode, precipitation mode is better. While slow scanning mode is used for when there is no or little activity of precipitation or movement in the area, while precipitation mode is used for faster scan time and for active weather....   [tags: huge, devastating tropical storms]
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Hurricane Andrew: Storm of the Century - Imagine that a family is sitting at home watching a calm game of baseball, when suddenly they realize that a massive wall of water is approaching the neighborhood. Where did this flash flood come from, a reader might ask. The wall of water was made by the raging winds and immense power of Hurricane Andrew. Hurricane Andrew was the second most expensive storm in history that destroyed over 250,000 homes in the states of Florida and Louisiana alone. Hurricane Andrew was not predicted to make landfall, so when it did many civilians did not have any ideas that the Hurricane was coming until it was almost too late....   [tags: Disaster Preparedness]
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2104 words
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Hurricane Katrina: The New Orleans Levee Failures - Most of the destructions from the events of August 29th 2005, when Katrina Hit the City Of New Orleans, were not only caused by the storm itself; but also, by failure of the engineering of the levee system protecting the entire infrastructure of the city. The years of poor decision making and avoidance of the levee system led to one of the most catastrophic events in the history of the United States. Throughout our research, we have identified three key players in charge of the levee system design, construction and maintenance....   [tags: Hurricane Katrina Essays]
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1001 words
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Hurricane Katrina: Two Disasters - Hurricane Katrina: Two Disasters From the Frontline Film, The Old Man and The Storm, the life of Herbert Gettridge was followed after he returned to the 9th Ward of New Orleans to rebuild his home after it was destroyed in Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. After Hurricane Katrina, 500,000 families were displaced, 200,000 homes were destroyed, and 600 congregations were demolished (The Old Man and The Storm). This was a natural disaster of monumental proportions. Ironically though, a mock scenario was created by Louisiana State University’s Center for the Study of Public Health: Impacts of Hurricanes and FEMA, called Hurricane Pam in July of 2004....   [tags: National Disaster]
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2017 words
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Hurricane Ike - Disasters are often followed by reports of damages to the built environment—the cost of buildings, roads, bridges, electricity lines, stores, schools and hospitals. These of course follow the death toll and economic and social impacts of citizen’s lives. It was not different with Hurricane Ike whose 20 feet surge left one of the hugest damages ever. The stories of how it impacted other things for the benefit do not make much of the well-known histories. For Gene Straatmeyer a resident of Bolivar Peninsula— which was most hit by the storm, the story is not just about how destructive it was: “When I saw my house three weeks after the storm, I was glad it stood but I knew it was time for chan...   [tags: Hurricane Ike Essays]
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1406 words
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An Analysis of the Hurricane Catrina Relief Effort - In a state of national emergency, the United States government is expected to be efficient and organized. When Hurricane Katrina struck on August 25th, 2005, the United States government was not readily prepared for such an immense disaster. The mismanagement of relief efforts by the U.S. government led to a lack of adequate assistance to U.S. victims along with a prolonged restoration period for those in need. Had the government accepted more foreign aid and further prepared for the storm, hurricane Katrina may not have proved such a disaster in our nation’s history....   [tags: foreign aid, hurricane, new orleans, storm]
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3741 words
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The 1900 Hurricane in Galveston, Texas: The Storm's Influence on Current Hurricane Forecasting Techniques - Hurricanes are known to be one of the most destructive natural forces on the planet Earth. On September 8, 1900, a massive hurricane came roaring out of the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall on the bustling island city of Galveston, Texas. This unprepared city and citizens were battered by gale-force winds and tremendous swells until it was completely destroyed by dawn of the next morning. This carnage preserved this storm’s place in American History and earned it the name The Great Storm of 1900....   [tags: weather, meteorology, american history]
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1176 words
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Defining a Hurricane - Defining a Hurricane A hurricane is a tropical storm that has winds of 74 miles per hour or more. The winds can sometimes reach up to 155 miles per hour. Another characteristic of hurricanes is their massive size that measures from 200 to 300 miles in diameter. In the center of each storm there is what is called the eye of the storm (Image to Right). The eye of the storm is usaually between 20-30 miles and is the calmest part of the storm. Winds here may only be 74 miles per hour....   [tags: Papers] 902 words
(2.6 pages)
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9/11 and Hurricane Katrina Disaster Evaluation - There are numerous resources available to treat and assist victims of a disaster, these resources are available at all three levels of government, and for the most part they are easily accessible. One valuable resource found at the federal level to assist victims is the Homeland Security: 9/11 Victim Relief Funds. This fund was established in response to 9/11 terrorist attacks. It was created to assist the victims 9/11 with much needed financial support. The donations coming in were donated to over 250 charitable organizations and this made the funds easily assessable to the victims who needed them....   [tags: 9/11, Katrina, FEMA]
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1881 words
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Does Global Warming Effect Hurricane Frequency and Intensity? - In order to even begin to answer the question posed by the title of the paper we must first explore what a hurricane is and how it is formed. We must also examine what is meant by the term global warming. Firstly hurricanes are formed over warm ocean waters of at least 26.5ºC through depths of at least 45m where there is a high Coriolis Effect such as there is just north and south of the equator. (Moran, 2011) Hurricanes begin as smaller storms called tropical disturbances, if there is sufficient loss in surface air pressure coincided with a strengthening sustained wind the storm is then considered to be a tropical depression....   [tags: Environment ]
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893 words
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Does Global Warming Effect Hurricane Frequency and Intensity? - Debates over the impact of global warming on weather patterns around the globe have been the source of intense scrutiny in recent years. One such debate that has seen increased attention in the scientific community is: What impact does global warming have on hurricane frequency and intensity. Since the especially intense hurricane season in 2005 that spawned the devastating storms of “Katrina” and “Rita” this question has spawned a lot of media attention as well. However before we can even begin to answer the question posed by the title of the paper we must first explore; What is a hurricane....   [tags: Environment ]
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1478 words
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Clash with the Hurricane- Personal Narrative - Clash with the Hurricane- Personal Narrative I woke up early morning and turned on the TV. I could not see anything clearly because I did not have my glasses on. Only red flashing lights from the TV appeared in my eyes. I got up and went and put on my glasses. The red flashing lights that were coming from the TV now made sense to me. ‘BREAKING NEWS’ I used the remote controller and went and put up the volume. ‘Indestructible hurricane has blown over the Big Ben’ I could not believe what I was hearing....   [tags: Papers] 816 words
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Hurricane - “Safety in Hurricanes” Hurricanes are one of the most damaging forces of nature. These tropical storms, with possible winds speeds of over eighty miles per hour, have the potential to destroy millions…including you. Which is why I write to you, the population of Southern Florida, in hopes of informing you about the dangers of hurricanes. Many precautions have been taken in the past. Though, some safety measures are unreliable. Having the attitude of “ Oh…what are the chances of a hurricane hitting me?” or “ What are the odds of that happening to me?” will not surpass as a justification for not taking the proper precautions....   [tags: essays research papers] 525 words
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What Did Hurricane Katrina Teach Us? - Hurricane Katrina was one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes to hit the United States in decades. The economic losses were extraordinary; however, it was the human losses that stuck Americans at their core. The media brought into our homes graphic images of the destruction of New Orleans. Its mayor had ordered a mandatory evacuation of the city and yet 150,000 citizens are said to have stayed. Like most of the nation I asked myself, “Well why did they stay. If a mandatory evacuation is issued, it stands to reason that state officials considered the situation to be precarious.” It is only recently, when I’ve seen reports of New Orleans slow rebuilding, that I have really given thought...   [tags: Disaster Response] 550 words
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Hurricane Floyd - A hurricane is easily the most powerful storm that mother-nature can throw at us. Every year people who live on the coasts fight hurricanes with no dismay. A hurricane is simply too strong. Their winds reach speeds of 75 mph. The winds around the eye wall can reach 130 to 150 mph. They are 200 to 300 miles in diameter. The number of casualties is endless, as well as the widespread destruction that takes millions of dollars to repair. Even if the hurricane doesn’t cause a lot of damage, the storm surge will....   [tags: essays research papers] 1256 words
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Hurricane Katrina - Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Katrina has been one the most devastating natural disasters to hit USA ever costing a total of 125 billion dollars, and leaving almost 1000 dead. We need to look at ways of preventing such a disaster. As this is the only problem, we can predict and perceive how dangerous a hurricane can be but preventing one is a different matter entirely. The U.S. National Hurricane Centre (NHC) reported on August 23 that Tropical Depression Twelve had formed over the south-eastern Bahamas this was soon to be named hurricane Katrina, it was upgraded to a hurricane on the 25th of august, it hit land the same day lousi...   [tags: Natural Disasters Papers] 668 words
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Hurricane Katrina - Hurricanes are natural occurrences that cannot be prevented, only prepared for. The similarities between Hurricane Hugo and Katrina included their size and equally terrifying wrath. Both hurricanes were Category four, with winds that soared up to 160 miles per hour, and engendered intense flooding in the regions they hit. The adverse conditions of Hugo made it the most destructive hurricane to ever strike the United States north of Florida, and one of the costliest hurricanes with over seven billion dollars in damages....   [tags: Natural Disasters] 1268 words
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Hurricane Andrew - Hurricane Andrew Synoptic description of the disaster : On August 24th, 1992 in the state of Florida, complete destruction was the end result of Hurricane Andrew. A Hurricane that began in the Atlantic ocean at 20mph. That is almost twice the strength that normal hurricanes begin at. The peak strength of Hurricane Andrew was so strong that devices were not able to measure the winds. An approximation of the force of the winds was said to be up to 200mph. Andrew destroyed about 28,000 homes, damaged 100,000 homes and left 250,000 people homeless along with 30 billion dollars in damage and almost 30 deaths....   [tags: Papers] 608 words
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Hurricane Andrew - Hurricanes are notoriously capricious. Andrew was a compact system. A little larger system, or one making landfall just a few nautical miles further to the north, would have been catastrophic for heavily populated, highly commercialized and no less vulnerable areas to the north. That area includes downtown Miami, Miami Beach, Key Biscayne and Fort Lauderdale. Andrew also left the highly vulnerable New Orleans region relatively unscathed. Andrew moved nearly due westward when over land and crossed the extreme southern portion of the Florida peninsula in about four hours....   [tags: essays research papers] 594 words
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Hurricane Iniki - Hurricane Iniki Kauia County, Hawaii consists of the islands of Kauia and Niihau. Kauia is a 555-square-mile island with a population of about 57,000 people. Lihue, the largest city on Kauia, is home to an estimated 12,000 people. Kauia is one of the wettest spots on Earth with an annual rainfall averaging 400 inches. It has seven microclimates including desert-like conditions on the west to tropical rain forests in the interior. Many species of endangered or threatened birds reside on the island....   [tags: Papers] 1982 words
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Analysis of Dave Egger's Zeitoun - Dave Eggers’ novel Zeitoun is labeled as a work of non-fiction. It tells the story of a Syrian-American man named Abdulrahman Zeitoun, also known as Zeitoun, who chose to stay in New Orleans to ride out one of the worst natural disasters in American history, Hurricane Katrina. Zeitoun, a family man and devoted to his business stayed in the city as the hurricane approached to protect not only his home and business, but also his neighbors’ and friends’ properties. After the storm he traveled the flooded city in a secondhand canoe rescuing neighbors, caring for abandoned pets and distributing fresh water....   [tags: Hurricane Katrina, Racial Profiling]
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The Story of a Hurricane - Here is the Story of a Hurricane Planet Earth is under attack by the very entities charged with its protection. Human beings are systematically destroying the planet and are deaf to its, so far, relatively subtle warnings. When temperatures rise by just a fraction of a degree, or yearly precipitation amounts increase by just an inch or two, these changes can be imperceptible. However, when these small changes accumulate after a period of years they can result in natural disasters that are uncommon to certain geographic areas....   [tags: Meteorology] 1339 words
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The Effect of the Dream Hurricane on Island Man and Grace Nichols - The Effect of the Dream Hurricane on Island Man and Grace Nichols Spread out across the world there are many different talented people, some which happen to be poets, many which are form different cultures from us. In these cultures are many different types of people, fat, thin, white, tanned, or even the way they act or dress. However, sometimes people aren't happy with what culture they are so decide to move into a different one. This may be due to them being unhappy, like the sound of a different culture, fancy a change or even disagree with their culture....   [tags: Papers] 1585 words
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The Hurricane - Lyrical Analysis Presentation On July 17, 1966, in Paterson, NJ, Rubin “Hurricane” Carter was contending for the heavyweight boxing title, when, one night, he was pulled over and suspected of a murder. There was no evidence or witnesses to prove the Hurricane guilty, but the cops needed somebody to blame; so they fixed the trial, and Rubin received the short end of the stick. He was put away for life for a crime he didn’t commit. This is a true story. The song was written by Bob Dylan to bring Rubin’s situation to the public....   [tags: essays research papers] 940 words
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Compare how Nichols and Alvi explore the issue of identity in Hurricane - Compare how Nichols and Alvi explore the issue of identity in Hurricane Hits England and Presents From My Aunts In Pakistan In this essay I aim to compare the two poems Compare how Nichols and Alvi explore the issue of identity in “Hurricane Hits England” and “Presents From My Aunts In Pakistan” In this essay I aim to compare the two poems “Hurricane Hits England” by Grace Nichols and “Presents From My Aunts In Pakistan” by Moniza Alvi. I aim to analyse the language and structure shape of different meanings, also to see what acts as a trigger in the two poems and finally to compare the issues rose about culture....   [tags: English Literature] 1108 words
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Data Collection And Analysis Paper - Almost every year a hurricane blast through Florida and takes its toll on the business, industry and affects the lives and dollars of the company and its workers. One can ask themselves, "How do we prevent this from happening again?" This is usually what businesses and persons affected by a hurricane ask each other. What about a hospital. How would a hospital prepare for a hurricane. To complicate things more, how would a hospital prepare for a hurricane if the hospital is to operate 24 hours a day....   [tags: Hurricane Natural Disaster Data Information] 1098 words
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The Cause of the Devastation of Hurricane Katrina - The historical event of Hurricane Katrina, a category three hurricane with winds ranging from 111-130 mph, in August 2005 revealed major structural failures in the levee systems of New Orleans. Though not all structural failures are as catastrophic, the breeched levees led to loss of life, homes, businesses, highways, and left a trail of destruction that is still being repaired today. The result of this failure led to lawsuits, conspiracy theories, and court cases. Hurricane Katrina had a major effect upon our country and those results are still rippling on today....   [tags: Natural Disasters]
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Race, Hurricane Katrina, and the Aftermath - “George Bush doesn’t care about black people.” these are the words that Kanye West spoke during a Hurricane Katrina fundraising concert. Not only did the sentiment expressed with those words resonate with many Americans watching the concert that day, but observing the post Hurricane Katrina aftermath some would go a step further and argue that the United States government doesn’t care about black people. Although there were several events in the history of this country that would lead one to the same conclusion it was the disproportionate suffering and devastation experienced by African Americans in New Orleans not only during Hurricane Katrina but long after the storm had passed tha...   [tags: George Bush, African Americans, Katrina]
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The Hurricane, Directed by Norman Jewison - I have recently viewed the film ‘The Hurricane’, directed by Norman Jewison and starring Denzel Washington as Rubin ‘Hurricane’ Carter, the boxer jailed for crimes he did not commit. This emotional drama is a fantastic watch, with Rubin and his friends battling for his freedom after twenty years of unfair punishment. This film has been a hit all over the world and not only is it a great watch worth every penny but it sends out messages about believing in yourself and never giving up in what you believe....   [tags: Movie Review, Film] 1229 words
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Carter's Transformation in the Film The Hurricane - In the film "The Hurricane" directed by Norman Jewison, an interesting character was Rubin Carter. Carter is an interesting character because of the changes he goes through throughout his life in prison until he is freed in 1988. Carter is aggressive and angry at first but has developed into a calmer and wiser man when he meets Lesra, a young African-American boy inspired by Carter's story. From the time of his meeting with Lesra to the end of the film, Carter begins to realize the importance of trust and eventually, this is what sets him free....   [tags: Film Analysis, Movie Analysis] 597 words
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St. Croix and Hurricane Hugo - St. Croix, notable for being the largest island of the U.S. Territory, received the highest caliber of damage out of any other region affected by Hurricane Hugo. Forming off the coast of West Africa a week prior to September 17, 1989, residents of the Virgin Islands braced themselves for the impending doom. With limited communications on hand, few knew of the strength this particular storm was amassing as it trekked across the Atlantic, honing in on its direct target; St. Croix. Nevertheless, citizens drew together any perishable resources they could find and barricaded their doors as best as they could in the hopes it would be just another storm....   [tags: Natural Disaster, Emergency Resources] 1504 words
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Government's Responce To Hurricane Katrina - Hurricane Katrina, one of the most devastating and costly tropical cyclones to ever impact the country, ravaged the southeastern United States on August 29, 2005. New Orleans, bearing the brunt of Katrina, was in a state of chaos. Government aid did not reach the city until several days after the storm made landfall. Many people argue that this delay in government aid forced the people of New Orleans to migrate out of the city. I agree and disagree with this statement. I believe that the government had no option after the hurricane struck other than to transfer the people elsewhere, however, I believe that government aid to the city should have arrived in a much more organized and prompt man...   [tags: Government] 559 words
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Media Coverage on Hurricane Katrina - Media Coverage on Hurricane Katrina News of the devastating hurricane Katrina and its economic, political, social, and humanitarian consequences dominated global headlines in an unprecedented manner when this natural catastrophe struck the region of New Orleans in mid August 2005 (Katrinacoverage.com). As a tradition, large-scale disasters like Katrina, inevitably, bring out a combination of the best and the worst news media instincts. As such, during the height of Hurricane Katrina’s rage, many journalists for once located their gag reflex and refused to swallow shallow and misleading excuses and explanations from public officials....   [tags: natural catastrophe, American society, media]
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Hurricane Aftermath: A Strategic Approach - Hurricane Aftermath Recommendations As an industrial hygienist I would advise the incident commander that all the people involved in the mission first get basic safety and precaution training. This should be implemented by the safety supervisor who is the person responsible for programs and training. The incident commander is the person responsible for all aspect of an emergency response. Thus he should quickly develop an incident objective, manage the incident operation, apply resources, and be responsible over the people involved (King County, 2010)....   [tags: Natural Disasters]
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Like a Hurricane Book Review - In Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee two American Indians from separate tribes join together to co-author this historically thought provoking portrayal of a time in history when playing by the rules did not work when dealing with minority rights issues. Paul Chaat Smith, a Comanche and Robert Allen Warrior an Osage join forces to create an accurate account of a time when the Native American civil rights movement took center stage television and press coverage. The world watched as Indian militants, American military, and world media covered three key events, which took place in a forty-two month period beginning with the student takeover of Alcatraz in Novem...   [tags: Book Review ]
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Hurricane Sandy: Personal Narrative - Hurricane Sandy was definitely a very difficult time for everyone in the northeast region. Initially I did not realize how hard it was going to hit us, because the previous year Hurricane Irene did not have such a strong effect on my town. Of course we did not leave the house, and there were a few fallen trees, however it did not affect us like Hurricane Sandy did. ​Even though I wasn’t expecting a very severe hurricane, my parents still prepared for the worst. They requested me to come home and stay even though many of my friends were still on campus....   [tags: Environment, disaster, climate change]
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The Eye of the Hurricane - The Eye of the Hurricane Switzerland’s role as a neutral nation proved an anomaly, especially considering its geographic location in the center of mainland Europe. In the face of Nazi aggression, Switzerland deterred the threat of attack with its formidably trained military and its important economic status, since it maintained its trade with Germany. Switzerland’s struggle against fascism stemmed from its fundamental disagreement with the Nazi ideology. With a total land mass of 41,284 square kilometers, Switzerland is one of Europe’s smaller countries....   [tags: Switzerland Culture History Essays]
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Hurricane Katrina - Introduction The initial response or lack thereof, to the widespread disaster in the Gulf Coast, caused by Hurricane Katrina, demonstrated high levels of incompetence and disorganization by government officials. Images of desperate individuals awaiting rescue on their rooftops, and masses of people packed together in deplorable conditions in the Super Dome, circulated the globe. There was no hiding from the painful reality and the obvious inaction or inability of those responsible to care for these individual in the wake of this catastrophe....   [tags: Natural Disaster, FEMA] 2601 words
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Hurricane Katrina - On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina forced its way into New Orleans, Louisiana with winds of more than 140 mph. This storm was a strong category three when it hit New Orleans. Hurricane Katrina destroyed homes, businesses, and factories from the high winds and flooding. The devastation that the city suffered was terrible; many people lost family members young and old and also their most prized possessions. Most of all it displaced families and caused an abundance of damage to properties. Due to the costly destruction that the city of New Orleans faced after Katrina, they must now find a way to alleviate the blighted properties from their environment and also face the challenges....   [tags: new orleans, louisiana, environment]
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Catasteophic Disaster Caused by Hurricane Katrina - Hurricane Katrina will always be remembered for the devastation it caused, my close friends, the Adams family knows this better than anyone else. My family has been close friends with the Adams for nearly my whole life; being from Louisiana they were incredibly passionate about helping others. Several of the Adams relatives live in Louisiana, including their parents on the father’s side. The parents live just twenty minutes south of New Orleans on a small farm. During Hurricane Katrina, when the levees were breached, water flooded the town and their farm....   [tags: storm, vast destruction, victms]
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Cause of Destruction and Plans to Rebuild after Katrina - In August of 2005, Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, leaving its signature of destruction form Louisiana all the way to Florida. The hardest hit area and the greatest catastrophe was in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. For many years the people of New Orleans had feared that one day a hurricane would drown their city with its storm surge. Katrina brought that nightmare storm surge and flooded the city. Yet the New Orleans levees system and flood control was the major cause of flooding, due to the inadequate repair and maintenance failure, incompletion of the levee system, and engineering designs based on outdated scientific data....   [tags: Hurricane Katrina New Orleans Essays Papers]
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Hurricane Katrina: A Man-made Disaster - At 7:10 EDT on August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina made landfall, etching lasting memories of those living in and around the New Orleans, Louisiana. It was this day that Hurricane Katrina came ashore and caused what was to be thought as one of the “most destructive storm in terms of economic losses” ("Hurricane Katrina —," 2007) of all times. Who was to be blamed for the failure in emergence management response and preparation, no one seemed to know or understand. Those left in the wake of this disaster could only stand by and wonder who was at fault, what preparation were to be in place and why wasn’t there a quicker response to help the hundreds of thousands that needed immediate aid and dis...   [tags: Emergency Management Essays]
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