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Analysis of The Eskimo Girl - Analysis of The Eskimo Girl Living in the Arctic wasn't easy. There were always problems, but this was different. Sophie had never been in such a desperate situation... She walked and looked around her. Sophie had lived in this part of the North Pole with her Inuit tribe for thirteen years. The Eskimos knew the land well. Sophie often explored the vast lakes and ancient mountains and had never got lost; but this time was different. She hadn't meant to walk far, but then she hadn't anticipated a snowstorm either....   [tags: Papers] 592 words
(1.7 pages)
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Eskimo Pie Corporation - Eskimo Pie Corporation Introduction      Reynolds Metals is the majority owner of the ice scream company Eskimo Pie Corporation and has decided to sell this company. Nestle Foods provided the highest offer of $61 Million. Due to delays of the Nestlé’s purchase, Reynolds Metals has take into consideration the IPO proposal of David Clark, president of Eskimo Pie Corporation, rather than selling the company to Nestle Foods (Case Study, 2001).      This analysis will identify the current value of the company at a stand-alone value and explain why Nestle Food would want to buy this company and the synergies involved for their reasoning....   [tags: Business Management Essays]
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1314 words
(3.8 pages)
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Eskimos in Alaskan Society - Eskimos in Alaskan Society The early Eskimos settled in the forest and tundra parts of northern and western Alaska. The Eskimos learned how to survive in this cod icy place that was frozen for most of the year. Some of the Eskimos lived in the southwestern part of Alaska The southwestern region is a little warmer and wetter. In Alaska there are three Eskimo groups they are yipik inupiat, and siberian yupik. A lot of the Eskimo families live in the flat tundra coast. The ocean gives them most of there food....   [tags: essays papers] 545 words
(1.6 pages)
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Comparing the Inuits and the North-West People - Comparing the Inuits and the north-west people We have been studying the people of the North West and Inuits. In this essay I will describe their differences and explain why they are different. They have a large variety of differences which had a large effect on lifestyles. Housing The Inuits lives in snow houses known as Igloos. They houses were made out of snow as it was plentiful in the area they lived in. The snow was many metres thick so it was ideal for insulating Igloos; this meant they kept at a comfortable 16°C especially when the females cooked food....   [tags: Eskimos] 1733 words
(5 pages)
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Analysis of When the Vikings Reached the New World - When the Vikings reached the New World, they called the native inhabitants (American Indians or Native Americans), “Skræling.” There has been much debate as to what exactly this word or label meant. Some translate it as “skin wearers,” which may be true as to how they described them, being the Norse generally wore woolen or linen clothing and North American Natives generally wore animal skins. But there was one additional thing puzzling about the Norse and the Skræling. The Viking explorers weren't curious or baffled by these new people....   [tags: vikings, norsemen, skraeling] 692 words
(2 pages)
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The Inuit People - The Inuit People The word Eskimo is not a proper Eskimo word. It means "eaters of raw meat" and was used by the Algonquin Indians of eastern Canada for their neighbours who wore animal-skin clothing and were ruthless hunters. The name became commonly employed by European explorers and now is generally used, even by them. Their own term for themselves is Inuit which means the "real people." The Inuit developed a way of life well-suited to their Arctic environment, based on fishing; hunting seals, whales, and walruses in the ocean; and hunting caribou, polar bears, and other game on land....   [tags: Papers] 1382 words
(3.9 pages)
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The Meaning of Food in Native American Cultures - Taking a deeper look at the meaning behind food through the eyes of traditional societies reveals nothing more than absolute complexity. Sam Gill, in Native American Religions, indisputably shows the complexity through detailed performances and explanations of sacred ceremonies held among numerous traditional societies. Ultimately, Gill explains that these societies handle their food (that gives them life), the source in which the good is obtained, and the way they go about getting their food are done in extreme symbolic manners that reflect their cosmology, religious beliefs, actions, and respect for ancestors/spirits that live among them....   [tags: World Cultures] 691 words
(2 pages)
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Clearly Pacifist, Clearly Credible - Clearly Pacifist, Clearly Credible Many people tend to think war is a part of life that mankind will never be able to rid itself of. This comes from the assumption that war is one of the basic needs of mankind. However, Margaret Mead does not make this assumption. In fact, she denies its credibility in her essay “Warfare is Only an Invention – Not a Biological Necessity.” In this essay, Margaret Mead combines a great deal of logos and ethos with limited pathos to support her pacifist claim that warfare is merely an invention of man, and not a need found in the very nature of man....   [tags: Weapons Warfare Essays] 1135 words
(3.2 pages)
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To What Degree Might Different Languages Shape In Their Speakers Different Concepts Of Themselves And The World - To What Degree Might Different Languages Shape In Their Speakers Different Concepts Of Themselves And The World. What Are The Implications Of Such Differences For Knowledge. The difference in languages can cause different perceptions of various cultures leading to distinctions or possible clashes. When I lived in France I faced some of the problems a language barrier can cause. The most common and at the same time most irritating problem of language is the inability to translate word for word as some words just don’t have a direct translation into another language....   [tags: essays research papers] 1109 words
(3.2 pages)
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Laguage Brings People Together - Without language as a way of knowing, it would be very difficult for humans to communicate ideas and gather knowledge. A language’s ability to be “rule-governed, intended, and creative and open-ended” allows it to be a useful tool in the development of culture; and thus aid an individual in the process of discovering his or her own identity (Dunn 57). In essence, different languages to a certain degree affect the views an individual may hold about themselves and the world around them, but this is not the only factor; the environment and experiences also influences these concepts....   [tags: English, Japanese, Communication, Ideas]
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932 words
(2.7 pages)
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Afraid of Change - Change is an inevitable process of life and often it can be extremely difficult to deal with. A change can be as small and insignificant as changing a habit, or maybe even as huge as switching schools or death. The Catcher in the Rye is a novel about the main character’s, Holden’s, journey of growing up. He experiences many varying types of changes. Holden is afraid of change and in many situations throughout the novel, he resists both change and the process of maturity. In J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the motif of the Museum of Natural History is the main object that helps to develop the theme of Holden’s fear of change, and it is obvious that he fears change and complexity more...   [tags: The Catcher in the Rye, Salinger, fear, innocence]
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1172 words
(3.3 pages)
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The Coming Disaster: The Environment, Climate Change, and Human Influences - Humans will not be able to survive the results of human activities due to land degradation, lack of water management skills, pollution, and increasing carbon footprints. In 1750, a revolution started globally. This revolution was called the Industrial Revolution; it changed agriculture, manufacturing, mining, transportation & technology forever. It has even changed lives economically and culturally, but most importantly, the great effects it has on the environment. “A glacier in the high Andes 5,200 meters above capital, Lima, where one of the main water supplying glaciers has shrunk by more than a kilometer over the last decade...Eskimo villagers are going hungry because global warming ha...   [tags: Climate Change]
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2542 words
(7.3 pages)
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Decline in Religious Involvement in American's Lives - ... They could vote and started working and providing for themselves. In the 1930s men began to leave their families due to the stock market crash. Women not only provided for themselves but also children without men. These women are still a very influential to today's people and all their changes are still in effect today. In today’s society the population of people has changed from 281.4 to 315 million people. From this increase in population the number of jobs available has decrease. The number of jobs is starting to decrease due to the recession....   [tags: changes in religion, diversity, education] 1254 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Inuit - The Inuit The Inuit are the northernmost inhabitants of North America. The name INUIT and Eskimo is given to the population of the Arctic region and the region from eastern Siberia to Greenland. The Inuit have been called "Eskimo" but they really do prefer to be called Inuit. The word Inuit means, "people who are alive at this time". Inuit also refers to the group of people of "Eskimoid" ancestry, which live in northern Canada. The word "Eskimo" means "eaters of raw meat" - and in today's time it is insulting to use the term....   [tags: Papers] 1722 words
(4.9 pages)
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Windflower by Gabrielle Roy - Windflower Gabrielle Roy, the author of Windflower, shows us through her main character, Elsa Kumachuck, that isolation can have unfortunate effects on an individual and the people around them. We, as readers, are in the beginning given the impression that Elsa is a fit mother who is responsible and knows how to raise her child properly. Later on though, we realize that it's the influence of other people in her life and the experience of isolation later on that lead her to make the decisions that she does....   [tags: essays research papers] 538 words
(1.5 pages)
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Relationship between Cultural Change and the Environment - Relationship between Cultural Change and the Environment The association between culture and human technologies is central to the issue of today’s worldwide environmental degradation. This relationship is often viewed as quite simple: as a culture develops, needs arise and are met by new technologies. The culture is then transformed by the effects the technologies have on the people’s way of life. It seems logical that new technology would only be developed as a result of incentive or passion inspired by the needs of a culture....   [tags: Environment Environmental Pollution Preservation]
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971 words
(2.8 pages)
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Very Short Wedding Toasts - Very Short Wedding Toasts The Light that Shines There is a light that shines beyond the heavens; this is the light that shines in your heart when you are in love. "May you have warmth in your igloo, oil in your lamp and peace in your heart!" ~Eskimo Proverb The Days of your Life May you live all the days of your life. — Jonathan Swift From this Day Forward May the face of every good news, And the back of every bad news, Be toward you, From this day forward. No Sorrow May the goblets of life hold no dregs of sorrow....   [tags: Wedding Toasts Roasts Speeches] 305 words
(0.9 pages)
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Has the Creation of Nunavut Come too Quickly? - Has the Creation of Nunavut Come too Quickly. The North of Canada may invoke thoughts of polar bears, penguins, and Eskimos, however this region has a history of exploitation. Since the 1940's, the Inuit people (Eskimo is considered a derogatory term by locals) have been forced to assimilate to Canadian laws and language. Prior to the arrival of the Canadian officials and their economic and law systems and infrastructures, the Inuit lived in small groups off the tundra. Their economic system was one of trade and they spoke Inuktitut, which was only an oral language until about fifty years ago....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Papers]
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1232 words
(3.5 pages)
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This Is Water: Synthesize the Essays by Freire and Wallace - “This is Water” is an essay that originated from a commencement speech that was delivered by David Foster Wallace at the Kenyon College on May 21, 2005 (Wallace 14). Wallace’s speech has gained a lot of acknowledgment because of its practical advice that navigate day-to day adult life. Additionally, the speech seems to be prominent as it contains various advices that one can put into account in day to day life. The main subject of the entire speech is to bring the entire graduating student’s attention to their negative thoughts....   [tags: ethos, logos, pathos, paulo freire] 1267 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Inuit Way of Life - The Inuit were people who lived in the Arctic such as Alaska, Northern Canada and Greenland. They can also be called Eskimos. The word Inuit refers to “real people of the north” and from this distinction as well as their way of living which I observed at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, I conclude that these people were a race of people with a strong spirit for life in general as well as each other. Their social customs included storytelling, dancing, drum playing, crafts, celebrations, games, hunting and survival skills....   [tags: essays research papers] 432 words
(1.2 pages)
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Leslie Marmon Silko's Lullaby, Storyteller, and Yellow Woman - Leslie Marmon Silko's Lullaby, Storyteller, and Yellow Woman Leslie Marmon Silko?s work is set apart due to her Native American Heritage. She writes through ?Indian eyes. which makes her stories very different from others. Silko is a Pueblo Indian and was educated in one of the governments. BIA schools. She knows the culture of the white man, which is not uncommon for modern American Indians. Her work is powerful and educating at the same time.      In this paper, I will discuss three different works by Silko (Lullaby, Storyteller, and Yellow Woman)....   [tags: Silko Lullaby Storyteller Yellow Woman Essays] 845 words
(2.4 pages)
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Differences Between the Laity and Monastic Worshippers Within Buddhist Tradition - The differences between the laity and monastic worshippers within Buddhist tradition are distinguished by the extent to which these two groups are willing to follow the middle-way as taught by Buddha. Typically, in order to have a functional Buddhist society, there must be the devout, and those who support the devout, giving aid in the form of food, monies, shelter, transportation, etc. The devout who sacrifice the purity of a true monastic lifestyle in order to support the community (who in turn are the recipients of merit or punya; a bank of ‘good’ actions tied to ‘good’ karma) (Gethin 101), from the monastic worshippers, are called the laity; upasakas (men laity) and upasikas (women laity...   [tags: Buddhism]
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1759 words
(5 pages)
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Digital Revolution: The Benefits of Modern Broad-Based Participatory Media - It is said that we are now entering an era of digital revolution. 'Cyberspace' has become the new place for people around the world to communicate, “surfing the internet” is no longer a novel phrase, people can 'friend' and 'unfriend' someone he or she has never met over social networks and you can chat with a monkey over the Internet for maybe half an hour without realizing the true identity of the other 'person'. One may say that aspects of cyberspace are surreal, maybe even bizarre but I think this is exactly why the digital world is so amazing....   [tags: internet, computers] 1001 words
(2.9 pages)
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Inuits of Greenland: An Adaptive Society - Inuits of Greenland: An Adaptive Society In a world far different from our own in the Northern Hemisphere lies an indigenous society known as the Inuits. Specifically focusing on the Inuits of Greenland these people have adopted various risk management strategies which has enabled them to survive in a harsh arctic environment. In indigenous cultures, their well-being and sustainability is managed through control of population growth like most present day indigenous societies have been influenced by western ideas and technologies, in which some of these influences have been beneficial while other western influences have threatened their traditional way of life....   [tags: Geography Geographical Essays]
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3292 words
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Matthew Henson and Merrick Johnston Discovery of the North Pole - Matthew Henson and Merrick Johnston both achieved something extraordinary. Matthew Henson was awarded as the co-discoverer of the North Pole. Merrick Johnston was the youngest person ever to climb Mt. McKinley. Although they differ, both of their ambitions were hard to achieve and were a huge milestone for each person. Life was forever changed for both Henson and Johnston when they reached their destination. In the dictionary, a goal is “something that one hopes or intends to accomplish.” Henson accomplished his goal on April 6th, 1909....   [tags: essays research papers] 379 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Greenland Shark - The Greenland Shark Sharks live in almost every part of the oceans, from coastal environments to deep-sea habitats. They also live in the warm waters of the tropics to the cold frigid waters of the polar region. The Greenland shark, also known as “somniousus Microcephalus,” lives in the dark, cold waters of the North Atlantic (I 65). The Greenland shark belongs to the order Squaliforms, more usually known as dogfish sharks. There are 70 species in this order, which includes the spied sharks, spiny dogfish, Sleeper sharks and lantern fish (I 50)....   [tags: science]
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1285 words
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Motifs in Creation Myths - Motifs in Creation Myths The motifs found in the creation myths are undoubtedly different from those found in any other type of myth. Contrary to popular belief, the purpose of the creation myths is much greater than a primitive attempt to explain the mysteries of creation. Behind each creation myth is a vast variety of symbolism along with a number of motives which are often shared between cultures, despite vast geographical differences. My intention here is not only to discuss the purpose of the creation myths, but also to compare and contrast common themes which can be found in three selected works....   [tags: Papers] 1656 words
(4.7 pages)
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The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho and The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger - In The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho and The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, the notion of the past and present played a great part introducing and developing a theme. A character in both novels long to relive their pasts but at the same time are okay with keeping things as they are. One of The Alchemist’s themes is about achieving one’s Personal Legend; and one of A Catcher in the Rye’s themes about the pain of growing up. These characters and their stance on the past and present were catalysts for introducing these themes....   [tags: the alchemist, paulo coelho]
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1032 words
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A Comparison of Three Pandemics: Their Cause, Impact on Society, and Mortalities - When one brings up the three diseases: Spanish flu, Black Plaque, and AIDS, what comes to mind. Is it the fact that each of them has killed millions. Or, that they each came at different periods of time on earth. I would like to compare the agents of each particular disease and portions of the world that was affected by these pandemics as well. Additionally, I would like to discuss the symptoms, cures, and potential cures for these diseases. The Black Death started in the fourteenth century. Relative to world population, it was by far the worst plague....   [tags: Disease ]
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1095 words
(3.1 pages)
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Biography of Malcolm X: A Famous Civil Rights Activist - Malcolm X Malcolm Little, Aka Malcolm X, was a famous civil rights movement activist. He had a hard childhood. He was picked on due to the light color of his skin by peers and family members. He grew up poor and spent years of his life committing crimes and ended up in prison. Malcolm X found Islam in prison, and developed different philosophies which came from his childhood experiences. Malcolm X eventually found peace, and unfortunately was killed after he began to make a positive difference....   [tags: peace, muslim mosque inc, africa]
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1605 words
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There Is No Such Thing as Fair Discrimination - Affirmative action is a method that tries to end discrimination, to bring diversity, and most importantly, to correct America’s historical racism and misdemeanor towards the minority--by giving a preferential treatment or boost towards the marginalized people in admissions to universities or employments. From former President Kennedy’s Executive Order 10925, the first use of the phrase, to Regents of the University of California v. Bakke, supreme court case that set the boundaries of affirmative action, affirmative action’s idea of expanding equality has become an issue continually commended and criticize....   [tags: affirmative action, ]
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1573 words
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Footwear Trends: Exploring America's Fascination with Uggs - America's love-hate relationship with the fuzzy footwear phenomenon known as uggs has gone on now for almost a decade. Sadly, the go-go boots of the naughts show few signs of going away. This fashion fad has left many wondering where exactly uggs came from. More importantly, people want to know, “why and how long the ugg is here to stay?” Often these questions are followed by the thought of, “where can I get my own ugly footwear?” because, after all, no one wants to be left out. If you've somehow missed this brand name buzz, or thought that ugg was just a hip slang word ugly used when describing this fuzzy slipper-boot, chances are good that you've seen them whether you realized it or not....   [tags: fashion, footwear] 901 words
(2.6 pages)
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Diets by Government Can Create More Problems - Every person has piece play overall even is smallest piece in world. The people give the government its voice. The world runs for many different reasons because governments work and there people support it. If the government does not have the support of the people then it will have a hard time to run it. The government runs many things like health care we use every day if control diets there even more control of now then before. The government should not run our diets in the government through the media affects what people think are healthy, unhealthy diets around country now and some many people who do not want it....   [tags: health, obesity]
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976 words
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Antropologists and The Y-Chromosome Variation - Y-Chromosome Variation Other genetic markers anthropologists can use to track the potential migration history of indigenous people in the Americas are the uniparentally inherited genetic materal: Y chromosomes and mitochondrial DNA. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is inherited from a mother to all her descendents while the Y chromosome is paternally inherited. The similar mode of inheritance between mtDNA and the Y chromosome allows anthropologist’s to pick either marker and hold to a high degree of certainty that they are seeing a single lineage into the past, but mtDNA and Y chromosomes rarely have an identical past or show congruent population variation due to discrepancies in sex variation...   [tags: sex chromosome, dna, rna, ]
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1360 words
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Race: Social Categorization, Not Biological - The English term ‘race’ is believed to originate from the Spanish word raza, which means ‘breed’ or ‘stock’ (Race). People use race to define other groups, this separation of groups is based largely on physical features. Features like skin color and hair don’t affect the fundamental biology of human variation (Hotz). Race is truly only skin deep, there are no true biological separations between two ‘racial’ groups. Scientifically speaking, there is more variation between single local groups than there is between two large, global groups; the human variation is constantly altering (Lewontin)....   [tags: racial groups, race, stereotypes]
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The Inuit - The Inuit I. Intoduction The Inuit are people that inhabit small enclaves in the coastal areas of Greenland, Arctic North America, and extreme northeastern Siberia. The name Inuit means the real people. In 1977 the Inuit Circumpolar Conference officially adopted Inuit as the replacement for the term "Eskimo." There are several related linguistic groups of Arctic people. Many of these groups prefer to be called by their specific "tribal" names rather than as Inuits. In Alaska the term "Eskimo" is still commonly used....   [tags: Papers] 1231 words
(3.5 pages)
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Whats Wrong with Adultery - Steinbock/What’s Wrong with Adultery. Adultery is a horrible sin to commit, but it can actually be avoided, although many people in today's society respond differently based on their religion and culture. When a person commits adultery they fail in keeping his/her commitment to their partner. When adultery happens the trust is broken in the relationship and the other person will feel deceived and betrayed. When a man and a woman come together and bind in holy matrimony, two people become one....   [tags: Social Issues, Christianity , Cahtolicism] 1334 words
(3.8 pages)
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The Climate of Alaska - The climate of Alaska is usually 4 to 5 degrees below zero most of the time. Huge icebergs would slide off gravel shores in October, and would never break up into the river. Not a lot of plants or shrubs in these types of areas, because it’s so there is more room for polar bears and other animals, and erosion of the land was slow, until global warming started up, so now erosion is faster. Temperatures have gone up 7 degrees in the past 50 years, so huge icebergs do not show in fall....   [tags: below zero, huge icebergs, glaciers]
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922 words
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How Morality is Culturally Relative - How Morality is Culturally Relative Abstract Within this world that we live in, there is an enormous amount of people. Each of these people belongs to different cultures and societies. Every society has traits and customs that make it unique. These societies follow different moral codes. This means that they will may have different answers to the moral questions asked by our own society. What I am trying to say is that every society has a different way of analyzing and dealing with life's events, because of their cultural beliefs....   [tags: essays research papers] 1471 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Significance of the Use of Language - The Significance of the Use of Language All of the ways of knowing are controlled by language.” What does this statement mean and do you think it is a fair representation of the relationship between perception, emotion, reason and language. Knowledge by itself involves the use of language, but also a variety of several other issues such as perception, emotion and reason....   [tags: Papers] 912 words
(2.6 pages)
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For this assignment we had to take samples from our CD collection and choose at least three instruments including vocals to create our own groove. The - For this assignment we had to take samples from our CD collection and choose at least three instruments including vocals to create our own groove. The songs that I chose to rearrange were ‘Fix Look Sharp’ by Dizzee Rascal, ‘Are You Really From The Ends’ by E.N.D, ‘Eskimo’ by Wiley, ‘Made You Look’ by Nas and we used short sample from a track taken from Mariah Carry’s latest album. There were a number of reasons that we decided to use these instruments and samples, the first being the tempo of the song....   [tags: Papers] 707 words
(2 pages)
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Strained Relationships, Resentment and Indignation Between the Classes in Great Expectations - Strained Relationships, Resentment and Indignation Between the Classes in Great Expectations Great expectations is a profound story. It contains the theme of love, desire, foolishness, the relationship between a family, and so on. And the story also strongly represents social context and social force of Dickens's time. Dickens provides us with scathing insight into the social standard of the time....   [tags: Great Expectations Essays] 1047 words
(3 pages)
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The Arctic Costal Plain Domestic Energy Security Act of 2001 - The Arctic Costal Plain Domestic Energy Security Act of 2001 There are many bills that are passed though the House of Representatives everyday. There are many government agencies and interests groups that are behind the bills that either support them or are against them. The bill I have chosen is the Arctic Costal Plain Domestic Energy Security Act of 2001. At this time and place I believe this bill is one of the most important bills that needs to be passed. Congress has found the nation's domestic oil and gas production is in a substantial decline and our dependence on foreign counties is unreliable....   [tags: Papers] 944 words
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Catcher in the Rye Essay: The Innocence of Holden - The Innocence of Holden in The Catcher in the Rye In J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield, the protagonist, spends several days wandering around New York. During this time, he learns many things about himself. He seems to have some sort of mental problem, but this problem fortunately begins to be less serious by the end of the story. But more interesting that the things he knows about himself are the things he does not know about himself. Holden is constantly holding children on a pedestal and dismissing adults as "phonies." Holden, though he does not know it, subconsciously protects the innocence of childhood within his mind....   [tags: Catcher Rye Essays] 882 words
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Perpetuation of Native American Stereotypes in Children's Literature - Perpetuation of Native American Stereotypes in Children's Literature Caution should be used when selecting books including Native Americans, due to the lasting images that books and pictures provide to children. This paper will examine the portrayal of Native Americans in children's literature. I will discuss specific stereotypes that are present and should be avoided, as well as positive examples. I will also highlight evaluative criteria that will be useful in selecting appropriate materials for children and provide examples of good and bad books....   [tags: American America History]
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2192 words
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Bottled Water Quality vs Municipal Drinking Water Quality - "If we paid as much for tap water as we do for bottled water, most people would have a monthly water bill of over $9,000." - -Andrew C. Revkin - The New York Times It is very common for research groups to set up a "bottled water taste test". The results are always the same: without a label, there is no obvious difference among any kind of bottled water or even tap water. Yet millions of Americans routinely buy bottled water and re-filter their tap water. The Clean Water Act of 1972 was supposed to ensure all water sources were pure and safe for drinking or swimming....   [tags: Drinking Water Quality]
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1788 words
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Sapir-Worf Hypothesis: Linguistic Determinism and Linguistic Relativity - Sapir-Worf Hypothesis: Linguistic Determinism and Linguistic Relativity The romantic idealism of the late eighteenth century, as encountered in the views of Johann Herder (1744-1803) and Wilhelm von Humboldt (I 762-1835), placed great value on the diversity of the world’s languages and cultures. The tradition was taken up by the American linguist and anthropologist Edward Sapir (1884-1939) and his pupil Benjamin Lee Whorf (1897-1941), and resulted in a view about the relation between language and thought which was widely influential in the middle decades of this century....   [tags: Psychology]
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855 words
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Religion and Spirituality in Native American Culture - Religion & Spirituality in the Native American Culture When the topic of the beliefs of the Native American culture arises, most people have generally the same ideas about the culture’s beliefs: they are very strong. Being part Native American myself, from the Cherokee tribe, I was raised to know my culture pretty well and follow the same beliefs that they teach and follow. One thing f that my grandma, who is the great-granddaughter of a Cherokee Chief, instilled in me is the importance of my beliefs in God....   [tags: essays research papers] 1603 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Magic of The Coral - The Magic of The Coral The Coral fly under the radar of popular mainstream music in America: less marketed than Australian rock band and Strokes-sound-a-likes Jet, The Coral are probably slightly less-known than The Shins, perhaps on the same level as British Sea Power. But The Coral needn’t worry. Those who know them like them, and want to spread the word (despite the good feeling of discovering a band that is a gem of a secret). I first discovered The Coral about a year ago—I saw they had been on Late Night with Conan O’Brien, and their CD was $10....   [tags: Music Band Musical Essays] 844 words
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Half My Type Regents notes - The Five Themes of Geography Geography: The study of people, their environments, their resources and the interactions among them The Five Themes of Geography are: 1. Location 2. Place 3. Human Environment Interaction 4. Movement of People Goods and Ideas 5. Region 1. Location: Where something is located on the Earth’s Surface Relative – Location of Something in relation to something else (Ex: A house in relation to the street address) Absolute – An exact location of something on the earth’s surface using the lines of latitude and longitude....   [tags: essays research papers] 2411 words
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Yeti, Myth or Not myth - YETIS, MONSTER OR MYTH. “Yetis are as pure and white as snow... Yetis have a soft side that they don’t show... Yeti this Yeti that, Yetis rule and u know that” - Capt. Terpin Timins Introduction: Yetis are creatures supposedly created from myth and fiction. They are large tempestuous creatures. Yetis can be classified in the same family as the Sasquatch and Big Foot. Many people believe that Yetis aren't real and are illusions of men who have claimed to have seen them. After researching them I want to say that Yetis are warm and cuddly but do not try to hug a Yeti....   [tags: essays research papers] 778 words
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The Importance of Language Acquisition - The Importance of Language Acquisition *Missing Works Cited* It is known, even to a person to whom the entire study of language isn't familiar, that the language is the greatest factor on which most of the human activities depend. Without any form of language, any cooperation and communication would be almost, if not totally impossible (World Book Encyclopedia 62). This significance of language is what draws scientists to study origin, differences and connections between languages. Constant change of today's languages is what amazes linguists even more....   [tags: Papers] 1618 words
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Egyptian Mythology: Enviromental Influences - Egyptian Mythology: Enviromental Influences Religion can be thought of as the recognition by human beings of a superhuman power that controls the universe and everything that is, was, or shall be in it. Each individual human being can consider that the superhuman control power is a deity worthy of being loved; or capable of inspiring awe, obedience, and even fear. The effect of these feelings on individuals can lead to the setting up of a system of worship of the deity; and to the drawing up of a code of beliefs and conduct inspired by their religious faith....   [tags: Ancient Egypt Egyptian History] 864 words
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God. Creator or Poet? - God. Creator or Poet. The Latin word “poet” means “creator”. Humans, realizing they are different from animals in the world, have been trying to rationalize things and themselves to the world ever since. Poets and writers used to come up with these far off imaginative ways of how to answer questions of life almost to explain it in a philosophical way. Who were the first humans. How did they come to be. What made the sun and the moon and the stars. Why the animals were made the way they were. What caused night and day, the seasons, the cycle of life itself....   [tags: Religion Religious God Essays] 1278 words
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Definitions of Learning Styles - Definitions of Learning Styles Although learning style may be simply defined as the way people come to understand and remember information, the literature is filled with more complex variations on this theme. James and Gardner (1995), for example, define learning style as the "complex manner in which, and conditions under which, learners most efficiently and most effectively perceive, process, store, and recall what they are attempting to learn" (p. 20). Merriam and Caffarella (1991) present Smiths definition of learning style, which is popular in adult education, as the "individuals characteristic way of processing information, feeling, and behaving in learning situations" (p....   [tags: Education Vocational Essays]
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catcher in the rye - The Catcher in the Rye is the definitive novel of a young man’s growing pains, of growing up in pain. Growing up is a ritual – more deadly than religion, more complicated than baseball, for there seem to be no rules. Everything is experienced for the first time.” To What extent do you agree with this passage. Do you agree that Catcher in the Rye is the definitive novel of a young man’s growing pains, of growing up in pain. Do you agree that growing up is a ritual. You need to identify whether or not you agree with this passage, and then you need to justify/support your answer....   [tags: essays research papers] 1240 words
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The Mandan Indians - The Mandan Indians were a small, peaceful tribe located at the mouth of the Knife River on the Missouri near present day Bismarck, North Dakota. The Mandan were most known for their friendliness and their homes, called earth lodges. The women of the Mandan tribe tended their gardens, prepared food, and maintained lodges while the men spent their time hunting or seeking spiritual knowledge. The Mandan Indians performed many ceremonies such as the Buffalo Dance and the Okipa Ceremony that have been the center of great interest to many historians....   [tags: American America History] 1955 words
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Counter-Culture Youth Pic - In the following essay, I will attempt to highlight the phenomenon in cinema known as the “counterculture youth-pic.” This trend in production started in the late 1960’s as a result of the economic and cultural influences on the film industry of that time. The following essay looks at how those influences helped to shape a new genre in the film industry, sighting Easy Rider as a main example, and suggests some possible reasons for the relatively short popularity of the genre. “The standard story of the counterculture begins with an account of the social order against which it rebelled, a social order that was known to just about everyone by 1960 as the “mass society.” The tale of post-war m...   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Culture Relativism - Culture Relativism Culture Relativism is a contradictory theory for the explanation of the way we ought to live because the roots of the theory don’t give any explanation for what is right and wrong but instead only a means for right and wrong to be judged. By no fathom of the imagination can one contend that his or her own self ideas are correct there are certain bias that come with all judgments on the correct way to live, but if culture relativism stood true than it must be able to give some sort of universal truth....   [tags: Papers] 584 words
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Matthew Henson - Matthew Henson Great Men Have Great Assistants “As I stood there on the top of the world and I thought of the hundreds of men who had lost their lives in their effort to reach it [North Pole], I felt profoundly grateful that I had the honor of representing my race.” With these words, Matthew Henson planted the American flag on the North Pole. During the past, black Americans have not received the acknowledgement they deserved. Such was the case of Matthew A. Henson. He was the first person to discover the North Pole, although Robert Peary is usually credited with this feat....   [tags: Essays Papers] 976 words
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Mock Documentaries - Mockumentary: The Genre of False Documentary A mock documentary is successful when it is able to combine both the appearance of historically accurate elements and present believable situations through a false lens, leading the audience to question the reality of what they are seeing. The genre of false documentary aims to present a convincing story through the use of credible documentary tactics to portray a "fictional documentary." Every mock documentary depends on its viewers believing its premise....   [tags: Mock documentary Film Essays]
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Euthanasia - Do We Have The Right To Die. Goldfarb, Jennifer ENC 1102 Mrs. Cartright In October of 1939, Louis Repouille chloroformed his thirteen-year-old son described as “an incurable imbecile.” The boy was deformed and mute since birth and therefor bedridden. Due to a brain tumor, he became blind. Two months afterward, the father was found guilty of manslaughter in the second degree. No man or woman can honestly say that this boy should have stayed alive to suffer inevitably or that his father should have sanely watched him....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Ethnocentrism - Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism is the name given to a tendency to interpret or evaluate other cultures in terms of one's own. This tendency has been, perhaps, more prevalent in modern nations than among preliterate tribes. The citizens of a large nation, especially in the past, have been less likely to observe people in another nation or culture than have been members of small tribes who are well acquainted with the ways of their culturally diverse neighbours. Thus, the American tourist could report that Londoners drive "on the wrong side of the street" or an Englishman might find some customs on the Continent "queer" or "boorish," merely because they are different....   [tags: Papers] 1801 words
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Alcoholism - The Physical Effects of Alcohol on the Body Alcoholism is a disease which, in many cases, appears to be a genetically transmitted biochemical defect. However, in other instances, it appears to be caused by overwhelming bombardment of the physiology of the body by repeated episodes of heavy drinking resulting in the incapacity to handle alcohol normally. Psychological and/or social pressures may aggravate the disease. It is characterized by a typical progression of drinking behavior that requires an average of twelve and one-half years of drinking to reach fully developed, overt symptoms and an average of eighteen years to reach the stage of deterioration....   [tags: essays research papers] 573 words
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Narwhals - Narwhals Introduction Narwhals, the unicorns of the sea, are very mysterious creatures that are not widely known. They are whales with many fascinating features and historical value. This research paper is answering the question, “What are Narwhals?”. General Description Monodon Monoceros, Latin for “one tooth, one horn”#; or Narhval, Norwegian for “corpse whale” , because of it mottled coloration suggests a bloated corpse#.Narwhals are in the white whale family, along with the beluga, but are actually covered with spots of black, white, gray-green, and cream....   [tags: science] 1013 words
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Greenland - Greenland The geography of Greenland is quite ironic considering its name. Greenland is Located in the northern part of North America. It is between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean, northeast of Canada. Greenland's area is approximately 2,715,600 square kilometers. Its area is slightly more than 3 times the size of Texas. It is the largest island in the world. It is also primarily by the Davis Strait and Baffin Bay and from Iceland on the east, by the Denmark Strait. Greenland's terrain is flat to a gradually sloping icecap....   [tags: Papers] 592 words
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The Lives of the Inuit - When you mention Alaska and the Arctic Circle, one envisions igloos, dog sleds, and invariably, Eskimos. However, little do most know, that what most refer to as Eskimos is actually a generalization representing three distinct groups. In order to understand the societies that live in this region and acknowledge their cultural differences we must explore the different groups that inhabit this region of which there are two: the Inuit, and the Yupik. For the purposes of this discussion we will focus on the lives of the Inuit....   [tags: World Civilization ]
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The Relationship Between Culture and Technology - The Relationship Between Culture and Technology The relationship between technology and culture is cyclical. Logically, a culture will develop technologies based on the needs or desires of the people, because this is where the creative influences lie. As this technology spreads and is absorbed into the people’s lives, it affects their culture and way of life. This change in lifestyle can also occur when a technology developed outside a culture is introduced into the culture, providing an external influence....   [tags: Environment Environmental Pollution Preservation]
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Katmai National Park Research Essay - Katmai National Park and Preserve encompasses 3,674,529.68 acres of land. It would fit in the state of Pennsylvania about eight times. Katmai National Park and Preserve is located on the northern tip of the Alaskan Peninsula and is made up of six active volcanoes and the surrounding forests, lakes, and mountains. Maybe the most well known of the volcanoes are Novarupta and Mount Katmai, famous for their eruption in 1912. Katmai National Park is located in the southern part of Alaska. It was established on September 24th, 1918 to protect the recently devastated region....   [tags: alaska, Mount Katmai and Novarupta]
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The Folklore and Science of Aurora Borealis - The Folklore and Science of Aurora Borealis Imagine a cold October night, you walk out to your car and something catches your eye. You step further into the street be it busy or not, and you begin to turn in 360 circles. For what your eyes behold is far from anything you have ever seen. A circle of green and blue swirl through the night sky, I could best describe this as two ballroom dancers doing a "Waltz" through the night sky. They flow, they glide so gracefully that they capture you and keep you entranced for a very long time....   [tags: Papers] 1267 words
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Symbols and Symbolism in Catcher in the Rye - The Catcher in the Rye - Symbolism In the Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger uses different examples of symbolism throughout the novel to let the reader into the thoughts of Holden Caulfield.  Three major examples of his symbolism are the ducks with the frozen pond, Jane Gallagher, and the Museum of Natural History.  Salinger uses all three of these symbols to represent the thoughts of the central character, Holden Caulfield.     While Holden Caulfield is wondering around New York City, he asks many people what happens to the ducks when the pond freezes.  The repetition of this question symbolizes what Holden is truly asking for himself.  He isn't trying to find out what will happen...   [tags: Catcher Rye Essays] 463 words
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The Differences Of Native American Cultures - The Differences of Native American Cultures The cultures of Native American tribes varied greatly from geographical region to region. The tribes in the Pacific Northwest had plenty of time to be involved in intricate forms of art. Great Plains tribes believed in magic buffalos and were nomadic. Easten Woodlands tribes made some pottery. Great Basin tribes worshipped the different seasons. Southwest tribes valued peace and wisdom. California and Baja tribes prized staying in one place and didn't like change....   [tags: essays research papers] 386 words
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Blue People of Troublesome Creek - The Blue people of Troublesome Creek, sounds like a title of fiction novel, but the Blue Fugates were no fictional characters, but they were real humans that lived not too far from where we are today. The Blue Fugates were a very close family live on the banks of eastern Kentucky's Troublesome Creek. Martin Fugate, a French orphan settled in Troublesome Creek and astonishingly Martin somehow managed to find a woman who carried the same, very rare disease. The disease, later discovered, was methemoglobinemia, a very rare heredity blood disorder caused by an inheritance of a gene as a simple recessive allele....   [tags: essays research papers] 688 words
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The Evolution Of Canada - The Evolution Of Canada Canada, independent nation in North America. A country rich in minerals and agriculture, it was settled by the French and English and became an independent Commonwealth country with a federal system of government, in which the provinces enjoy a large measure of autonomy. Land and Economy. The 2nd-largest country in the world (after the USSR), Canada occupies the N half of the North American continent, stretching E and W from the Atlantic to Pacific oceans, N from the 49th parallel to the North Pole, including all the islands in the Arctic Ocean from W of Greenland to Alaska....   [tags: Canadian Culture] 1616 words
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Analysis Of Holden Caulfield in J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye - In Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, Holden Caulfield is confronted with the difficulties of both humanity and life as he struggles to find direction, as well as a connection to a world which he has lost faith in. From the very beginning of the novel, the reader can appreciate and relate to Holden’s criticism and condemnation about society and the way people in society govern themselves. “Phoniness”, a reoccurring motif in the novel, is one of Holden’s most favorite conceptions, and is his catch phrase for describing the superf...   [tags: Character Profile, Phoniness] 1296 words
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Holden's Crisis With Adolescence in The Catcher in the Rye - “Occasionally in life there are those moments of unutterable fulfillment which cannot be completely explained by those symbols called words. Their meanings can only be articulated by the inaudible language of the heart.” - Martin Luther King Jr. Symbols are not defined by words, but by the way one feels toward it. The emotional connection between a symbol and a person can only be showed through the heart and soul. In the Catcher in the Rye, J.D Salinger uses symbolism to show Holdens contradictory personality and his crisis with adolescences....   [tags: The Catcher in the Rye Essays] 797 words
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Whaling: The hunting of Fin Whales in Antarctic Ocean - Whaling The biggest animal known to mankind is a whale has been in hunted since the 800 B.C. Today in the world that we live in there are many problems one of them is hunting whales. One of Whaling is the hunting of all different types of whales for oils and meats. Around 1,000 whales are killed each year and there are many reasons why whalers should not be able to kill these innocent animals. (Berzin) Japanese are the most common people to kill so many of the whales around 1,500 are killed. Japan eating the meat of a whale is a tradition in their culture....   [tags: japanese, innocent animals, ]
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Eating Healthy: Classism and Choice - What we eat, the way we do it, and why we do it, will always be scrutinized and in this article the author does just that. She argues that eating healthy or not depends on witch social class we fit in; witch can be true in a way. However, eating healthy or not can also be a question of choice. Obviously having more money will always give you more choices and the option to go for expensive products with higher quality. The journalist goes back to the 19th century saying that white bread was a luxury that only rich people could afford but showed no evidence that, by eating white bread they were healthier than the poor who could not afford it....   [tags: classism, eating, health,] 948 words
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Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids - More and more research studies are finding that getting enough Omega-3 fatty acids is critical to our health in many ways. Omega-3 fats are essential for the survival of the human body, but our bodies can't manufacture them on their own, so we need to get them from the foods we eat. Good dietary sources of Omega-3 fatty acids are fish and seafood, like salmon, tuna, sardines, halibut, herring, algae and krill, plus some plants and nut oils such as flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, canola oil, soybeans and soybean oil, pumpkin seeds and pumpkin seed oil, purslane, perilla seed oil, and walnuts and walnut oil....   [tags: Preventing Illness] 1219 words
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American Indians and Alaska Natives - The United States population growth rate continues to increase gradually by less than 1% per year. Over the past decade, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) population increased by 26.7%.1 According to 2010 census, there are approximately 5.2 million AIANs living in the United States representing 1.7% of the U.S. population.2 By 2050, the projected population of AIANs will reach an estimated 8.6 million.2 Alaska Natives (AN) comprise of the second largest population group in Alaska. They make up a bigger percentage of Alaska’s population than Native Americans in any other state....   [tags: population growth, alaska, natives]
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