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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Brief history of the theory and theorist. In it's simplest form, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, (or CBT as it will be referred to from here on out), refers to the approach of changing dysfunctional behaviors and thoughts to realistic and healthy ones. CBT encompasses several types of therapy focusing on the impact of an individual's thinking as it relates to expressed behaviors. Such models include rational emotive therapy (RET), rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), behavior therapy (BT), Rational Behavior Therapy (RBT), Schema Focused Therapy, Cognitive therapy (CT)....   [tags: Psychology, Rational Behavioral Therapy] 2449 words
(7 pages)
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The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy - The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (cognitive behavioral therapy) Introduction Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy. The effectiveness has been researched extensively over the years (Dobson, 2001). There are over three hundred published studies about the outcomes of cognitive behavioral therapy interventions. The main reason for this is that an ongoing adaptation of this form of psychotherapy makes it applicable to a vast amount of disorders and related problems (Rounsaville & Caroll, 2002)....   [tags: Health, Treatment] 2559 words
(7.3 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - According to author Kendra Cherry, “professional counseling is an application of mental health, psychological or development principles, through cognitive, affective, behavioral or systemic intervention strategies, that address wellness, personal growth, or career development” (Cherry - Paraphrase). Many counselors specialize in specific forms of therapy. Generally, counselors who focus on specific types of counseling methods usually require advanced knowledge in the specific field. Counseling can be described as guidance of an individual by utilizing psychological methods especially in collecting case history information, using various techniques of the personal interview and testing interests as well as aptitudes....   [tags: Psychology]
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1195 words
(3.4 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Depression - Cognitive behavioral therapy commonly known as CBT is a systematic process by which we learn to change our negative thoughts into more positive ones. CBT is a combination of two types of therapy, Cognitive Therapy and Behavioral Therapy. Cognition is our thoughts, so cognitive behavioral therapy combines working with our thought process and changing our behavior at the same time. Cognitive behavioral therapists believe that our behavior and our feelings are influenced by the way we think; also our mood is affected by our behavior and thought process....   [tags: CBT]
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2068 words
(5.9 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Cognitive Behavioral Play Therapy takes into account interactions between cognitions, emotions, behavior, and environment. The therapist looks to modify attitudes, beliefs, and expectations, they aim to identify and modify maladaptive thoughts. ( Knell 2009) The emphasis of therapy is placed on the child, issues of control, master, and responsibility are addressed as well as responsibility for one’s own behavior change. A child’s perception of events rather than the event themselves is assumed as the cause for behavior in cognitive therapy....   [tags: Counseling ]
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1375 words
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Effectiveness - Introduction Depression is one of the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders among school-aged youth, with high prevalence and far-reaching consequences (Probst, 2008). “School Phobia and excessive clinging to parents may be symptoms of depression in children. Poor academic performance, substance abuse, antisocial behavior, sexual promiscuity, truancy, and running away may be symptoms of depression in adolescents” (Sadock & Sadock, 2003, p. 554). Depression in adolescents often is an unremitting disorder that predicts ongoing depression and psychosocial impairment (Kratochvil et....   [tags: Psychology ]
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1822 words
(5.2 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Depression - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Depression Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a method of correcting invalid thought patterns to a more positive view of the person and their place in their world. Some people do not believe that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a real treatment for depression, claiming it is a form of positive thinking ("The Daily Mail," 2009). On the opposite end of the spectrum, others argue that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy should be used in all therapies for depression as it allows the patient to take an active role in their treatment....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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2362 words
(6.7 pages)
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COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF ADHD - Roger Yeager PHD states “Parenting challenging kids requires that you become a chef, not just rely on a cookbook recipe” (Miller). Approximately 9.5% or 5.4 million children 4-17 years of age have ever been diagnosed with ADHD, as of 2007. As of 2007, 2.7 million youth ages 4-17 years (66.3% of those with a current diagnosis) were receiving medication treatment for the disorder (cdc.gov). The Surgen General lists ADHD, as the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder of childhood. With numbers as these it seems imperative to know what works best for over 2.7 million children in treatment....   [tags: Medical Research]
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950 words
(2.7 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Introduction This essay aims to critically evaluate one therapeutic intervention in psychology, named, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). It begins with defining CBT and discussing the underlying principles and concepts of this approach. Some examples of treating psychological disorders by employing a CBT approach in children and adolescents will be made and then, It will move on to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this therapeutic intervention. The review will be finished by a conclusion regarding employing such approach....   [tags: Psychology, Depression, Mental Disorder] 594 words
(1.7 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Cognitive behavioural therapy has been proven to be effective in the treatment of child and adolescent depression (Lewinsohn & Clarke, 1999; Harrington et al, 1998, March et al, 2004). There is general agreement in the clinical literature that the techniques of cognitive behavioural approaches to therapy are likely to be effective in treating depression (Brewin, 1996; Beech, 2000). In the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic & Statistical Manual (APA, 2000) the symptoms of depression are: loss of interest or enjoyment in activities; changing in weight and appetite; changes to sleep pattern; loss of energy; feeling worthless or guilty; suicidal thoughts; poor concentration and being either agitated or slowed up....   [tags: Psychology, Depression, Anxiety] 1070 words
(3.1 pages)
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Person Centered Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - Carl Roger’s believed that everyone is inherently good. Therefore, even the vilest of people would be included. Some disputes have been made among behavior theorists that because the theory lacks structure, it is not as effective in treating illness. However, it is one of the main theories utilized by therapists today. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is another popular theory that is used. It emphasizes the present and fixing cognitive distortions that clients may have. However, it too received some arguments against it, such as; treating symptoms and not the underlying cause of an illness....   [tags: Therapy/Rehabilitation]
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1185 words
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Person-Centered Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Missing Works Cited Person-Centered Therapy In the 1940s Carl Rogers was well on his way to revolutionizing the state of traditional, directive psychotherapy and pioneering what would soon become the person-centered approach....   [tags: Psychology, Carl Rogers] 2572 words
(7.3 pages)
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The Integration of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Introduction Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) is a short-term psychotherapy that was developed by Myrna Weissman and Gerald Klerman in the 1980’s. It focuses on the interpersonal relationships in the client’s life, instead of on past or biological causes. The therapy is kept fairly structured by the clinician’s use of a manual and aims to help the client recover from their current episode of depression. Interpersonal Psychotherapy has been used in conjunction with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in research studies, with promising results....   [tags: Psychology]
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2241 words
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Management of Anorexia - Introduction In this paper, I will discuss how cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be utilized in the management of eating disorders. More specifically I will identify Anorexia Nervosa and provide statistics that relate to the disease. Etiologies will be discussed as well as symptoms. Various techniques of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy will be described as well as the rationale as it relates to the clinical issue. Therapy has been used for many generations as a mean to resolve dilemmas in a persons’ life....   [tags: Diseases/Disorders]
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2261 words
(6.5 pages)
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy For Bulimia Nervosa - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy For Bulimia Nervosa INTRODUCTION Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating as well as by self-induced vomiting and/or laxative abuse (Mitchell, 1986). Episodes of overeating typically alternate with attempts to diet, although the eating habits of bulimics and their methods of weight control vary (Fairburn et al., 1986). The majority of bulimics have a body weight within the normal range for their height, build, and age, and yet possess intense and prominent concerns about their shape and weight (Fairburn et al., 1986)....   [tags: Eating Disorders Medical Treatment Essays]
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2926 words
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The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy - The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is based on the concept that behavior change may be achieved through altering cognitive processes. The assumption underlying the cognitively based therapeutic techniques is that maladaptive cognitive processes lead to maladaptive behaviors and changing these processes can lead to behavior modification. According to Mahoney (1995), an individual's cognitions are viewed as covert behaviors, subject to the same laws of learning as overt behaviors....   [tags: Papers] 2421 words
(6.9 pages)
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Psychotherapy - My preferred theoretical orientation is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The main assumption of CBT is that events and situations in life do not cause emotional problems (e.g., guilt or depression); rather problems are due to irrational beliefs and perceptions about the situations (Corey, 2009). The goals of CBT focus on correcting the client’s automatic and self-defeating thoughts, which should ultimately help them to develop a more adaptive philosophy of life (Corey, 2009). I like that this approach focuses on challenging and changing the client’s cognitive distortions, core beliefs, automatic thoughts, and schemas....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy] 941 words
(2.7 pages)
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Psychotherapy - My preferred theoretical orientation is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The main assumption of CBT is that events and situations in life do not cause emotional problems (e.g., guilt or depression); rather problems are a by-product irrational beliefs and perceptions about the situations (Corey, 2009). The goals of CBT focus on correcting the client’s automatic and self-defeating thoughts, which should ultimately help them to develop a more adaptive philosophy of life (Corey, 2009). CBT focuses on putting insight into action, so by creating insight and changing thoughts the client should be able to understand and modify their behaviors and emotions....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy] 1037 words
(3 pages)
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Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Key points: There were several key points described in this chapter that validated psychosocial treatments. This analysis will only focus on the discussion of the research study that focused on the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bipolar affective disorder. This chapter discussed a study of twenty-eight people (Cochran, 1984) who received outpatient CBT for a bipolar disorder diagnosis. The study was designed to change the way half of the participants (14) would think and behave so that they would better comply with their medication regime....   [tags: Papers] 5098 words
(14.6 pages)
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Advantages of Employing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Advantages of Employing CBT Fundamentally, CBT is a collaborative project between patient and therapist. In CBT, both patient and therapist are as active as each other. Patients are helped by the therapist to attain knowledge of their problem, in terms of the real experience of the problem and also the ways by which it interacts with and affects their lives. Therapist and patient both collaborate to find the best explanation for the situation and solution to the problem (Haaga & Beck, 1992). CBT therapists are actively engaged with their patients....   [tags: Psychology, Anxiety] 866 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Treating Depression - In this assignment I will introduce my research project and examine some of the issues surrounding my topic, take an initial look at the research papers I have chosen for my literature review and consider the wider context that the research took place in. I have chosen to look into the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy(CBT) on treating depression in primary care. I am interested in this particular area of counselling as my impression is that it is currently the favoured form of counselling that is offered when people approach their GP for help....   [tags: CBT] 2035 words
(5.8 pages)
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Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Sexually Abused Children - Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) shows empirical evidence to support its validity when counseling sexually abused children. The theory was designed to resolve post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive and anxiety symptoms. This model of psychotherapy is not only useful to children and adolescents but to a wide range of population, such as parents, and many persons suffering from mental illness. The methodology of CBT is specific and brief therapy that teaches a person to talk about emotion and thoughts and how they contribute to the person’s behavior....   [tags: Psychology, argumentative, persuasive]
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1182 words
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Sex Offender Treatment: A Literature Review - The purpose of this literature review is to discuss the importance of sexual offender treatment, to compare and contrast research points regarding treatment, and to address the validity of the peer reviewed articles. Every year 6,000 sex offenders enter treatment (Waldram, 2008). Various therapeutic treatment options are offered, and the primary focus is to rehabilitate and change behavior. The body of research reveals different therapeutic treatment models and discusses the purpose and effectiveness of each model....   [tags: sex offender, cognitive behavioral therapy, recidi]
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2338 words
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy And Exposure With Response Prevention In The Treatment Of Bulimia Nervosa - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy And Exposure With Response Prevention In The Treatment Of Bulimia Nervosa Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder with psychological, physiological, developmental, and cultural components. The disorder is commonly characterized by binge eating followed by inappropriate compensatory behaviors, such as self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, fasting, and the misuse of diuretics, laxatives or enemas. Patients properly diagnosed with bulimia nervosa endure many psychological and physiological problems....   [tags: Eating Disorder Weight Health Essays]
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3127 words
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children - The use of several therapeutic methods to treat children with PTSD increases the argument among clinicians about the most effective treatment for PTSD. The clinical literature describes a wide variety of interventions besides CBT including, psychoanalytic techniques, creative arts, play therapy, crisis intervention, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and pharmacotherapy; which raises the question about what could be the most effective treatment for children with PTSD (Cohen, Mannarino & Rogal 2001)....   [tags: Child Psychology ]
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1669 words
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Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral, and Reality Theories - Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral and Reality Theories Cognitive Theory Cognitive theory is a learning approach in psychology that attempts to explain the behavior of humans by studying thoughts and reasoning process. The cognitive theory is founded on many other factors like cognitive reasoning and social cognitive theory. Aaron Beck founded the theory and it is meant to understand the human behavior by observing the processes triggered by reasoning and individual thoughts. The cognitive theory is a research based theory because it tends to investigate human behavior through making observations and thought analysis....   [tags: Psychology]
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1300 words
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The Integration of Cognitive and Behavior Therapy - My personal theoretical orientation to counseling is Cognitive-Behavioral therapy. Cognitive-Behavioral therapy helps the client to uncover and alter distortions of thought or perceptions which may be causing or prolonging psychological distress. The theoretical foundations of CBT are essentially those of the behavioral and cognitive approaches. CBT leads to a clear, persuasive, and evidence-based description of how normal and abnormal behavior develops and changes (Kramer 293). The term “cognitive-behavioral therapy” or CBT is a term for therapies with many similarities....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Group Therapy - Cognitive therapy is one of the few theories that have been extensively scientifically tested and found to be highly effective in over 300 clinical trials. It focuses on the immediate or automatic thoughts the client has and how these thoughts affect their feelings and behaviors. The goal of cognitive therapy is to identify these thoughts that are poorly affecting the client. Then teach the client how to identify these automatic thoughts and how they can effectively change them. Through the very structured sessions of cognitive therapy, a client should essentially learn the tools to be their own cognitive therapist for future problems they may encounter....   [tags: Psychology]
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1294 words
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Cognitive Behavior Therapy For PTSD - Cognitive Behavior Therapy Based Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: Cognitive Processing Therapy Approach What do you do when you experience a life threatening, traumatic event, and months later you are still experiencing the same frightening responses. Individuals who experience trauma are often forced to face their problems long after the event has happened. The first step to dealing with this issue would be to seek professional help as soon as possible so that they may be properly diagnosed and receive accurate treatment to overcome the intrusive symptoms....   [tags: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders]
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A Look at Human Behavior: Cognitive-Behavioral Frame of Reference - Human behavior can be perceived through an infinite amount of perspectives; each individual has their own philosophy regarding the topic. The question of why do people do what they do has been around for ages, and when occupational therapist are asked the question often they turn to theories and frames of references for answers. A frame of reference is a “set of internally consistent and related concepts, postulates and principles that could be used to guide practice” (Bruce & Borg, 2007). These frames of references give occupational therapists models to choose from with different philosophies, in order to direct their therapy....   [tags: Psychology]
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1861 words
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is classified as an anxiety disorder that can develop after an individual has observed and/or experienced an extreme traumatic event that involved actual or threatened death or serious injury to one’s self or another (APA, 2000). An extreme traumatic event can include, but is not limited to, military combat, terrorist attacks, natural or manmade disasters, sexual assault, physical assault, robbery, and torture (APA, 2000)....   [tags: Health Care, Anxiety Disorder, Treatment] 1531 words
(4.4 pages)
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Brief Therapy - Brief therapy helps people by focusing on solutions, instead of problems. The therapist asks questions thereby facilitates the client by helping formulates solutions. The client leads the meeting by actively formulating ideas in which he/she can serve to improve the client's negative circumstances. This is contrary to cognitive therapy, which focuses on a client's cognitive processes (how he or she thinks about people/places/things). The therapist collaborates with the client to help the client develop alternative solutions....   [tags: Counseling/Therapy]
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967 words
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The Road Through Music Therapy - Upon many different techniques of health restorations music therapy has been known to have a great effect on people. This therapy reduces physical, emotional, and mental pain. Stretching a hand to those who are battling against cancer, or to those who have last someone close and are now dealing with depression and suicide thoughts. Those who have dedicate their lives into educating them selves for music therapy have a desire to help those who are in need, combining with a compassionate personality....   [tags: Music Therapy] 1110 words
(3.2 pages)
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Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy - Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) is a form of Cognitive Behavior Therapy created by Albert Ellis. REBT was one of the first types of cognitive therapies and was first called rational therapy. In 1959 the name was changed to Rational Emotive Therapy and did not get its current name, Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, until 1992. REBT is based on believing that feeling upset is not caused by an event but rather our beliefs toward the event that upsets us....   [tags: Therapy/Counseling]
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Behavioral Therapy - Most contemporary psychological treatment approaches are predecessors of the ancient and medieval philosophies and theories. Cognitive behavioural therapy as one of the modern treatment method in not an independently formed treatment, different theories have contributed to its present shape and application. The purpose of this paper is analysing the contributing treatment approaches that resulted in the emergence of the Behavioural Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The paper presents and analyses the contributions that previous psychological treatment methods made in culminating the CBT....   [tags: Psychology, Illness, Hypnosis , Pain] 1841 words
(5.3 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Psychodynamic Theory - In this assignment I am going to introduce and unpack cognitive behavioural theory and psychodynamic theory. This will include the history of each theory and the theorists that discovered and developed both. I am going to link each theory to where they fit in Payne’s Triangle of Social Work as well as compare and contrast each theory. Both Cognitive behavioural theory and psychodynamic theory both support the purposes of social work in which I will cover beneath. This assignment will also include criticisms of both theories as well....   [tags: Psychology]
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Forgiveness Therapy - Summary of the Article This study was developed to provide its reader with an understanding of Forgiveness Therapy as a key component for recovery for inpatient alcohol and substance abusers at a rehabilitation facility. Within this article a randomized group study was preformed with two groups of seven. These two groups underwent a study for approximately twelve sessions. One group specialized in Forgiveness Therapy while the others focused on alternative individualized treatment based on routine therapy techniques....   [tags: Article Analysis ]
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1070 words
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Behavioral Treatment Programs for Methamphetamine Addiction - Methamphetamine is a powerful and dangerous drug. It has the reputation as being a delightful and sneaky drug that robs your body of life. Although it has been around for over sixty years, it is only in the last 30 years that people have realized what a significant problem it has caused. Treatment for Methamphetamine remains mainly in the experimental stages and needs more research to find the exact treatment protocol. Methamphetamine addiction is extremely hard to treat (Lee& Rawson, 2009). The main reasons are due to the length of time it takes for the drug to pass through the body....   [tags: Drugs]
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Effection Depression Therapy - The variable mix is age, between the ages of 18 and 65, level and diagnosis of unipolar depression, occupation, stress level, race, cognitive issues (I.Q.), adequate or inadequate sleep, physical limitations, previous knowledge of study, type of questionnaires given, whether cooperative, patient/counselor relationship, and other extraneous variables not mentioned therein. These are purposeful sampling requirements with this qualitative study using specific case studies with patients with unipolar depression....   [tags: Research Analysis ]
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Major Forms of Therapy - Therapy has long been thought of as taboo. In this paper, I will discuss the major forms of therapy and their characteristics along with the strategies that are also used. This essay will also cover examples of each disorder and show which therapeutic method is best used in caring for individual(s). Psychological Disorders have been around for centuries, back then they did not know how to treat various disorders. Throughout much of human history, people linked abnormal behavior to witchcraft....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy - Summary Researchers such as Hayes and Strosahl (2005) defines acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as an empirically based intervention technique from the cognitive behavior model of psychotherapy that employs mindfulness and acceptance methods mixed in various ways. Grounded within the practical concept of functional contextualism and based on the comprehensive idea of language and cognition, ACT is different from the normal or traditional cognitive behavioral therapy. The differences are manifested in the paradigm of instead of teaching people to control their emotions, ACT teaches them to acknowledge, accept and embrace the emotions and or feelings (Hayes, Louma, Bond, Masuda, & Lillis, 2006)....   [tags: Psychology]
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Bulimia Nervosa: The Disease, Diagnosis and Therapy - Bulimia, known as Bulimia Nervosa, is a deadly eating disorder in which an individual believes they are fat or overweight. Those individuals lose weight through unhealthy and dangerous methods. The overall desire to be thin and accepted appears to be the main cause of Bulimia. The attitudes about diet and appearance expressed by parents can be a factor. Teens may temporarily become slightly overweight and parents who react negatively may cause their children to become fearful or anxious about the way they look....   [tags: Diet, Nursing, Eating Disorders, Weight, Medical] 876 words
(2.5 pages)
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Horse Therapy - There are a few different types of therapy that uses horses. Hippotherapy means- “treatment with the help of a horse” (Naomi Scott). The word hippo is used because this term is derived from the greek word hippo which means horse. “Hippotherapy is generally indicated for children and adults with mild to severe neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction.” (Naomi Scott). This type of therapy uses the horses motion to improve on the neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction of the patient. These dysfunctions can include “abnormal muscle tone., impaired balance responses, impaired coordination, impaired communication, impaired sensorimotor function, postural asymmetry, poor postural control, decreased mobility, and limbic system issues related to arousal, motivation, and attention....   [tags: Psychology ] 1133 words
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Discussing the Four Main Methods of Psycho Therapy - Have you ever needed to conduct psycho therapy on someone but you didn’t know how. Fear no more, because I am about to tell you about the 4 main methods of therapy, which will let you help your friends and relatives in ways that you never thought possible before. The four types of therapy I will be talking about today are psychoanalytical, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral. You may want to determine what method best suits you, or what method will best suit the situation you or your friend is faced with....   [tags: psychology, mental health] 775 words
(2.2 pages)
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Cognitive Research and Reasons Schizophrenics Have Auditory Hallucinations - Cognitive Research and Reasons Schizophrenics Have Auditory Hallucinations Schizophrenia is a common illness. "Schizo", Latin for "split" and "phrenic", "mind" describes the split from reality experienced by the schizophrenic mind. The personality loses it unity and wholeness as a result of unorganized, incoherent thinking, shifting emotional moods and strange perceptions. It has approximately 1-% population prevalence in all cultures....   [tags: essays research papers] 2157 words
(6.2 pages)
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Music Therapy - Music Therapy During the past thirty years, concepts in the mental health profession have undergone continuous and dramatic changes. A relatively new type of therapy is musical therapy, which incorporates music into the healing process. Music therapy also is changing, and its concepts, procedures, and practices need constant reevaluation in order to meet new concepts of psychiatric treatment. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato....   [tags: Papers] 1432 words
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Cinderella In Therapy - Cinderella in Therapy In the movie “Cinderella,” Cinderella is a maid to an evil stepmother and two very heartless and obnoxious stepsisters. The only reason that Cinderella still puts up with their orders is an example of the Behavioral perspective. The Behavioral Perspective puts emphasis on learning by experience with rewards and punishments. She knows that if she does not do the chores, she will be punished or thrown out of the household. She does not have anywhere to go because her mother and father have passed away....   [tags: essays research papers] 661 words
(1.9 pages)
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Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - The development of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has been culminated as a result of combination of factors that necessitated the drastic shift in assessment and treatment of behavioural and mental diseases. The failure of psychoanalysis and laboratory experiments approaches let to the precursor approaches to accelerate scientific progress by providing evident-based diagnosis and effective treatments. As a result, the popularity of psychoanalysis psychotherapy and laboratory experiments had to diminish with the advent of cognitive revolution (Keith S....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Therapy] 2101 words
(6 pages)
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Offender Classification and Therapy - Over the last few decades classification systems for offenders have been used for a variety of organizational purposes. Over time these classification systems have evolved, not only as a whole in the criminal justice system, but also varying between different organizations. Classification systems that create models based on the risks and needs of offenders are most popular. Throughout the years these models and the purposes for their use have been in a state of change, as well as the way their effectiveness is gaged....   [tags: Social Studies]
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Roger’s Theory as compared to that of Ellis’ Theory - Anderson (n.d) states, “Carl Rogers, a pioneering psychotherapist and the most influential psychologist in American history was one of the most prominent people of his time.” Rogers’ ideas and practices brought about a change in the school of humanistic psychology. What he learned in philosophy and philosophy of education influenced his personal life experiences which led him to a revolutionary of theory of therapy (Corsini, 2011 p. 148). According to an electrical resource, Client –centered therapy is a form of talk psychotherapy developed by psychologist Carl Rogers in 1940s and 1950s (“PCT”, n.d.)....   [tags: Psychology, Therapy] 957 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety - The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manuel of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM IV-TR) (APA, 2000), Anxiety Disorders can manifest in a number of different ways including Panic Attacks, Phobias, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety. Common threads of symptoms among these disorders include heighted autonomic response, shortness of breath, excessive worry, and of course anxiety. The treatment of Anxiety disorders has included Cognitive Behavior Therapy (Saavedra, Silverman, Morgan-Lopez, & Kurtines, 2010; White, Ollendick, Scahill, Oswald, & Albano, 2009), Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (Wilde, 2008), and Pharmacological treatments such as benzodiazepines (Sher, 2009)....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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2540 words
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The Grinch - According to an online article that I read regarding psychoanalysis therapy, it is said to be very helpful in dealing with those who have personality disorders and neurosis. “Psychoanalysis therapy basically aims to find associations between the unconscious constitutents of patients’ mental process, by tracing out associations between the mind and mental process, all so in a systematic way” http://lifestyle.iloveindia.com/lounge/psychoanalytic-therapy-9740.html. While watching the video regarding the Grinch there are a few different things that come to my mind as I watch this....   [tags: Psychoanalysis Therapy, Video] 1439 words
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Creating an Effective Group Therapy Environment for Adults - Group therapy is an important method that is commonly used by psychiatric professionals in the treatment of many types of mental illnesses. They consist of three or more people and are targeted at promoting psychological development and change. There are three different types of groups. The task group works by using tasks, such as activities and techniques, designed to help clients work toward desired goals. In addition, midrange groups work by allowing clients to share their thoughts and feelings with others who have learned to cope with similar problems over a longer period of time....   [tags: Effective Group Counseling]
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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Family Interventions for Psychosis - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Family Interventions for Psychosis Psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia are not new in the research literature. Psychological treatments have been previously used in the treatment of schizophrenia. For example in terms of behaviour therapy, operant approaches such as token economy programmes were used in the 1960s and 1970s to improve the behaviour of patients in long stay hospitals. However, the evidence suggests that the clinical gains were limited and did not generalise beyond the therapeutic setting and also did not address delusional convictions (Alford 1986; Himadi et al 1991)....   [tags: Papers] 7800 words
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Effectiveness of Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Individuals Experiencing Auditory Hallucinations - Critical Review Summary This paper reviews two studies on the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for individuals experiencing auditory hallucinations. The first study (Newton, Larkin, Melhuish, & Wykes, 2007) aims to elicit the positive and negative aspects of group CBT treatment by listening to the perspectives of young people undergoing such treatment. The second study (Penn et al. 2009) seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of group CBT for auditory hallucinations compared to an active control group of enhanced supportive therapy (ST)....   [tags: Psychology]
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The Theories of Albert Bandura - The Theories of Albert Bandura Albert Bandura was influenced by behaviorism while at the University of Iowa studying for his PhD in the early 1950s, he developed his own theories called reciprocal determinism, he believed that not only does the environment influence behavior, but behavior influences the environment, or to put it in his own words ’the world and a persons behavior cause each other‘. Bandura is often considered a ‘father’ of the cognitive movement, he looked at personality as three things that interact, the environment, behaviour and the person’s psychological processes....   [tags: Behaviorism Behavioral Psychology]
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Biopsychosocial Therapy - I am particularly interested in Biopsychosoical Therapy. (Myers) From what I have learned in psychology courses in college, I feel like the best way to help people in marriage and family therapy is to have a good approach to an individual, couple or family in order to have a positive effect. Combining Biological, Psychological and Social Therapy is the best way to identify external and internal issues in relationships and approach them with a successful outcome. In order to get to the root of an unconscious issue, I can practice a form of Psychoanalysis, Psychodynamic, Humanistic, Behavior or Cognitive Therapy....   [tags: Therapy]
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Music Therapy and Children - In the early eighteenth century, the phonograph has been used to reinforce patients in hospitals to sleep and during surgery and anesthesia process (Barrera et al., 2002, p. 379). In the nineteenth century, there was a desire to use the sounds of music to minimize pain. In the 1980s, the use of music therapy was documented, but it had not proved any effectiveness (Barrera et al., 2002, p.379). Also, Munro et al. (1987) reported that the Greeks used music in psychology treatment (p. 1029). Music therapy was defended by Munro et al....   [tags: Therapy]
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Benefits and Challenges of Play Therapy - Play is a way for children to learn about their environment and how interaction occurs within. It is through trial and error that children are able to create options; follow their own interests and show “independence in thought and actions” using their knowledge and understanding (Moyles, 2005, p.3). Children develop resilience though play. However for a number of children can experience stressful occurrences during their lives and play can often be restricted. Therefore the play worker’s role in supporting children’s play is a crucial measure towards children's development....   [tags: Therapy]
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Cognitive Therapy - Beck and his theories of cognitive therapy seem to provide a good balance between the amount of direction and authority the client and therapist each have. I like that Beck does provide direction and insight, but in a way that does not make him seem like he is just dictating a diagnosis. Beck discusses what he thinks is going on with the client and explains what he thinks and why. The idea of collaborative empiricism is one that empowers the client to go out into his or her world and test his or her biases, but this is also done with the help of the therapist who can guide the process....   [tags: Psychology] 436 words
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Actions Caused by Cognitive Dissonance - “If I chose to do it or say it, I must believe in it.” asserts the psychologist Leon Festinger (as cited in Psychology: Eighth Edition in Modules, 2007, p.731). When we become aware that our actions contradict our attitudes, we tend to revise our attitudes. This statement fits Festinger’s cognitive dissonance theory that asserts that we act to reduce discomfort or dissonance, an unpleasant tension, we experience when two of our thoughts or cognitions are inconsistent. Mkimmie, et al. (2003) investigated the impact of social support on cognitive dissonance arousal in their experiment, “I’m a Hypocrite, but So Is Everyone Else: Group Support and the Reduction of Cognitive Dissonance.” The psychologists aimed to test the impact of social support on dissonance by testing two hypotheses....   [tags: Cognitive Dissonance, psychology, ] 915 words
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Craniosacral Therapy - Missing Works Cited Eight year old, Jenny has tantrums over every little thing, she refuses to cooperate with her parents and she barely talks. Jenny was diagnosed with a learning and behavioral disorder when she was two. Since then, her parents have struggled to cope with her condition. Every day is a battle to get her to go to school, behave appropriately and not hit other children, and cooperate with what they tell her to do....   [tags: Health, Physical Therapy, Medical] 2082 words
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The Root Cause of Depression: Biological, Cognitive-Behavioral, or Both? - Depression is a debilitating mental disorder, which can be detrimental to a person’s way of living. For example, depression can cause an individual to have negative thoughts, experience chronic distress, and hopelessness (Pourbabaee, n.d.). Researchers focus on two causes of depression. Those who support the cognitive-behavioral perspective believe depression results from faulty thinking associated with low self-esteem or learned helplessness, as well as environmental influences such as the loss of a loved one or a job....   [tags: Diseases/Disorders]
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The Analysis of Behavior Centered and Person Centered Therapy and the Benefits of the Integration and Synthesis of Both in Counseling - The long-term goal of any counselling session is to aid the client in their overcoming and defeat of obstacles they may face through the facilitation of psychological tools and theories. The evolution of psychology over the last 100 years has seen numerous theories put forth for application to therapy in the clinical setting. Two widely used and well-founded methods include Behaviour Therapy and Person Centered Therapy. The dynamics of Behaviour Therapy were first discovered by the famous researcher and psychologist B.F Skinner, through his findings on operant conditioning (Lindsley; Skinner & Soloman, 1953)....   [tags: Behaviour Therapy ]
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Comparing the Behavioral Perspective and the Cognitive Perspective - Comparing the Behavioral Perspective and the Cognitive Perspective The behavioral perspective is the idea that if psychology was to be a science, then it must focus on events, which are directly observable on behavior, rather than on mental life. The behavioral perspective maintains the primary emphasis on observable behavior and its relation to environmental events. Behavioral perspective is through reinforcement, which is the idea that patterns of emitted behavior can be selected by their consequences....   [tags: Psychology] 302 words
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Cognitive Behavior Therapy - Cognitive Behavior Therapy Cognitive Behavior Therapy for body image has been proven an effective way to improve body dissatisfaction. It has been applied to persons with eating disorders, obesity, body dysmorphic disorder, and normal weight, all of whom harbor negative feelings toward their bodies. It is critically important to target body image for specific treatment, as negative feelings about one's body are often a major precipitous to eating disorders. What is body image. Body image can be defined as the picture one has in his mind about the appearance (i.e....   [tags: Self Image Weight Papers]
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Couples Therapy for Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse - As many as one in three females have experienced sexual abuse by the age of 18 (Russell, 1986). Many survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) experience negative psychological symptoms (Browne & Finkelhor, 1986; Kendall-Tackett, Williams, L. M., & Finkelhor, 1993). These women may later in life engage in relationships. The negative impact of sexual abuse could result in challenges faced by the relationship due to shame and difficulty with trust (Kochka & Carolan, 2002; MacIntosh & Johnson, 2008)....   [tags: Therapy]
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Music Therapy - Music therapy is used to treat people for various reasons and there are multiple styles of treatment presently being used. Music therapy is an effective form of therapy that is used on people of all ages to improve quality of life. Music therapy has been used in the medical industry for more than 60 years and there are many people who have no idea what it is. During W.W.I., music therapy in the United States began to develop when music was used in the Veterans Administration Hospitals as an intervention to address traumatic war injuries....   [tags: History Music Therapy Descriptive] 1713 words
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Cognitive Theories of Human Development - Cognitive Theories of Human Development Jean Piaget, known as the most important theorist; started the most comprehensive theory of intellectual development. Piaget was born in 1896, in Neuchatel Switzerland, and lived a full and significant life, he passed away at age 84. His father was a medieval historian, and his mother was a homemaker; she was highly emotional and her behavior disrupted the normalcy of their home. Piaget married Valentine Chatenay, and they soon welcomed three girls; Jacqueline, Lucienne, and Laurent....   [tags: Cognitive Development]
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Behavioral Management and the Hawthorne Effect - Behavioral management is “the study of how managers should behave to motivate employees, encourage them to perform at high levels and to be committed to the achievement of organizational goals” (Waddell et al. 2007, p. 52). A number of intellectuals explored possible theories that would explain the basis and effect of behaviours of both the management and staff. Some theorists whose ideas are still prominent today include Fredrick Taylor, Mary Follett, Douglas McGregor and Elton Mayo et al. This piece, however, focuses on the ‘Hawthorne effect,’ conducted by Elton Mayo alongside associates F.J....   [tags: Behavioral management, Business Management]
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Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) within Social Psychology - Social Psychology can be a challenging concept to master when at the beginning of a psychology education. This week as a student in my undergraduate class approached me and asked how he could explain the difference between psychology, sociology and social psychology to his friend. As I began explaining the differences to him, I quickly remembered going through a similar journey of confusion, clarity, more confusion and then finally conceptually understanding the differences and similarities between the three fields previously mentioned....   [tags: Psychology]
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The Cognative and Behavioral Effects of Nicotine: An Argument for Brain=Behavior - The Cognative and Behavioral Effects of Nicotine: An Argument for Brain=Behavior For the majority of this class I have been a fence-sitter with 'mystical' leanings. However when I decided to do my paper on smoking, I found in the phenomina of addiction a very strong argument for our brain=behavior hypothesis. In the following essay, I will describe the biological effects of nicotine on the Central Nervous System and some of the resulting behavioral effects. Afterwards I will present thoughts as to why I believe addiction is a very important point to be considered in the question we've been asking since the first day of class....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Dance Therapy - Dance Therapy Dance therapy is a type of psychotherapy that uses movement to further the social, cognitive, emotional, and physical development of the individual. Dance therapists work with people who have many kinds of emotional problems, intellectual deficits, and life-threatening illnesses. They are employed in psychiatric hospitals, day care centers, mental health centers, prisons, special schools, and private practice. They work with people of all ages in both group and individual therapy....   [tags: History Health Therapy Dancing Essays] 1813 words
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The Evolution of Cognitive Psychology - The Evolution of Cognitive Psychology Definition of Cognition Cognition is the mental process or faculty of acquiring knowledge by the use of perception, reasoning or intuition. This is the mental process of knowing, which including aspects such as; perception, judgment, attention, reasoning, producing language, remembering, understanding, decision making and solving problems. Cognition is generally defined as the mental process and activity used in perception, remembering and thinking....   [tags: Cognitive Psychology, informative]
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Animal-Assisted Therapy - In the field of therapy, there are numerous of therapy available out there for different type of individuals and situations as well. There is one type of therapy that usually contains people and animal, it is animal-assisted therapy is a therapeutic approach that brings animals and individuals with physical and/or emotional needs together to perform the therapy. Animal-assisted therapy tend to be focused on individuals either children or elderly for them to be able to connect with the animal thus feeling comfortable talking with the therapist....   [tags: Therapy, Animals]
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Emotional Release: Benefits of Art Therapy  - Title Emotional Release: Benefits of Art Therapy A 6-year-old girl sits next to her therapist, with signs of anxiety upon her face. Pieces of paper, pencil and some markers are placed in front of the girl. She is hesitant to speak out, but these colors do help release some of the tension in the air. She begins to draw and paint, in a matter of fifteen minutes she finishes with a sequence of fourteen pictures: “A little girl pig is attacked by a man who wax her with a big stick and hits her in the face with a stone, although she has done nothing wrong to him....   [tags: Art Therapy]
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Family Therapy Involving an Alcoholic Parent - One in five adults can identify with growing up with an alcoholic relative and Twenty-eight million Americans have one parent abusing or dependent on alcoholic (Walker, & Lee, 1998). There are devastating and ubiquitous effects of alcoholism, which vary from psychological, social, or biological problems for families. Counselor’s treating this problem all agree that the relationships within a family, especially between a parent and a child is one of the most influential within a system, but what are the effects on the family when a parent is an alcoholic....   [tags: Counseling/Therapy]
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Foundational Assumptions of Psychoanalytic Family Therapies - ... Cognitive-behavioral therapy aims to change specific negative or unhealthy behavior patterns, when the patterns are altered through positive reinforcements not only the individual but the entire family system is capable of functioning in a healthy, beneficial manner. The models are also very different in several ways, the first being that psychoanalytic family therapy seeks to find what is hidden. There is an assumption that unconscious thoughts drive and motivate an individual as well as family behavior; but there must be a search first to attempt to discover the unconscious thoughts that are directing behaviors....   [tags: Psychology, Psychiatry ]
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Music Therapy for Autistic Children - When a child is diagnosed with autism, one thing that is noted is the lack of eye contact. Music therapy works to help this in numerous ways. When the therapist starts at the child’s level, according to the British Colombian Music therapy association, they can base what needs to be done and how to do it off of where the child is and after many sessions, where they are now (M-7). According to a report in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, “Eye contact – this refers to an event where child looks at therapist while playing, manipulating” (E-7)....   [tags: Music, Music Therapy] 898 words
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Client Centered Therapy - It is inevitable that in psychotherapy there are numerous theories. Theories arise out of scholarly investigations of ideas on human behavior. Human behavior is an extraordinarily interesting subject and therefore produces a plethora of ideas from a variety of theorists. These theorists are influenced by their education, culture, and time period. One of the most influential, empathetically understanding, theorists is Carl Rogers. His contributions to human behavior have changed many of the theories that preceded him, and contributed his theory to many theories that followed him....   [tags: Therapy, Rogers,Truscott] 1397 words
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