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Different Definitions of the Word "Pious" Depicted in Plato's Socratic Dialog Euthyphro - Plato's Socratic dialog Euthyphro is in many ways archetypal of the sort of philosophy that Socrates is thought to have been interested in. In it (as in most classic 'Socratic dialogs'), Socrates seeks out a person who claims to have a certain sort of knowledge. He then proceeds to show that these experts do not possess this knowledge by getting them to contradict themselves. With this in mind, I will discuss the three definitions of the word 'pious' that the character Euthyphro gives to Socrates, and Socrates' problems with each of these definitions....   [tags: Euthyphro] 1244 words
(3.6 pages)
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On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein - On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein They say that, in his youth, Rabbi Israel studied eight hundred books of the Kabbalah. But the first time he saw the maggid of Mezritch face to face, he instantly knew that he knew nothing at all. I have on my desk one of my daughter's college textbooks, the Mentor edition of Great Dialogues of Plato as translated by W. H. D. Rouse. It cost $4.95. It is a good book with helpful footnotes and a minimum of scholarly obstruction. The editor has included half a dozen dialogues: Ion, Meno, Symposium, Republic, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo....   [tags: Euthyphro] 3504 words
(10 pages)
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The Euthyphro Dilemma - The Euthyphro Dilemma In Plato's dialogue, 'Euthyphro', Socrates presents Euthyphro with a choice: `Is what is pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved [by the gods]?' Euthyphro responds by asserting that piety is that which is approved [loved] or sanctioned by the gods; whence impiety is whatever is disapproved of by the gods. However, as Socrates points out, the question poses a dilemma for those who believe as Euthyphro does that Truth is revealed by divine authority alone....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Euthyphro] 1552 words
(4.4 pages)
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Magistrates of Morality: How the Euthyphro Dilemma Cripples Divine Command Theory - Throughout human history, the topic of theology has been a central aspect of everyday life. A common denominator of all modern-day religions is that they provide a set of rules which one is to follow in order to live as a good, moral being. When a deity (or a group of deities) commands followers to abide by specific moral standards though a vehicle such as prophets, religious texts or otherwise, this is called Divine Command Theory (DCT). Those who accept this theory believe that moral action coincides with what has been ordered by the deities, and immoral action would occur when one deviates from these orders....   [tags: Euthyphro, DCT, theology]
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Euthyphro, by Plato - In what is noted as one of Plato first accounts, we become acquainted with a very intriguing man known as Socrates; a man, whose ambition to seek knowledge, inevitably leaves a significant impact on humanity. Most of all, it is methodologies of attaining this knowledge that makes him so mesmerizing. This methodology is referred to as Socratic irony, in literature. In any case, I will introduce the argument that Plato's Euthyphro is extremely indicative of this type of methodology, for the reason being that: Socrates's portrays a sense of intellectual humility....   [tags: Socratic Irony, Intellectual Humility] 871 words
(2.5 pages)
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Euthyphro, by Plato - Euthyphro by Plato The concept of holiness is essentially, because the real question, is holy loved by gods as it is spoken of love by god, and it in itself is holy. The significant problem that was created is what identified as holy. Those who worship would provide certain implications of holy something expected of gods. What I am trying to say, regardless of what belief a person might entail, they must follow anyway because the god will follow to. Therefore, if the other side of the spectrum were to be examined, then there is more to be considered in the sense of what is holy or not holy....   [tags: Concept of Holiness, Piety]
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Defining Piety in Euthyphro by Plato - ... The initial definition fails to provide critical characteristics that make holy things holy. For instance, Euthyphro starts by defining piety as what he is doing now, which is a mere example rather than a definition. The second definition that Euthyphro offers makes reference to gods, which is praise worthy. Nevertheless, Socrates questions the authenticity of the “divine approval” theory stating that deities disagree among themselves especially on the subject of what is pleasing. This is attributed to Euthyphro’s imperious ideation on mythical stories about Greek history....   [tags: holy, gods, just] 580 words
(1.7 pages)
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On Euthyphro's Dilemma and Divine Command - ... Bertrand Russell argues If you are quite sure there is a difference between right and wrong, you are then in this situation: Is that difference due to God's fiat or is it not. If it is due to God's fiat, then for God Himself there is no difference between right and wrong, and it is no longer a significant statement to say that God is good If you are going to say, as theologians do, that God is good, you must then say that right and wrong have some meaning which is independent of God's fiat, because God's fiats are good and not good independently of the mere fact that he made them (12).Zellner 4 Russell brings up a valid point; To say that God is good, as was presupposed earlier, would be...   [tags: Plato, Socrates, philosophy]
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1747 words
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Euthyphro-Plato: What is Holiness? - ... He argues that there are many holy actions that go beyond persecution of religious dissidents. Similarly, he cites that the gods have often quarrelled among themselves. They, therefore, approve of different things. Socrates, therefore, argues that there is no inherent understanding of holiness among different individuals (Plato. & Gallop, 1997). In his second attempt, Euthyphro posits that holiness is what has been approved of by all the gods. However, Socrates argues that what is holy and what has been approved of the gods cannot be the same....   [tags: holiness, student, knowledge, persecution]
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546 words
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The Euthyphro and The Republic - The Euthyphro and The Republic I. In the Euthyphro, Euthyphro himself gives three proposals of piety. First, the pious is to prosecute the wrongdoer and the impious is not to prosecute the wrongdoer. Socrates disputes this example as lacking generality. He believed that in order to define piety, one had to find the form that made all pious acts pious. An example of a pious act does not in turn define piety. Euthyphro’s second attempt stated that the pious is loved by the gods, while the impious was hated by them....   [tags: Papers] 1263 words
(3.6 pages)
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Solving the Euthyphro Dilemma - Imagine being stranded on the open sea in a lifeboat with a maximum capacity of fifty people. Who would you let go, who would you save. Consider this; there are a total of one hundred and seventy-five people who all deserve to live as much as the next. This can pose a difficult decision for any individual in charge of the situation. There are different ways an individual may go about coming to an ultimate decision which can be traced back to their personal motives along with their background on making ethical decisions....   [tags: Divine Command Theorist] 882 words
(2.5 pages)
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Euthyphro Dialogue - In the dialogue Euthyphro (Cahn and Markie), Plato presents an argument against the divine command meta-ethical theory. While the argument is presented against the predominantly pantheistic Greek religions, the argument can be easily applied to the monotheistic Abrahamic religions. The dialogue starts off with the two main characters: Euthyphro and Socrates. Socrates has been indicted for corrupting the youth of Athens and Euthyphro is indicting his father for murdering a day-labourer who killed one of his servants through neglect....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Socrates, Plato, Euthyphro, Apology and the Republic - ... This type of knowledge is true and sets aside any normative statements one may use to argue it. Through Plato’s three texts, Euthyphro, Apology and Republic, one can see how Socrates’ demonstrates the goal of philosophy. With Euthyphro, Socrates’ explains to Euthyphro how what is pious/impious differs among the gods and there is piety in justice but justice is not always in piety. It is the core concept of finding what is true in a statement, such as piety and justice that lays great knowledge and makes one wise....   [tags: philosophy concepts and discussion] 986 words
(2.8 pages)
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Holiness according to Socrates and Plato - Keeping true to Socratic/Platonic methodology, questions are raised in the Euthyphro by conversation; specifically “What is holiness?” After some useless deliberation, the discussion between Socrates and Euthyphro ends inconclusively. Euthyphro varying definitions of piety include “What I do is pious to the gods,” and, “What is pleasing to the gods is pious.” Socrates proves these definitions to be insufficient, which leads us to the Apology. In the defense speech given by Socrates at the beginning of his trial, he hints at a definition of holiness....   [tags: Euthyphro] 373 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Incompleteness of Plato's Euthyphro - The Incompleteness of Plato's Euthyphro The Euthyphro, like other Platonic dialogues, seeks to uncover the definition of a virtue. In its case, the virtue is piety. In the end, the dialogue fails to uncover this definition, rendering an impression of incompleteness. On account of the dialogue's dual effect -- the presentation of Socrates' spirit as well as the Greeks' inability to define piety -- explanations for its incompleteness often place too much emphasis on Socrates and, as a result, fail to unearth its true genesis....   [tags: Papers] 852 words
(2.4 pages)
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Euthyphro - Euthyphro The beginning of the story was easy to understand. I could picture Euthyphro walking up and asking Socrates what he had been doing at the palace. He didn’t seem to be too surprised to hear that Socrates was being impeached. I’m not sure what I think about Euthyphro prosecuting his own father. I suppose that for the sake of justice, it would be the right thing to do. To judge him on terms of piety, I would have no clue how to do that. I wasn’t really sure exactly what piety was when I began reading the story....   [tags: Papers] 428 words
(1.2 pages)
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Bad Euthyphro - Bad Euthyphro Euthyphro did not act pious toward his father at all. If he had been trying to be a pious human he would to think deeper in to what he did. Euthyphro turned in his father for killing one man, but he only satisfied one part of being a pious person. According to the American Heritage Dictionary being a pious person has “ devotion and severance towards his god and family.” Euthypro only pleased his god; by bring justice towards his father. He maimed his family and betrayed them....   [tags: essays research papers] 433 words
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Plato's Euthyphro - Plato's Euthyphro One of the most interesting and influential thinkers of all time was Socrates, whose dedication to careful reasoning helped form the basis for philosophy. Socrates applied logical tricks in the search for the truth. Consequently, his willingness to call everything into question and his determination to accept nothing less than an accurate account of the nature of things made him one of the first people to apply critical philosophy. Although he was well known for his philosophical ways of thinking, Socrates never wrote anything down, so we are dependent on his students, like Plato, for any detailed knowledge of his methods or way...   [tags: Plato Socrates Papers] 584 words
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Traditional And Utilitarian Approaches To The Euthyphro Dilemma - Traditional And Utilitarian Approaches To The Euthyphro Dilemma In the Euthyphro, Plato describes the proceedings of a largely circular argument between Socrates and Euthyphro, a self-declared prophet and pious man, over the nature of piety and even of the gods themselves. The issues raised in this dialogue have been reinterpreted and extended to remain relevant even with a modern theological framework, so much so that the central issue is now known simply as ?the Euthyphro dilemma.. This is based on Socrates....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays]
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Socrates Elenchus Verses Scientific Theory - The Socrates Elenchus was Socrates way of questioning a proposal. His method is tested and explained in Plato’s Euthyphro and Meno. Socrates’ method is a series of steps that are meant to test or challenge a claim. The scientific method is a modern day method used to test a theory. Both Socrates’ Elenchus and the Scientific method have similarities and differences. Socrates’ method is very alike to the scientific method however; Socrates’ method seems to be less effective than the scientific method....   [tags: Euthyphro, Meno, Plato, Socrates]
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The Question of Piety - The concept of piety is one long discussed among philosophers. In fact, Socrates yearned to learn the exact definition of piety, with which he could defend himself against accusations of impiety. In his quest for this information he inquired of Euthyphro, who claimed to be both pious, and knowledgeable about the very nature of piety, as Euthyphro brought about the trial of his father for murder. Socrates considered all that Euthyphro said in order to understand the very nature of the concept, and in his thirst for knowledge managed to dismantle all versions of the definition offered to him by Euthyphro....   [tags: Greek Mythology, Socrates, Euthyphro]
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Natural Ethics and the Ethics of Divine Command - The tension between eudaimonist or otherwise natural ethics and the ethics of divine command goes back to Plato’s Euthyphro, where we ask whether right is right because the God says so, or if God says so because it is right (philosophers sometimes call this the Euthyphro dilemma). Divine command theory, which affirms the former, featured in work by Ockham, Kierkegaard and Barth, and even appears in Locke and Berkeley [Honderich, 2005, “Divine command ethics”]. Nonetheless, even today Christian scholars can attest to the historical dominance of natural ethical thought in the West: Indeed, St....   [tags: plato´s euthyphro, god] 3144 words
(9 pages)
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Plato’s Concept of the Soul and its Relationship with the Body - Plato’s Concept of the Soul and its Relationship with the Body Plato’s theory of the body and soul originated from his earlier theories and dialogs, ‘the analogy of the cave’ and ‘the theory of forms’. Plato believed that the soul is immortal. That the soul existed before it came to the physical body, and it is still there when the body dies. This is a dualistic interpretation of the mind/body problem. Plato linked the soul to a charioteer in charge of two horses, the mind and the body, which are pulling in completely opposite directions....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Euthyphro] 725 words
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Belief in a Higher Power and Greek Philosophers - ... The third answer to what is pious and what is impious comes along, “I would certainly say that the pious is what all the gods love, and the opposite, what all the gods hate, is the impious.” Socrates begins to pick apart Euthyphro’s answer for one reason and once reason only, to make Euthyphro to doubt himself. This is the idea of the balancing of belief and doubt. When one begins to doubt what they believe they fall into an uncomfortable state. This is what Socrates goal was from the start of this piece....   [tags: Deity, Gods] 1379 words
(3.9 pages)
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Socrates: A Revolutionary Philosopher Who Posed a Threat to the Government and Society - Socrates was a revolutionary thinker. He brought new ideas and processes of thought to Athenian society and his work still has its place in the world today. However during his time, his ideas were not always thought of as a good thing. Many viewed him as a corrupting influence on other people and accused him of forcing his ideas upon others. Perhaps most frequently the center of controversy was his thoughts on theocracy and piety as seen in the Plato’s Euthyphro. Socrates also appears at the butt end of Aristophanes’ comedy Clouds, where he is satirically ridiculed and seemingly corrupting the youth of Athens in his school, the Thinkery....   [tags: Philosophy, socrates, government,] 638 words
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Socrates Method of Cross-Examine - ... Meletus says that it is worse to associate with wicked people, than virtuous people. Meletus reasoning was that wicked people would cause harm and misfortune to their associates. Socrates thinks Meletus’ answer in uncontroversial (The Apology 25c). Socrates argues that because associating with wicked people is harmful, he would not intentionally corrupt the Athenian youth (The Apology 25e-26a). Since Socrates would not intentionally corrupt the youth, he argues that the charge of him doing so is false....   [tags: benefit, justified, mission, skills] 1389 words
(4 pages)
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Socrates - Definitions of Piety - Socrates - Definitions of Piety      During the Periclean age (around 400 B.C.) in Athens Greece there was a man named Socrates. He was considered a very wise man by the Athenians. However there were men in power who did not care for him or his teachings; Claiming that he corrupted the Athenian youth and did not believe in the Greek gods, Socrates was put on trail. On his way to his trial Socrates met a man named Euthyphro, a professional priest who is respected by the "authorities" (those who want get rid of Socrates)....   [tags: Socrates Plato Philosophy]
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Socrates Was NOT Guilty -      Socrates, in his conviction from the Athenian jury, was both innocent and guilty as charged. In Plato’s Five Dialogues, accounts of events ranging from just prior to Socrates’ entry into the courthouse up until his mouthful of hemlock, both points are represented. Socrates’ in dealing with moral law was not guilty of the crimes he was accused of by Meletus. Socrates was only guilty as charged because his peers had concluded him as such. The laws didn’t find Socrates guilty; Socrates was guilty because his jurors enforced the laws....   [tags: Innocence of Socrates Essay] 1660 words
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The Ignorance of Youth - For over two thousand years, Socratic dialogues have had a deep effect on the progression of society. A key example of an effective Socratic dialogue is that of Plato's Euthyphro. Socrates demonstrates, among other things, the extent to which in our youth we are the most ignorant. In addition, he utilizes his conversation with Euthyphro to accomplish certain things that directly benefit only him. He uses this conversation to show that he is truly not as wise as everyone believes him to be. He vents his bitterness and practices speaking in preparation for the upcoming trial with Meletus....   [tags: essays research papers] 986 words
(2.8 pages)
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Exploring the Relationship Between Morality and Religion - The relationship between religion and morality is one which has been, and continues to be, exhaustively discussed and debated by philosophers. Are the two hopelessly intertwined, or are they able to exist independent of one another. One argument which seeks to provide a solution to this matter of contention is the Divine Command Theory. In this paper, I will argue that the reasoning provided by the Divine Command Theory is an inadequate defence of the dependence of religion on morality because it fails to provide logical justification for God's moral dictates....   [tags: Divine Command Theory, God's Moral Dictates]
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Comparing Islamic Fundamentalism and Plato's Dialogues - Parallels can be drawn from the Islamic fundamentalism and the discussion of piety, justice, truth, and knowledge in Plato's dialogues. In Plato's dialogues of Socrates' Apology, it becomes clear that Socrates is a pluralist, as is Noman Benotman . A pluralist is someone who believes there is more than one correct solution to a problem but not all possible solutions are correct. This differs from relativism, as relativism is that everyone in a given situation is right and all solutions are correct....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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The Trial and Death of Socrates - Recognized as one of the classical Greek Athenian philosophers who founded Western philosophy, Socrates was a mysterious figure known essentially through the accounts of later classical writers, especially from writings of his students Xenophon and the most popular Plato. Through Plato’s dialogues, Socrates has been portrayed and renowned for his involvement in the field of moral principles, and by this the concepts of Socratic irony and the Socratic Method had come about. With Socrates’ pedagogy, a series of questions can be asked not only to draw individual answers, but also to persuade deep-seated insights into the real issues at hand....   [tags: Greek Philosopher] 840 words
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am i? - Socrates was a very simple man who did not have many material possessions and spoke in a plain, conversational manner. Socrates often engaged in conversations with people who claimed to be “experts”. He would question them on issues that, if they were the “experts” they claimed to be they would have the correct answer in seconds. Socrates often made these “experts” look quite foolish when he would prove them wrong in front of many other citizens. Plato’s Euthyphro is about one day when Socrates was on his way to the courthouse he ran into Euthyphro (a young Athenian priest)....   [tags: essays research papers] 441 words
(1.3 pages)
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The origin of piety - The moral code of a society is established by many different factors. A large amount of different social guidelines are derived from religious doctrines. Due to the evolution of religion, social guidelines lack an absolute. The absolute of piety is what Socrates seemed to be searching for. His questioning of Euthyphro may have been due to his innocent curiosity. It is also probable to assume that Socrates knew that there was no true definition of Piety, and that his overall quest to find the universal of piety was used more as an example....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Plato’s Portrayal of Socrates - Plato’s Portrayal of Socrates The portrayal of Socrates by his student Plato creates one of the most controversial characters of all time. There are few other personalities in history that have drawn criticism and praise from the furthest ends of each spectrum. Socrates has been called the inventor of reason and logic, and at the same time has been condemned as a corruptor and a flake. Perhaps he was all of these. Despite this disagreement, one is a certainty: Socrates had a very interesting and active sense of humor....   [tags: Plato Socrates]
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Plato’s Five Dialogues and Applications of Today’s Society - Socrates put one’s quest for wisdom and the instruction of others above everything else in life. A simple man both in the way he talked and the wealth he owned, he believed that simplicity in whatever one did was the best way of acquiring knowledge and passing it unto others. He is famous for saying that “the unexplained life is not worth living.” He endeavored therefore to break down the arguments of those who talked with a flowery language and boasted of being experts in given subjects (Rhees 30)....   [tags: classic, phylosophy, creek]
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We Must be Punished for Our Mistakes - ... In this book the author displays Socrates’ story by using the dialogue method between Socrates and another man called Euthyphro. Euthyphro went to the court to prosecute his father and he found Socrates there. This kind of behavior is good overall and is the right thing to do if his father makes an unforgivable mistake such as stealing, and killing and he should get the right punish for his mistake. In my home country of Kuwait, if anyone steals or kills, the court will prosecute that person and blame the parents for his/her actions....   [tags: crime, respect, religion] 1395 words
(4 pages)
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Philosophy: Socrates and The Divine Theory - Introduction The nature of morality is believed to have been heavily impacted by the enduring history of religion, yet philosophical conflict has arisen of over differing interpretations of Socrates question of whether ‘our moral virtues were designed as good by an omnipotent God, or whether they are good because God recognizes them as good.’ The argument stands on the presumed belief in the God of the bible, which results in a contradiction in the infinitely debatable question posed by Socrates....   [tags: god, bible, religion, interpretations] 1242 words
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teenage alcoholism - Socraric Method The Socratic Method of philosophy is basically a series of question leading to an answer. In order for this method to work though, two conditions must be met. The first one is that the interlocutor has to say what he believes. The second is that the answers must be kept short. Here is a classic example of how this method works. It is a dialogue between Socrates and Euthyphro. The thesis is “What is dear to the gods is pious, what is not is impious.” Next Socrates gets Euthyphro to agree to the following points....   [tags: essays research papers] 382 words
(1.1 pages)
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Plato on Education as the Development of Reason - Plato on Education as the Development of Reason ABSTRACT: Socrates' great educational innovation was in ascribing moral worth to the intellectual activity reflectively directed at one's own life. His concept of eudaimonia was so different from the ordinary that talking about it took on sometimes a paradoxical air, as in Apology 30b3. For him, reason is not a tool for attaining goals independently thought worthwhile; rather, rationality itself, expressed in the giving of reasons and the avoidance of contradictions, confers value to goals and opinions....   [tags: Educational Philosophy Papers]
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The Socratic Psyche - The Socratic Psyche I will begin this paper with a brief account of Socrates. I feel this is necessary for those who are not familiar with Socrates. It is as follows: Socrates (C. 470-399 B.C.) Athenian philosopher who allegedly wrote down none of his views, supposedly from his belief that writing distorts ideas. His chief student, Plato, is the major source of knowledge about his life. Socrates questioned Athenians about their moral, political, and religious beliefs, as depicted in Plato^s dialogues; his questioning technique, called dialectic, has greatly influenced Western philosophy....   [tags: essays papers]
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From Mythos to Logos - Plato once said, “Philosophy begins in wonder.” Plato was right but he missed an important factor about when people start to question what they know in the world. When people question everything in the known world, the conclusions that arise can change the thinking of everyone in that world. Most of these types of change came from ancient Greek philosophy. The examples given in this essay represents a shift between a mythological worldview to a more logical worldview....   [tags: Plato, Socrates, Philosophy] 994 words
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The Devine Command Theory - ... The argument from objectivity of morality also advocates the Divine Command Theory. It states that moral standards are objective, separate from all culture’s judgment. It also states that they’re universal. Thus, morality can only be objective and universal if it depends on the commands of God. In response, morality is solely dependent on God’s commands. While both these theories have something of value, they both hold flaws. The theory from divine supremacy, while being agreed upon within many religions, makes several significant assumptions....   [tags: god, morality, will] 853 words
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Discussion of the View that Morality and Religion are Linked - Discussion of the View that Morality and Religion are Linked The view that morality and religion are linked together implies that it is God who dictates to us humans whatever is moral. Therefore, any action dictated to humans to carry out by God is morally right or acceptable. Looking from this point of view, morality would be based on unchangeable laws and this view is deontological because it based on golden rules and does not look at present consequences before it is considered moral or right....   [tags: Papers] 579 words
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student - Euthyphro Good or bad, right or wrong, truth or lie, piety or impiety, just or unjust, honorable or dishonorable; these controversies are and always have been problematic for human beings. It is not as easy as it seems to draw a line between those antonyms, partly because people have cultural differences, dissimilar backgrounds, educational levels, values, believes, and views on religion, as in the case with Socrates and Euthyphro. Following the conversation of Socrates and Euthyphro, it is obvious that Socrates is a philosopher who relies on his philosophic point of view and believes that it is not normal to pursue your own father for murder, if he killed a non-relative....   [tags: essays research papers] 642 words
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Last Days Of Socrates - The Last Days of Socrates Plato. The Last Days of Socrates. London: Penguin Books Ltd., 1993 Imagine the time just after the death of Socrates. The people of Athens were filled with questions about the final judgment of this well-known, long-time citizen of Athens. Socrates was accused at the end of his life of impiety and corruption of youth. Rumors, prejudices, and questions flew about the town. Plato experienced this situation when Socrates, his teacher and friend, accepted the ruling of death from an Athenian court....   [tags: Plato Socrates Philosophy Essays] 2263 words
(6.5 pages)
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Socrates: One of the Greatest Minds the World Has Ever Known - Inspiring. Enigmatic. Stubborn. Insightful. Truly one of the greatest minds the world has ever known was the philosopher, Socrates. Yet next to nothing is known for certain about him. This is because he didn’t bother to write any of his musings or teachings. However, most of what we know about Socrates today comes to us from the works of Socrates’ student, Plato. It is through many of his works that the ethical theories of Socrates can be learned and his methods known. WHO WAS HE. Socrates was a devoted student of human nature and human motives....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Biblical Ethics and Moral Dilemmas: God is the Answer - Throughout the history of the world, people have been concerned with what it is to live a moral life. Many answers have been put forth for this question, but the best by far is found in the Christian Bible. This is because the Bible is a revelation from the Creator. While people can grope in the dark to find answers to moral questions by looking at natural law, they are always frustrated because the real nature of the world we live in is fallen and corrupt. We have an adversary who tries to deceive us and minds that are easily deceived....   [tags: Ethics]
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Moral Intentions, Actions, and Decisions - ... Without religion, there is no morality, therefore no right and wrong behavior. Although there are other claims that are claiming religion exists based on the necessity to motivate and guide people to behave morally correct, most people take the claim of the necessary connection between morality and religion to mean that right and wrong come from the commands of God. This states that an action is considered right if God commands us to do it, and wrong if God forbids us from doing it . However, it is thought to have several flaws, for example, it assumes that God exists and that we can know what God commands....   [tags: evaluate, religion, God] 539 words
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Socrates' Pursuit of Wisdom - Philosophy can be defined as the pursuit of wisdom or the love of knowledge. Socrates, as one of the most well-known of the early philosophers, epitomizes the idea of a pursuer of wisdom as he travels about Athens searching for the true meaning of the word. Throughout Plato’s early writings, he and Socrates search for meanings of previously undefined concepts, such as truth, wisdom, and beauty. As Socrates is often used as a mouthpiece for Plato’s ideas about the world, one cannot be sure that they had the same agenda, but it seems as though they would both agree that dialogue was the best way to go about obtaining the definitions they sought....   [tags: Philosophy, Philosophical] 1155 words
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The Complicated Life of Socrates - Socrates was a classical Greek philosopher that was born in Athens, Greece around 470/469 BC. He served in the Athenian army and fought in many battles. When Socrates retired from fighting in the army, he began focusing on expressing his beliefs. He wasn’t the typical “teacher” or “preacher”; he was a very critical and analytical thinker that helped guide his students and the Athenians during his time. Through his teachings and beliefs, Socrates had positive and negative influence on the people during his time and modern time....   [tags: Biography, Greek Philosopher, Athens]
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Rules and Exceptions - Rules and Exceptions One of the factors which have led many philosophers to adopt a more or less sceptical attitude in moral philosophy has been the recognition that most rules have exceptions. This has commonly been regarded as a threat to the entire moral enterprise. How can a philosopher even attempt to find an account of the moral relations that obtain among things which will weave them into the unity of a stable system if every principle, every rule, every judgment has to be qualified by who knows how many exceptions....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Papers]
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Morality and Laws in The Trial and Death of Socrates - Morality and Laws in The Trial and Death of Socrates Upon reading Plato, The Trial and Death of Socrates, Socrates strongly held views on the relationship between morality and laws become apparent to the reader. Equally, Socrates makes clear why laws should be followed and why disobedience to the law is rarely justified. Finally, he makes clear his views regarding civil disobedience. Socrates’ view on morality is that anyone can do wrong. It is said that injuring someone in return for injury to oneself is wrong....   [tags: Morals Socrates Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 1245 words
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Socrates' Systematic Defense - Plato's Apology begins with the opening statements of Socrates. The jurymen's ears are still ringing with the sound of his accuser's well-crafted arguments, and the stage is set for Socrates to defend himself. The reputable orator surprisingly begins his defense by stating that he is not going to “toy with words” but will argue his case with the first words that come to mind (17c). The tension becomes evident as Socrates' systematic defense leads him to contradict his opening statements and undermine the ethos he sought to establish in the beginning of the dialog....   [tags: Politics, Philosophy] 2051 words
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According to Socrates, Should you Obey an Unjust Law? - Convicted For Living. Do we have an obligation to obey any law, no matter how unjust or evil, provided only that it is in fact a valid rule of the legal system in which we happen to be physically located. In the following composition, I am going to examine the answer to this question in accordance to what Socrates believes. The best way to understand this almost “WWSD” (What Would Socrates Do) approach is by looking at Socrates' actions in the three Platonic dialogues we have read. These dialogues bring forth three possible bases for why Socrates believes one should obey the law....   [tags: socrates, unjust law, obeying] 567 words
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Music and Morality - Music and Morality "Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man, and make gentle the life of this world." This famous Robert Kennedy quote reminds us of how influential our predecessors were to us in many different facets, including music. Throughout history, we see how dearly important music and the morality of music were for many societies. As early as 400 B.C.E, during the time of philosophers like Socrates and Plato, music (although much different from what it is today) greatly influenced the mores of society....   [tags: Music] 1458 words
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The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues - The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues ABSTRACT: When contemplating the origins of philosophical paideia one is tempted to think of Socrates, perhaps because we feel that Socrates has been a philosophical educator to us all. But it is Plato and his literary genius that we have to thank as his dialogues preserve not just Socratic philosophy, but also the Socratic educational experience. Educators would do well to better understand Plato's pedagogical objectives in the Socratic dialogues so that we may appreciate and utilize them in our own educational endeavors, and so that we may adapt the Socratic experience to new interactive educational technologies....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 2861 words
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Socrates and Plato's The Republic - Socrates and Plato's The Republic Throughout his life, Socrates engaged in critical thinking as a means to uncover the standards of holiness, all the while teaching his apprentices the importance of continual inquiry in accordance with obeying the laws. Socrates primarily focuses on defining that which is holy in The Euthyphro – a critical discussion that acts as a springboard for his philosophical defense of the importance of lifelong curiosity that leads to public inquiry in The Apology. Socrates continues his quest for enlightenment in The Crito, wherein he attempts to explain that while inquiry is necessary, public curiosity has its lawful price, thus those who inquire must both contin...   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Republic Essays] 2169 words
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What Is a Good Human Life and How Should It Be Lived? - What is a good human life and how should it be lived. Introduction The ancient philosophers had put much emphasis on the constitution of the human life and the manner in which it should be lived. From Aristotle to Plato and Socrates, all these philosophers had different views concerning the manner in which people should live with themselves and with each other. The aim of this paper is to explore the views of these three philosophers and then analyze where they compare and contrast with each other....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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By Jove: A Brief Look at Polytheistic Divine Command Theory - ... However, in this case, it would also seem that it would be a pious act to purposefully hinder Odysseus’ return, for instance, to be opening the bag of ill winds knowing full well what was inside. On the other hand, based on the divine will of Poseidon, it would also be a pious act for the hypothetical Ciconian shipbuilder to purposefully leave leaks and holes in discreet places on Odysseus’ ship, knowing that this could likely send him to the bottom, Along the same lines, it would be a pious act to prevent the bag of ill winds from being opened by a malicious (and incidentally suicidal) sailor....   [tags: Sophocles, playwright, Antigone]
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Patriotism Aided in Socrate's Acceptance of His Death - THESIS STATEMENT Patriotism aided in Socrates' acceptance of his death, although believing he was unjustly convicted of corrupting the youth of Athens and creating divinities in place of the gods. PURPOSE STATEMENT Through books and essays about Socrates, research, and analysis it shows that he was truly guilty of his crimes and accepted them willingly although he believed he was innocent. INTRODUCTION A member of the jury watched as the defendant, tense and nervous, looked over at the Kleptsydra, or the water-clock, and realized time is of the essence....   [tags: History, Death Penalty] 1803 words
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The Value of Nature to Humans - ... In order for a being to value, they must be able to produce rational thoughts. In order to be able to produce rational thoughts, they must have a uniquely organized prefrontal cortex. Humans are the only beings who have a special prefrontal cortex. Therefore, humans are the only beings with the ability to value. Plants and, more generally non-humans, have value only because humans project value onto them. Humans are dependent on the natural world for survival, making nature valuable to humans....   [tags: projection, humans, planet, destroying] 1986 words
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Plato's Vision of the Ideal State - Plato's Vision Of The Ideal State As Presented In The Republic The concept of questioning meaning of life, the universe and everything has become debauched in modern society. But there is an exigency for and a value in the procedure of reasoning through aspects of our experience beginning with moral principles to existence. It can, for ordinary peoples as much as for professional philosophers, enlivening, vivid, and developmental. Plato is one of the most influential thinkers in human history. His philosophies have made a far-reaching impact on the human societies and have laid the foundation of many avenues of knowledge....   [tags: selfishness, utopia, God] 1275 words
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Defining Justice in Plato’s the Republic - ... Throughout these tools man is exposed to the pleasures of gain, knowledge, and honor. It is with these tools that man is able to properly position themselves on the scale of pleasure and pain. However, it is not merely enough for these elements of reason, spirit, and desire on an individual level and lovers of wisdom, reason, and spirit on a social level to exist separately. It is necessary for them all to coexist together in harmony to achieve justice. For “there is a point midway between the two [pleasure and pain] at which the soul reposes from both” (Plato, 116)....   [tags: soul, enlightened, ethics] 796 words
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Hearing Voices and Etheogens - ... Is he able, but not willing. Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing. The whence cometh evil. Is he neither willing nor able. Then why call him God?” - Epicurus (341-271 B.C.) The question here is whether morality actually exists independent of God, or whether it is contingent on the existence of human beings and their ability to create God. Since we live in a world where both so many atrocities are committed and so many humans hear voices, often the voice of God, we must concern ourselves with the origin of ethical and unethical behavior....   [tags: Mental, Shaman, Supernatural] 2485 words
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Greeks - Greeks Greek beliefs changed over time. In the beginning the Greeks believed strongly in the gods. These ideas were very similar to those of earlier peoples (Craig, Graham, et. al. 57). The Greek gods shared many of the same characteristics of the Mesopotamian deities (Craig, Graham, et. al. 57). The Greek pantheon consisted of the twelve gods who lived on Mount Olympus (Craig, Graham, et. al. 83). These gods were: -Zeus, the father of the gods, -Hera, his wife, -Zeus’s siblings: Poseidon, his brother, god of seas and earthquakes, Hestia, his sister, goddess of the hearth, Demeter, his sister, goddess of agriculture and marriage, -Zeus’s children: Aphrodite, goddess of love and beaut...   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Rene Descartes - Essay # 2 Rene Descartes was a French philosopher. His theory is that reality consists of mind and matter. Descartes answers the question or attempts to answer the question of “what is real?” using dualism. Dualism is defined as the view that reality is composed of two different substances, so that neither one can be related to the other. Such examples being; spirit/matter, mind/body, good/evil. Descartes feels that the human can be broken down into two separate substances; a mind having no physical attributes and a body having a shape....   [tags: essays research papers] 404 words
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Compare Utilitarianism with the religion that you have studiedUtilitarianism VS Christianity - Compare Utilitarianism with the religion that you have studied Utilitarianism VS Christianity BASIC MAXIM – “THE GREATEST HAPPINESS FOR THE GREATEST NUMBER” JEREMY BENTHAM – Act Utilitarianism (each action should be judged on its ability to bring about the greatest happiness for the greatest number) - Devised principle of utility - Established a hedonic calculus to measure pleasure/pain brought about by each action. JOHN STUART MILL – Rule Utilitarianism (rules should be formulated first, based on utilitarian principles....   [tags: Papers] 686 words
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Theme of Justice in the Odyssey and the Bible - Theme of Justice in the Odyssey and the Bible       Justice is a theme that differs in many different texts, and this also true in the Odyssey and the Bible.  Justice in Homeric texts was served to neutralize a situation and bring things back to the way they were, to a time of stability and respect for authority.  The bible has usually been interpreted, however, as serving justice on a moral basis, as a way to punish those who did not respect each other or act in God likeness.          The Greeks in the Odyssey viewed justice as only coming from the gods.  They believed the gods punished them because they have fallen out of their favor, and not because they had really done anything wrong...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Erroneus Assumptions in The Trial and Death of Socrates - Erroneus Assumptions in The Trial and Death of Socrates In Plato's Crito, Socrates explains to his old friend Crito his reasons for refusing an offer to help him escape execution. One of the tools Socrates uses to convince Crito of the righteousness of his decision is a hypothetical argument concerning the state and laws of Athens. Central to this argument is the congeniality that Socrates had always found in Athens, reflected by the fact that Socrates chose to remain in Athens for most of his life....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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A life sketch of Plato and his works - If Thales was the first of all the great Greek philosophers, Plato must remain the best known of all the Greeks. The original name of this Athenian aristocrat was Aristiclis, but in his school days he received the nickname "Platon" (meaning "broad") because of his broad shoulders. Plato was born in Athens, Greece to one of the oldest and most distinguished families in the city. He lived with his mother, Perictione, and his father, Ariston (Until Ariston died.) Born in an aristocratic and rich family, Plato’s childhood was indulged within luxury....   [tags: essays research papers] 886 words
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Athens: The Acropolis and the Agora - Athens: The Acropolis and the Ago Modern day Athens has managed to maintain an ancient landscape.. The Acropolis and the Agora are two major features of ancient Greece that have a home in this metropolitan city.. Both of these ancient sites preserve their power and mystery in a modern day world. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, an agora is an open space in ancient Greek cities that served as both a meeting place and as an area for various civic activities (?Agora?).. The Agora of ancient Athens was rebuilt after the Persian Wars (490-449 BC) in response to a lengthy period of wealth and peace in the city (ibid).....   [tags: History Historical Papers]
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Literary Works of Plato: Critical Essay - This essay attempts to present a critical analysis of the literary works of Plato. Plato's literary work span is wide containing issues pertaining to justice, social life, specific virtues, good ruler's knowledge, value of justice, love and many others. The philosophical tones of Plato resembled very much with that of Socrates addressing the similar issues in his own Platonic version of dialogues. The Republic and the citizen played an important role in his work in addressing to the various social issues and intricate understanding of the human nature of human responsibilities in a republic....   [tags: Philosophy] 782 words
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Hugo Meynell and the Christian Doctrine - Hugo Meynell and the Christian Doctrine Hugo Meynell's book is a clear example of the growing interest in apologetics. Meynell considers four common objections to Christian doctrine, the belief in God is morally irrelevant; that there is no reason to believe in the special claims of Christianity over those of non-Christian religions. Meynell, also says no sense can be made of the doctrines of Incarnation, Atonement, and the Trinity and that Christian doctrine about life after death is based upon an indefensible view of the nature of human persons-and shows to his own views that these remarks can be met....   [tags: Papers] 1028 words
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The Father of Western Philosophy Socrates - The Father of Western Philosophy: Socrates Since the dawn of man, the invariable love of knowledge has kindled the hearts of humankind. That true passion in the heart for mankind over the flux of time is the study of philosophy. One of the greatest embellishments to philosophy overtime is the lionized Socrates of Athens born in 469B.C. His life exemplifies a true philosopher’s life, and the aspect of wonder that has cloaked mankind since the beginning of time. Therefore, the philosophical significance of Socrates is strenuous to parallel for he: practiced systematic and logical reasoning, lived an undemanding life, and pursued truth and wisdom....   [tags: essays research papers] 695 words
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Plato's The Crito - There are many instances in Plato's the Crito where Socrates gives reasons for himself to stay in Athens and face his death. Arguments range from that of him being too old to run, to the common response two wrongs don't make a right. The reason I intend to argue against is one Socrates expresses in regards to his obligations to the city he has lived in all his life, and thus the rules that he has subsequently followed throughout that time. In Athens just like any other city, one follows the rules that the respective city has laid down because he/she believes in those laws, or does not and keeps silent....   [tags: essays research papers] 981 words
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Socrates - Socrates Socrates was accused of many things in the Athens market. Socrates was accused of being a man who makes the worse argument into the stronger argument. A man who knows about the heavens and earth and therefore any one who believe this must not believe in the gods. Socrates was accused of being an atheist. Most of the people that followed him around his quest were inquisitive. Where as most adults would walk by Socrates with his “annoying question” the youth stopped to see what he had to say....   [tags: essays research papers] 645 words
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The Republic - The Republic Plato was born around the year 428 BCE into an established Athenian household with a history of political connections -- including distant relations to both Solon and Pisistratus. Plato's parents were Ariston and Perictone, his older brothers were Adeimantus and Glaucon, and his younger sister was Potone. In keeping with his family heritage, Plato was destined for the political life. But the Peloponnesian War, which began a couple of years before he was born and continued until well after he was twenty, led to the decline of the Athenian Empire....   [tags: Papers] 1498 words
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Plato - Philosopher. According to sources, Plato was born on or around May 21, 427 (or 428) B.C. in Athens, the son of Ariston and Perictione, both of Athenian aristocratic ancestry. He lived his whole life in Athens, although he traveled to Sicily and southern Italy on several occasions, and one story says he traveled to Egypt. Little is known of his early years, but he was given the finest education Athens had to offer the scions of its noble families, and he devoted his considerable talents to politics and the writing of tragedy and other forms of poetry....   [tags: essays research papers] 1730 words
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Plato - Plato Plato was born in Athens to a wealthy family and lived from 429-347 B.C.E. He was Socrates' greatest student and held his teacher in such high regard that in most of his works Socrates plays the main character. Some people doubt the existance of Socrates but, "like nearly everyone else who appears in Plato's works, he is not an invention of Plato: there really was a Socrates" (Kraut). Plato wrote many works asking questions about terms such as justice, piety, and immortality to name a few....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophers]
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