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Your search returned over 400 essays for "dementia"
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Caring for a Person With Dementia - Introduction Dementia is an umbrella term used to explain the gradual decline in multiple areas of functions, which includes thinking, perception, communication, memory, languages, reasoning, and the ability to function (Harrison-Dening 2013). Worldwide, 47.5 million people have dementia and there are 7.7 million new cases every year. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and may contribute to 60–70% of cases. (Alzheimer's society 2014). The complexity of dementia presents a number of behavioural challenges to those who live with dementia and their care providers....   [tags: Dementia and Aggressive Behavior]
:: 14 Works Cited
2038 words
(5.8 pages)
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Technology for the Elderly with Dementia - The World Health Organization put forward a document in 1980 titled, International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH). This document defined individuals with disabilities as having an impairment that did not allow them to contribute in everyday conventional activities and in which they are incapable to perform their normal role, resulting a handicap. The use of assistive technology then comes in order to minimise interruption to a user’s habituated and desired ways of doing things, which then results with an enhanced quality of life (DeRuyter, F....   [tags: assistive technology, ireland, dementia]
:: 14 Works Cited
1729 words
(4.9 pages)
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Analysis and Description of Dementia - Dementia is characterized as a condition where the mental processes of cognition and memory start to deteriorate. It is described as a syndrome that hinders the daily lives of those who have it and is characterized by memory and thinking impairment. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s Disease and the second most common is vascular dementia. Dementia is a syndrome occurring usually, but not limited, to people over the age of 40 and is due to brain damage caused by natural deteriorating, stroke or can be brought on by factors such as excessive drinking or drug abuse....   [tags: alzheimer, vascular dementia, memory loss]
:: 11 Works Cited
1744 words
(5 pages)
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Dementia: Forgotten Memories - While the average life expectancy of the world’s population has increased, the number of detected dementia cases has commensurately risen to astonishing levels. Along with improved discovery of this disorder, new causes and treatments have been found, from which many innovative techniques have been developed towards the prevention of future incidences and reduction of the effects of this condition; however, the quest for these solutions have raised more questions than it has answered. Why do some develop this disorder, while others do not....   [tags: Dementia Condition and Symptoms]
:: 3 Works Cited
849 words
(2.4 pages)
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Alzheimer´s Disease and Its Relation with Dementia - ... In early onset, patients display the symptoms of the condition prior to the age of 65, but rather between the ages of 30 to 40. Research suggests that the early onset form is genetically heritable and may affect a number of generations in a family. The probable cause for the development of this form of the disease is a mutation in one of the following genes: the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) and two presenilin genes (PSEN-1 and PSEN-2). (Alzheimer’s Society, 2007). On the other hand, the late onset disease occurs more frequently than the early onset disease....   [tags: dementia, brain, remembrance]
:: 4 Works Cited
534 words
(1.5 pages)
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Understanding Dementia in Relation to Brain and Communication Disorders - Understanding Dementia in Relation to Brain and Communication Disorders It is well known that the elderly population in our society is growing larger. With this increase comes the awareness and prevalence of common health issues of the elderly. Dementia is an illness that is commonly associated with the geriatric population. To understand dementia, one would need to learn its symptoms, its causes, and its various treatment options. This study specifically focuses on the relationship that dementia holds with brain and communication disorders....   [tags: Common Health issues, Elderly, Dementia]
:: 7 Works Cited
1285 words
(3.7 pages)
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What is the Current Status of Occupational Therapy Practice for Adult Drivers with Dementia - Introduction Occupational therapy (OT) is a client-centered approach resolute to assist individuals in attaining their highest occupational performance (American Occupational Therapy Association [AOTA], 2014c). Driving and aging is an emerging topic of interest for occupational therapists (OTs) (AOTA, 2007). According to the Administration on Aging (AOA) (2013), by the year 2030 the number of 65 year olds and older in the United States will be 72.1 million, which is a 32.5 million increase compared to 2009’s census....   [tags: mental health, dementia, alzheimer disease]
:: 29 Works Cited
1276 words
(3.6 pages)
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Dementia is a Syndrome - The functions of the human brain are extremely fascinating. Each brain structure is responsible for different functions. When these structures are damaged or tampered with, the ability of those functions decline. For example, the cerebellum is responsible for a person’s balance. This is how people are able to walk correctly and maintain proper balance. When a person drinks alcohol, the cerebellum is affected and is not able to function properly. This why people have horrible balance when they are intoxicated....   [tags: brain disease, Alzheimer’s disease]
:: 5 Works Cited
1930 words
(5.5 pages)
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Dementia in the Elderly - 1. What dementia brought into my mind Dementia is a common syndrome found among elderly over the globe. Talking about dementia, the first word emerge from mind is “loss”. Learning about the disease manifestation, it is known that dementia does bring a huge impact to the affected senior so as the caregiver. Many of us used to focus on the losses of dementia client which indeed causing a labeling effect. Remembered in the first lesson, a question “As a case manager, what will you do to help the client with dementia and the family?” was asked....   [tags: ]
:: 8 Works Cited
1489 words
(4.3 pages)
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Overview of Dementia - Dementia is a syndrome, which is usually of a chronic or progressive nature, which causes deterioration in cognitive function. It goes beyond what is expected from normal aging. It causes changes in what you remember, like appointments, or phone numbers. It may cause you to get lost in a familiar setting like driving to the grocery store. You may not be able to balance your checkbook or add up your points in a card game. Communication becomes difficult; as you cannot find the words you want to say....   [tags: syndrome, cognitive function, paranoid]
:: 7 Works Cited
1366 words
(3.9 pages)
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Interacting with Dementia - ... The object of the game is to turn over pairs of matching cards. This game is used to exercise the brain and help recollect and concentrate individuals with dementia. Some other games that I personally play with my residents at work are bingo and ball toss. Although, games are a great way to interact with elderly individuals with dementia, a second way that people who are working with the elderly community can interact with elderly individuals with dementia is by bring familiar objects such as a photographs and accessories to help trigger memories and engage in good conversation....   [tags: loss of mental functions, healthcare professionals]
:: 6 Works Cited
1094 words
(3.1 pages)
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Overview of Dementia - Introduction Margaret is a 77 year old who has a diagnosis of dementia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. She has been recently separated from her daughter who was her primary carer and her husband who were both unable to cope with her agitated behaviour. Margaret now resides in an age care facility. Margaret’s mental and emotional health is a cause for concern and the family are upset and are struggling with feelings of guilt and anger. This paper with discuss the intervention professional healthcare workers can implement to reduce the turbulence of this transitional period for all individuals involved....   [tags: Health, diabetes mellitus]
:: 16 Works Cited
987 words
(2.8 pages)
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Dealing With Dementia - “Ted sought a diagnosis after being terminated from his job. Little did anyone know his memory and performance issues were due to a disease. (Life with ALZ)” This disease causes the loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Dementia, is one form of this disease that gradually gets worse over time. It affects memory, thinking, and behavior. (WebMD, 1995) “Changes that take place in the brains of people. These brain changes may cause the memory loss and decline in other mental abilities that occur with Alzheimer's disease....   [tags: health, disease, brain function]
:: 6 Works Cited
976 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Exact Cause of Dementia - ... The mechanism that causes Dementia is also the mechanism that causes the symptoms to start appearing. Causes and symptoms go hand in hand in the case of Dementia. Worldwide, 35.6 million people have dementia and there are 7.7 million new cases every year (WHO 2012). There are many people living with Dementia today, but there are several different types people suffer from. Some types of Dementia are, Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common form Dementia, Vascular Dementia, Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), Mixed Dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Frontotemporal dementia and many more (alz.org)....   [tags: brain damage, disease] 921 words
(2.6 pages)
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Alcohol COnsumption and the Risk of Dementia - ... 282). The next part of the examination detailed the alcohol intake of the subjects also at the baseline of the study. Before their visit to the study center, a checklist was given to the patients that outlined what types of food and drink they ingested the preceding year. The checklist followed the food-frequency questionnaire that detailed one hundred seventy different food items, inducing beverages like coffee and tea as well as different types of alcohol. The subjects were then questioned on any previous consumption of alcohol and the frequency at which they drank it....   [tags: deadly drug, health risks, brain, elderly]
:: 3 Works Cited
1349 words
(3.9 pages)
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Understanding Dementia in the Elderly - Delirium, Depression, and Dementia are some of the most common psychological diagnoses in the elderly today. The three D’s are difficult to differentiate between in older adults because they overlap with each other and can all exist in the same patient at once. Delirium, Dementia, and Depression all affect the elderly’s quality of life and often increase the risks for one another (Downing, Caprio & Lyness, 2013). For the purpose of this paper I will be focusing primarily on the diagnosis of Dementia, the prevention, and nursing measures associated with it, but first I would like to differentiate between Delirium and Depression because Dementia is often associated with the two in the older ad...   [tags: Signs, Symptoms, Causes]
:: 1 Works Cited
518 words
(1.5 pages)
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Dementia Effects the Elderly and Their Caregivers - ... The article examines the high rates of anxiety, stress, and burnout that caregivers’ experience (Butler, 2008). Research and studies are sparse on the services that provide caregivers support (Butler, 2008). The research that has been done has been very little (Butler, 2008). The concluding point and recommendation from the committee is to offer everyone with dementia and their caregiver a single health or social care professional contact point (Butler, 2008). However, Gainey and Payne (2006) discuss the burden that exists in all types of caregiving....   [tags: stress, support, family]
:: 6 Works Cited
718 words
(2.1 pages)
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Caring For Patients With Dementia - Caring for dementia involves a lot of patience and understanding. It should be dealt with audacity and flawlessness to ensure the vulnerable adults’ well-being. Aiding at home or care home required carers to be at their best, physically and emotionally. The responsibility can be distressing but it is rewarding as well since helping dementia adults in their day to day activities is a significant matter for them. However, carers need a pause as over duty can result to substandard nursing. The big question is: who take care for the carers of people with dementia....   [tags: Nursing]
:: 5 Works Cited
966 words
(2.8 pages)
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Dementia - Dementia While the average life expectancy of the world’s population has increased, the number of Dementia cases detected has commensurately risen to astonishing levels. Along with improved detection of this disorder, many new causes and treatments have been found, from which many innovative techniques have been discovered to prevent future incidences or reduce the effects of this condition. The quest for treatments and cures to this dilemma has brought additional questions to be answered, with limited success....   [tags: Mental Health]
:: 4 Works Cited
524 words
(1.5 pages)
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Taking a Look at Dementia - ... Scary tissues develops in these parts of the brain also. Many of the surviving cells tend to have an abnormal shape and are shrunken. These cells then surrounded by abnormal proteins causing the loss of connection in the brain Located in the frontal lobe is the motor cortex, a very important part of the brain that takes in information in order to send out singles to the body to carry out movement. The temporal lobe, that houses the auditory cortex is located at the bottom of the brain is responsible for forming one's memory, and talking....   [tags: persistent disorder of the mental processes] 1013 words
(2.9 pages)
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An Overview of Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia - Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia Intro/Overview Section of Disease Paper “Horribly tragic, scary, slow, sad, maddening, etc.” These are words some would use when asked what Alzheimer’s/dementia is. This answer is common to those who have watched loved ones suffer from this disease that ultimately lead to their passing. As defined in McGraw Hill Medical Dictionary, Alzheimer’s Disease is a ‘progressive neurologic disease of the brain that causes irreversible loss of neurons and eventual dementia characterized by loss of memory, impairment of judgment, decision making, language use, and awareness of surroundings’(pg....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
1924 words
(5.5 pages)
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Social Work with Dementia Patients - HISTORY OF DEMENTIA: The human brain is extraordinary organ. It stores our memories, vision, hearing, speech, and capable of executing executive higher reasoning and functions setting us apart from animals. Today we know more about the human brain because of medical advances and the development of technology. These brain disorders have been studied for years and many others would classify dementia as a mental illness because it causes cognitive impairments. The following paragraphs will discuss what dementia is, what the types of dementia are, perspectives of patients with dementia as well as the perspective of a caregiver to a dementia patient....   [tags: Social Workers]
:: 7 Works Cited
1782 words
(5.1 pages)
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Dementia in Elder Adults - Introduction Dementia illness is the most feared and distressing disorder of later life. This essay will address the overview of dementia followed by the most common types of dementia. The essay will cover the nursing assessment and the interventions. One issue relating to activity of living will be indentified and it will also explore the care required in relation to this activity for an older patient / client suffering from dementia, as well as patient, carer advice. Analysis of Dementia Overview The term dementia refers to a serious loss in memory and other intellectual abilities in a formerly unimpaired person, further than what might be expected from normal aging (Dhanani & Wilkins,...   [tags: Mental Illness ]
:: 12 Works Cited
1711 words
(4.9 pages)
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Dementia in Elder Adults - Dementia is the most feared and distressing disorder of later life. This essay will give an overview of dementia followed by the most common types of dementia. The essay will cover the nursing assessment and the interventions. Issues relating to sleeping disorders will be identified and it will also explore the care required in relation to these sleeping problems for an older patient / client suffering from dementia, as well as patient and carer advice. Analysis of Dementia Overview The term dementia means a serious loss in memory and other intellectual abilities in a formally unimpaired person, further than what might be expected from normal ageing (Dhanani & Wilkins, 2008)....   [tags: Mental Health ]
:: 17 Works Cited
1876 words
(5.4 pages)
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Dementia - When recalling his grandmother’s end-stage of life care, geriatrician and dementia researcher Greg A. Sachs, MD, of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, remembers that there has been little change in the care of patients with end-stage dementia in the past 30 years (Salynn Boyles, WebMD Health News, 2009). As Sabat (2009) wrote concerning the need for improving the lives of patients with end-stage dementia, “constitutes a call to action that cannot and should not be ignored” (p. 1806)....   [tags: Health, Diseases] 1873 words
(5.4 pages)
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Elder Population and Dementia - ... They do not remember the little things like where their car keys are or if they ate breakfast that day. This would be where the symptoms start, because the symptoms of dementia start off rather slow but they gradually worsen over time. “Dementia is caused by damage to brain cells” (Alzheimer’s Association 2014). When the cells are damaged in a specific region of the brain this causes the brain cells to not be able to communicate with one another, these specific regions of the brains each carry out different functions and when they cannot communicate this function does not get accomplished....   [tags: illness, mental illness] 697 words
(2 pages)
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Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease Treatments - Immunotherapy is defined as the “treatment of disease by inducing, enhancing, or suppressing an immune response” (Dictionary.com 2009). Immunotherapies are divided into two categories: activation immunotherapies and suppression immunotherapies. Immunotherapy is currently being tested on humans for its effects on Cancer, various allergies, and Alzheimer's Disease. Human testing began in 2013 and is still not widely used, although studies suggest that early treatment may have more significant positive results....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
1016 words
(2.9 pages)
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Dementia in Older Adults - Introduction This assignment critically discusses about dementia, a widespread disability among older adults today. It provides an introduction to dementia and analyses its prevalence in society. The various forms of dementias are elaborated with description about dysfunctions and symptoms. Nursing Assessment and Interventions are provided in the further sections which discusses about actions nurses should take on while evaluating patients and treating them. Finally, communication, an important Activity of Daily Living (ADL) is explored and patient/carer advice is presented so as to maintain good health conditions in the patient....   [tags: Mental Health ]
:: 10 Works Cited
2100 words
(6 pages)
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Taking a Look at Dementia - ... With mild AD, memory loss and changes in cognitive abilities occur. Some people may experience getting lost; not being able to pay bills; losing things or not remembering where you put things; mood and personality changes. It is at this stage that people are generally diagnosed. Individuals who are diagnosed with moderate AD their memory is greatly reduced and are more confused, they have trouble recognizing their family and friends, have impulsive behavior and are unable to care for personal hygiene, they may have to have assistance with daily living....   [tags: loss of memory and cognitive skills] 1245 words
(3.6 pages)
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Dementia and Educating Carers - Other carers such as assistants in nursing should have a clear understanding of dementia and the common traits of people afflicted with the disease. Carers should appreciate that dementia is an illness that impacts on cortical function, calculation, language, judgement, and learning capacity (Lemone et al., 2011). Deterioration in emotional stability, sociability and motivation are typical and can be attributed to the disability of cognitive function (Lemone et al., 2011). Dementia sufferers are afflicted with memory loss, lose their ability to problem solve and develop personality changes such as agitation and hallucination (Lemone et al., 2011)....   [tags: health, cognitive disability]
:: 16 Works Cited
1371 words
(3.9 pages)
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Edgar Allan Poe's Dementia - Edgar Allan Poe’s Dementia Several aspects of Edgar Allan Poe’s life are well known because of his popularity in American literature. Commonly known facts include, but are not limited to knowing that Poe greatly influenced the horror genre of writing, published many famous poems, and that he is credited with creating detective-fiction. One aspect of his life, however, is not as common. Poe suffered from a cognitive disorder presently known as dementia, which, in Poe’s case, worsened throughout his life....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 5 Works Cited
1336 words
(3.8 pages)
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Dementia and Alzheimer´s Disease - ... Another strong risk factor of Alzheimer’s disease is family history. Those who have family members such as a brother, sister or parent that have Alzheimer’s may possibly develop this life-altering disease. When diseases run in families, it is either by their genes (heredity) or by their life style (environmental) that play a role. According to Alzheimer’s Association, genetic testing are now available for scientists to see if the patient has the types of genes that play a role in developing the disease (Overview Alzheimer's Association)....   [tags: mental hability, brain control] 1620 words
(4.6 pages)
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Dementia and Parkinson´s Disease - ... Initially these solutions were large and bulky and resembled a robotic arm, but over time they have become more compact. Using various types of constraints and braces, these contraptions force the patient’s tremor to cease. However, it is hard to imagine wearing these uncomfortable devices in public or trying to eat with them in the presence of others. San Francisco-based company Lift Labs recently developed a type of electronic utensil (called Liftware) to help offset the effects of tremors using stabilizing technology....   [tags: paralysis, tremors, liftware] 733 words
(2.1 pages)
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Effective Dementia Care - Dementia care offers support and services to an individual affected by the disease itself, which is dementia. It addresses the right and needs of the person with dementia and their families. Improving quality of life and changing attitudes towards dementia is the main goal of dementia care. Dementia care also provides quality of care, maintain dignity and promote health, security and comfort in consideration with the standard of care and ethical guidelines (Adams & Manthorpe, 2003). Understanding dementia care is necessary for those health care providers who are planning to handle dementia patients....   [tags: Health, Diseases] 1566 words
(4.5 pages)
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Canine Dementia - Many of the population today believe animals of the canine genus, dogs, to be “man’s best friend.” This philosophy appears to be especially pertinent when dealing with the comparison between Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia in the two species. The amount, progression and deterioration of the brain of the two are strikingly similar. Canine Dementia is a rising concern for elderly dogs, as the damage appears to localize on the areas of the brain that affect spatial determination. For example, a dog may stand for hours staring at the hinges of a door, knowing it to be open, but unable to remember where the door opens; another scenario is if one’s dog got out of the yard and wande...   [tags: Animal Science ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1848 words
(5.3 pages)
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Dementia Vs Delirium - Dementia and Delirium are perplexing conditions both to differentiate and experience. Dementia is a progressive intellectual function and other cognitive skills decline condition which results to a decline in an individual’s performance of their daily activities. Unlike dementia, delirium also known as acute confusional state is an acute medical condition which results in confusion and other disruptions in a person’s thinking and behavior including attention, activity level and perception. It is very important to distinguish between the two conditions because, delirium can be found in a person that already has dementia....   [tags: Differential Diagnosis]
:: 4 Works Cited
866 words
(2.5 pages)
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Intervention Dementia - Critique 2 Intervention Dementia The objective of this study (Eloniemi-Sulkava et al., 2009) was to analyze if a program of care based on multiple components, such as peer support groups, exercise education and comprehensive geriatric assessment among others could delay the need for institutionalization of patients with dementia and prolong their care in the community. At the same time, the authors investigate if the impact that this program will have in the use and cost of social and healthcare service utilized by the studied patients compared with the usual care....   [tags: Mental Health]
:: 4 Works Cited
1408 words
(4 pages)
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Three Primary Types of Dementia: Alzheimer’s Disease, Vascular Dementia and Lewy Body Dementia - Dementia is a wide term applied to identify loss of brain functions to the level where it affects day-to-day living. Being. There are many preventable risk factors that can be controlled to reduce one’s chances of producing dementia, but the biggest risk factor is increasing age and typical onset occurs after the age of sixty. Contrary to popular belief, dementia is not a normal process of ageing (Alpert 2011). It puts a heavy onus on the families and carers of those moved by the day-to-day responsibility of worrying for a patient with dementia are likely to suffer from physical and psychological torment as one would expect from a highly stressful occupation....   [tags: risks factors, brain, diagnosis]
:: 11 Works Cited
1390 words
(4 pages)
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Providing Quality Care for Patients with Dementia - Jeon Y.H. et al.(2012) told that There is an increase demand for care and help services knowledgeable aged care workers due to the increased cases of dementia. Staff should have proper knowledge of dementia and should be properly trained before providing care to the residents suffering from dementia. Banner et al (2009 as cited in Lee J.et al.2012) focussed that attitudes of care staff with the residents suffering from dementia matters because their attitudes shows in the way they react with residents in their routine work....   [tags: staff, care facilities, knowledge] 1416 words
(4 pages)
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Dementia: How to Help a Loved One - ... Dementia was often known as senile which is common with old age. Studies through the years have shown that it is much more serious and causes damage to areas of the brain. Alois Alzheimer in 1910 noticed tangles, plaques, and arteriosclerotic changes in the brain when examining post-mortem. Dementia is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and more than five million people are living with it today. Dementia is incurable- Dementia progresses with time and causes degeneration or loss of nerve cells in the brain....   [tags: past, disease, diagnose, incurable, signs]
:: 4 Works Cited
814 words
(2.3 pages)
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Statins Preventing Dementia - QUESTION: What is the current data on statins causing or preventing dementia? OBJECTIVE: To determine if dementia can be caused or prevented by the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors: Pravastatin, Lovastatin, Simvastatin, Rosuvastatin, and Atorvastatin. RETRIEVAL OF SOURCES: The journal articles and publications used in this review were searched using PubMed and Google scholar as well as the FDA references cited in the warning regarding cognitive impairment on the FDA website. Key search words used include: statins, dementia, cognitive function, HMG-coA reductase inhibitors, impaired memory....   [tags: statins, prescription medications, memory loss]
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1236 words
(3.5 pages)
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Dementia and Alzheimer's Research Analysis Paper - Dementia and Alzheimer’s Research Analysis Paper Part 1: Introduction The topic I am writing about is memory loss or more specifically: Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Modern medicine has improved significantly in the last decade and the average human lifespan has been extended. However, since humans are living longer, there is also an increased susceptibility for chronic diseases as opposed to infectious diseases. A chronic disease that is slowly on the rise is Alzheimer’s, as it is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States....   [tags: memory loss]
:: 6 Works Cited
1869 words
(5.3 pages)
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The Rights People with Dementia Should Have - ... This lady fitted the definition of a vulnerable adult under the Safeguarding Adults Framework for Action which relates to people with mental health needs, including with dementia. (no secrets DH 2000). I considered my role in the context of anti-oppressive practice, to understand diversity, equality of opportunity and complying with anti-discriminatory legislation to promote a service free from discrimination and prejudice. Anti-oppressive methodologies necessitated listening to the service user to identify what her needs were and use it to her best advantage....   [tags: disposing of cadavers]
:: 24 Works Cited
2185 words
(6.2 pages)
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End Stage Dementia - When recalling his grandmother’s end-stage of life care, Greg A. Sachs, MD, a geriatrician of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, remembers that there has been little change in the care of patients with end-stage dementia in the past 30 years (Boyles, 2009). According to Sabat (2009), the need for improving the lives of patients with end-stage dementia; “constitutes a call to action that cannot and should not be ignored” (p. 1806). In this study, I will seek to discover changes that I can make in the daily care routines of cognitively impaired patients to decrease their stress levels....   [tags: Health, Diseases, Long Term Care] 1838 words
(5.3 pages)
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Dementia: Reminiscence Therapy and Montessori Method - This essay is a comparative research study into the effectiveness and relevance of two interventions for people with dementia; Reminiscence Therapy and Montessori Method. The two methods will be analysed for their relevance and effectiveness, as well as comparing to discover their differences and similarities, with consideration to the supporting underlying psychology. In many ways the theories of Reminiscence and Montessori are about effecting the past into the here and now, which in essence is very existential in nature....   [tags: existencialism, loss, grief]
:: 9 Works Cited
1224 words
(3.5 pages)
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Falls Among Older Persons with Dementia - “Fall may be defined as an unexpected event in which the person comes to rest on the ground, floor, or lower level” (Struksness, Lindström, Lord, Slaasletten, Johansson, et al., 2011). In older populations, falls are quite common, but with a mental illness such as dementia, the problem is worsened. This cross-sectional study showed that the most common causes of falls reported by nursing staff were individual factors like physical impairment and mental impairment. Background: Falls are a common cause of death for people over the age of 65....   [tags: Healthcare]
:: 1 Works Cited
1046 words
(3 pages)
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Difference between Dementia, Delirium and Alzheimer's - ... The exact mechanism is still unknown, but animal studies shown that antagonist of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, atropine, anticholinergic drugs such as biperiden and scopolamine produces delirium like symptoms. It means that HYPOCHOLINERGIC state causes delirium. This figure shown above further elaborates what actually happens in delirium. Decreased oxidative metabolism in the brain that causes cerebral dysfunction due to abnormalities of various neurotransmitter systems which causes reduced cholinergic function, excess release of dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate, and both decreased and increased serotonergic and GABA activity....   [tags: mental illness, conditions of the elderly] 1216 words
(3.5 pages)
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Most Common Dementia: Alzheimer's Disease - Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia in older people. Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible and progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and other important mental functions, which is due to degeneration between the brain cells and the brain cell receptors (Alzheimer’s Stages & Behaviors, 2014). Alzheimer’s disease results in the loss of intellectual and social skills (Alzheimer’s Stages & Behaviors, 2014). According to the Alzheimer’s Association there are 7 stages to this disease (Alzheimer’s Stages & Behaviors, 2014)....   [tags: memory, capacity, elderly] 1095 words
(3.1 pages)
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Dementia is the Leading Cause of Alzheimer’s Disease - ... The sample test consisted of 332 participants less than the age of 75, and they had to be diagnosed with dementia. The way the research was done was by a trained research assistant, most likely a psychologist or physician. This research was conducted every one in a half year. The first assessment was the assessment of depression. That was used to test how long the depression lasts and what age they are. They came up with symptoms like depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, loss or gain of weight and appetite, changes in sleeping patterns, guilt, and suicidal thoughts....   [tags: impairment of memory, elderly] 1551 words
(4.4 pages)
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Dementia: Diseases Associated with Loss of Intellectual Functioning - Dementia is a broad term that describes a cluster of diseases associated with loss of memory, judgment, language, complex motor skills, and other intellectual functioning; usually caused by permanent damage of the brain nerve cells or neurons (Alzheimer’s Association, 2014). There are several types of dementia including: Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, dementia with lewy bodies, mixed dementia, Parkinson’s disease, frontotempal dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, normal pressure hydrocephalus, huntingtos disease, and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (Alzheimer’s Association, 2014)....   [tags: Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, nursing]
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1563 words
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Dementia - Dementia Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntington's disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the most significant dementing disease occurring in over 50% of demented patients (see epidemiology)....   [tags: Papers] 3248 words
(9.3 pages)
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Quality of Life of Spouses Caring for Loved Ones with Dementia - Introduction The goals of this case study are to gather empirical evidence through comprehensive research to make an observable difference in the spouses caring for their loved ones with dementia. The problem spouses are facing while providing care for a loved one stricken with dementia can be overwhelming. First we assessed the quality of life in spouses caring for loved one with dementia. Second we wanted to provide concrete tools for the spouses who are the caregivers for loved ones with dementia....   [tags: Family Caregivers]
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2386 words
(6.8 pages)
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The Effect of Dog Assisted Therapy on Elderly Patients with Dementia - ... Although there is evidence suggesting that dog ownership can improve people's physical and mental health, there is little research documenting the psychological and behavioral effects of dog-assisted therapy, especially on elderly patients with dementia, who have difficulty maintaining contact with the external world. METHOD   In order to examine the psychological and behavioral effects of dog-assisted therapy on elderly residents with dementia, I analyzed the blogs of Madeline Vann and The Alzheimer’s Association and their commentary....   [tags: behavior, emotions, social]
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570 words
(1.6 pages)
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Music Therapy Should Be Conjunctive Treatment for Dementia Patients - ... Although they may display these emotions the majority of the time, it is not all that they have the potential for. This idea is clearly supported and easily seen in the presence of music. Research has shown that although individuals with dementia have a decreased ability to understand verbal language, receptive and expressive music abilities appear to remain even in the late stages of the disease process (Wall and Duffy, 2010). Research Support If music therapy is so beneficial, why isn’t it being implemented today....   [tags: psychological therapy]
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1975 words
(5.6 pages)
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Restlessness and Agitation in People With Dementia - Restlessness and Agitation in People With Dementia Restlessness and agitation are common in people with dementia. Cohen M et al (1986) attempted to define restlessness and agitation as " inappropriate verbal, vocal or motor activity" associated by 29 behaviors including general restlessness, constant attention seeking, complaining, negativism, pacing and screaming. In my nursing placement I experienced a case of vascular dementia. The name of patient, the name of the ward and hospital should remain unmentioned in the essay in order to maintain confidentiality....   [tags: Papers] 1502 words
(4.3 pages)
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Nursing Care Issues and the Frail Elderly: Dementia - Walking into the room hearing the conversation could not be helped. Two elderly patients were conversing, one was talking about experiences in World War II and the other was listening intently. When questioned as to what they were discussing and why, the answer received was one that surprised and saddened. The patient telling the story explained “Sometimes my friend forgets all about the past, so I sit here and tell my stories and then it helps my friend remember.” The other patient replied “that is right, there are days I just can’t remember anything and my friend here….remembers everything and tells me all about it”....   [tags: Nursing Profession, Nursing Career]
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1759 words
(5 pages)
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Assessment of Post-Operative Pain in Dementia Patients - Assessment of Post-Operative Pain in Dementia Patients Introduction The purpose of this paper is to present a discussion of the application and evaluation of Post-Operative pain management in elderly patients with dementia in a rehabilitation setting. Conceptual-Theoretical-Empirical Structure (C-T-E) Johnson’s Behavioral System Model is a model of nursing care that supports the development of efficient and effective behavioral functioning in the patient to prevent illness. The patient is recognized as a behavioral system composed of seven behavioral subsystems including affiliative, dependency, ingestive, eliminative, sexual, aggressive, and achievement....   [tags: rehabilitation setting, healthcare providers]
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1954 words
(5.6 pages)
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Case Study on a Client with Verbal Aggression Brought on by Dementia - ... The nurse is trying to decrease Ellen’s agitation behavior and acknowledges Ellen’s frustrations. By bringing Toni into the conversation and offering to take Ellen outside, reduces her agitation. Ellen appears to be content outside, she is having a calm conversation with Toni. It was important for Ellen to be heard, she wanted to go outside, this was a significant moment for her to express what she wanted to do. The result for Ellen is that she was able to go outside and for a walk around the garden....   [tags: agitation, nursing, experience] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
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Atzheimer´s Dementia Posterior Cortical Atrophy - ... Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006. Dictionary: Atrophy. [Online] Available at: http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=8423 [Accessed 18 December 2013]. Mormino, E. C., 2011. Neural effects of beta amyloid in normal aging. [Online] Available at: http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.utas.edu.au/docview/896621496 [Accessed 18 December 2013]. Norton, M., 2013. Tau be or not Tau be. [Online] Available at: http://www.dementiablog.org/tau-proteins/ [Accessed 18 December 2013]. Pratchett, T., 2013....   [tags: symptoms, pathology, structures, locations]
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664 words
(1.9 pages)
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Etiology of HIV-Associated Dementia - Etiology of HIV-Associated Dementia The etiologic agents of the neurologic disease associated with HIV and AIDS are many. Opportunistic infections- cryptococcus, toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, are a few of the organic causes of neurologic disease in AIDS patients, but will not be the main focus of this paper. The human immunodeficiency virus in itself is implicated in much of the neurological manifestations of the disease, and it is the effects of the presence of the virus within the central nervous system which is of interest to me in this paper....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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1297 words
(3.7 pages)
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Alzheimer's Disease is the Most Frequent Form of Dementia - ... Brain volume is at its peak in adolescence and then decreases approximately 0.2% to 0.5% annually. However, AD patients have a more rapid decrease in brain volumes. Autopsy of an AD brain shows widespread of atrophy. Figure 1.2 shows two pictures of normal brains and AD brains. It is quite apparent that AD brains have enlarged ventricles and sulci, combined with decrease tissues (Edmund & Mark 2007). It is believed that the increased production of small proteins called amyloid-β (Aβ), the primary component of the plaques, is essential to the pathogenesis of AD (Bruno et al....   [tags: cognitive skills, behavior, brain strinkage] 763 words
(2.2 pages)
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Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease - Dementia and Alzheimer's During an average lifetime, one can expect to have at least occasional memory lapses from time to time. Usually it's something as simple as forgetting what you just did a few minutes ago, forgetting if you turned the stove off, or if you left your keys on the table or in the bathroom counter. Such lapses are relatively normal, but when they become a recurring theme, it's a more serious problem. As people age, it is natural for them to experience a mild degree of memory loss....   [tags: Alzheimer's Disease Essays]
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640 words
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What´s Dementia - ... Sporadic AD is when the person with AD has no genetic background of the disease. Several miRNAs were recognized to be drastically altered in AD BMC using miRNAqt-PCR, including miR-181b, miR-34a, and let-7f. Interestingly, miR-34 targets include p53, Notch, and Bcl-2. Let-7 expression is regulated by the oncogenic Myc protein, signifying a regulatory feedback loop. Together, these observations emphasize the significance of these miRNAs in cell/tissue homeostasis. Recently, Bekris et al. (2013) reported in a 3-phase study including post-mortem brain arrays and qRT-PCR validation, that plasma miR-15a connected with neurotic plaque score and Braak stages in AD....   [tags: brain, alzheimer´s disease] 3347 words
(9.6 pages)
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How Can We Prevent Memory Loss? Is Soy the Answer? - ... Many of these receptors are located in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. These areas of the brain are used for memory, learning and cognitive functions and are also known to be prone to deterioration as we age. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease. It occurs due to accumulation of plaques and the “formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles” in the brain. Inflammation and loss of synapses are also contributing factors. Animal studies in rats have shown that genistein, one of the components of phytoestrogens, has a protective effect on neurons....   [tags: phytoestrogens, dementia] 1032 words
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The Illegal Use of PCP and Its Effects on the Body - ... Effects of PCP on the Nervous System PCP is a sympathomimetic drug, meaning that it copies the effects of transmitter substances within the sympathetic nervous system such as epinephrine or dopamine. The recall of norepinephrine (responsible for maintaining concentration) into the presynaptic neuron is blocked, resulting in a maintained level of sympathetic nervous system activation. This causes the feelings of prolific paranoia and anxiety, the “flight or fight response”. In addition, the parasympathetic system, responsible for calming the body down, is blocked by a decrease in acetylcholine at the receptors, maintaining the nervous and frantic states, PCP also inhibits dopamine’s reup...   [tags: hallucinations, dementia] 1133 words
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Dementia Praecox - In 1887 Dr. Emile Kraepelin identified schizophrenia for the first time in history. Dr. Kraepelin used the term "dementia praecox” which means “early dementia,” separating it from other forms of dementia usually occurring later in life. Kraepelin believed that “dementia praecox” was primarily a disease of the brain. In 1911, a Swiss psychiatrist by the name of Eugene Bleuler, was the first to use the term “schizophrenia” and the first to describe the symptoms as “negative” or “positive.” Bleuler believed that the name given by Kreapelin was misleading, since the disease was not part of dementia since it did not lead to mental deterioration in all cases and it could occur in young age...   [tags: essays research papers] 1638 words
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What is Alzheimer's Disease? - What is Alzheimer's Disease. Alzheimer's Disease is an existential form of Dementia. Alzheimer's is a gradually crippling disease that affects an individual’s mental and physical capabilities over time. The disease develops predominantly within aged individuals. It is unknown as to what factors contribute to the etiology, or cause, of Alzheimer's Disease. In order to better understand Alzheimer's Disease, medical research and theories have helped shed a light as to how Alzheimer's occurs. By understanding what events lead to the cause of the disease, a specific treatment can then be developed that can hopefully stop or even reverse this debilitating disease that affects the elderly....   [tags: Dementia, Elderly]
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927 words
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What is Alzheimer´s Disease? - ... Basically dementia attacks brain cells, nerves, and transmitter which then cause the brain to deteriorate and shrink. Most of the deterioration is observed in the temporal lobe and hippocampus. As the parts of the brain are destroyed, body systems fail and one’s personality is drastically lost. Who develops Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s is calculated to be the sixth largest cause of death in the United States.5 It kills more than prostate cancer and breast cancer combined.5 The risk of attaining the disease increases with age....   [tags: Dementia, Memory]
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1137 words
(3.2 pages)
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Dementia is Marked b Memory Disorders, Character Changes, and Impaired Reasoning - ... A few are excessive alcohol or drug use, head injuries, diseases that affect blood vessels, such as strokes and heart attacks, diseases that cause loss of nerve cells in the brain such as Parkinson’s disease, and several more. Although adults are mostly affected by this condition, Dementia can also be passed down through genetics. This shows that the disease can also occur in children. Batten disease, a fatal hereditary disorder of the nervous system that begins in childhood is a familiar cause of dementia in children....   [tags: elderly, brain cells, communication] 520 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Relationship Between Physical Activity and the Prevention, Delayed Onset and Slowed Progression of Dementia - ... This paper will examine and analyse the relationship between dementia and physical activity and more specifically explain its influence on the prevention of dementia as well as its impact on delaying the onset and slowing the progression of dementia and how these processes work. To begin, one of the most common forms of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease and approximately 13% or 4 million of the cases worldwide have been attributed to people being physically inactive or in other words being considerably sedentary (Farrow & Ellis 2013)....   [tags: Brain, Disease] 980 words
(2.8 pages)
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Needs for Dementia Patients Are Physical, Psychological, Social, Emotional and Spiritual - ... Grace has Iron-deficient anaemia, if a person does not have enough iron, their body cannot make enough haemoglobin to meet its needs. Red blood cells then become abnormally small and cannot transport enough oxygen to the organs and tissues. This can result in a person suffering from fatigue and poor concentration. As previously mentioned Grace has hypertension, hypertension is a chronic medical condition where the blood pressure in the arteries is elevated. Grace has a history of UTI’s, a UTI is an infection that occurs when bacteria enters the urinary tract through the urethra....   [tags: healthcare, diagnosis, humanistic] 1110 words
(3.2 pages)
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Analysis of a Research Project on Dementia Patients Being Cared for by Adult Daughters - ... If both the mother and daughter consented to participation than “an in-depth, focused interviewing approach,” was used to collect data (Ward-Griffin, Bol, & Oudshoom, 2006). Field notes were transcribed immediately after each interview, and memos and notes were used to keep track of the researcher’s thoughts. Team analysis was conducted in order to clarify concepts and themes and to interpret the data gathered (Ward-Griffin, Bol, & Oudshoom, 2006). To ensure credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability, the researchers looked to Guba and Lincolns (1989) criteria (Ward-Griffin, Bol, & Oudshoom, 2006)....   [tags: ethics, credibility, health] 755 words
(2.2 pages)
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Caring for a Patient with Alzheimer's Disease - Mrs Marie is a 67 year old lady. She lives in local family friendly estate together with her 69 year old husband. According to Mr Marie, they have a daughter and 2 grandchildren. Mrs Marie used to work as a manager until she retired in her early 60s. She always had a good memory and high levels of concentration. Mr Marie recalled that Mrs Marie could become disorientated at any moment, and could not remember where she was. She would easily lose track of conversations. Mr Marie reported that when it became worrying to him, he made an appointment to see their general practitioner (GP)....   [tags: Dementia Patient, Nursing Essays]
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3140 words
(9 pages)
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Taking a Closer Look at Alzheimer's Disease - ... These guidelines updated the criteria published in 1984 and defined three stages of Alzheimer’s disease: preclinical Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease. The 2011 guidelines propose that AD begins before the development of symptoms, a dramatic change from the criteria set out by the 1984 guidelines. Preclinical Alzheimer’s disease Because current research indicates that AD related brain changes may begin 20 or more years before symptoms occur, the preclinical stage of AD has been developed....   [tags: most common form of dementia] 779 words
(2.2 pages)
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Understanding What Keeps Dementia Sufferers Awake at Night - Understanding What Keeps Dementia Sufferers Awake at Night Sleep disturbance is a very common and very problematic symptom of dementia. New research indicates that causes of this sleep disturbance may differ in different kinds of dementia. Hopefully, understanding these causes will lead to better treatments. Dementia is a term used to refer to a loss of thinking abilities. Although there are many causes of dementia, it is most often associated with aging. The most common cause of dementia associated with aging is Alzheimer's disease, which affects approximately one in 10 people over age 65 and nearly half of those over age 85....   [tags: Papers] 639 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Major Challenge in the Medical Field Right Now - ... Since you have a finite amount of T cells, one can only use a set amount of these to combat disease at any one time, meaning if you use all of these you have little protection left. The number of elderly patients in hospitals increases yearly, for example between 2011 and 2012 the total number of over 65s admitted to hospital for any type of treatment or concern increased by approximately 10%. Another problem is that the percentage of time physicians spend with patients over the age of 65 is also increasing....   [tags: geriatrics, health, financial, dementia] 1234 words
(3.5 pages)
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AIDS and The Nervous System: A Focus On The AIDS Dementia Complex - AIDS and The Nervous System: A Focus On The AIDS Dementia Complex Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the biologic agent of the AIDS syndrome, has emerged as one of the most important threats to public health in the United States and its incidence is rapidly increasing. A highly lethal disease with over 70% of AIDS patients dying within 2 years of diagnosis. This disease has already become the leading cause of death in men aged 25-44 and women aged 25-34. The Centers for Disease Control have for the purpose of epidemiological surveillance, defined AIDS as a "reliably diagnosed disease that is at least moderately indicative of an underlying cellular immunodeficiency in a p...   [tags: AIDS Disease Diseases Essays]
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1861 words
(5.3 pages)
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Alzheimer´s Disease: An in Depth Look at Signs, Symptoms, and Disgnosis - ... Tangles, are also found which our twisted strands of another protein due to nerve cells dying and bunching together. Plaques and tangles are prime suspects in the death and tissue loss in the Alzheimer’s brain. Beta-amyloid is a chemical and is sticky which causes it to gradually build up into plaques. This chemical derives from a larger protein found in the nerve cells with fatty membranes. These tangles destroy a vital cell transport system made of proteins. There are seven stages of Alzheimer’s, classified by Dr....   [tags: dementia, brain, cell, stages]
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657 words
(1.9 pages)
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Biological, Psychological and Social Influences on Health - ... Some had physiological conditions ranging from mild to severe arthritis, joint pains and pulmonary respiratory diseases, and others where recovering from strokes and heart attacks. Others were suffering from different types of cancers. These conditions affected their physical and mental functioning abilities in various and related ways and to varying degrees and were largely related to the ageing process (Kirkwood and Rose 1991). This is supported by Kirkwood and Austad, (2000) who state that ageing is usually defined as the progressive loss of function accompanied by decreasing fertility and increasing mortality with advancing age....   [tags: older, illness, dementia] 1501 words
(4.3 pages)
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Taking a Look at Alzheimer's Disease - ... The nerve cells slowly get attacked, and it causes the patient to slowly lose their memory, ability to control emotions, and their judgment. Some symptoms of Alzheimer’s are memory loss, challenges in planning things or solving problems, difficulty completing familiar tasks at home or at work, confusion with time place or the date, trouble understanding visual images, problems with words in speaking or writing, misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps, decreased or poor judgment, withdrawal from work or other social activities, changes in mood or personality, asking the same question over and over, forgetting how to cook, how to make repairs on something, how to play car...   [tags: neurodegenerative illness causing dementia] 1027 words
(2.9 pages)
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