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Your search returned 200 essays for "handmaid tale":
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A Handmaid's Tale - A Handmaid's Tale A new society is created by a group of people who strengthen and maintain their power by any means necessary including torture and death. Margaret Atwood's book, A Handmaid's Tale, can be compared to the morning after a bad fight within an abusive relationship. Being surrounded by rules that must be obeyed because of being afraid of the torture that will be received. There are no other choices because there is control over what is done, who you see and talk to, and has taken you far away from your family....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 1650 words
(4.7 pages)
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Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale - I Tell, Therefore I Am In Margaret Atwood’s, The Handmaid’s Tale, women are subjected to unthinkable oppression. Practically every aspect of their life is controlled, and they are taught to believe that their only purpose is to bear children for their commander. These “handmaids” are not allowed to read, write or speak freely. Any type of expression would be dangerous to the order of the Gilead’s strict society. They are conditioned to believe that they are safer in this new society. Women are supposedly no longer exploited or disrespected (pornography, rape, etc.) as they once were....   [tags: Margaret Atwood The Handmaid's Tale] 878 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Handmaid's Tale and Family Values - The Handmaid's Tale and Family Values In the olden days, religion and politics went hand in hand. The church either ran the land or had a strangle hold on the people. If the church thought there was one way to do something, one had to do as the church requested or suffer great penalty. To go against the church was to go against God, and that meant death. The king was supposed to be chosen by God to rule the people in the way he commanded. The king was the closest thing to God on earth....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 1273 words
(3.6 pages)
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Essay on the Religious Right and The Handmaid's Tale - The Religious Right and The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is set in the near future in the Republic of Gilead, formerly the United States. A religious extremist right-wing movement assassinated the president and congress and took complete control of the government. The constitution was suspended and liberties revoked. Women found themselves completely subordinated in the new regime, generally assigned to the legal care of a male "guardian." Offred, the main character of the story, was fortunate in many ways....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 568 words
(1.6 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: The Handmaid's Dystopia - The Handmaid's Dystopia "The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is a dystopia about a world where unrealistic things take place. The events in the novel could never actually take place in our reality." This is what most people think and assume, but they're wrong. Look at the world today and in the recent past, and there are not only many situations that have ALMOST become a Gilead, but places that have been and ARE Gileadean societies. We're not in Kansas any more, Dorothy. Even today there are places in the world where there is startling similarity to this fictitious dystopia....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 1495 words
(4.3 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: An Analysis - The Handmaid's Tale The novel, The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood focuses on the choices made by the society of Gilead in which the preservation and security of mankind is more highly regarded than freedom or happiness. This society has undergone many physical changes that have led to extreme psychological ramifications. I think that Ms. Atwood believes that the possibility of our society becoming as that of Gilead is very evident in the choices that we make today and from what has occured in the past....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 651 words
(1.9 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: The Struggle of Women - The Struggle of Women in The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale This is a futuristic novel that takes place in the northern part of the USA sometime in the beginning of the twenty-first century, in the oppressive and totalitarian Republic of Gilead. The regime demands high moral retribution and a virtuous lifestyle. The Bible is the guiding principle. As a result of the sexual freedom, free abortion and high increase of venereal diseases at the end of the twentieth century, many women, (and men also, but that is forbidden to say), are sterile....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 850 words
(2.4 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: The Red Motif - The Red Motif in The Handmaid's Tale In the dystopian novel "The Handmaid's Tale" written by Margaret Atwood, the recurrent appearance of the color red draws an interesting yet perverse parallel between femininity and violence. The dominant color of the novel, red is associated with all things female. However, red is also the color of blood; death and violence therefore are closely associated with women in this male-dominated ultraconservative government. We are first introduced to the color red when the narrator is describing how she gets dressed: "The red gloves are lying on the bed....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 539 words
(1.5 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: The Oppression of Women - The Oppression of Women in Handmaids Tale         Within freedom should come security. Within security should come freedom. But in Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood, it seems as though there is no in between. Atwood searches throughout the novel for a medium between the two, but in my eyes fails to give justice to a woman’s body image. Today's society has created a fear of beauty and sexuality in this image. It is as though a beautiful woman can be just that, but if at the same time, if she is intelligent and motivated within acting as a sexual being, she is thought of as exploiting herself and her body....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: Men Will be Men - Men Will be Men in The Handmaid's Tale Perhaps the most frightening aspect of Offred's world is not even its proximity, but its occasional attractiveness. The idea that women need strict protection from harm is not one espoused solely by the likes of Rush Limbaugh or Pat Buchanan, but also by women like Andrea Dworkin and Catharine MacKinnon. This protectionist variety of feminism is incorporated in the character of Offred's mother, and to a certain degree in Aunt Lydia. Offred's mother is just as harsh in her censorship of pornography as any James Dobson....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 588 words
(1.7 pages)
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Essay on Food as a Control Mechanism in Handmaid's Tale - Food as a Control Mechanism in Handmaid's Tale Food traditionally represents comfort, security, and family. We recall the traditional concept of comfort food and the large family dinners in Norman Rockwell's piece Freedom from Want. However, for many, food is also a serious, and potentially damaging, method of control. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are classic examples of psychological syndromes, related to control, that express themselves with eating disorders. Prisoners of war are denied food as the most basic method of torture and control....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 833 words
(2.4 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: Offred - Offred of The Handmaids Tale I have decided to analyze the main character Offred because she seams to feel trapped in this new society. She speaks very openly about the situation thats she's in and plays her actions very well. I will do an overall analysis of her actions. Offred is a very strange character. She follows the new rules of her society unlike her rebellious friend Moira. But you can also tell that Offred misses her family very much and she always goes back in her head to remember the past....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 545 words
(1.6 pages)
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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: Life and Times of Margaret Atwood - The Life and Times of Margaret Atwood Three Sources Cited Atwood was born in Ottawa, Ontario, on November 18, 1939. She lived in a cabin in the Canadian wilderness for most of her childhood (her father was a forest entomologist), and that is where she gained her love for books and reading - probably from boredom. She also took up writing during this time, at the age of six (Margaret Atwood). Sshe came to want ot be a writer her senior year in high school when she says, "all of a sudden a big thumb came out of the sky and touched my head and a poem was formed." Who would have thought that the young girl who lived in the woods would grow to become a prominent female writer and po...   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 1109 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Handmaid’s Tale - The Handmaid’s Tale The Handmaid’s Tale and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. draw on different narrative techniques to establish our relationship to their protagonists. Margaret Atwood allows the reader to share the thoughts of the main character, while Philip K. Dick makes the reader explore the mysteries behind the story. Atwood’s style works because she can directly show her readers what she wants. Dick’s opposing style works for him because he can present paradoxes and mysteries and let the reader form the conclusion....   [tags: Margaret Atwood The Handmaid’s Tale Essays] 1075 words
(3.1 pages)
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The United States as a Dystopian society in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid’s Tale - In the Days of Anarchy To live in a country such as the United States of America is considered a privilege. The liberties that American citizens are entitled to, as declared in the Constitution, makes the United States an attractive and envied democracy. It would be improbable to imagine these liberties being stripped from American society. However, Margaret Atwood depicts the United States as a dystopian society in her novel The Handmaid’s Tale. The first society is modern America, with its autonomy and liberal customs....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Handmaid's Tale] 1122 words
(3.2 pages)
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Rebellion in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale - Rebellion in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale "Rebels defy the rules of society, risking everything to retain their humanity. If the world Atwood depicts is chilling, if 'God is losing,' the only hope for optimism is a vision that includes the inevitability of human struggle against the prevailing order." -Joyce Johnson- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale analyzes human nature by presenting an internal conflict in Offred: acceptance of current social trends (victim mentality) -vs- resistance for the sake of individual welfare and liberties (humanity)....   [tags: Handmaids Tale] 2092 words
(6 pages)
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A Comparison of The Handmaid's Tale and Anthem - A Comparison of The Handmaid's Tale and Anthem The two novels, The Handmaid's Tale and Anthem, are both haunting, first person tales of personal hardship in a closed and controlled society. In this essay I will point out similarities and differences between the two books. There are similarities in the setting of each work, and the between the two societies in which the stories take place, as well as more important differences between the main characters. To start I would like to compare the settings of the two books....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 802 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood In every human beings life, one is given freedoms. With freedom comes responsibility, consequence following close behind. Sometimes this freedom is not freedom to do, but freedom from harm. The extreme form of this would form a Garrison mentality. A Garrison mentality is a situation in which a society protects but also confines an individual. “There is more than one kind of freedom, said Aunt Lydia. Freedom to and freedom from. In the days of anarchy, it was freedom to....   [tags: Papers] 730 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - James Fils-Aime The Handmaid’s Tale Fact or Fiction The Handmaid's Tale is a dystopian novel in which Atwood creates a world which seems absurd and near impossible. Women being kept in slavery only to create babies, cult like religious control over the population, and the deportation of an entire race, these things all seem like fiction. However Atwood's novel is closer to fact than fiction; all the events which take place in the story have a base in the real world as well as a historical precedent....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 2 Works Cited
1401 words
(4 pages)
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The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Moira is Offred's best friend. She is a part of Offred's life in all three time phases of the novel. In the "time before" they were easy-going college students together, and they meet again at the Red Center. Moira is a strong-willed woman who is not intimidated by the regime. She possesses an irreverent sense of humor and is like a breath of fresh air in the stilted, enclosed, fearful world of the Center....   [tags: Papers] 435 words
(1.2 pages)
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The Handmaids Tale - Social Situation - The Handmaids Tale - Social Situation Margaret Atwood's novel The Handmaids Tale belongs to the genre of anti-utopian (dystopian) science fiction where we read about a woman's fictive autobiography of a nightmarish United States at the end of the twentieth century when democratic institutions have been violently overthrown and replaced by the new fundamentalist republic of Gilead. In the novel the majority of the population are suppressed by using a "Bible-based" religion as an excuse for the suppression....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 972 words
(2.8 pages)
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Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood - The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale is a gripping novel about one woman's struggle through a revolution of extremism. In this society of severe military rule, her position is one of slavery were she is used for breeding. She is under constant surveillance and any miscue she makes can result in death. We follow her along this path as she meets different characters, goes through daring situations, and reflects on her former life. The thing about the novel that is so striking is seeing all the human emotions and the characters adapt in the most inhumane of times....   [tags: Atwood Handmaid's Tale] 1156 words
(3.3 pages)
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The Handmaids Tale - The Handmaids Tale In Margaret Atwoods novel, "The Handmaids Tale", the birth rate in the United States had dropped so low that extremists decided to take matters into their own hands by killing off the government, taking over themselves, and reducing the womens role in society to that of a silent birthing machine. One handmaid describes what happened and how it came about as she, too, is forced to comply with the new order. Before the new order, known as the Sons of Jacob, took over, women had a lot to be afraid of....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 1533 words
(4.4 pages)
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Nineteen Eighty-Four and The Handmaid's Tale - Utopias and Dystopias Nineteen Eighty-Four - George Orwell The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood These two novels are dystopian tales about the possible future for the human race. Both have people totally controlled by the society in which they live. Nineteen Eighty-Four was written in 1948 when the two world wars were still fresh in everybody's minds, also people were well aware of totalitarian states due to publicity about places under dictatorship rule such as Nazi Germany. The Handmaid's Tale was written in 1987 and features a dystopia in which women have had all of their rights removed....   [tags: English Literature] 898 words
(2.6 pages)
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Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood This novel is an account of the near future; a dystopia, where pollution and radiation has rendered countless women sterile, and the birth rates of North America are dangerously declining. A puritan theocracy now controls the former United States called the Republic of Gilead and Handmaids are recruited to repopulate the state. This novel contains Atwood’s strong sense of social awareness, as seen in the use of satire to comment on different social conditions in the novel....   [tags: Papers] 937 words
(2.7 pages)
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Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale - Offred’s Lost of Identity The main character of this book is Offred, one of the faceless many of the new Republic of Gilead. Each day she is removed farther and farther from her true self, to a complete no one. Expected to feel nothing, think nothing, and want nothing, she is used only as an instrument to bear children. Throughout the book, the narrator often speaks with a numbed tone despite all the horrifying ordeals she has seen and experienced. Although her offhand comment to herself are presented in a slight bitter and humorous manner, she must learn to hide this from others in order to survive....   [tags: essays research papers] 515 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - The role of a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead is ultimately to breed, and nothing more. Cooped up in a nondescript room with nothing but her own thoughts and painful memories for company, the narrator, Offred, shows many signs of retreating further and further into her own world, and becoming slowly more unstable throughout the course of the novel as her terrible new life continues. The most common and by far the most disturbing example of this is the use of imagery and symbolism in the book....   [tags: essays research papers] 1307 words
(3.7 pages)
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Comparing the Rights of the Individual in Handmaid's Tale and Invisible Man - Rights of the Individual in Handmaid's Tale and Invisible Man   The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood, and Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison, are two novels which use an essentially "invisible" central character to comment on the manipulative power society holds over people, destroying the individual. Offred, the protagonist of The Handmaid's Tale, and the narrator of Invisible Man are both invisible as individuals and are manipulated by society to become a dehumanized natural resource. The authors of these two works use the protagonist to criticize society's use of certain groups of people only as resources to reach a goal, ignoring the individuality of these people....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
985 words
(2.8 pages)
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Comparing Brave New World and Handmaid's Tale - Comparison and Contrast between Brave New World and Handmaid's Tale The government in Huxley's Brave New World and Atwood's Handmaid's Tale, both use different methods of obtaining control over individuals, but are both similar in the fact that humans are looked at as instruments. Human's bodies, in both novels, are looked at as objects and not directly as living things with feelings. In both societies the individuals have very little and are controlled strictly by the government....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 932 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Importance and Presentation of Moira in A Handmaid's Tale - Moira is presented through Offred as the novel is written in first person narrative. The readers get a very biased view of Moira because we only got Offreds view of Moira. This is important because this makes offred "feel safer knowing that Moira is here." When offred is in the Jezebels she spots Moira who had escaped. "I'm willing so hard, she must look at me...before she disappears." Moira was Offreds only friend. Although Moira is presented in her own voice as she is describing how she escaped....   [tags: American Literature] 440 words
(1.3 pages)
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Abuse of Religion in The Handmaid’s Tale - Abuse of Religion in The Handmaid’s Tale Gilead is a society where religion is used to control people. Atwood has included many Biblical references and religious suggestions throughout ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ to demonstrate this. The name ‘Gilead’ is a place in the Old Testament which is named after a mountainous region East of Jordan which means ‘heap of stones’. This links in with patriarch Jacob and the prophet Jeremiah. It was a frontier land and a place where a country was at war so protected its boarders....   [tags: Papers] 955 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Handmaid’s Tale : A Product Of Debates - The Handmaid’s Tale : A Product Of Debates Often times a reader finds that a character in a novel resembles the author’s friend or a distant relative. There is almost always some connection to the author, his surroundings, or events in his life. The Handmaid’s Tale reflects the life of Margaret Atwood on a much stronger level. It is a product of debates within the feminist movement of the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. Atwood has been much a part of that movement. The defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, the rise of the religious right, the election of Ronald Regan and many other historical events led writers like Atwood to fear the antifeminist movements....   [tags: Free Essay Writer] 842 words
(2.4 pages)
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Comparing The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood and Anthem by Ayn Rand - Comparing The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood and Anthem by Ayn Rand The two novels, ‘The Handmaid's Tale’ and ‘Anthem‘, are both haunting, first person tales of personal hardship in a closed and controlled society. In this essay I will point out many important similarities and differences between the two books, mainly the setting and the similarities between the two societies in which the stories take place, as well as more important differences between the main characters....   [tags: Papers] 642 words
(1.8 pages)
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Comparing the Escape Theme in Raise the Red Lantern, Handmaid's Tale, and Doll's House - Raise the Red Lantern, The Handmaid's Tale, A Doll's House: Freedom Through Escape Women have suffered as the result of harassment and discrimination for centuries. Today, women are able to directly confront their persecutors through the news media as well as the legal system. Three important literary works illustrate that it has not always been possible for women to strike back. In Raise the Red Lantern, The Handmaid's Tale, and A Doll's House, the main female characters find ways to escape their situations rather than directly confronting the problem....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 824 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Handmaid’s Tale Freedom To and Freedom From - The Handmaid’s Tale Freedom To and Freedom From In “the time before”, Gilead had become a place where “women were not protected”. Gilead was very unsafe and percussions had to be taken. For example women were told not to open their door to a stranger even if they said it was the police (ID’s had to be slid underneath the door), they were told not to stop and help a motorist ‘pretending’ to be in trouble and not to “go into a laundromat at night, alone.” This shows that the society of Gilead as a whole had become very cautious....   [tags: English Literature] 603 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Handmaid's Tale: Offred Chapters 1 to 4 - The story starts with a woman reflecting on her past (Offred), she has been living in an army-based camp with other girls. She starts with describing the history of the room where she is now based, talking (in detail) about old surroundings which have now gone to pass. She describes the changing of room quite distinctively; a quote to support this could be `old sex in the room and loneliness, and expectation, of something without a shape or name.' This suggests that any cheerful moment in this room has been a really long time ago, or that's what it seems....   [tags: World Literature] 827 words
(2.4 pages)
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Offred's Struggle to Maintain Control Over Her Own Life in The Handmaid's Tale - How Effectively Does Atwood Present Offred's Struggle to Establish/Maintain Control Over Her Own Life/Identity The Handmaids Tale is a woman's autobiographical narrative that challenges the absolute authority of Gilead, highlighting the significance of story telling as an act of resistance against oppression, thereby making a particular kind of individual political statement. Such as when Offred steals the butter from the dinner table to use as hand and face cream. " There's a pat of butter on the side of the plate....   [tags: English Literature] 1160 words
(3.3 pages)
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Comparing Dystopian Dream of Brave New World, The Handmaid’s Tale and GATTACA - The Dystopian Dream of Brave New World, The Handmaid’s Tale and GATTACA   In Utilitarianism, John Stuart Mill writes that “it is better to be a human being dissatisfied than a pig satisfied.” By this he meant there are qualitative degrees of satisfaction and if to be satisfied we’re lowered in status to that of a pig, it’s better for us to be dissatisfied humans. The film GATTACA and the books Brave New World and The Handmaid’s Tale create fictional places where the needs and desires of humans are met, but not as well as they should be and not without a price....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 3033 words
(8.7 pages)
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Comparing Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Laurence's The Fire-Dwellers - Loss of Identity in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Margaret Laurence's The Fire-Dwellers The protagonists in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Margaret Laurence’s The Fire-Dwellers are very different in character.  However, both of these women lose their identity due to an outside influence.  In each of the books, we see the nature of the lost identity, the circumstances which led to this lost identity, and the consequences which occurred as a result of this lost identity.              In The Handmaid’s Tale our main character, Offred, has her whole world stolen away by the government of Gilead.  This new society is sexually repressed and is founded by rel...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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2469 words
(7.1 pages)
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The Soviet Government, Gilead of The Handmaid’s Tale and Oceania of 1984 - Though the rewards are pleasing to the ear, the path to obtaining the benefits of communism is a violent one. This strict governing idea was derived from Communist Manifesto, a book written by two German economists, Karl Marx and Fredrich Engels, who declare that many problems in society are caused by the unequal distribution of wealth. These two believe that “Communism deprives no man of the ability to appropriate the fruits of his labour. The only thing it deprives him of is the ability to enslave others by means of such appropriations.” To achieve the goal of happiness and prosperity for all, the lines that distinguish the differences between the rich and poor must be erased....   [tags: Communism Essays] 1636 words
(4.7 pages)
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Cameron’s The Terminator and Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale as Responses to Neo-conservatism - From abortion to pornography, the “war on drugs” to the end of the Cold War, the 1980s played host to considerable controversy; amidst such political uneasiness, then, it seems that Reagan Era rejuvenated middle-America’s latent conservatism. This return to the traditional Puritan values of the “nuclear family” also sponsored heightened State intervention and policing of the private sphere, thereby buttressing cultural myths of the dangerous, unknown “Other”. As such a fear of the Other was socially perpetuated, it seemed the responsibility of liberal-minded skeptics to note such propaganda as an alarming preparation for totalitarianism....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1619 words
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Handmaids Tale - The aim of the indoctrination centres is clearly shown by the quote: "Some women believed there would be no future, they thought the world would explode. That was the excuse they used, says Aunt Lydia. They said there was no sense in breeding. Aunt Lydia's nostrils narrow: such wickedness. They were lazy women, she says. They were sluts. . . . They made mistakes, says Aunt Lydia. We don't intend to repeat them. Her voice is pious, condescending, the voice of those whose duty it is to tell us unpleasant things for our own good....   [tags: Margaret Atwood] 944 words
(2.7 pages)
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Handmaids Tale - Handmaids Tale In what ways can The Handmaid&rsquos Tale be considered a feminist novel. The Handmaid&rsquos Tale is narrated by an oppressed woman, so it is to be expected that feminism becomes a recurring theme. Women have no rights or money unless they have a valid marriage to a man. They are given few options&ndash if they are fertile they can become sex slaves&ndash&lsquo womb on legs&rsquo to Commanders or choose to go to the colonies. Infertile women or&lsquo unwomen&rsquo are seen as having no use so they automatically go to the colonies where they will die from disease or radiation....   [tags: essays papers] 1716 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Lover's Tale - The Lover's Tale Whan that the goode Wif of Bathe hadde hir tale ytold, with ful light herte thought she, “Whan that I go again from Canterbury, Sekirly shalle I have a soper at the cost of alle.” Anoon a yonge lovere saide in parfit Englisch, “Lordings, now leten me tell the tale of most solas and best sentence.” The young lover paused for a moment: “Surely the tale would be much more enjoyable if we stop with all the Middle English.” The pilgrims nodded in agreement, wondering why they had not decided upon this earlier, and the lover continued, “Now, permit me to tell the most pleasant and meaningful tale.” “In the days of old, during the ti...   [tags: The Lover's Tale Chaucer Canterbury Tales Essays]
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The Tale of the Pardoner in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - A Look at the Pardoner: the Genius of Chaucer The Canterbury Tales is a literary masterpiece in which the brilliant author Geoffrey Chaucer sought out to accomplish various goals. Chaucer wrote his tales during the late 1300’s. This puts him right at the beginning of the decline of the Middle Ages. Historically, we know that a middle class was just starting to take shape at this time, due to the emerging commerce industry. Chaucer was able to see the importance and future success of the middle class, and wrote his work with them in mind....   [tags: Pardoner's Tale] 1940 words
(5.5 pages)
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The Power of Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale - The Power of The Winter's Tale        Many of Shakespeare's later plays broke with customs of genre. The Merchant of Venice has all the elements of a comedy, but deals with very grave matters and ends ambiguously. Pericles foreshadows the novel in its romantic plot and use of narration. Such plays challenged prevalent Renaissance literary theory which demanded fairly strict adherence to classical values of realism and unity. The Winter's Tale is a self-conscious violation of these expectations, and a jibe at the assumptions behind them....   [tags: Shakespeare Winter's Tale Essays]
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1968 words
(5.6 pages)
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An Analysis of A Tale of Two Cities - An Analysis of A Tale of Two Cities By reading the novel A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, it gives us an understanding of the French Revolutionary War that cannot be found in textbooks. By reading between the lines, each of the characters represents the stirring emotions and reactions of the people that were affected by the War. Lucie Manett, who later becomes Lucie Darnay, is a tender and affectionate loving person. She is a very virtuous woman who reaches out to all human beings in need of love....   [tags: Tale Two Cities Essays] 464 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Narrator in The Tell-Tale Heart - The Narrator in The Tell-Tale Heart Through the first person narrator, Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" illustrates how man's imagination is capable of being so vivid that it profoundly affects people's lives. The manifestation of the narrator's imagination unconsciously plants seeds in his mind, and those seeds grow into an unmanageable situation for which there is no room for reason and which culminates in murder. The narrator takes care of an old man with whom the relationship is unclear, although the narrator's comment of "For his gold I had no desire" (Poe 34) lends itself to the fact that the old man may be a family member whose death would monetarily benefit t...   [tags: Tell-Tale Heart Essays] 883 words
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Resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities - Resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities During a time of lost hope, death and war, the `golden thread', Lucie Manette plays the roll of a heroine doing everything she can to make sure the important people in her life are loved. Lucie provides not only warmth toward her father, Dr. Manette, but also towards the man that yearns for Lucie's love; Sydney Carton. Despite all the negativity that surrounds Lucie and her loved ones, she doesn't fail to lead her father and Carton to rebirth. Unlike the process of actual birth, rebirth is associated with rejuvenation....   [tags: Tale Two Cities Essays] 1007 words
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A Tale of Two Cities - Free A Tale of Two Cities Essays - Sydney Carton and Charles Darney Sydney Carton and Charles Darney were alike in certain ways but completely different in other ways. Some of their characteristics were very similar while others were unlike. Carton was an attorney’s assistant who lived in Paris while Darney was a teacher who lived in London. They both had intangibles about them that you just couldn’t put your finger on. These similarities and differences helped develop Dickens’s theme. Though there were some similarities between Sydney and Charles there were not that many....   [tags: Tale Two Cities Essays] 505 words
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Handmaids Tale Vs. Fire Dwelle - In the two books Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and Margaret Laurence’s The Fire Dweller’s, the protagonists are very different in character. However, both of these women lost their identity due to an outside influence. In each of the books we see the nature of the lost identity, the circumstances which led to this lost identity and the consequences which occurred as a result of this lost identity. In the book The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood our main character (Offred) has had her whole world stolen away by the government of Gilead....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Pardoner’s Tale of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - The Canterbury Tales - The Pardoner’s Tale  One might assume that the person telling the story has a lot to do with the story they're telling.  This is the case in the Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales." In the tale of "The Pardoner's", the voice tells a tale dealing with his famous preach; "Radix malorum est Cupiditas."  In English, "The root of all evil is Greed." An ironic distinction can be made with what a "Pardoner" is known to be, the character (the voice/Pardoner), and the tale that he tells....   [tags: Pardoner's Tale] 449 words
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Summary and Analysis of The Squire's Tale - Summary and Analysis of The Squire's Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Epilogue to the Merchant's Tale and Prologue to the Squire's Tale: The Host laments the Merchant's tale, praying that he would never find such a terrible wife. The Host admits that he also has a wife that he laments marrying. He advises the Squire to tell a tale next. The Squire's Tale is not complete, ending after only six hundred lines. The Squire's Tale: The Squire tells the tale of Cambyuskan, the king of Sarai in Tartary. With his wife Elpheta he had two sons, Algarsyf and Cambalo, and a daughter Canacee....   [tags: Canterbury Tales The Squire's Tale Essays] 604 words
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Summary and Analysis of The Prioress' Tale - Summary and Analysis of The Prioress' Tale (The Canterbury Tales) The Prioress' Tale: The Prioress tells a tale set in an Asian town dominated by the Jewry in which usury and other things hateful to Christ occurred. The Christian minority in the town opened a school for their children in this city. Among these children was a widow's son, an angelic seven year old who was, even at his young age, deeply devoted to his faith. At school he learned a song in Latin, the Alma redemptoris, and asked the meaning of it....   [tags: Canterbury Tales The Prioress' Tale Essays] 716 words
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Summary and Analysis of The Summoner's Tale - Summary and Analysis of The Summoner's Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Prologue to the Summoner's Tale: The Summoner was enraged by the tale that the Friar told. He claims in response to the Friar that friars and fiends are one and the same. He tells that a friar once was brought to hell by an angel and remarked that he saw no friars there. However, Satan lifted his tail and thousands of friars came out from his ass and swarmed around hell. Analysis The Summoner becomes insane with anger upon hearing the Friar's Tale, which, although it was told with great vitriol against summoners, had a measured manner and refrained from personal attacks....   [tags: Canterbury Tales The Summoner's Tale Essays] 1046 words
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - The Modern and Mediaeval Merchant's Tale - The Modern and Mediaeval Merchant's Tale   "The Merchant's Prologue and Tale" is mainly concerned with the infidelity of May while she is married to Januarie. Infidelity is undoubtedly a popular topic for discussion in modern times and is often the subject of magazine or television stories. Despite the concern with marriage and the status of men and women within such a relationship keeping the story applicable to the audience even more than 600 years later, there are many elements of the Prologue and Tale which root them in a mediaeval context....   [tags: The Merchant's Tale] 960 words
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Summary and Analysis of The Monk's Tale - Summary and Analysis of The Monk's Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Prologue to the Monk's Tale: When the tale of Melibee ended, the Host said that he'd give up a barrel of ale to have his wife hear the tale of Prudence and her patience, for she is an ill-tempered woman. The Host asks the narrator his name, and attempts to guess his profession ­ perhaps a sexton or other such officer, or a wily governor. The Monk will tell the next tale, a series of tragedies. Analysis Chaucer uses the prologue to the Monk's Tale as one more opportunity for satiric, self-referential comedy....   [tags: Canterbury Tales The Monk's Tale Essays] 944 words
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Essay on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Sin in The Pardoner's Tale - Importance of Sin in The Pardoner's Tale There are seven deadly sins that, once committed, diminish the prospect of eternal life and happiness in heaven. They are referred to as deadly because each sin is closely linked to another, leading to other greater sins. The seven deadly sins are pride, envy, anger, sloth, gluttony, avarice, and lechery. Geoffrey Chaucer's masterpiece, The Canterbury Tales, provided an excellent story about the deadly sins. Focusing mainly on the sins of pride, gluttony and greed, the characters found in The Canterbury Tales, particularly The Pardoner's Tale, were so overwhelmed by their earthly desires and ambitions that they failed to see the effe...   [tags: Pardoner's Tale] 774 words
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Essay on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Power of the Pardoner's Tale - The Power of the Pardoner's Tale       Geoffrey Chaucer was a author of the 12th century.  Chaucer is known as the father of English poetry.  He wrote Canterbury Tales which is a collection of narrative short stories written in verse.  "The Pardoners Tale" is among the more popular of these varied tales.  It is told by a pardoner who uses the story to preach against those who are blastfamous and gluttonous.  In an odd twist, after he tells the story he trys to sell others counterfiet relics.  In this short story about greed, disrespect and death Chaucer utilizes three important literary tools personification, irony, and symbolism....   [tags: Pardoner's Tale]
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A Tale of Two Cities Essays: A Sad Tale Of Two Cities - A Tale Of Two Cities The focus of A Tale Of Two Cities concerns the impetus and fervor of 18th century European socio-political turmoil, its consequences, and what Dickens presents as the appropriate response of an enlightened aristocracy and just citizenry. The tale opens with Dr. Manettte having spent the last 18 years of his life in the Bastille - innocent of all crimes save his disdain for the base actions of a French Marquis. The heinous nature of his confinement induced a madness remedied only by the devoted love of his Lucie....   [tags: Tale Two Cities Essays] 655 words
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Knight's Tale - In his prologue, Chaucer introduces all of the characters who are involved in this fictional journey and who will tell the tales. One of the most interesting of the characters introduced is the Knight. Chaucer refers to the Knight as “a most distinguished man” and, indeed, his sketch of the Knight is highly complimentary. Another Knight seen in the “Canterbury Tales” is the rapist knight in the Wife of Bath’s Tale, who is not a very noble knight and doesn’t follow a chivalric code. This knight seems more realistic as opposed to the stereotypical ideal knight that Chaucer describes in the Prologue....   [tags: Chaucer Knight's Tale Essays] 1039 words
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The Red Symbol in The Handmaid's Tale - In the dystopian novel, "The Handmaid's Tale" written by Margaret Atwood, the color red is a reoccurring, significant symbol throughout the book. The dominant color of the novel, the color red is paired with the Handmaids. The Handmaids are always seen in their red uniform, even down to their red shoes and red gloves. From the opening pages of the novel we are informed that they are trained at the “Red Centre,” and we are introduced to the importance of the red imagery as Offred, the narrator and protagonist of the novel, describes herself getting dressed: “The red gloves are lying on the bed....   [tags: Literature, Margaret Atwood] 1155 words
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Power in The Handmaid's Tale - Power in The Handmaid's Tale As you read through the handmaid’s tale you see the relationships of the characters develop and the fight for power, however small that glimpse of power may be. The images of power can be seen through out the novel, but there are major parts that stand out to the reader from the aunt’s in the training centre to the secret meetings between the Commander and Offred. The first we see of the struggles of power between people is when the novel opens and we first see the aunts of the red centre with their electric cattle prods and their stern moral teaching and their stern looks....   [tags: Papers] 1127 words
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Offred's Narrative in The Handmaid's Tale - Offred's Narrative in The Handmaid's Tale "Writing is an act of faith; I believe it's also an act of hope, the hope that things can be better than they are" MargaretAtwood Offred is an oppressed woman in the patriarchal society of Gilead. She is telling her story to an unknown reader. We learn about Offred through her own personal private thoughts....   [tags: Papers] 611 words
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Character Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale - Character Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale Moira ===== We first meet Moira "breezing into" (P65) Offred's room at college. She is the breath of fresh air. As Offred says, "She always made me laugh" (P66). One of her roles is to bring humour to the reader, to lighten the situation and contrast with the horror of the Gileadean regime. An example of this is when Moira changes the hymn "There is a Balm in Gilead" to "There is a Bomb in Gilead" (P230). Margaret Atwood uses imagery to illustrate the role of Moira's humour in giving hope to the handmaidens....   [tags: Papers] 746 words
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The Satire of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale - The Handmaid's Tale has been described as a scathing satire and a dire warning. Which elements of our own society is Margaret atwood satirising and how does her satire work . Atwood tries to open our eyes by satirising our society with a brilliant contrasting novel. Dystopian in every way, the reader encounters a world in which modern values of our society seem/ are replaceable. Showing the worst of all possible outcomes, she demonstrates that our primarily heartless, just economical thinking could bring the downfall of our society....   [tags: literary genre, Satirical] 505 words
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Personal Discovery of the Protagonist in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale - In a world where women have no freedom, it is essential to discover one’s self. Margaret Atwood portrays this idea in The Handmaid’s Tale. The protagonist, Offred, is an imprisoned Handmaid in this new world of the Republic of Gilead and has to rediscover her own past for the benefit for finding herself. There are various moments in this book when Offred is reminded of her past. When this happens, it helps herdiscoverer herself a little more. This is hard for her considering the fact that the new government says it is a sin to remember anything from the past life....   [tags: Past Life, New Government]
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The Presentation of the Commander in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - The Presentation of the Commander in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood The commander can be seen as a man torn between two worlds, he was one of the founders of Gilead yet still enjoys and yearns for the pleasures of the old society he managed to break. It can be seen as ' he has made his bed and now he must sleep in it'. The commander is cool and collected on the surface but underneath he is bitter and corrupted for the world he has managed to create. I believe the commander secretly longs for the world to be as it once was and this is why he savours his time with Offred because she may remind him of life before Gilead; it is also ironic how both these char...   [tags: Papers] 485 words
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Handmaids Tale - Does the women of Gilead know that they are being controlled. Are the women of Gilead aware that they are being controlled by the society. In Margaret Atwood¡¯s The Handmaid¡¯s Tale, the theme of control is a very important factor of the book. In the story, at the Republic of Gilead, the women are being controlled by the society to do what the society wants them to do. The handmaids are brainwashed before they start working for the society. But since the brainwashing happens so naturally over a period of time, the handmaids don¡¯t fully realize that they have been brainwashed by the society to do what the society wants them to do....   [tags: essays research papers] 574 words
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The Importance of the Japanese Tourists in Chapter Five of The Handmaids Tale - The Importance of the Japanese Tourists in Chapter Five of The Handmaids Tale The Japanese tourists presented in chapter five may only cover a page and a half in the novel, however, this passage should not be underestimated as the tourists importantly act as a subtle representation of everything that the Handmaids have been stripped of, most importantly their freedom. The way in which the author introduces the reader to the tourists is notably intriguing: 'A group of people is coming towards us....   [tags: Papers] 688 words
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Memories of Life Before Government Control: Orwell's 1984, Atwood's The Handmaids Tale, and Huxley's Brave New World - Overbearing governments can change every aspect of society but people’s memories and their stories of the past cannot be completely altered to forget what life was like. Society uses these memoires to compare it to the new way of ruling which sometimes is less favorable to the individual. Governments try to change people’s opinions of reality which proves to be impossible. Within the novels, 1984 by George Orwell, The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley the Governments have taken society's freedom away and all that remains are the memories of what life was like before the changes; the main characters are constantly using the past as a way to survive through...   [tags: Literary Comparison, Term Paper] 1109 words
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Summary and Analysis of The Physician's Tale - Summary and Analysis of The Physician's Tale (The Canterbury Tales) The Physician's Tale: As Titus Livius tells us, there was once a knight called Virginius who had many friends, much wealth, and a loving wife and daughter. The daughter possessed a beauty so great that even Pygmalion could not create her equal. She was also humble in speech and avoided events in which her virtue could be compromised. There was a judge, Appius who governed the town who saw the knight's daughter, and lusted after her....   [tags: Canterbury Tales The Physician's Tale Essays] 456 words
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Summary and Analysis of The Manciple's Tale - Summary and Analysis of The Manciple's Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Prologue to the Manciple's Tale: The Host asks the Cook to tell the next tale, but the Cook is drunk and incoherent. The Manciple agrees to tell a tale in his place and criticizes the Cook for his boorish behavior. The drunken Cook, angry at the Manciple, attempts to get on his horse, but is too unsteady and falls off. He then tries to fight the Manciple, but fails. The Host warns the Manciple that he is foolish to so openly criticize the Cook, for he will eventually get his revenge....   [tags: Canterbury Tales The Manciple's Tale Essays] 526 words
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The Handmaid's Tale - In Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaids Tale’, we hear a transcribed account of one womans posting ‘Offred’ in the Republic of Gilead. A society based around Biblical philosophies as a way to validate inhumane state practises. In a society of declining birth rates, fertile women are chosen to become Handmaids, walking incubators, whose role in life is to reproduce for barren wives of commanders. Older women, gay men, and barren Handmaids are sent to the colonies to clean toxic waste. Fear is power. Fear is ever-present in Gilead; it is implemented through violence and force....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale Essays]
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Interpreting The Handmaid's Tale - Interpreting The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale is distinguished by its various narrative and structural divisions. It contains four different levels of narrative time: the pre-Revolution past, the time of the Revolution itself, the Gileadean period, and the post-Gileadean period (LeBihan 100). In addition, the novel is divided into two frames, both with a first person narrative. Offred's narrative makes up the first frame, while the second frame is provided by the Historical Notes, a transcript of a lecture given by a Cambridge professor....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 623 words
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Essay on A Society of Oppression in A Handmaid's Tale - A Society of Oppression in A Handmaid's Tale      As the saying goes, 'history repeats itself.' If one of the goals of Margaret Atwood was to prove this particular point, she certainly succeeded in her novel A Handmaid's Tale. In her Note to the Reader, she writes, " The thing to remember is that there is nothing new about the society depicted in The Handmaiden's Tale except the time and place. All of the things I have written about ...have been done before, more than once..." (316). Atwood seems to choose only the most threatening, frightening, and atrocious events in history to parallel her book by--specifically the enslavement of African Americans in the United States....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]
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Essay on The Handmaid's Tale as a Warning to Society - The Handmaid's Tale as a Warning to Society Margaret Atwood's renowned science fiction novel, The Handmaid's Tale, was written in 1986 during the rise of the opposition to the feminist movement. Atwood, a Native American, was a vigorous supporter of this movement. The battle that existed between both sides of the women's rights issue inspired her to write this work. Because it was not clear just what the end result of the feminist movement would be, the author begins at the outset to prod her reader to consider where the story will end....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays] 934 words
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Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood In Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Offred recounts the story of her life and that of others in Gilead, but she does not do so alone. The symbolic meanings found in the dress code of the women, the names/titles of characters, the absence of the mirror, and the smell and hunger imagery aid her in telling of the repugnant conditions in the Republic of Gilead. The symbols speak with a voice of their own and in decibels louder than Offred can ever dare to use....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays Atwood ]
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The Handmaid's Tale - The Handmaid's Tale Serena Joy is the most powerful female presence in the hierarchy of Gileadean women; she is the central character in the dystopian novel, signifying the foundation for the Gileadean regime. Atwood uses Serena Joy as a symbol for the present dystopian society, justifying why the society of Gilead arose and how its oppression had infiltrated the lives of unsuspecting people. Atwood individualises the character of Serena Joy, as her high status in the society demands power and the domination over the inferior members of the Commander’s household, such as Offred – a handmaid....   [tags: English Literature Essays] 939 words
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The Handmaid's Tale - In Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaids Tale’, we hear a transcribed account of one womans posting ‘Offred’ in the Republic of Gilead. A society based around Biblical philosophies as a way to validate inhumane state practises. In a society of declining birth rates, fertile women are chosen to become Handmaids, walking incubators, whose role in life is to reproduce for barren wives of commanders. Older women, gay men, and barren Handmaids are sent to the colonies to clean toxic waste. Fear is power. Fear is ever-present in Gilead; it is implemented through violence and force....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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