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Your search returned over 400 essays for "dementia"
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Caring for a Person With Dementia - Introduction Dementia is an umbrella term used to explain the gradual decline in multiple areas of functions, which includes thinking, perception, communication, memory, languages, reasoning, and the ability to function (Harrison-Dening 2013). Worldwide, 47.5 million people have dementia and there are 7.7 million new cases every year. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and may contribute to 60–70% of cases. (Alzheimer's society 2014). The complexity of dementia presents a number of behavioural challenges to those who live with dementia and their care providers....   [tags: Dementia and Aggressive Behavior]
:: 14 Works Cited
2038 words
(5.8 pages)
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Analysis and Description of Dementia - ... It is expected that less than half of the people suffering from dementia are known in the dementia database. These results show that a large population of the elderly are living with dementia and have not been diagnosed with it and are therefore not receiving any help. This is a problem because without a proper diagnosis they cannot be given treatment and helped sufficiently (Connolly, Gaehl, Martin, Morris, Purandare, 2011). One of the major problems with dementia is how underdiagnosed and overlooked it is....   [tags: alzheimer, vascular dementia, memory loss]
:: 11 Works Cited
1744 words
(5 pages)
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Dementia: Forgotten Memories - While the average life expectancy of the world’s population has increased, the number of detected dementia cases has commensurately risen to astonishing levels. Along with improved discovery of this disorder, new causes and treatments have been found, from which many innovative techniques have been developed towards the prevention of future incidences and reduction of the effects of this condition; however, the quest for these solutions have raised more questions than it has answered. Why do some develop this disorder, while others do not....   [tags: Dementia Condition and Symptoms]
:: 3 Works Cited
849 words
(2.4 pages)
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Understanding Dementia in Relation to Brain and Communication Disorders - ... Maintaining mental function through medication, which work by regulating neurotransmitters, may assist in preserving cognitive abilities. Managing behavioral symptoms are being studied to enhance the treatment for DAT patients, as reported by the NIA, which includes sleeplessness, agitation, wandering, anxiety, anger and depression. The NIA continues to look into slowing, delaying, and preventing Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical trials include, but are not limited to, immunization therapy, cognitive training, and the effects of cardiovascular treatments (National Institutes of Health, 2012)....   [tags: Common Health issues, Elderly, Dementia]
:: 7 Works Cited
1285 words
(3.7 pages)
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Dementia is a Syndrome - ... As the diseases advances, the person suffers cognitive disorders that lead to dementia. The loss of cognitive ability is caused by the death of the neurons in the brain. (Ferrara 496) Frontotemporal dementia is not a common form of dementia. This type of dementia is caused by the death of the frontal and temporal lobes. When the pathways to the lobes die, the pathways are forced to change. The change in the pathways will cause the brain tissue to shrink. There will be a growth of abnormal proteins that grow in the cells....   [tags: brain disease, Alzheimer’s disease]
:: 5 Works Cited
1930 words
(5.5 pages)
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Overview of Dementia - Dementia is a syndrome, which is usually of a chronic or progressive nature, which causes deterioration in cognitive function. It goes beyond what is expected from normal aging. It causes changes in what you remember, like appointments, or phone numbers. It may cause you to get lost in a familiar setting like driving to the grocery store. You may not be able to balance your checkbook or add up your points in a card game. Communication becomes difficult; as you cannot find the words you want to say....   [tags: syndrome, cognitive function, paranoid]
:: 7 Works Cited
1366 words
(3.9 pages)
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Overview of Dementia - Introduction Margaret is a 77 year old who has a diagnosis of dementia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. She has been recently separated from her daughter who was her primary carer and her husband who were both unable to cope with her agitated behaviour. Margaret now resides in an age care facility. Margaret’s mental and emotional health is a cause for concern and the family are upset and are struggling with feelings of guilt and anger. This paper with discuss the intervention professional healthcare workers can implement to reduce the turbulence of this transitional period for all individuals involved....   [tags: Health, diabetes mellitus]
:: 16 Works Cited
987 words
(2.8 pages)
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Dealing With Dementia - “Ted sought a diagnosis after being terminated from his job. Little did anyone know his memory and performance issues were due to a disease. (Life with ALZ)” This disease causes the loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Dementia, is one form of this disease that gradually gets worse over time. It affects memory, thinking, and behavior. (WebMD, 1995) “Changes that take place in the brains of people. These brain changes may cause the memory loss and decline in other mental abilities that occur with Alzheimer's disease....   [tags: health, disease, brain function]
:: 6 Works Cited
976 words
(2.8 pages)
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Caring For Patients With Dementia - Caring for dementia involves a lot of patience and understanding. It should be dealt with audacity and flawlessness to ensure the vulnerable adults’ well-being. Aiding at home or care home required carers to be at their best, physically and emotionally. The responsibility can be distressing but it is rewarding as well since helping dementia adults in their day to day activities is a significant matter for them. However, carers need a pause as over duty can result to substandard nursing. The big question is: who take care for the carers of people with dementia....   [tags: Nursing]
:: 5 Works Cited
966 words
(2.8 pages)
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Dementia - Dementia While the average life expectancy of the world’s population has increased, the number of Dementia cases detected has commensurately risen to astonishing levels. Along with improved detection of this disorder, many new causes and treatments have been found, from which many innovative techniques have been discovered to prevent future incidences or reduce the effects of this condition. The quest for treatments and cures to this dilemma has brought additional questions to be answered, with limited success....   [tags: Mental Health]
:: 4 Works Cited
524 words
(1.5 pages)
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An Overview of Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia - Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia Intro/Overview Section of Disease Paper “Horribly tragic, scary, slow, sad, maddening, etc.” These are words some would use when asked what Alzheimer’s/dementia is. This answer is common to those who have watched loved ones suffer from this disease that ultimately lead to their passing. As defined in McGraw Hill Medical Dictionary, Alzheimer’s Disease is a ‘progressive neurologic disease of the brain that causes irreversible loss of neurons and eventual dementia characterized by loss of memory, impairment of judgment, decision making, language use, and awareness of surroundings’(pg....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
1924 words
(5.5 pages)
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Social Work with Dementia Patients - ... Providing a detailed accurate patient history helps determine if there is a pattern of illness. Some of these conditions include past and present medical history, types of medication currently taken by the patient. They assess for diseases that may run in the family. This is also followed by what they call a Mini-Mental State Exam that tests the patient’s problem solving skills, attention span, and ability to recall information. This test consists of 30 questions within the areas mentioned before....   [tags: Social Workers]
:: 7 Works Cited
1782 words
(5.1 pages)
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Dementia - When recalling his grandmother’s end-stage of life care, geriatrician and dementia researcher Greg A. Sachs, MD, of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, remembers that there has been little change in the care of patients with end-stage dementia in the past 30 years (Salynn Boyles, WebMD Health News, 2009). As Sabat (2009) wrote concerning the need for improving the lives of patients with end-stage dementia, “constitutes a call to action that cannot and should not be ignored” (p. 1806)....   [tags: Health, Diseases] 1873 words
(5.4 pages)
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Dementia in Elder Adults - Introduction Dementia illness is the most feared and distressing disorder of later life. This essay will address the overview of dementia followed by the most common types of dementia. The essay will cover the nursing assessment and the interventions. One issue relating to activity of living will be indentified and it will also explore the care required in relation to this activity for an older patient / client suffering from dementia, as well as patient, carer advice. Analysis of Dementia Overview The term dementia refers to a serious loss in memory and other intellectual abilities in a formerly unimpaired person, further than what might be expected from normal aging (Dhanani & Wilkins,...   [tags: Mental Illness ]
:: 12 Works Cited
1711 words
(4.9 pages)
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Dementia in Elder Adults - Dementia is the most feared and distressing disorder of later life. This essay will give an overview of dementia followed by the most common types of dementia. The essay will cover the nursing assessment and the interventions. Issues relating to sleeping disorders will be identified and it will also explore the care required in relation to these sleeping problems for an older patient / client suffering from dementia, as well as patient and carer advice. Analysis of Dementia Overview The term dementia means a serious loss in memory and other intellectual abilities in a formally unimpaired person, further than what might be expected from normal ageing (Dhanani & Wilkins, 2008)....   [tags: Mental Health ]
:: 17 Works Cited
1876 words
(5.4 pages)
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Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease Treatments - ... Amyloid-beta protein aggregation has been found in high numbers of Alzheimer's patients. Amyloid-beta aggression causes extracellular plaques (also called Senile plaques, neuritic plaques, senile druse, or braindruse) and tangles which are “structures formed from degenerating cell bodies” (Huffman, 2010) in the brain's gray matter. This discovery prompted scientists to believe that Amyloid-beta peptides cause aggrigation and are the main source of the deterioration of neural structures associated with Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of Dementia....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
1016 words
(2.9 pages)
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Dementia in Older Adults - Introduction This assignment critically discusses about dementia, a widespread disability among older adults today. It provides an introduction to dementia and analyses its prevalence in society. The various forms of dementias are elaborated with description about dysfunctions and symptoms. Nursing Assessment and Interventions are provided in the further sections which discusses about actions nurses should take on while evaluating patients and treating them. Finally, communication, an important Activity of Daily Living (ADL) is explored and patient/carer advice is presented so as to maintain good health conditions in the patient....   [tags: Mental Health ]
:: 10 Works Cited
2100 words
(6 pages)
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Dementia and Educating Carers - Other carers such as assistants in nursing should have a clear understanding of dementia and the common traits of people afflicted with the disease. Carers should appreciate that dementia is an illness that impacts on cortical function, calculation, language, judgement, and learning capacity (Lemone et al., 2011). Deterioration in emotional stability, sociability and motivation are typical and can be attributed to the disability of cognitive function (Lemone et al., 2011). Dementia sufferers are afflicted with memory loss, lose their ability to problem solve and develop personality changes such as agitation and hallucination (Lemone et al., 2011)....   [tags: health, cognitive disability]
:: 16 Works Cited
1371 words
(3.9 pages)
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Edgar Allan Poe's Dementia - Edgar Allan Poe’s Dementia Several aspects of Edgar Allan Poe’s life are well known because of his popularity in American literature. Commonly known facts include, but are not limited to knowing that Poe greatly influenced the horror genre of writing, published many famous poems, and that he is credited with creating detective-fiction. One aspect of his life, however, is not as common. Poe suffered from a cognitive disorder presently known as dementia, which, in Poe’s case, worsened throughout his life....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 5 Works Cited
1336 words
(3.8 pages)
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Effective Dementia Care - Dementia care offers support and services to an individual affected by the disease itself, which is dementia. It addresses the right and needs of the person with dementia and their families. Improving quality of life and changing attitudes towards dementia is the main goal of dementia care. Dementia care also provides quality of care, maintain dignity and promote health, security and comfort in consideration with the standard of care and ethical guidelines (Adams & Manthorpe, 2003). Understanding dementia care is necessary for those health care providers who are planning to handle dementia patients....   [tags: Health, Diseases] 1566 words
(4.5 pages)
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Canine Dementia - Many of the population today believe animals of the canine genus, dogs, to be “man’s best friend.” This philosophy appears to be especially pertinent when dealing with the comparison between Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia in the two species. The amount, progression and deterioration of the brain of the two are strikingly similar. Canine Dementia is a rising concern for elderly dogs, as the damage appears to localize on the areas of the brain that affect spatial determination. For example, a dog may stand for hours staring at the hinges of a door, knowing it to be open, but unable to remember where the door opens; another scenario is if one’s dog got out of the yard and wande...   [tags: Animal Science ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1848 words
(5.3 pages)
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Intervention Dementia - Critique 2 Intervention Dementia The objective of this study (Eloniemi-Sulkava et al., 2009) was to analyze if a program of care based on multiple components, such as peer support groups, exercise education and comprehensive geriatric assessment among others could delay the need for institutionalization of patients with dementia and prolong their care in the community. At the same time, the authors investigate if the impact that this program will have in the use and cost of social and healthcare service utilized by the studied patients compared with the usual care....   [tags: Mental Health]
:: 4 Works Cited
1408 words
(4 pages)
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Statins Preventing Dementia - QUESTION: What is the current data on statins causing or preventing dementia? OBJECTIVE: To determine if dementia can be caused or prevented by the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors: Pravastatin, Lovastatin, Simvastatin, Rosuvastatin, and Atorvastatin. RETRIEVAL OF SOURCES: The journal articles and publications used in this review were searched using PubMed and Google scholar as well as the FDA references cited in the warning regarding cognitive impairment on the FDA website. Key search words used include: statins, dementia, cognitive function, HMG-coA reductase inhibitors, impaired memory....   [tags: statins, prescription medications, memory loss]
:: 18 Works Cited
1236 words
(3.5 pages)
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End Stage Dementia - When recalling his grandmother’s end-stage of life care, Greg A. Sachs, MD, a geriatrician of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, remembers that there has been little change in the care of patients with end-stage dementia in the past 30 years (Boyles, 2009). According to Sabat (2009), the need for improving the lives of patients with end-stage dementia; “constitutes a call to action that cannot and should not be ignored” (p. 1806). In this study, I will seek to discover changes that I can make in the daily care routines of cognitively impaired patients to decrease their stress levels....   [tags: Health, Diseases, Long Term Care] 1838 words
(5.3 pages)
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Dementia: Reminiscence Therapy and Montessori Method - ... 4). Upon further research one discovered an article from 2005 interviewing Camp, conducted by Zinn (2005) who elicited information about the success of MM long term for people with dementia. It was stated that as a particular person moved along the trajectory of Alzheimer’s, he was not only able to keep conducting his activity, but additionally commented on how much he looked forward to the group engagement. When Zinn asked about the results the discussion turned to how even when the facilitator did not necessarily believe in trying out the program, the clients themselves demonstrated the succuss by willingly wanting to engage....   [tags: existencialism, loss, grief]
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1224 words
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Falls Among Older Persons with Dementia - “Fall may be defined as an unexpected event in which the person comes to rest on the ground, floor, or lower level” (Struksness, Lindström, Lord, Slaasletten, Johansson, et al., 2011). In older populations, falls are quite common, but with a mental illness such as dementia, the problem is worsened. This cross-sectional study showed that the most common causes of falls reported by nursing staff were individual factors like physical impairment and mental impairment. Background: Falls are a common cause of death for people over the age of 65....   [tags: Healthcare]
:: 1 Works Cited
1046 words
(3 pages)
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Dementia - Dementia Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntington's disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the most significant dementing disease occurring in over 50% of demented patients (see epidemiology)....   [tags: Papers] 3248 words
(9.3 pages)
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Quality of Life of Spouses Caring for Loved Ones with Dementia - Introduction The goals of this case study are to gather empirical evidence through comprehensive research to make an observable difference in the spouses caring for their loved ones with dementia. The problem spouses are facing while providing care for a loved one stricken with dementia can be overwhelming. First we assessed the quality of life in spouses caring for loved one with dementia. Second we wanted to provide concrete tools for the spouses who are the caregivers for loved ones with dementia....   [tags: Family Caregivers]
:: 17 Works Cited
2386 words
(6.8 pages)
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Restlessness and Agitation in People With Dementia - Restlessness and Agitation in People With Dementia Restlessness and agitation are common in people with dementia. Cohen M et al (1986) attempted to define restlessness and agitation as " inappropriate verbal, vocal or motor activity" associated by 29 behaviors including general restlessness, constant attention seeking, complaining, negativism, pacing and screaming. In my nursing placement I experienced a case of vascular dementia. The name of patient, the name of the ward and hospital should remain unmentioned in the essay in order to maintain confidentiality....   [tags: Papers] 1502 words
(4.3 pages)
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Nursing Care Issues and the Frail Elderly: Dementia - Walking into the room hearing the conversation could not be helped. Two elderly patients were conversing, one was talking about experiences in World War II and the other was listening intently. When questioned as to what they were discussing and why, the answer received was one that surprised and saddened. The patient telling the story explained “Sometimes my friend forgets all about the past, so I sit here and tell my stories and then it helps my friend remember.” The other patient replied “that is right, there are days I just can’t remember anything and my friend here….remembers everything and tells me all about it”....   [tags: Nursing Profession, Nursing Career]
:: 5 Works Cited
1759 words
(5 pages)
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Etiology of HIV-Associated Dementia - Etiology of HIV-Associated Dementia The etiologic agents of the neurologic disease associated with HIV and AIDS are many. Opportunistic infections- cryptococcus, toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, are a few of the organic causes of neurologic disease in AIDS patients, but will not be the main focus of this paper. The human immunodeficiency virus in itself is implicated in much of the neurological manifestations of the disease, and it is the effects of the presence of the virus within the central nervous system which is of interest to me in this paper....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 8 Works Cited :: 8 Sources Cited
1297 words
(3.7 pages)
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Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease - Dementia and Alzheimer's During an average lifetime, one can expect to have at least occasional memory lapses from time to time. Usually it's something as simple as forgetting what you just did a few minutes ago, forgetting if you turned the stove off, or if you left your keys on the table or in the bathroom counter. Such lapses are relatively normal, but when they become a recurring theme, it's a more serious problem. As people age, it is natural for them to experience a mild degree of memory loss....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited :: 4 Sources Cited
640 words
(1.8 pages)
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Dementia Praecox - In 1887 Dr. Emile Kraepelin identified schizophrenia for the first time in history. Dr. Kraepelin used the term "dementia praecox” which means “early dementia,” separating it from other forms of dementia usually occurring later in life. Kraepelin believed that “dementia praecox” was primarily a disease of the brain. In 1911, a Swiss psychiatrist by the name of Eugene Bleuler, was the first to use the term “schizophrenia” and the first to describe the symptoms as “negative” or “positive.” Bleuler believed that the name given by Kreapelin was misleading, since the disease was not part of dementia since it did not lead to mental deterioration in all cases and it could occur in young age...   [tags: essays research papers] 1638 words
(4.7 pages)
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Music Affecting the Memory of Alzheimer’s Patients - ... The company has implemented iPods in hundreds of facilities in the United States and Canada. The program is implemented the most in Wisconsin serving over 124 organizations. Getting the program at your facility If a team of caregivers will like to get their care facility certified they will have to take a series of three 90 minute webinars. During these webinars you will learn how to set up a customized playlist for different types of residents with Alzheimer’s disease. They will be taught how adding personal music to the Alzheimer’s patient is a therapeutic tool....   [tags: death, dementia, therapy]
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1074 words
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Caring for Older People - Caring for older people highlights many special and difficult issues for nurses and carers, such as separation, illness, loneliness, death and how to provide continued care (Morrissey et al, 1997). This essay discusses the strategies of care delivered for an older person with dementia during my recent clinical placement. Discussions will focus on normal ageing process taking into account the relevant biological, sociological and physiological perspectives and the impact this had on this individual’s life experience....   [tags: Health Care, Diseases, Dementia] 1752 words
(5 pages)
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Understanding What Keeps Dementia Sufferers Awake at Night - Understanding What Keeps Dementia Sufferers Awake at Night Sleep disturbance is a very common and very problematic symptom of dementia. New research indicates that causes of this sleep disturbance may differ in different kinds of dementia. Hopefully, understanding these causes will lead to better treatments. Dementia is a term used to refer to a loss of thinking abilities. Although there are many causes of dementia, it is most often associated with aging. The most common cause of dementia associated with aging is Alzheimer's disease, which affects approximately one in 10 people over age 65 and nearly half of those over age 85....   [tags: Papers] 639 words
(1.8 pages)
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AIDS and The Nervous System: A Focus On The AIDS Dementia Complex - AIDS and The Nervous System: A Focus On The AIDS Dementia Complex Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the biologic agent of the AIDS syndrome, has emerged as one of the most important threats to public health in the United States and its incidence is rapidly increasing. A highly lethal disease with over 70% of AIDS patients dying within 2 years of diagnosis. This disease has already become the leading cause of death in men aged 25-44 and women aged 25-34. The Centers for Disease Control have for the purpose of epidemiological surveillance, defined AIDS as a "reliably diagnosed disease that is at least moderately indicative of an underlying cellular immunodeficiency in a p...   [tags: AIDS Disease Diseases Essays]
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1861 words
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Evaluate a Qualitative Study - ... The purpose statement presents the variables that they want to use in order to get the results of reading in older adults suffering from dementia. The purpose statement aims to promote the methods that will be used. When a purpose statement is present in the article its main purpose is to express what the researchers are trying to establish in the end. It provides you with the agreement of the whole study. In the purpose statement not everything the ends up happening is proposed. However in the end it can be represented in the statement if needed to be added....   [tags: dementia, article review, data, interviews]
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1244 words
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Reading Difficulties in Patient AM Following the Development of Vascular Dementia - Reading Difficulties in Patient AM Following the Development of Vascular Dementia ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION Dementia was defined by Cummings et al. (1980) as 'an acquired, persistent impairment of intellectual function with compromise and at least of the following spheres of activity: language, memory, visuospatial skills, emotion or personality and cognition.' Dementia occurs as a series of subtypes, one of which is known as vascular dementia (Brown, 1993). Vascular dementia is a disease which is most commonly caused by impairment to the circulatory system of the brain following damage caused by a stroke (Alzheimer, Scotland., 2002)....   [tags: Papers] 7577 words
(21.6 pages)
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High Cholesterol - Evidence is increasing concerning an association among vascular risk factors in midlife with an increased risk of both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia decades later (citation). Diverse studies have found total cholesterol measured in midlife to be a significant predictor of subsequent dementia (Whitmer et al., 2005), mild cognitive impairment (Kalmijn et al., 2000) or cognitive decline (Kivipelto et al., 2001). Total cholesterol on midlife was also associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in some studies (Kivipelto et al., 2001) and especially with concomitant hypertension (Beeri et al., 2009)....   [tags: Health, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease] 446 words
(1.3 pages)
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Escape Through Dementia in The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - Escape Through Dementia in The Yellow Wallpaper     Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wall-paper" is an excellent story on several levels. It works as a suspenseful thriller about the effects of mental illness. It also serves to make several points about feminism and the pervailing attitudes of her time. John, the husband, serves as a metaphor for masculine views of the time, and for the masculine side of humans, the side of reason and logic. "John is practical in the extreme. He has no patience with faith, an intense horor of superstition, and he scoffs openly at any talk of things not to be felt and seen and put down in figures" (1658)....   [tags: The Yellow Wallpaper Essays]
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1044 words
(3 pages)
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Making Connections Between Art, Manic-Depressive Illness, and Frontotemporal Dementia - "And Something's odd - within - That person that I was - And this One - do not feel the same - Could it be Madness - this?" -Emily Dickinson Those of us who enjoy the arts, either as participants or avid fans of the creative process, are very much aware of the so-called "myth of the artist" and other similar stereotypical sketches that link the artistic genius to an inner, emotional world of tumultuous highs, lows, and sheer "madness". Mental illness, particularly manic depression, has somehow become an inseparable part of the successful artist's experience in the romanticized biographies of famous poets, painters, and musicians of our time....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 8 Works Cited :: 8 Sources Cited
2166 words
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Atonement Response - Ian McEwan’s novel Atonement depicts a story told from the perspectives of three of the main characters: Briony Tallis, Robbie Turner, and Cecelia Tallis. Briony is the ultimate focus of the novel because her mission is atonement. She almost single handedly convicted Robbie for the rape of her cousin, Lola Quincey. She is seeking atonement for this horrible crime she committed against Robbie. However, Briony is never able to achieve atonement. Regardless of the efforts Briony makes, she cannot truly achieve atonement....   [tags: Ian McEwan,novel, writier, vascular dementia]
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868 words
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The Way Smartphones Affect Our Lives - ... Smartphone users are 70 percent more likely than regular cellphone users to believe that their phones afford them a great deal of privacy (Smart Phone … Settings). Thus, users are more willing to reveal private issues in public spaces. They are also less concerned about bothering individuals who share those spaces. Dr. Tali Hatuka, of Tel Aviv University, says that smart phones create the illusion of "private bubbles" around their users in public spaces (Smart Phones … Settings). When asked how his he uses his phone during a get together with friends, Ambrose Abbracciamento stated, “When using my phone, I ignore all of my friends for a little bit, but once my phone is down I come back t...   [tags: digital dementhia,hippocampus,anti-social behavior]
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1423 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Aging Brain - The Aging Brain Why does the human brain age. Brain aging is a part of human life and a big part of society as the awareness for brain aging increases. Over time memory tends to become less efficient as we age and the neurons in the brain decreases (Bendheim, P.E. (2009). By 2050 in the US, 20 percent of the population will be 65 years or older. And as the elderly population increases, so will the incidence of age-related neurological disorders (Perlmutter, David. (2004). Therefor it is important to understand the aging brain, and how to keep the brain functioning as one ages....   [tags: Mental Health ]
:: 5 Works Cited
894 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Three Stages of Alzheimer's - Alzheimer’s is most likely formed by other symptoms called dementia. Dementia is not an actual disease, but has a vast range of symptoms which are precursors to many types of diseases. When dementia is detected in an individual their memory tends to decline and it becomes a hassle to complete everyday duties. When diagnosing individuals there are a series of steps taken in order to see if the individual progressed to dementia and also which disease caused those symptoms to take effect. These stages are preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays] 1401 words
(4 pages)
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Factors, Symptoms and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease - Alzheimer Disease 1 Alzheimer Disease Introduction This research paper will examine factors, signs of symptoms, treatment, when to visit a doctor and how to care for a love one with Alzheimer disease. In the early stages of the disease, scientists have estimated that 500,000 people in their 30’s, 40’s and 50’s that have Alzheimer disease or a related dementia. Younger individuals may have problems with memory, thinking and concentration....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays] 940 words
(2.7 pages)
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Music Making Across Ages - Music is a powerful art that surrounds a sense of expressivity that words cannot suffice. Various selections of and amounts of music have the capability to independently control each person in a particular and emotional manner. Music making throughout different chapters of life can be a major catalyst in giving purpose to the life of individuals, such as at risk youth and the elderly with Alzheimer’s and dementia. At risk students are those who lack basic skills and enthusiasm to continue school, furthermore, neglecting to reach their full potential....   [tags: Creative Music, Health]
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1136 words
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Burden of Alzheimer’s Disease High and Growing - Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive and fatal form of dementia, frequently seen in the elderly altering their cognition, thought process and behavior. AD is reported in about half of patients that have a dementia diagnosis; one study states that about 10.3% of the population over 65 years is affected by dementia with an increase to almost 50% over the age of 85. (Beattie, 2002) Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of the aging process in humans, but rather found in a group of diseases that affect the brain leading to a decline in mental and physical control....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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2117 words
(6 pages)
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Making Decisions: A Case Study - MAKING DECISIONS: A CASE STUDY OF INCLUSION, COMMUNICATION AND WELL BEING Introduction and rationale Communication is the sharing of information and it is needed to confirm our identity and our individualism. Allan and Killick (2008, p.212) describe the relationship we have with others in “As social animals, we conduct our lives in the context of relationships which rely on communication”. A person with dementia can often be excluded from the communication process through many internal or external barriers....   [tags: Inclusion, Communication, Well Being]
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1907 words
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Healthcare Food in Nursing Homes - ... Chewing difficulties such as chewing discomfort or difficulties caused by loose teeth, missing teeth, ill-fitting dentures, and decreased saliva production can make eating very difficult. As we age our teeth become more vulnerable to tooth decay because more of the enamel, that once covered the teeth entirely, has been worn off over time. Reduced taste is also a factor that can cause the elderly to eat less. As we age the sensitivity of our taste buds is reduced, this is created by the deterioration of our taste buds, causing eating to be less enjoyable (Elderly Health Service)....   [tags: growing old, lifespan, meal times]
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Rising Incidence of Alzheimer's Disease - Alzheimer’s disease is the most common dementia that destroys brain cells and causes problems with memory, thinking and behaviour. According to recent statistics (Alzheimer's Association, 2010), Alzheimer’s is the 7th-leading cause of death in the USA with the number of people suffering from AD only in America over 5.3 million. It affects more women than men, causing differences in symptoms depending on gender. There is no cure which can guarantee a recovery for diseased people to date. However, more possible cures exist for diseased females....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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Care Planning: Making Decisions That Involve Everyday Participation and Communication. - Communication The biomedical approach to assessments and care planning seem to be the accepted form of communicating physical needs from a hospital environment. Certainly, all the people we have admitted to the home in the past ten years arrived with a plan of care that was medically led, if it is even supplied at all. Therefore, it is possible to argue , that a plan of care focused on the influential abilities of a person with dementia would be more than helpful in comparison to the medical diagnose....   [tags: Communication ]
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Pathology and Current Treatment of the Alzheimer's Disease - Pathology and Current Treatment of the Alzheimer's Disease Introduction One of the most feared aspects of aging is the deterioration of the memory and cognitive function (dementia) that occurs among the elderly with increasing frequency with advancing years. A significant proportion of otherwise healthy elderly persons show a significant decline in mental function later in life. It has been estimated that 10% of the population over the age of 65 suffers from mild to moderate dementia and 4-5% suffer from severe dementia....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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The Cause of Alzheimer's Disease - ... Some of the screening procedures include Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), mini-cog, and mood assessments. MMSE is an examination performed where a healthcare professional asks a patient variety of questions to test their mental skills. The maximum score of the MMSE exam is 30 points, where 20 to 24 states that one may have a mild dementia, 13 to 20 points states that one may have moderate dementia, and less than 12 indicates severe dementia. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease is complex....   [tags: diagnosis, prognosis, treatment]
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Nursing: Person-Centred Care - The case study will identify a number if strategies to apply supportive approaches using the principals and practices of providing person-centred care, reflected against a real client situation within an organisational perspective. The case study is considering the situation with reflection of the two questions chosen from the Person-centred Care Assessment Tool. In relation to one’s ability to engage and be supported in the facilitation and management of person-centred care directives, within the role of a leisure and health officer....   [tags: care assessment tool, nurses]
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Alzheimer’s Disease - Alzheimer’s disease defined: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive, terminal, degenerative brain disease. It is the fourth leading cause of death in adults and currently affects over four million people in the United States. This number is expected to increase over the next several years as the baby boomers age, until it reaches fourteen million by the year 2025. Alzheimer disease generally occurs in people over seventy five years of age; however it does strike people in their forties, fifties, and sixties, but this is rare....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays] 2552 words
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Exploring Alzheimer's Disease - Exploring Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders requires several criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia. These include impairment in memory, disturbances in cognitive and executive functioning, and impairment in occupational or social functions. Cognitive disturbances may include one or more of the following: aphasia, apraxia, and agnosia. Cognitive deficits must demonstrate decline from previous levels of functioning and are characterized by gradual onset....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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The Role of Genetics In Alzheimer’s Disease - ... 3. No evidence of mixed etiology. D. The disturbance is not better explained by cerebrovascular disease, another neurodegenerative disease, the effects of a substance, or another mental, neurological, or systematic disorder (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013, p. 611). In order to predict whether or not a person has developed Alzheimer’s disease, a medical evaluation is completed. Doctors compile a medical history by interviewing the patient and someone who the patient lives with or is in close contact with....   [tags: Tau Proteins, Mental Skills]
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Better Sleep for the Elderly - The elderly population has been increasing over the past decade and now with the baby boomers entering into this population it only applies more pressure to an ever increasing dilemma on how to improve their health. Sleep is essential to a person’s well being and cognitive function. Research studies have shown that there is significant decline in a person’s cognitive function when they do not receive an adequate night’s sleep. The secret to aging healthfully is getting enough sleep to allow the body to heal and rejuvenate from the day’s experiences and traumas....   [tags: Health, Geriatrics]
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Still Alice by Lisa Genova - Lisa Genova, the author of Still Alice, a heartbreaking book about a 50-year-old woman's sudden diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, graduated valedictorian from Bates College with a degree in Biopsychology and holds a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Harvard University. She is a member of the Dementia Advocacy, Support Network International and Dementia USA and is an online columnist for the National Alzheimer's Association. Genova's work with Alzheimer's patients has given her an understanding of the disorder and its affect not only on the patient, but on their friends and family as well (Simon and Schuster, n.d.)....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease, Novel Anlysis]
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Neuropathology of AIDS - Neuropathology of AIDS Since its discovery in 1981, AIDS has mainly been characterized as a disease effecting the bodying immune system. It has been recognized, however, that there are distinct neurological pathologies associated with the disease. AIDS neuropathology can be characterized by the existence of subcortical dementia, motor difficulties, and affective disorders. Most AIDS patients experience dementia of one form or another. It has been observed that approximately 95% of AIDS patients brain’s show signs of damage, and 60% of patients develop dementia of one degree or another....   [tags: Health Medicine Medical Diseases Essays]
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Alzheimer's Disease - Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a progressive degenerative disease of unknown aetiology, as first described by Alois Alzheimer (1907). According to Shoenberg et. al (1987), it is the commonest cause of dementia in the elderly with an incidence ranging from 2.5 to 5 per thousand. Furthermore, this incidence has grown in recent years as a result people generally living longer. The disease is incurable at present but there are drug treatments that delay the symptoms in the early stages....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays] 2881 words
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Alzheimer’s Disease - Alzheimer’s Association (2010) explains that Alzheimer’s disease is a brain’s disease which affects the way people think, remember and behave. Finally, people living with Alzheimer’s do not know themselves; do not able to perform everyday activities, which means that they always have to be under control. All of these are caused by improper function of the brain. This disease leads to the death. Nowadays, the 7th cause of death in United States of America is Alzheimer’s disease. There is no method of curing yet, but it was proved that life of people living with the disease and caregivers can become better if good care and aid are provided during the whole period of the illness (Alzhe...   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays] 1145 words
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The Desire to Die: Suicide and Euthanasia in the Elderly - Mrs. Jones, 78 years old, arrived in the emergency department (ED) via ambulance. She was alert and oriented, but was having episodes of lost consciousness. She was put on the cardiac monitor and her vital signs were obtained. Her cardiac rhythm was normal. Her vital signs were as follows: Temperature 97.3°F, Pulse 43, respirations 26, blood pressure 100/58 and O2 saturation of 94% on room air. Additionally, Mrs. Jones was vomiting and had 2 loose, incontinent stools. She was pale, cool to touch and diaphoretic....   [tags: Health] 1517 words
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The Use of Vitamin B12 in Stroke Prevention and Post Stroke Recovery - ... This strong correlation would imply that those at greatest risk are people suffering from Vitamin B12 deficiency. Consequently Hcy levels are now used by some physicians when people with suspected Vitamin B12 deficiency are being screened (#8). Research demonstrates that Vitamin B12 plays a pivotal role in stroke prevention by lowering Hcy concentrations. Smith et al. (2010) performed a control trial (VITACOG study) to determine the impact of B vitamins HHcy levels (Table 3). The 271 participants took a combination of Vitamin B12 (0.5 mg/d), Vitamin B6 (20 mg/d) and Vitamin B9 (0.8 mg/d)....   [tags: cognitive degeneration, healthy aging, canadians]
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Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease: A Look Into Biomarkers - INTRODUCTION Alzheimer's disease is a form of dementia that is nonreversible and develops over a period of years that affects mostly the elderly population. Alzheimer's disease can be mistaken for normal aging but personality and behavior changes sets Alzheimer's disease apart. Although Alzheimer's disease is considered an aged disease, it has been documented to affect people before the age of 65. This is termed early onset Alzheimer's disease which accounts for 5-10% of all Alzheimer's disease....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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Code of Ethics for Nurses: End-of Life Case Study - The Code of Ethics for Nurses in an important set of guidelines that provides nurses with specific rules and regulations for interacting with patients, colleagues, and society in an ethical, honest, respectful, and effective manner. Nurses should strive to adhere to at all times throughout their career. Having a code of ethics provides health care professionals to provided to their patients with ethical, high quality care. Ensign (2004) confirms the importance of having and adhering to a code of ethics as follows: A code of ethics states a profession’s goals, values, and level of commitment to the public and the community which it serves.  The development and promulgation of a code of...   [tags: Nursing Case Study]
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Care In and Out of the Hospital - Imagine watching an elderly loved one move back and forth between their own home and a hospital, all because they did not have adequate home care. The hospital, in turn, did not provide enough rehospitalization time. This happens to many elderly folks who can no longer take care of themselves and neither can their spouses. Mrs. Gerlach, age 82, suffered from a disease is called Giant Cell Arthritis and is very common for older people to contract. It is when the cells in the artery that feed the optic nerve become enlarged....   [tags: Health Care]
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Professional, Ethical and Legal issues in nursing - According to American Nurses Association (ANA), (2010) “the nurse promotes, advocates for and strives to protect the heath, safety and right of the patient” (p. 6). Nursing responsibilities should be acted at the highest standard and must be based on legal and ethical obligations. Healthcare provider’s perception and judgment in the patient’s well being as well as taking into account the right of the patient in every action is one of the key elements in nursing practice. International Council of Nurses (ICN), (2006) states “The nurse at all times maintains standards of personal conduct which reflect well on the profession and enhance public confidence” (p....   [tags: Health Care] 2256 words
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Alzheimer’s Disease: The Importance of Public Awareness - Imagine greeting your grandmother and being met with a blank stare. Think about how it would feel to watch as your father forgets how to drive or dress himself. Picture your own mother crying out for her long dead parents and siblings. Try to envision the look on a loved one’s face as you tell them that they can no longer live at home alone. Now put yourself in their place-- slowly losing your freedom, your memory, and your very identity. Welcome to the world of Alzheimer’s disease. This is the reality that nearly fifteen million caregivers and over five million patients must face every day....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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Cell Phone Radiation May Help Alzheimer's Disease - Every 71 seconds in this country, someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and in a startling new report out today from the Alzheimer's Association, predicts that one out of every eight baby boomers-- or almost 10 milllion Americans – is expected to develop this disease, (Mckenzie). The University of South Florida has led a study along with the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center which has abandoned the idea that cell phone radiation is detrimental to our health. The experiment studied the effects of cell phones on Alzheimer's....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays] 1554 words
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Pathophysiology, Progression, and Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease - Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that affects cognitive function in the elderly population. The exact cause of the disease is unknown but may include genetic as well as environmental factors. A progression of specific neurological changes allows the progression of the disease. Short-term memory losses along with dementia are typical symptoms of the disease. A definite diagnosis of the disease currently can only be confirmed by an autopsy. The disease progresses in five stages that will vary with every patient....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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Critiquing Quantitative and Qualitative Studies: Family Caregivers - Research initiatives can be critiqued and analyzed utilizing different reviewing approaches. This assignment is intended to demonstrate that both information and knowledge that are obtained from qualitative as well as quantitative studies. Both studies approach similar topics of interest from different angles, but both provide valuable information for evidence-based practice. The quantitative and qualitative studies I chose to critique are “Coping and Subjective Burden in Caregivers of Older Relatives”(Casado, Osuna, Palomino-Moral, & Pancorbo-Hidalgo, 2011) and “Essential Knowledge for Family Caregivers”(Angelo, Egan, & Reid, 2013) respectively....   [tags: health, caregivers]
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Alzheimer's Disease in the Elderly - Alzheimer is a disease that affects the elderly most. The disease was discovered by Dr. Alois Alzheimer in the year 1906 when he was examining a female’s brain. He found out that the woman displayed memory loss, language problems and some inexplicable changes in behavior. The disease was named after the doctor who was a German psychiatrist and a neuropathologist. Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that leads to memory loss, personality changes, and language problems (Gilbert & Julie 2)....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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A Cure for Alzheimer's - A Cure for Alzheimer's In February of 2000, I lost my grandmother to Alzheimer's disease. She was diagnosed with the disease just less than two years prior to her death. Throughout that time, I watched changes in my grandmother that made her seem like an entirely different woman to me. She gradually began losing her short-term memory and we began to see signs of her long-term memory degrading too. It began to get harder and harder to take her out into public without being afraid of what would happen next....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays] 1622 words
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Participation, Facilitation and Power - Model for everyday/everynight An everyday approach to participation is a concept that identifies the involvement of the person. The assessment and care plans are discussed with the people they are written about but are not always written with. Often the assessment and care plans rely on the input of medical or relatives to complete areas choice. It can be argued, how this could be possible to determine when the person with dementia is not asked to contribute. This experience of non-inclusive decision making describes the participation of another person, a proxy-respondent and not the respondent person’s viewpoint (Tyrrell,2008)....   [tags: Communication ]
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Overview of Alzheimer's Disease - Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a severe, incurable form of dementia that causes impairment and cognitive deficits such as language, speech, memory and basic motor skills (Buckley, 2011). Currently in the United States, there are 5.2 million individuals living with AD (Alzheimer’s Association, 2013). AD is a deterioration of one’s cognitive functions that prevents the ability for daily function and unfortunately has no known cure or preventative methods (Buckley, 2011).The main deficit that AD has on the brain is the deterioration of different areas of the brain....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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1757 words
(5 pages)
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Concussions in the NFL - Many memories are made in football, but sadly some of the greatest players cannot recall them. The National Football League has been associated with concussions and brain traumas throughout the years, but lately it has been exposed by media and NFL veterans. The league recently “reached a $765 million preliminary settlement with thousands of former players who were suing the league over its treatment of concussions…” (Waldron). Many former players are experiencing the effects of taking hard hits over and over again; they were not properly treated, which makes the injury worse and long term....   [tags: sports, football]
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Schizophrenia, A splitting of the mind - Schizophrenia, A splitting of the mind Dementia Praecox, the early term for schizophrenia was presented by Emil Kraepelin in 1898. Dementia Praecox included – dementia paranoids, catatonia and hebephrenia. Whilst these different entities are symptomatically very diverse, Kraepelin believed they shared a common core. Kraepelin noted several major symptoms in his patients, these included hallucinations, delusions, negativism, attentional difficulties, stereotyped behaviour and emotional dysfunction....   [tags: essays research papers] 3072 words
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