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On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein - On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein They say that, in his youth, Rabbi Israel studied eight hundred books of the Kabbalah. But the first time he saw the maggid of Mezritch face to face, he instantly knew that he knew nothing at all. I have on my desk one of my daughter's college textbooks, the Mentor edition of Great Dialogues of Plato as translated by W. H. D. Rouse. It cost $4.95. It is a good book with helpful footnotes and a minimum of scholarly obstruction. The editor has included half a dozen dialogues: Ion, Meno, Symposium, Republic, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo....   [tags: Euthyphro] 3504 words
(10 pages)
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Different Definitions of the Word "Pious" Depicted in Plato's Socratic Dialog Euthyphro - Plato's Socratic dialog Euthyphro is in many ways archetypal of the sort of philosophy that Socrates is thought to have been interested in. In it (as in most classic 'Socratic dialogs'), Socrates seeks out a person who claims to have a certain sort of knowledge. He then proceeds to show that these experts do not possess this knowledge by getting them to contradict themselves. With this in mind, I will discuss the three definitions of the word 'pious' that the character Euthyphro gives to Socrates, and Socrates' problems with each of these definitions....   [tags: Euthyphro] 1244 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Euthyphro Dilemma - The Euthyphro Dilemma In Plato's dialogue, 'Euthyphro', Socrates presents Euthyphro with a choice: `Is what is pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved [by the gods]?' Euthyphro responds by asserting that piety is that which is approved [loved] or sanctioned by the gods; whence impiety is whatever is disapproved of by the gods. However, as Socrates points out, the question poses a dilemma for those who believe as Euthyphro does that Truth is revealed by divine authority alone....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Euthyphro] 1552 words
(4.4 pages)
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Euthyphro - Euthyphro The beginning of the story was easy to understand. I could picture Euthyphro walking up and asking Socrates what he had been doing at the palace. He didn’t seem to be too surprised to hear that Socrates was being impeached. I’m not sure what I think about Euthyphro prosecuting his own father. I suppose that for the sake of justice, it would be the right thing to do. To judge him on terms of piety, I would have no clue how to do that. I wasn’t really sure exactly what piety was when I began reading the story....   [tags: Papers] 428 words
(1.2 pages)
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Euthyphro Dialogue - In the dialogue Euthyphro (Cahn and Markie), Plato presents an argument against the divine command meta-ethical theory. While the argument is presented against the predominantly pantheistic Greek religions, the argument can be easily applied to the monotheistic Abrahamic religions. The dialogue starts off with the two main characters: Euthyphro and Socrates. Socrates has been indicted for corrupting the youth of Athens and Euthyphro is indicting his father for murdering a day-labourer who killed one of his servants through neglect....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Bad Euthyphro - Bad Euthyphro Euthyphro did not act pious toward his father at all. If he had been trying to be a pious human he would to think deeper in to what he did. Euthyphro turned in his father for killing one man, but he only satisfied one part of being a pious person. According to the American Heritage Dictionary being a pious person has “ devotion and severance towards his god and family.” Euthypro only pleased his god; by bring justice towards his father. He maimed his family and betrayed them....   [tags: essays research papers] 433 words
(1.2 pages)
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Plato's Euthyphro - Plato's Euthyphro One of the most interesting and influential thinkers of all time was Socrates, whose dedication to careful reasoning helped form the basis for philosophy. Socrates applied logical tricks in the search for the truth. Consequently, his willingness to call everything into question and his determination to accept nothing less than an accurate account of the nature of things made him one of the first people to apply critical philosophy. Although he was well known for his philosophical ways of thinking, Socrates never wrote anything down, so we are dependent on his students, like Plato, for any detailed knowledge of his methods or ways of thinking....   [tags: Plato Socrates Papers] 584 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Euthyphro and The Republic - The Euthyphro and The Republic I. In the Euthyphro, Euthyphro himself gives three proposals of piety. First, the pious is to prosecute the wrongdoer and the impious is not to prosecute the wrongdoer. Socrates disputes this example as lacking generality. He believed that in order to define piety, one had to find the form that made all pious acts pious. An example of a pious act does not in turn define piety. Euthyphro’s second attempt stated that the pious is loved by the gods, while the impious was hated by them....   [tags: Papers] 1263 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Incompleteness of Plato's Euthyphro - The Incompleteness of Plato's Euthyphro The Euthyphro, like other Platonic dialogues, seeks to uncover the definition of a virtue. In its case, the virtue is piety. In the end, the dialogue fails to uncover this definition, rendering an impression of incompleteness. On account of the dialogue's dual effect -- the presentation of Socrates' spirit as well as the Greeks' inability to define piety -- explanations for its incompleteness often place too much emphasis on Socrates and, as a result, fail to unearth its true genesis....   [tags: Papers] 852 words
(2.4 pages)
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Traditional And Utilitarian Approaches To The Euthyphro Dilemma - Traditional And Utilitarian Approaches To The Euthyphro Dilemma In the Euthyphro, Plato describes the proceedings of a largely circular argument between Socrates and Euthyphro, a self-declared prophet and pious man, over the nature of piety and even of the gods themselves. The issues raised in this dialogue have been reinterpreted and extended to remain relevant even with a modern theological framework, so much so that the central issue is now known simply as ?the Euthyphro dilemma.. This is based on Socrates....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays]
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Plato’s Concept of the Soul and its Relationship with the Body - Plato’s Concept of the Soul and its Relationship with the Body Plato’s theory of the body and soul originated from his earlier theories and dialogs, ‘the analogy of the cave’ and ‘the theory of forms’. Plato believed that the soul is immortal. That the soul existed before it came to the physical body, and it is still there when the body dies. This is a dualistic interpretation of the mind/body problem. Plato linked the soul to a charioteer in charge of two horses, the mind and the body, which are pulling in completely opposite directions....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Euthyphro] 725 words
(2.1 pages)
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student - Euthyphro Good or bad, right or wrong, truth or lie, piety or impiety, just or unjust, honorable or dishonorable; these controversies are and always have been problematic for human beings. It is not as easy as it seems to draw a line between those antonyms, partly because people have cultural differences, dissimilar backgrounds, educational levels, values, believes, and views on religion, as in the case with Socrates and Euthyphro. Following the conversation of Socrates and Euthyphro, it is obvious that Socrates is a philosopher who relies on his philosophic point of view and believes that it is not normal to pursue your own father for murder, if he killed a non-relative....   [tags: essays research papers] 642 words
(1.8 pages)
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am i? - Socrates was a very simple man who did not have many material possessions and spoke in a plain, conversational manner. Socrates often engaged in conversations with people who claimed to be “experts”. He would question them on issues that, if they were the “experts” they claimed to be they would have the correct answer in seconds. Socrates often made these “experts” look quite foolish when he would prove them wrong in front of many other citizens. Plato’s Euthyphro is about one day when Socrates was on his way to the courthouse he ran into Euthyphro (a young Athenian priest)....   [tags: essays research papers] 441 words
(1.3 pages)
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Socrates: A Revolutionary Philosopher Who Posed a Threat to the Government and Society - Socrates was a revolutionary thinker. He brought new ideas and processes of thought to Athenian society and his work still has its place in the world today. However during his time, his ideas were not always thought of as a good thing. Many viewed him as a corrupting influence on other people and accused him of forcing his ideas upon others. Perhaps most frequently the center of controversy was his thoughts on theocracy and piety as seen in the Plato’s Euthyphro. Socrates also appears at the butt end of Aristophanes’ comedy Clouds, where he is satirically ridiculed and seemingly corrupting the youth of Athens in his school, the Thinkery....   [tags: Philosophy, socrates, government,] 638 words
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Socrates - Definitions of Piety - Socrates - Definitions of Piety      During the Periclean age (around 400 B.C.) in Athens Greece there was a man named Socrates. He was considered a very wise man by the Athenians. However there were men in power who did not care for him or his teachings; Claiming that he corrupted the Athenian youth and did not believe in the Greek gods, Socrates was put on trail. On his way to his trial Socrates met a man named Euthyphro, a professional priest who is respected by the "authorities" (those who want get rid of Socrates)....   [tags: Socrates Plato Philosophy]
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Socrates - Socrates      Socrates, in his conviction from the Athenian jury, was both innocent and guilty as charged. In Plato’s Five Dialogues, accounts of events ranging from just prior to Socrates’ entry into the courthouse up until his mouthful of hemlock, both points are represented. Socrates’ in dealing with moral law was not guilty of the crimes he was accused of by Meletus. Socrates was only guilty as charged because his peers had concluded him as such. The laws didn’t find Socrates guilty; Socrates was guilty because his jurors enforced the laws....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Socrates Essays] 1660 words
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Mr. - Keeping true to Socratic/Platonic methodology, questions are raised in the Euthyphro by conversation; specifically “What is holiness?” After some useless deliberation, the discussion between Socrates and Euthyphro ends inconclusively. Euthyphro varying definitions of piety include “What I do is pious to the gods,” and, “What is pleasing to the gods is pious.” Socrates proves these definitions to be insufficient, which leads us to the Apology. In the defense speech given by Socrates at the beginning of his trial, he hints at a definition of holiness....   [tags: essays research papers] 373 words
(1.1 pages)
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teenage alcoholism - Socraric Method The Socratic Method of philosophy is basically a series of question leading to an answer. In order for this method to work though, two conditions must be met. The first one is that the interlocutor has to say what he believes. The second is that the answers must be kept short. Here is a classic example of how this method works. It is a dialogue between Socrates and Euthyphro. The thesis is “What is dear to the gods is pious, what is not is impious.” Next Socrates gets Euthyphro to agree to the following points....   [tags: essays research papers] 382 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Ignorance of Youth - For over two thousand years, Socratic dialogues have had a deep effect on the progression of society. A key example of an effective Socratic dialogue is that of Plato's Euthyphro. Socrates demonstrates, among other things, the extent to which in our youth we are the most ignorant. In addition, he utilizes his conversation with Euthyphro to accomplish certain things that directly benefit only him. He uses this conversation to show that he is truly not as wise as everyone believes him to be. He vents his bitterness and practices speaking in preparation for the upcoming trial with Meletus....   [tags: essays research papers] 986 words
(2.8 pages)
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Comparing Islamic Fundamentalism and Plato's Dialogues - ... Benotman told the Al Qaeda, that what they were doing was wrong and was not the best solution (Taking Back Jihad). Benotman told them that everything they were doing was a total failure (Taking Back Jihad). He also told them they were losing the war (Fighting Words). He told them the extremists that jihad was about changing the Islamic state, not what their beliefs currently were, making them kill innocent people (Taking Back Jihad). Violence was not working for this particular revolution, it was instead doing damage (Taking Back Jihad)....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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The origin of piety - ... Webster’s dictionary provides a definition of piety that is very similar to the definition provided by Euthyphro. The dictionary first states piety as an act of being pious, Socrates would have accepted this definition as a mere particular and would not accept this representation of piousness as being universally understood. The dictionary then defines piety as the submission to a higher authority such as parents, or the rules imposed by governmental authority. Socrates would have dismissed this definition as well, he would simply point out that the authority of society is not a stable absolute....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Plato’s Portrayal of Socrates - Plato’s Portrayal of Socrates The portrayal of Socrates by his student Plato creates one of the most controversial characters of all time. There are few other personalities in history that have drawn criticism and praise from the furthest ends of each spectrum. Socrates has been called the inventor of reason and logic, and at the same time has been condemned as a corruptor and a flake. Perhaps he was all of these. Despite this disagreement, one is a certainty: Socrates had a very interesting and active sense of humor....   [tags: Plato Socrates]
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The Socratic Psyche - The Socratic Psyche I will begin this paper with a brief account of Socrates. I feel this is necessary for those who are not familiar with Socrates. It is as follows: Socrates (C. 470-399 B.C.) Athenian philosopher who allegedly wrote down none of his views, supposedly from his belief that writing distorts ideas. His chief student, Plato, is the major source of knowledge about his life. Socrates questioned Athenians about their moral, political, and religious beliefs, as depicted in Plato^s dialogues; his questioning technique, called dialectic, has greatly influenced Western philosophy....   [tags: essays papers]
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Plato on Education as the Development of Reason - Plato on Education as the Development of Reason ABSTRACT: Socrates' great educational innovation was in ascribing moral worth to the intellectual activity reflectively directed at one's own life. His concept of eudaimonia was so different from the ordinary that talking about it took on sometimes a paradoxical air, as in Apology 30b3. For him, reason is not a tool for attaining goals independently thought worthwhile; rather, rationality itself, expressed in the giving of reasons and the avoidance of contradictions, confers value to goals and opinions....   [tags: Educational Philosophy Papers]
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Last Days Of Socrates - The Last Days of Socrates Plato. The Last Days of Socrates. London: Penguin Books Ltd., 1993 Imagine the time just after the death of Socrates. The people of Athens were filled with questions about the final judgment of this well-known, long-time citizen of Athens. Socrates was accused at the end of his life of impiety and corruption of youth. Rumors, prejudices, and questions flew about the town. Plato experienced this situation when Socrates, his teacher and friend, accepted the ruling of death from an Athenian court....   [tags: Plato Socrates Philosophy Essays] 2263 words
(6.5 pages)
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Discussion of the View that Morality and Religion are Linked - Discussion of the View that Morality and Religion are Linked The view that morality and religion are linked together implies that it is God who dictates to us humans whatever is moral. Therefore, any action dictated to humans to carry out by God is morally right or acceptable. Looking from this point of view, morality would be based on unchangeable laws and this view is deontological because it based on golden rules and does not look at present consequences before it is considered moral or right....   [tags: Papers] 579 words
(1.7 pages)
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Greeks - Greeks Greek beliefs changed over time. In the beginning the Greeks believed strongly in the gods. These ideas were very similar to those of earlier peoples (Craig, Graham, et. al. 57). The Greek gods shared many of the same characteristics of the Mesopotamian deities (Craig, Graham, et. al. 57). The Greek pantheon consisted of the twelve gods who lived on Mount Olympus (Craig, Graham, et. al. 83). These gods were: -Zeus, the father of the gods, -Hera, his wife, -Zeus’s siblings: Poseidon, his brother, god of seas and earthquakes, Hestia, his sister, goddess of the hearth, Demeter, his sister, goddess of agriculture and marriage, -Zeus’s children: Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty, Apollo, god of sun, music, poetry, and prophecy, Ares, god of war, Artemis, goddess of the moon and the hunt, Athena, goddess of wisdom and the arts, Hephaestus, god of fire and metallurgy, -Hermes, messenger of the gods (Craig, Graham, et....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Socrates' Pursuit of Wisdom - Philosophy can be defined as the pursuit of wisdom or the love of knowledge. Socrates, as one of the most well-known of the early philosophers, epitomizes the idea of a pursuer of wisdom as he travels about Athens searching for the true meaning of the word. Throughout Plato’s early writings, he and Socrates search for meanings of previously undefined concepts, such as truth, wisdom, and beauty. As Socrates is often used as a mouthpiece for Plato’s ideas about the world, one cannot be sure that they had the same agenda, but it seems as though they would both agree that dialogue was the best way to go about obtaining the definitions they sought....   [tags: Philosophy, Philosophical] 1155 words
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Biblical Ethics - Throughout the history of the world, people have been concerned with what it is to live a moral life. Many answers have been put forth for this question, but the best by far is found in the Christian Bible. This is because the Bible is a revelation from the Creator. While people can grope in the dark to find answers to moral questions by looking at natural law, they are always frustrated because the real nature of the world we live in is fallen and corrupt. We have an adversary who tries to deceive us and minds that are easily deceived....   [tags: Ethics]
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Socrates: One of the Greatest Minds the World Has Ever Known - ... In other words, if the person is corrupt or possesses some sort of graft then the government will also. Socrates, if one reads any of Plato’s works, seems to be a man of intense and never satisfied curiosity. He employed the same logical actions developed by the Sophists to a new purpose, the pursuit of truth. Many credit Socrates with the birth of critical philosophy in that he would accept nothing less than a full account of how something worked, what someone’s motivations were for committing certain acts, and where one might go to find the answers....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Rules and Exceptions - Rules and Exceptions One of the factors which have led many philosophers to adopt a more or less sceptical attitude in moral philosophy has been the recognition that most rules have exceptions. This has commonly been regarded as a threat to the entire moral enterprise. How can a philosopher even attempt to find an account of the moral relations that obtain among things which will weave them into the unity of a stable system if every principle, every rule, every judgment has to be qualified by who knows how many exceptions....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Papers]
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Morality and Laws in The Trial and Death of Socrates - Morality and Laws in The Trial and Death of Socrates Upon reading Plato, The Trial and Death of Socrates, Socrates strongly held views on the relationship between morality and laws become apparent to the reader. Equally, Socrates makes clear why laws should be followed and why disobedience to the law is rarely justified. Finally, he makes clear his views regarding civil disobedience. Socrates’ view on morality is that anyone can do wrong. It is said that injuring someone in return for injury to oneself is wrong....   [tags: Morals Socrates Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 1245 words
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Music and Morality - Music and Morality "Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man, and make gentle the life of this world." This famous Robert Kennedy quote reminds us of how influential our predecessors were to us in many different facets, including music. Throughout history, we see how dearly important music and the morality of music were for many societies. As early as 400 B.C.E, during the time of philosophers like Socrates and Plato, music (although much different from what it is today) greatly influenced the mores of society....   [tags: Music] 1458 words
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Socrates - Socrates Socrates was accused of many things in the Athens market. Socrates was accused of being a man who makes the worse argument into the stronger argument. A man who knows about the heavens and earth and therefore any one who believe this must not believe in the gods. Socrates was accused of being an atheist. Most of the people that followed him around his quest were inquisitive. Where as most adults would walk by Socrates with his “annoying question” the youth stopped to see what he had to say....   [tags: essays research papers] 645 words
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Socrates' Systematic Defense - ... This may seem pointless to argue, for even today we are aware of the accusations against us before appearing in court, but this proves that they had this same privilege in ancient Greece and were not simply brought into court, accused on the spot, and forced to offer defense. The defendant did indeed have an opportunity to formulate a systematic defense. Evidences of a Systematic Defense Two primary evidences prove that, despite the ethos Socrates is attempting to communicate, the approach he takes in defending himself is formulated and methodical and undermines his desired ethos....   [tags: Politics, Philosophy] 2051 words
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The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues - The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues ABSTRACT: When contemplating the origins of philosophical paideia one is tempted to think of Socrates, perhaps because we feel that Socrates has been a philosophical educator to us all. But it is Plato and his literary genius that we have to thank as his dialogues preserve not just Socratic philosophy, but also the Socratic educational experience. Educators would do well to better understand Plato's pedagogical objectives in the Socratic dialogues so that we may appreciate and utilize them in our own educational endeavors, and so that we may adapt the Socratic experience to new interactive educational technologies....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 2861 words
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Plato - Philosopher. According to sources, Plato was born on or around May 21, 427 (or 428) B.C. in Athens, the son of Ariston and Perictione, both of Athenian aristocratic ancestry. He lived his whole life in Athens, although he traveled to Sicily and southern Italy on several occasions, and one story says he traveled to Egypt. Little is known of his early years, but he was given the finest education Athens had to offer the scions of its noble families, and he devoted his considerable talents to politics and the writing of tragedy and other forms of poetry....   [tags: essays research papers] 1730 words
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Socrates and Plato's The Republic - Socrates and Plato's The Republic Throughout his life, Socrates engaged in critical thinking as a means to uncover the standards of holiness, all the while teaching his apprentices the importance of continual inquiry in accordance with obeying the laws. Socrates primarily focuses on defining that which is holy in The Euthyphro – a critical discussion that acts as a springboard for his philosophical defense of the importance of lifelong curiosity that leads to public inquiry in The Apology. Socrates continues his quest for enlightenment in The Crito, wherein he attempts to explain that while inquiry is necessary, public curiosity has its lawful price, thus those who inquire must both continue to do so and accept the lawful consequences of their inquiry....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Republic Essays] 2169 words
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Rene Descartes - Essay # 2 Rene Descartes was a French philosopher. His theory is that reality consists of mind and matter. Descartes answers the question or attempts to answer the question of “what is real?” using dualism. Dualism is defined as the view that reality is composed of two different substances, so that neither one can be related to the other. Such examples being; spirit/matter, mind/body, good/evil. Descartes feels that the human can be broken down into two separate substances; a mind having no physical attributes and a body having a shape....   [tags: essays research papers] 404 words
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Patriotism Aided in Socrate's Death - ... "Socrates' lifespan marked the beginning and an end of an idea -- the idealistic vision of an autonomous, tolerant democratic Athenian city state" (Hughes 360). Socrates dreamed of a perfect Athens, hoping to pave the way by instructing the young, but many believed Socrates corrupting the youth. This was influenced by the book The Clouds. Socrates was guilty of corrupting the youth of Athens and creating new divinities in the place of the gods. "But if Socrates did question the old myths, then the charge that he failed to respect 'the city's gods' was perfectly true" (Wilson 31)....   [tags: History, Death Penalty] 1803 words
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What Is a Good Human Life and How Should It Be Lived? - ... Therefore, the three souls must work jointly and should be interrelated for the benefit of an individual. Only then can the justice of an individual person come out. The Human Life According to Aristotle’s Ethics Aristotle relays his theory of good life for humans in the Nichomachean Ethics. He speaks of the good life as the happy one. According to him, good life rises above being amused and feeling happy about existence. It includes living one’s life actively while functioning well within the essential and unique elements of human life....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Plato - Plato Plato was born in Athens to a wealthy family and lived from 429-347 B.C.E. He was Socrates' greatest student and held his teacher in such high regard that in most of his works Socrates plays the main character. Some people doubt the existance of Socrates but, "like nearly everyone else who appears in Plato's works, he is not an invention of Plato: there really was a Socrates" (Kraut). Plato wrote many works asking questions about terms such as justice, piety, and immortality to name a few....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophers]
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Buy Essay Online: Theme of Justice in the Odyssey and the Bible - Theme of Justice in the Odyssey and the Bible       Justice is a theme that differs in many different texts, and this also true in the Odyssey and the Bible.  Justice in Homeric texts was served to neutralize a situation and bring things back to the way they were, to a time of stability and respect for authority.  The bible has usually been interpreted, however, as serving justice on a moral basis, as a way to punish those who did not respect each other or act in God likeness.          The Greeks in the Odyssey viewed justice as only coming from the gods.  They believed the gods punished them because they have fallen out of their favor, and not because they had really done anything wrong by human standards.  As Socrates later stated in the Euthyphro, what is holy, and perhaps then just, is what is “approved by the gods.”  Although Socrates proved this to be wrong, it still shows the view of most Greeks.  Zeus in the opening book of the Odyssey stated, “Upon my word, just see how mortal men always put the blame on us gods!  We are the source of evil, so they say- when they have only their own madness to thank if their miseries are worse than they ought to be.”   This shows that the Greeks feared justice; they felt it was negative and often undeserved.  However, each Greek deserved his punishment because he has a hand in its reason.  For example, when Odysseus’s troops killed the cattle of Helios, they deserved Zeus destroying their ships because he had warned Odysseus beforehand not to let the men eat the cattle....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Erroneus Assumptions in The Trial and Death of Socrates - Erroneus Assumptions in The Trial and Death of Socrates In Plato's Crito, Socrates explains to his old friend Crito his reasons for refusing an offer to help him escape execution. One of the tools Socrates uses to convince Crito of the righteousness of his decision is a hypothetical argument concerning the state and laws of Athens. Central to this argument is the congeniality that Socrates had always found in Athens, reflected by the fact that Socrates chose to remain in Athens for most of his life....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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Athens: The Acropolis and the Agora - Athens: The Acropolis and the Ago Modern day Athens has managed to maintain an ancient landscape.. The Acropolis and the Agora are two major features of ancient Greece that have a home in this metropolitan city.. Both of these ancient sites preserve their power and mystery in a modern day world. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, an agora is an open space in ancient Greek cities that served as both a meeting place and as an area for various civic activities (?Agora?).. The Agora of ancient Athens was rebuilt after the Persian Wars (490-449 BC) in response to a lengthy period of wealth and peace in the city (ibid).....   [tags: History Historical Papers]
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A life sketch of Plato and his works - If Thales was the first of all the great Greek philosophers, Plato must remain the best known of all the Greeks. The original name of this Athenian aristocrat was Aristiclis, but in his school days he received the nickname "Platon" (meaning "broad") because of his broad shoulders. Plato was born in Athens, Greece to one of the oldest and most distinguished families in the city. He lived with his mother, Perictione, and his father, Ariston (Until Ariston died.) Born in an aristocratic and rich family, Plato’s childhood was indulged within luxury....   [tags: essays research papers] 886 words
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Plato's The Crito - There are many instances in Plato's the Crito where Socrates gives reasons for himself to stay in Athens and face his death. Arguments range from that of him being too old to run, to the common response two wrongs don't make a right. The reason I intend to argue against is one Socrates expresses in regards to his obligations to the city he has lived in all his life, and thus the rules that he has subsequently followed throughout that time. In Athens just like any other city, one follows the rules that the respective city has laid down because he/she believes in those laws, or does not and keeps silent....   [tags: essays research papers] 981 words
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Plato - Plato (circa 428-c. 347 BC) Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens. His father, Ariston, was believed to have descended from the early kings of Athens. Perictione, his mother, was distantly related to the 6th- century BC lawmaker Solon. When Plato was a child, his father died, and his mother married Pyrilampes, who was an associate of the statesman Pericles. As a young man Plato had political ambitions, but he became disillusioned by the political leadership in Athens. He eventually became a disciple of Socrates, accepting his basic philosophy and dialectical style of debate: the pursuit of truth through questions, answers, and additional questions....   [tags: essays research papers] 2476 words
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Literary Works of Plato: Critical Essay - This essay attempts to present a critical analysis of the literary works of Plato. Plato's literary work span is wide containing issues pertaining to justice, social life, specific virtues, good ruler's knowledge, value of justice, love and many others. The philosophical tones of Plato resembled very much with that of Socrates addressing the similar issues in his own Platonic version of dialogues. The Republic and the citizen played an important role in his work in addressing to the various social issues and intricate understanding of the human nature of human responsibilities in a republic....   [tags: Philosophy] 782 words
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Hugo Meynell and the Christian Doctrine - Hugo Meynell and the Christian Doctrine Hugo Meynell's book is a clear example of the growing interest in apologetics. Meynell considers four common objections to Christian doctrine, the belief in God is morally irrelevant; that there is no reason to believe in the special claims of Christianity over those of non-Christian religions. Meynell, also says no sense can be made of the doctrines of Incarnation, Atonement, and the Trinity and that Christian doctrine about life after death is based upon an indefensible view of the nature of human persons-and shows to his own views that these remarks can be met....   [tags: Papers] 1028 words
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The Republic - The Republic Plato was born around the year 428 BCE into an established Athenian household with a history of political connections -- including distant relations to both Solon and Pisistratus. Plato's parents were Ariston and Perictone, his older brothers were Adeimantus and Glaucon, and his younger sister was Potone. In keeping with his family heritage, Plato was destined for the political life. But the Peloponnesian War, which began a couple of years before he was born and continued until well after he was twenty, led to the decline of the Athenian Empire....   [tags: Papers] 1498 words
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Compare Utilitarianism with the religion that you have studiedUtilitarianism VS Christianity - Compare Utilitarianism with the religion that you have studied Utilitarianism VS Christianity BASIC MAXIM – “THE GREATEST HAPPINESS FOR THE GREATEST NUMBER” JEREMY BENTHAM – Act Utilitarianism (each action should be judged on its ability to bring about the greatest happiness for the greatest number) - Devised principle of utility - Established a hedonic calculus to measure pleasure/pain brought about by each action. JOHN STUART MILL – Rule Utilitarianism (rules should be formulated first, based on utilitarian principles....   [tags: Papers] 686 words
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The Father of Western Philosophy Socrates - The Father of Western Philosophy: Socrates Since the dawn of man, the invariable love of knowledge has kindled the hearts of humankind. That true passion in the heart for mankind over the flux of time is the study of philosophy. One of the greatest embellishments to philosophy overtime is the lionized Socrates of Athens born in 469B.C. His life exemplifies a true philosopher’s life, and the aspect of wonder that has cloaked mankind since the beginning of time. Therefore, the philosophical significance of Socrates is strenuous to parallel for he: practiced systematic and logical reasoning, lived an undemanding life, and pursued truth and wisdom....   [tags: essays research papers] 695 words
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Socrates and His Escape - Socrates and His Escape Each one of us has been accused of some kind of act at some point in our lives. Yet those accusations have been terribly mistaken and sometimes there is so little that a person can do to fix that. In this case we are talking about the wonderful philosophist Socrates, a person of many beliefs and ideas. He was a man who dearly believed in justice and doing justice to others. We will examine Socrates' way of thinking and his rationality towards a healthy and logical mind....   [tags: Papers] 1786 words
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Plato - In 428 B.C. Aristocles (later known as Plato) was born in Athens. He was born on the island of Aegina, which lies just twelve miles off shore from Athens in the Saronic Gulf (Havelock 3). Aristocles was born into a great political family (Friedlander 14). His father being the descendant of Codrus, the last king of Athens, and his mother was descendant from the great Athenian law maker Solon (Friedlander 15). Like most adolescent children his ambitions were far from anything his parents had ever done....   [tags: essays research papers] 1047 words
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How to et a Computer to Write your Paper - How to et a Computer to Write your Paper ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: HOW TO GET A COMPUTER TO WRITE A TERM PAPER WITHOUT DOING ANY WORK Can computers think. What is thinking, exactly, and how does one recognize it. What is the correlation, if any, between thinking and consciousness. Could a computer be conscious. For years, science fiction writers have used these questions as material for their stories, from domestic robots who do all the housework to automated spaceships colonizing and mining the galaxy in the name of industry....   [tags: essays papers] 3659 words
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