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Your search returned over 400 essays for "federalism"
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United States Government and Federalism - Over the last two centuries the United States has grappled with the idea of federalism. While former President James Madison had a very concrete understanding of that form of governance, “In the compound republic of America, the power surrendered by the people is first divided between two distinct governments, and then portion allotted to each subdivided among distinct and separate departments” (Madison, 1788, p. 67), the United States has never had a conclusive division of power between the state and the US Federal Governments....   [tags: Federalism, Division of Power] 1462 words
(4.2 pages)
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The United States and Federalism - Federalism can be seen as the cornerstone of liberty and the constitutional structure of America. The Founders were looking for a system that would provide them with cohesiveness between the individual states and a government. The initial widespread loyalty to the state governments prevented the Founders from wanting a unitary system. A system with a more moderate option was chosen that provided national unity, but allowed for local representation and authority to occur within the states as well....   [tags: United States, Federalism]
:: 11 Works Cited
1234 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Advantages of Federalism - The Advantages of Federalism Federalism was selected as the most appealing system of government in 1787, primarily because of lack of feasible alternatives. Confederacy had been tried by the 13 states under the Articles of Confederation, and found to be lacking, in that it did not provide adequate cohesiveness between the individual nation-states. However, widespread loyalty to state government and identity prevented the adoption of a fully unitary system. Instead, founders chose federalism as a moderate option which could best meet the needs of a people desiring national unity, but demanding local representation and authority as well....   [tags: Governmental Federalism Political Essays] 4551 words
(13 pages)
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Federalism Is Overrated - ... The federal government role during this time was in the most part held to a stern constitutional denotation by the courts. Thus, limiting the federal government powers over certain issues like for example civil rights. To come to the point, the common view was that state and federal governments should be equally powerful. In contrast, cooperative federalism is not separated like dual federalism, but work together collectively between the federal and state governments to determine who takes responsibility in certain sectors, thereby creating policies in those areas....   [tags: Cooperative and dual feeralism] 612 words
(1.7 pages)
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Federalism in Canada - Since federalism was introduced as an aspect of Canadian political identity, the country has undergone multiple changes as to how federalism works; in other words, over the decades the federal and provincial governments have not always acted in the same way as they do now. Canada, for example, once experienced quasi-federalism, where the provinces are made subordinate to Ottawa. Currently we are in an era of what has been coined “collaborative federalism”. Essentially, as the title would suggest, it implies that the federal and provincial levels of government work together more closely to enact and make policy changes....   [tags: Canadian History, Politics] 991 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Evolution of Federalism and Housing Policy - When James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay drafted the Federalist Papers to persuade the state of New York to ratify the newly drafted United States Constitution, they could never have envisioned the controversy that the political theory of Federalism would generate, and the subsequent evolution of federalism that would follow. The Framers of the Constitution never planned for the federal government to be directly involved with the general welfare of people living within the United States beyond ensuring for a national defense and the creation of a national economy (Wills, 1982)....   [tags: Political Science]
:: 7 Works Cited
1468 words
(4.2 pages)
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The New Deal and American Federalism - Federalism may be described as a system of government that features a separation of powers and functions between the state and national governments. This system has been used since the very founding of the United States. The constitution defines a system of dual federalism, which ensures sovereignty of the state and national governments. This is put in place in order to limit the national government’s power. However, the Great Depression of 1929 greatly weakened the nation’s economic systems. President Roosevelt made many changes in the relationship between the national and state governments, thus revolutionizing our understanding of federalism, through the New Deal....   [tags: american history, government]
:: 1 Works Cited
891 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Evolition of Federalism in the United States - ... New York. This was the beginning of the “incorporation” of the Bill of Rights and the 14th amendment. With the Cooperative federalism the Supreme Court was able to get into personal lives and have taxes on individuals. Unions also started controlling banks. Between 1960 and 1980 creative federalism was created and became overwhelming. This had overload cooperation and crosscutting regulations. And finally we get t New Federalism, which was created in 1981 and is still going on today. With this they furthered the devolution of power from the nation, it is given to groups by the central government, deregulation, but it also made it harder for states to go through with their mandates....   [tags: government, amendments, state] 647 words
(1.8 pages)
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Taking a Look at Federalism - ... James Madison a federalist, believed that the bill of rights was needed, he then proceeded to inform the federalist that they would need to add the bill of rights to start this new government. After a long process of waiting for states to approve the constitution, they finally approved and the new form of government was in place. In our local city council meetings you can see how federalism is working in The United States of America. We are granted the right to have these local meetings by the state....   [tags: forms of government]
:: 4 Works Cited
549 words
(1.6 pages)
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An Inside Look at Federalism - ... The executives dominate the political arena and the subnational level is therefore responsible only to the central government. This dynamic makes it somewhat difficult for local concerns to infiltrate the national agenda. A constitution that lacks provisions for any state autonomy creates an environment for an overreaching and overbearing central government, not one specifically responsive to local concerns. Devolution may be appealable in certain instances, but it also has its drawbacks. Once again, since it is the state dolling out the authority and not a written document, it can lead to inconsistencies....   [tags: government styles]
:: 4 Works Cited
925 words
(2.6 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism is a legal concept that is centered around the concept that law is best handled as a two layered responsibility. Federalism is also built on a belief that sharing power with the local government is key to a successful governance. According to the text book, “the United States was the first nation to adopt federalism as its governing framework” (pg83). The following are a few examples of some advantages, as well as disadvantages of Federalism. I believe that the advantages that Federalism provides far outweigh those of the anti-federalist movement....   [tags: Government] 1206 words
(3.4 pages)
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Perspectives of Austrian and Canadian Federalism - A federation is a type of sovereign state in which a number of smaller self-governing states are united by a federal government (Watts)1. However, all federations are not made equal. There exists a great amount of variation between federal states on a number of functional areas. The aspect of federalism that this paper will address is power centralization. The two countries that will be compared are Austria and Canada. This author will attempt to prove that Austria’s federal system is more centralized than Canada’s by analyzing their orders of government, their constitutional mandates, and the impact of sociocultural cleavages on the federal model....   [tags: Power Centralization, Government Structure]
:: 6 Works Cited
2540 words
(7.3 pages)
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Federalism: Evolution and Effiency - Federalism is the system of government that divides power between a central government and the regional government. The idea of federalism came about after the American Revolution when the drafters of the Constitution were debating over the roles of the national and state governments. The Federalists carefully planned out their idea of federalism and ensured that their view would best handle their concerns and issues. In Madison’s Federalist 51, he explains many key concepts that he believed were important to the foundation of a new government....   [tags: Government]
:: 7 Works Cited
2026 words
(5.8 pages)
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Federalism and Governmental Relations - Modern federalism was born in America¹. Arguably, it was born out of political necessity. James Madison called it a “composition”². In the 19th century the view of the nation and states was that of dual federalism. In the mid 20th century, the line between nation and state became blurred. The challenges for the 21st century are to reinvent government so that it can effectively deal with lasting social problems and growing threats to personal freedom and civil liberties. States have played a strong and leading role in responding to domestic needs, they still do, and their role is crucial for the development of national domestic policies and programs....   [tags: Presidential Actions, Administration]
:: 3 Works Cited
570 words
(1.6 pages)
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Forms of Government: Federalism - ... Therefore it could not enforce legislation or make states honor national obligations. Even before the constitution was ratified, strong argument were made by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison in the federalist papers urging the inclusion of a federal form of government to replace the failed confederation. The people of the United States needed a central government that was capable of holding certain powers over the states. The founders were looking for a system that would provide them with cohesiveness between the individual states and the national government....   [tags: cornerstone of liberty & constitutional structure] 695 words
(2 pages)
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The Federalist Papers And Federalism - The Federalist Papers and Federalism The Federalist Papers were mostly the product of two young men: Alexander Hamilton of New York, age 32, and James Madison of Virginia, age 36. Both men sometimes wrote four papers in a single week. An older scholar, John Jay, later named as first chief justice of the Supreme Court, wrote five of the papers. Hamilton, who had been an aide to Washington during the Revolution, asked Madison and Jay to help him in this project. Their purpose was to persuade the New York convention to ratify the just-drafted Constitution....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 2 Works Cited
1006 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Evolution of Federalism - The Evolution of Federalism American federalism has changed drastically since its genesis. In 1776 the thirteen colonies adopted the Articles of Confederation in order to coordinate their efforts in the war for independence. The Articles of Confederation bound the states together in two main aspects; foreign and military affairs. The Articles of Confederation worked well while all the states had a common cause. However, as soon as the war ended and interests began to change, it became obvious that the Articles were not enough....   [tags: History Historical Democracy Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
983 words
(2.8 pages)
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Balanced Federalism - Debates over how the division of powers between the states and federal government should be handled have been predominant from the very beginning. The founders understood that this decision would have an enduring influence on the types of policies implemented along with how the impact would be felt by the citizens. This would all be dependent on if the laws were coming from Washing D.C. or the state capitals (Barbour and Wright, 78). In light of this the founders established the United States government based on a fair division of powers between Federal and State governments as highlighted in the constitution and tenth amendment....   [tags: Government]
:: 2 Works Cited
1373 words
(3.9 pages)
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Describe the main features of American federalism. - American federalism is constantly used as a benchmark for democratic societies. Having been successfully implemented along with the constitution, it has shown that it has been able to adapt to the changing environments throughout history. One scholar has claimed, “Federalism – old style – is dead.” However I disagree. In the following paragraphs, I will show how federalism is a part of the United States but how some problems make it seem like it is failing in the modern environment. American federalism is a system of dual-sovereignty between two levels of government....   [tags: American Government]
:: 8 Works Cited
2237 words
(6.4 pages)
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Federalism in The European Union: Treaty of Lisbon - Federalism in the EU Federalism is a system of administration involving two or more levels of government with autonomous power and responsibilities. It is a political concept in which a group of members are bound together by a covenant with a governing representative head. The term "federalism" is also used to describe a system of government in which sovereignty is constitutionally divided between a central governing authority and constituent political units (such as states or provinces). In the United States, Federalism argues for a stronger central government which is not the case with the EU....   [tags: political concept, power]
:: 4 Works Cited
1366 words
(3.9 pages)
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Abortion: The Impact of Federalism and the Separation of Power - Otto von Bismarck once said, “Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see them being made.” The arduous process that a bill undergoes in order to become a law may seem grueling and pointless; however, the processes high caliber of difficulty allows for the extreme prestige and exclusivity of bills that are passed. Because the process is so exhausting, and filibusters, subsequently requiring a super-majority vote to pass a bill, have always been such a threat in Congress, historically, bills that attempt to reform sensitive issues have not fared well in the legislative branch....   [tags: legal issues, laws, bills]
:: 5 Works Cited
1214 words
(3.5 pages)
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Federalism in America - Federalism in America Federalism is a concept that started many years ago during the times of the ratification of the document we live by called the Constitution. This concept basically states that there will be two levels of government, the national and the state. Federalism states that the national and state governments are separate entities and have formal authority over the same area and people. With its largest effect was during the Civil rights movement. Federalism isn’t a natural outgrowth of the Articles of Confederation....   [tags: Papers] 430 words
(1.2 pages)
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The Significance of Federalism in Political Culture - The Significance of Federalism in Political Culture The United States government is constructed of many systems and ideas which, when bound together, create the Democratic government utilized by the country. All of the different things, in most cases compliment each other and therefore, work together. Two examples of this are the system of federalism and the idea of political culture. They make up some of the important aspects of the government and its operation. Federalism is the system the United States uses as a frame for its government's power distribution when it comes to policies, procedures, and the likes....   [tags: Papers] 365 words
(1 pages)
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Federalism: A Happy Medium Between Unitary and Confederate Governments - The United States Constitution established a form of government called federalism. In addition to the United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil, Germany, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria and Switzerland are all federalist governments. In a federalist government, political systems divide and share power and resources between central and regional governments. A federalist government is very unique and contrasts with other government types such as a unitary and confederate government. Overall the balance between a state and national government has kept our country strong....   [tags: government] 524 words
(1.5 pages)
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Government and Politics - The Benefits of Federalism - Government and Politics - The Benefits of Federalism In the early days of the United States, it was obvious to many that a system combining both federalism and representative democracy was needed. According to the textbook, “the people were too widely dispersed, and the country’s transportation and communication systems too primitive to be governed [solely] from a central location” (pg. 58). Although today both communication and transportation are highly advanced, America still maintains a federal system....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 885 words
(2.5 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism Federalism is a widely accepted system of government in North American cultures. To many North Americans it seems to be the obvious choice for all world governments, but this is not the case. In all honesty, federalism is a fairly unique form of government. Out of approximately two hundred nations on the earth one hundred and eighty states practice unitary forms of government, leaving only twenty or so as federal nations (Winchester, 1999). Unitary forms of government consist of only one level of government....   [tags: Papers] 1367 words
(3.9 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism Due to the immense power of our federal government, people often argue that it is too powerful and should be lessened. Since the 1990’s there has been an effort to shift power from the federal government to the states. States’ rights has been an issue since our country was first founded, and even now we can’t seem to please everyone’s requests at equal power. This country was founded with the attempt to separate the federal government and the state government, known as federalism....   [tags: Papers] 314 words
(0.9 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism Federalism is flexible. Federalism is not a rigid structural arrangement. It seeks pragmatic solutions to the organization and distribution of political powers in order to meet the common needs of people while accommodating their diverse circumstances and preferences. Federalism is dynamic. While structures and even constitutional provisions may endure, the practices and operations are likely to change over time. At different times, federal systems may become more centralized, or they may become more decentralized....   [tags: Papers] 403 words
(1.2 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism Federalism is a system of government that divides power between a national government and a regional government with the use of a constitution. Throughout the United States history, federalism has played a significant role in the constitution and the system of government adopted by the United States of America. Federalism has also changed throughout the course of America's history to fit the constitution and the government. Montesquieu was a French philosopher who was very important in the American constitutional thought....   [tags: Papers] 1657 words
(4.7 pages)
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Federalism and Poverty in the United States - Federalism and Poverty in the United States Many Americans believe that the federal government is too big, both in the number of agencies it directs and in the scope of its powers. Some people also think that the daily business of Capitol Hill has no effect on their lives, in part because they believe that politicians do not understand their problems. This dissatisfaction with Washington, D.C., in recent years has renewed debate over the division of power between federal and state and local governments....   [tags: Papers] 1687 words
(4.8 pages)
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Federalism - INTRODUCTION TO FEDERALISM Federalism is the form of government in the united states where separate states are united under one central authority but with specific powers granted to both components in a written constitution .Patrick Henry coined the word in 1788 when, during the Virginia ratification convention debates over the proposed U.S Constitution ,he angrily asked, “Is this federalism?.’’ In 1787 the constitution replaced it with another, more balanced, version that has worked for over two centuries....   [tags: essays research papers] 976 words
(2.8 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism Federalism denotes a form of decentralised government where legally at least the component parts of the federation (states, provinces, Länder or cantons) have statehood of their own and often have historically existed prior to the federation. The central body is frequently called the federal government. The precise allocation of responsibilities and powers varies infinitely. The USA, Canada, Australia, Germany and Switzerland are examples of federal arrangements....   [tags: Papers] 1109 words
(3.2 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism The term "federalism" describes the changing relationship between the national and state governments as they sort out their roles and responsibilities within the federal system. America has a decentralized government; there is no single source of power or center of government. Federalism goes well with pluralism, because of the multiple centers of power that exist in the government, and also the many divisions of power. There are several levels of government including the federal government, the 50 states, county and city governments and independent school districts....   [tags: Papers] 2586 words
(7.4 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism The Constitution of the United States was drafted at a time when our country was in dire need of many answers to political and social questions. In addition to many other things, the drafters of the Constitution were concerned with solidifying our central government and the Constitution was intended to provide a solid structure from which our burgeoning nation could grow. The Constitution gave explicit powers to the federal government and provided the states with the Tenth Amendment which states ,"Powers not delegated to the United States, nor prohibited to the states, are reserved to the states respectively…" Of the enumerated powers given to the federal government by t...   [tags: Papers] 1960 words
(5.6 pages)
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Federalism in the United States - Federalism in the United States The current state of federalism in the United States is of one of peril, plagued with recent Supreme Court rulings, current debates over the devolution of Federal powers, and variance in State governing. The United States has always been troubled with the role of the Federal government V. State government on numerous issues. Since around the time of the Great Depression, the federal government was charged with the taking care of the American public in many social and economic matters....   [tags: Papers] 366 words
(1 pages)
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Federalism and the Supreme Court - Federalism and the Supreme Court "The powers delegated. . .to the federal government are few and defined. . . .The powers reserved to the several states will extend to all the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties and properties of the people and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the State." ---James Madison, The Federalist Papers #45 Since the establishment of judicial review in Marbury vs. Madison , the Supreme Court has been charged with the role of mediator....   [tags: Papers] 1570 words
(4.5 pages)
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federalism - Federalism The United States Government is beloved to all Americans, in the simple fact that all men are created equal and all men are given equal opportunity, to aspire to achieve success and make their dreams come true. Although the percentage of people who achieve all of their goals in life is fairly small, they have the freedom to chase them and America for the most part is a pretty content place. The “law of the land” that sets the standards for our rights and privileges is the U.S. Constitution....   [tags: essays research papers] 1206 words
(3.4 pages)
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Federalism - Federalism has played a large role in our government since the time that the Constitution was ratified. It originally gave the majority of the power to the states. As time went on, the national government gained more and more power. It used the "necessary and proper" clause of the Constitution to validate its acts, and the Supreme Court made decisions that strengthened the national government creating a more unified United States. Finally, the recent course of federalism has been to give powers back to the states....   [tags: essays research papers] 1696 words
(4.8 pages)
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Jefferson And Madison And Federalism - John Adams was the last Federalist president which led to the next 16 years of Thomas Jefferson as president for two terms and James Madison as president for two terms. Jefferson and Madison were members of the Republican Party, which had principles and philosophies that were very different than the views of the Federalists. Jefferson and Madison each abandoned the Republican philosophies for Federalism. Jefferson and Madison took on Federalist views while being President of the United States. However, Jefferson and Madison each picked somewhere to stand their ground and keep some of their Republican views....   [tags: Political Science] 916 words
(2.6 pages)
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Exploring the Source of Power of the Federal Government - When it comes to identifying the powers of the federal government, we know where to look, but it can be complicating at times. Article I of the Constitution provides a list, which specifies powers to each branch of government. The debate is, and has always been, how to interpret the meaning of these provisions and how broadly or narrowly to interpret that meaning. Although the Constitution provides a specific list of limitations on state powers along with a list of certain rights, it does not provide any written list of state powers or even a general statement as to their scope....   [tags: Federalism Essays]
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2426 words
(6.9 pages)
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Evolving Federalism - Evolving Federalism Pre-Class Assignment Federalism by definition is the division of power between a central government and its participating members. How that power is divided is the subjective aspect of federalism that was before the framers of the United States. Through compromise and necessity the seeds for a strong central government were planted alongside already strong state governments. Over time the seeds for strong central government grew; wars, economic fluctuations and national growth established a strong central government....   [tags: essays research papers] 1017 words
(2.9 pages)
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American Federalism - Federalism, by definition, is the division of government authority between at least two levels of government. In the United States, authority is divided between the state and national government. “Advocates of a strong federal system believe that the state and local governments do not have the sophistication to deal with the major problems facing the country” (Encarta.com). Even before the Constitution was ratified, strong argument were made by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison in the Federalist Papers urging the inclusion of a federal form of government to replace the failed confederation....   [tags: essays research papers] 2725 words
(7.8 pages)
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The Difference Between Separation of Powers and Federalism - Separation of powers is the separation of branches under the constitution by the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of government. Federalism is a government system that includes the national government, which shares sovereign powers with fifty state governments. The difference between the separation of powers and federalism is slim to nothing. Federalism consists of the national government and the fifty states, in which the national government is defined by the separation of powers: the three branches of government....   [tags: Political Science] 308 words
(0.9 pages)
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The Important Role of Federalism in the Development and Ongoing Prosperity of the United States - Federalism plays an integral part in the growth and development of the United States of America and is a key factor in determining the basis of power in this country. Clearly, the term federalism can be understood in many different ways pertaining to each person's view, but it can be more broadly defined in terms of the separation between the state and federal government. Thomas E. Patterson defines federalism as, “the division of sovereignty, or ultimate governing authority, between a national government and regional (that is, state) governments....   [tags: government, american history] 2195 words
(6.3 pages)
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Federalism in Government Policy toward Education - Education is the key to our future and that is why it is such an important subject in the United States. Education relates to federalism by interacting with the national government, state governments, and local governments. Each level of government is responsible for improving education within their limits of power. The national government has been helping to improve and regulate education since 1965 when they passed the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The main purpose of this act was to help America's disadvantaged students that lived in poverty....   [tags: Education] 1502 words
(4.3 pages)
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What is Federalism and How Does It Relate to State Governments and Other Forms of Governance? - ... The specified strengths of the national government is conveyed in the Constitution found in the introductory seventeen stipulations of Article 1 § 8 (Bardes, Shelley II, & Schmidt, 2011). Besides, the adaptable condition declared in the Constitution in Article 1 § 8, states that Congress has the ability to do anything vital to execute its specific commitments (Bardes, Shelley II, & Schmidt, 2011). Further, the innate powers are not especially surrendered to the national government however rather proposed, for instance, entering into a settlement with a remote government as no state may do so (Bardes, Shelley II, & Schmidt, 2011)....   [tags: robust central government]
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859 words
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The Key to the Protection Against Tyranny in the American Constitution - ... The separation of powers outlined in the Constitution eliminated tyranny by ensuring that branches of the government could not influence or manipulate decisions made by the others and thus control other branches. Articles 1, 2, and 3 of the Constitution separately vest “All legislative powers herein granted...in a Congress of the United States...”, “The executive power...in a President of the United States of America.”, and “The judicial power of the United States..in one Supreme Court...” respectively....   [tags: constitution, tyranny, federalism] 1402 words
(4 pages)
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Should the Canadian Federation be Centralized or Decentralized? - Introduction The issue of this paper is the argument between centralized and decentralized systems in the nation of Canada and which system should be put in place. In this paper, I shall focus on the concept of decentralization in reference to Canada and its politics. It shall distinguish decentralization in the sense of fiscal federalism, defined for this paper’s purpose as the interaction between the federal, provincial and municipal governments in reference to financial transfers for policy initiatives....   [tags: canada, politics, fiscal federalism]
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1569 words
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How the Great Depression Changed the Federal Relationship - ... The Americans who didn’t react to the great depression by blaming themselves responded with protests which were first uncoordinated and spontaneous, but then grow in size and support. Americans joined together to form unemployed councils, sponsoring marches for public assistance, and protesting the eviction of unemployed families from their homes. President Hoover’s response to the great depression, in the eyes of many Americans, was inadequate and uncaring. In the 1930’s, the administration remedies, like the Hawley-Smoot Tariff, made the economic situation worse....   [tags: states, credit, money, federalism] 668 words
(1.9 pages)
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How the Constitution Guards Against Tyranny - ... Constitution guards against tyranny by including a separation of powers, federalism, and the fair representation of states. The separation of powers keeps any one branch from gaining too much power by creating 3 separate, distinct branches power can be shared equally among. According to Madison, “Liberty requires that the three great departments of power should be separate and distinct.”(Document B) In other words, to avoid tyranny and achieve liberty, the three branches of government (executive, legislative, and judicial) must be separate and diverse....   [tags: separation of powers, federalism] 642 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Power Struggle of the States and Federal Government in the United States - To define the terminology of federalism to a simplistic way is the sharing of sovereignty between the national government and the local government. It is often described as the dual sovereignty of governments between the national and the local to exert power in the political system. In the US it is often been justified as one of the first to introduce federalism by the ‘founding fathers’ which were developed in order to escape from the overpowered central government. However, federalism in the United States is hitherto uncertain where the power lies in the contemporary political system....   [tags: federalism, government, USA, politics,] 1531 words
(4.4 pages)
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How Does the Constitution Protect the People from Tyranny? - ... (Madison FP # 47) It prevents this by having the U.S Government split into three branches, Legislative Branch (Congress), Executive Branch (President), Judicial Branch (The Courts). The Constitution keeps them separated and distinct from one another, by evenly splitting the duties and power to each branch. Legislative Branch builds and passes the laws, while the Executive Branch makes sure those laws are enforced and are being followed, and the Judicial Branch takes care of those court laws by giving just and fair trials to those who have disobeyed those laws....   [tags: federalism, separation, balances]
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723 words
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The Constitution's Defences Against Tyranny - ... Also, Federalism divides the power between groups, so that no one group gains more power or control. The concept of double security restrained the other government from growing stronger. In addition, the chart on document A shows the powers specifically given to the central government, states, and those that are shared. “Powers given to the Central Government – regulate trade. Powers given to the States – pass marriage and divorce laws. Powers Shared – making and enforcing laws.” (Doc A). The powers given to the states only affect that individual state, while the powers of the central government affect the whole country....   [tags: power, federalism, balances] 619 words
(1.8 pages)
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A Traditional U.S. Government During the Formation of the Constitution - ... Those which are to remain in the State governme:nts are numerous and indefinite. The former will be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation, and foreign commerce; with which last the power of taxation will, for the most part, be connected. The powers reserved to the several States will extend to all the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties, and properties of the people, and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the State." Describe the character of federal-state relations today....   [tags: capitalism, safeguards, federalism] 1974 words
(5.6 pages)
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Criminal Justice System and Law - Within the Federal Government there are three main branches; “the Legislative, the Judicial, and Executive” (Phaedra Trethan, 2013). They have the same basic shape and the same basic roles were written in the Constitution in 1787. The legislative branch consists of the Senate and the House of Representatives also known together as Congress is the only branch that has the power to create new laws. Furthermore the legislative branch employs an amazing amount of power. However the members of this branch are likely voted out of office if their objectives are not acceptable to the people....   [tags: Federalism, Government, Court]
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1239 words
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Three Main Approaches to Public Administration - The three approaches to public administration are political, managerial, and legal. In the political approach, political authority is divided between a central government and the provincial or state governments. This means that some provinces or states are accorded a substantial measure of constitutional or legal sovereignty, although they still remain subordinates of the central government in certain constitutional or legal respects. The political approach promotes the political values of military strength, economic development, union, and representation....   [tags: federalism, state sovereighty, government]
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Thre Federal Drug Policy - ... This is done by attacking the supply side of the drugs History The history of drug use dates back to the 19th century during the US Civil War. This saw a number of policies being introduced and by the year 1898, heroine was inaccessible. The next drugs that were targeted were alcohol and by the year 1906, the US Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act (PFDA) to help stop the use of such drugs. The next drug that was targeted was opium and an act was passed in 1909 to ban it. Congress has since passed a number of acts to establish a control over the use of other drugs like marijuana and other narcotics....   [tags: levels, policy, federalism, issues] 664 words
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Federalism - The Perfect Balance of Individual and Collective Interest - Federalism - The Perfect Balance of Individual and Collective Interest I have arrived at some temporary solutions to problems regarding political philosophy in the real world. For the most part, the debate over the ideal political philosophy has been narrowed down to two choices: socialism and capitalism. I agree with this. However, blending in with that debate my own conviction that toleration and moderation are the keys to success in any situation, I have concluded that there are, for purposes of this discussion, two types of political philosophies, and each is best served by a compromise between socialism and capitalism....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays] 1040 words
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Constitution Guarding Against Tyranny - With the birth of a new nation, and a goal of being completely independent of Britain, many protocols needed to be set straight. Most of the rules are written directly into our Constitution and have a main purpose; to establish a democracy in the most efficient form possible. But without rules to ensure democracy, how do we know that the formal document actually guards our new nation from tyrannical rule. There are a plethora of statements that support it, but the four major ones are big vs. small states, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism....   [tags: democracy, branches, federalism] 561 words
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Canada´s Great Government System - Introduction Since the founding of Canada in 1867, Canada has been a stable country that is an example of a great government system. The Fathers' confederation did a great job setting up a federal system of government, institution and process that is led by and written by the constitution, that could stand the test of time. No institution, process or government is the perfect and will make its citizen happy all the time, but many of the institutions, and processes of the Government have proven themselves to be durable and have withstand the test of time....   [tags: process, institutions, federalism, branch] 2187 words
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Clash of the Political Titans: Texas and the US Government - Both horses paw the ground in nervous excitement. The knights tightly grip their handles as they stoically stare at each other on either side of the long fence dividing them. The horses, feeling the imminence of battle, fidget uncontrollably. A cry in the air rings in both knights’ tin helmets like gunfire in a great hall. From one moment all was still, and the next both horses launch into full gallop down the fence picking up speed with each frantic paddle. Bracing, both knights close their eyes, the impact is coming....   [tags: federalism, us government, texas government]
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Same-Sex Marriage and Immigration: The Role of Federalism - Throughout recent years, two major issues have become prevalent in the United States, followed by increasing debate of whether they should be regulated by the federal government or state governments: same-sex marriage and immigration. Although the federal government has attempted to deal with same-sex marriage in the past, it has become evident that the public is not in agreement over this issue, rendering the efforts of the federal government to be ineffective and stagnant. Additionally, with an ever increasing flow of immigrants, the federal government is unable to regulate immigration well, leaving states to deal with many problems themselves....   [tags: Government]
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Anti-Federalist vs Federalist - After winning the Revolutionary War and sovereign control of their home country from the British, Americans now had to deal with a new authoritative issue: who was to rule at home. In the wake of this massive authoritative usurpation, there were two primary views of how the new American government should function. Whereas part of the nation believed that a strong, central government would be the most beneficial for the preservation of the Union, others saw a Confederation of sovereign state governments as an option more supportive of the liberties American’s fought so hard for in the Revolution....   [tags: Federalist & Antifederalist Positions]
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James Madison and the Federalist Papers - On September 17, 1787, the Philadelphia Convention sent their new constitution to the states for ratification. The Federalists highly approved of the Constitution because it allowed for a more central and powerful government that was previously undermined under the Articles of Confederation. The Anti-Federalists, however, didn’t want a powerful central government, but, instead, powerful state governments; in response to the Constitution, many Anti-Federalists began writing essays and creating pamphlets as a means of arguing against it....   [tags: Federalist Papers] 739 words
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An Analysis of Federalist Papers 10 and 51 - ... Madison understands who his audience is; he comprehends in its entirety that the population he is addressing is not taught in the ways of politics therefore he does not bother simplifying his speech. Instead he embellishes his proposal with high vocabulary and introduces ideas that sound nice, which would impress a crowd and lead them to believe that they should support him. Take into account an excerpt from article 51 where Madison states “It is of great importance in a republic not only to guard the society against the oppression of its rulers, but to guard one part of the society against the injustice of the other part”, it sounds very enticing, but it does not propose an actual solut...   [tags: The Federalist Papers]
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The Quasi-Legislative Effect of the Supreme Court of Canada - The Quasi-Legislative Effect of the Supreme Court of Canada Daniele Zerbo 300119020 25 March 2014 INTRODUCTION The Charter of Rights and Freedoms, 1982 symbolized a new era for Canada. Championed by Pierre Elliot Trudeau, the charter entrenched the fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadian society, and allowed for those rights to be enforced by any individual should they be infringed upon. The enactment of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms illustrates yet another shift from traditional Westminster style of governance, and created a new political atmosphere....   [tags: politics, federalism, interpretation ] 2332 words
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Democratic Election: America, You’re Doing It Wrong - A class votes for which game they want to play to review for a big math test. Each student writes on a piece of paper the name of the game they want to play and gives it to the teacher. The majority of the class wants to play “Mathsketball”, but the teacher decides the class will play Jeopardy instead. Is that fair. Most of the class does not think so. Since the ratification of the Constitution of the United States, there has been a similar component of the government that has defied the requests of the public....   [tags: Electoral College, Federalism]
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The Federalist Papers and The Hamilton Report - First I would like to welcome you to the wonderful land of America. I hope you have had fair travels from London. As I understand the situation, you are in a state of ambivalence in regards to your political affiliations; I write to you today to help you see the strength in the Federalist Party. The Federalist Party has the potential to continue aiding America in taking lengthy strides toward being a great nation. I will debrief you on the successes the Federalist Party has participated in thus far; the Federalist Papers and the Hamilton Reports....   [tags: ratification of the constitution] 1404 words
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Alexander Hamilton's "Federalist no. 78" - In Federalist no. 78 Hamilton explains the powers and duties of the judiciary department as developed in Article III of the Constitution. Article III of the Constitution is very vague on the structure of the federal courts. Hamilton had to convince Americans that the federal courts would not run amok. He presented that the federal courts would not have unlimited power but that they would play a vital role in the constitutional government. Hamilton limited judiciary power by defining it as a text-bound interpretative power....   [tags: Alexander Hamilton, Federalist no. 78, USA, histor] 1100 words
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Illegal Immigration and the Federalist System - Illegal Immigration and the Federalist System The influx of illegal immigrants into the United States affects every level of government in a significant way. Although the actual effects of illegal immigration are hotly debated, it remains the government's difficult duty to balance the massive amounts of data and diversity of public opinion in order to best accommodate the overall will of its people. In recent times we have witnessed a vast disconnect between what constituents want for their state versus what the nation as a whole considers Constitutionally justifiable....   [tags: Immigration ]
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Federalist No. 10 and No. 51 by James Madison - Federalist No. 10 and No. 51 were a series of essays written by James Madison, arguing for the ratification of the U.S Constitution. Before the ratification, the Articles of Confederation only bounded the thirteen colonies, uniting them as military alliance rather than a cohesive government. The central government lacked authority; the national government could not collect taxes or force states to comply with their laws. The lack of a strong central government made it difficult for states to operate effectively as one single nation....   [tags: thoughts of the 4th US president] 1349 words
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Aristotle's Legacy in the Federalist Papers - Aristotle's Legacy in the Federalist Papers While the government of the United States owes its existence to the contents and careful thought behind the Constitution, some attention must be given to the contributions of a series of essays called the Federalist Papers towards this same institution. Espousing the virtues of equal representation, these documents also promote the ideals of competent representation for the populace and were instrumental in addressing opposition to the ratification of the Constitution during the fledgling years of the United States....   [tags: Federalist Papers Essays]
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Alexander Hamilton’s First Federalist Paper - Alexander Hamilton’s First Federalist Paper Alexander Hamilton’s first Federalist Paper endorses ratification of the proposed constitution. His unifying point is that the use of reason—in the form of the people’s "reflection and choice"—will lead to the truth, whereas their use of passion will lead to ruin. Hamilton attempts to persuade his readers to make the correct decision by reminding them of the sheer importance of the matter. He suggests that "good men" will want to make the correct choice in light of their "true interests" (33), while the adversaries of the Constitution will be ruled by passions, deceit, and even weak minds....   [tags: Federalist Papers]
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Madison And Jefferson's Federalist Ideas - From 1801-1817 there was a clear separation of the United States. The Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties were in strong opposition of one another. Though the Republicans were usually characterized as strict constructionists, who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists, both Jefferson and Madison's presidencies highlighted Federalist ideals in many of their decisions. This included Jefferson's unconstitutional decision in purchasing the vast Louisiana territory and Madison's… The standard Democratic-Republican had many beliefs in which followed the Constitution whole heartily....   [tags: Political Science] 952 words
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The New Federalist Party - The New Federalist Party Part I As the sole member of the New Federalist party, it is with great honors that I now present to you the very first New Federalist platform. PREAMBLE The growing dissension between the two major political parties today has drawn them away from the public's views. It has been determined that the citizens of the United States cannot get what they want from the current major parties. Because of this, a total reconstruction of the current political structure is in dire need....   [tags: essays research papers] 3039 words
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The Federalist - In order to ascertain the cultural and literary significance of the “The Federalist”, an understanding of some small but significant United States history is in order. In 1787 the Constitutional Convention was to meet and determine the next pivotal step for the United States of America. What will be the governing body of this new republic and how should it strike forward on this great adventure. A team of framers set out to write what would become one the greatest documents in modern history. “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Bl...   [tags: Cultural, Literary Significance]
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Success of the People of the United States - ... The founding fathers had the ability to see afar off and therefore created numerous goals. One of their main goals was to avoid the issue of tyranny. In order to achieve this goal, the Framers set up different systems to prevent the abuse of power. Federalism was one of these important systems. Federalism was specifically devised to balance the power of the State and national governments and thereby limiting the powers of the national government. In creating a federalist system, the Framers were in effect countering both the British government and the Articles of Confederation....   [tags: constitution, government, federalist] 950 words
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Federalists and Antifederalists - Frustration was mounting. As he sat in the North Carolina ratifying convention and listened to the roll call of their membership, William Richardson Davie must have worried that the federalist movement in his state would die a slow and agonizing death before him. Davie, an ardent proponent of federalism and its promotion of a strong national and central government, had spent nearly a year arguing and debating the necessity and importance of ratifying the newly-proposed federal Constitution. The membership’s list of names forebode trouble for Davie and his federalist colleagues and he realized as the names were read aloud that the convention’s membership favored those who opposed the federal...   [tags: north carolina, federalist movement] 2684 words
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The Federalist Party - If I was a citizen in the United States of America back in 1790, I would want to be part of the Federalist Party. The Federalist Party was created by Alexander Hamilton, and his party wants a strong central government in America with power given to the wealthy and political leaders. The only other party back then was the justly named Anti-Federalist party. The Anti-Federalist party was started by Thomas Jefferson and this party had completely opposite views to the Federalists. Anti-Federalists focused on power among the individual states, as opposed to having a powerful central government....   [tags: American Government] 825 words
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The Federalist Papers - ... Hamilton, as well as Madison, expressed deep concern about the factions that were organized around individuals who were only interested in achieving their goals, regardless of the fact that it could annihilate morality and other values, which represent the foundations of the civil government. Alexander Hamilton in the first of many essays written in this series was trying to draw attention to the ethical issues and the human nature. He tried to bespeak how our nature is not flawless and how we can be sometimes blinded by our own interests: ˝men may be actuated by upright intentions; and it cannot be doubted that much of the opposition which has made its appearance, or may hereafter make...   [tags: writers, madison, hamilton, john jay] 1243 words
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