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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Ellis became dissatisfied with practicing traditional psychoanalysis and psychotherapy and began to focus more on philosophical beliefs including those that clients could change self defeating behaviors by changing their point of view (p333. Sharf, 2012). Ellis was the first to connect the impact of thoughts as they relate to behaviors when he published in 1962, Reason and Emotion in Psychotherapy (Walsh, 2010). Ellis's work asserted that an individual's underlying thinking about him or herself directly effected his/her behavior, and as a therapist, his goal was to help the client become more reasonable in thought, and ultimately in the followed behaviors....   [tags: Psychology, Rational Behavioral Therapy] 2449 words
(7 pages)
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The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy - ... It helps the client show the actual situation by focusing on facts. The therapist uses an inductive method to help the client determine the elements that upset him. For support, the therapist can also introduce homework to the patient or client (Alexander, 2007). In general a lot can be said about the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy but almost all literature states a positive effect for this kind of therapy. The effectiveness holds for both clinical and non clinical settings. It hold also for people of all ages, although differences in how people react to the therapy can be contributed partially to the age of the person....   [tags: Health, Treatment] 2559 words
(7.3 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... There are several forms of cognitive behavioral therapy such as: rational emotive therapy, cognitive therapy, and multimodal therapy” (Dobson and Dozois - Paraphrase). There are multiple components of cognitive behavioral therapy. People develop faulty beliefs throughout trials in life. Thoughts and feelings can become a dysfunctional part of a person’s character. Faulty belief systems can affect a person’s life in a multitude of ways. Faulty belief systems can develop into problematic behaviors that negatively affect a person’s relationships with family, friends as well a person’s work relationships....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Depression - ... Cognitive behavioral therapy combines techniques of behavior modification into a cognitive reconstructive approach. Beck combined his own understanding and observation of schema with Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalysis to further develop the cognitive behavioral theory. He also developed the “Beck Hopelessness Scale, Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation, Beck Youth Inventories and Beck Anxiety Inventory to treat different mental disorders.” (whitfield, 2007). His methods are highly used throughout the clinical world....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... (Stress Inoculation Therapy) and David Burns, M.D. David Burns, M.D. popularized CBT with his 1980's best-selling book, Feeling Good. More recently, cognitive-behavioral therapy has been influenced by the work of Aldo Pucci, Psy.D. (Rational Living Therapy), Michael Mahoney, Ph.D., Marsha Linehan, Ph.D., and Arthur Freeman, Ed.D.” (National Association of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy 2011) Cognitive Behavior therapy is not a distinct therapeutic technique it is actually a mix of approaches that have the following characteristics, its based on the cognitive model of emotional response, its briefer and time limited, it’s a collaborative effort between the therapist and client, some is based on aspects on stoic philosophy, (Beck’s is not)....   [tags: Counseling ]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Effectiveness - ... According to Amaya et al. (2011) forty-seven percent of the participants were female and 83% were Caucasian. The methods of this study were similar to Jacob et al. (2010) study because the sample was conducted from the same national study. Data from the TADS indicated that unhealthy family functioning has a negative impact on acute treatment outcome of adolescents’ depression, and these effects were greater among youth who received CBT than for fluoxetine or a combination of CBT and fluoxetine (Amaya et al., 2011)....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Depression - ... Cognitive appraisal is another approach in which the patient evaluates circumstances and situations while reinforcing the fact that our emotions are based on perception of a situation (Anaparti, 2010). Rumination Another behavior effecting depression sufferers is called rumination. Rumination is a “style of thinking in which, like a hamster in a cage, you run in tight circles on a treadmill in your brain. It means obsessing about problems, about a loss, about any kind of a setback or ambiguity without moving past thought into the realm of action” (McGrath, 2003, para....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF ADHD - ... The therapist will look at the problem area, and better ways of dealing with the situations. It is hands on and needs commitment because you have to carry it through between sessions. It helps retrain the way the child thinks. It is most helpful in aiding in self esteem and relationship difficulties. Most sessions are one hour per week and require six to twenty sessions varying per persons needs. CBT can teach things like how to solve problems, make lists and use them, use calendars and to list distractions instead of focusing on them....   [tags: Medical Research]
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Person Centered Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - ... It was originally developed to treat depression and anxiety but is now used for many different disorders. It is a very effective type of therapy because it is time limited. The amount of sessions is usually between four and fourteen. CBT focuses on schemas or core beliefs which are usually negative thoughts like “I’m worthless” or “I’m not loveable” (Beck, 1970). In order to treat cognitive distortions the negative thoughts need to be addressed. First, the individual needs to “recognize idiosyncratic cognitions”....   [tags: Therapy/Rehabilitation]
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The Integration of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Clinicians use three important techniques when working on resolving the client’s current depressive episode: role-play, encouraging affect, and communication analysis. Role-playing is used as a way to change the client’s behavior, and to uncover the client’s communication style. Once the client can see the ways in which they communicate ineffectively, they can work on new communication strategies in role-plays with the therapist. For example, if during role-plays the client discovers they are passive aggressive during fights with their partner, they can act out fights with the therapist and try different ways to communicate that change the outcome of the fight....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Management of Anorexia - ... Therapeutic Process The Cognitive Behavior Therapy for anorexic individuals involves several steps. As with many therapeutic processes, assessment is usually the initial step. During this stage of treatment objective and subjective symptoms are noted. After a definitive diagnosis of AN, families must work to acknowledge the characteristics and origin of the disorder. This is deemed as part of the treatment process and often entails that work is done outside of clinical sessions. (Treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa....   [tags: Diseases/Disorders]
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Psychotherapy - ... CBT is open to using techniques from other approaches that fit the needs of the client, and the empirically validated techniques of CBT, when individualized for the client, work well in other approaches (Corey, 2009). These aspects of CBT make it a useful approach that can be adapted for individuals from different cultural and economic backgrounds (Corey, 2009; Kellogg & Young, 2008). In general, CBT is a structured approach and includes techniques and outcomes (e.g., behavior changes) that are easily measured, which provides it with a substantial amount of empirical support (Corey, 2009)....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy] 941 words
(2.7 pages)
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Psychotherapy - ... CBT is open to using techniques from other approaches that fit the needs of the client, and the empirically validated techniques of CBT, when individualized for the client, work well in other approaches (Corey, 2009). Overall, CBT is a structured approach that emphasizes learning, empowerment, brevity, and focusing on the individual. These aspects of CBT make it a useful approach that can be adapted for individuals from different cultural and economic backgrounds (Corey, 2009; Kellogg & Young, 2008)....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy] 1037 words
(3 pages)
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy For Bulimia Nervosa - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy For Bulimia Nervosa INTRODUCTION Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating as well as by self-induced vomiting and/or laxative abuse (Mitchell, 1986). Episodes of overeating typically alternate with attempts to diet, although the eating habits of bulimics and their methods of weight control vary (Fairburn et al., 1986). The majority of bulimics have a body weight within the normal range for their height, build, and age, and yet possess intense and prominent concerns about their shape and weight (Fairburn et al., 1986)....   [tags: Eating Disorders Medical Treatment Essays]
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The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy - The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is based on the concept that behavior change may be achieved through altering cognitive processes. The assumption underlying the cognitively based therapeutic techniques is that maladaptive cognitive processes lead to maladaptive behaviors and changing these processes can lead to behavior modification. According to Mahoney (1995), an individual's cognitions are viewed as covert behaviors, subject to the same laws of learning as overt behaviors....   [tags: Papers] 2421 words
(6.9 pages)
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Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Key points: There were several key points described in this chapter that validated psychosocial treatments. This analysis will only focus on the discussion of the research study that focused on the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bipolar affective disorder. This chapter discussed a study of twenty-eight people (Cochran, 1984) who received outpatient CBT for a bipolar disorder diagnosis. The study was designed to change the way half of the participants (14) would think and behave so that they would better comply with their medication regime....   [tags: Papers] 5098 words
(14.6 pages)
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Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Sexually Abused Children - ... Working with a child who has experienced a traumatic event can be difficult for even the most competent parents. The parenting skills included in TF-CBT have been found to be effective in helping parents with their child’s behavior problems (Cohen, Deblinger, Mannarino, & Steer, 2004). TF-CBT components include Psychoeducation, Parenting skills, Relaxation skills, Affective modulation skills, Cognitive coping skills, Trauma narrative and cognitive processing of the traumatic events (Cohen 2008)....   [tags: Psychology, argumentative, persuasive]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Beck in the 1960s. As defined by Emery & Tracy (1987), CBT is “a series of strategies that relieve psychological suffering by correcting distorted and maladaptive thinking. The therapy is based on a theory of psychopathology that recognises the reciprocal interrelationship among the cognitive, behavioural, somatic and emotional systems”. Although CBT is often referred to as a unitary treatment, it is actually a diverse collection of complex and subtle interventions that must each be mastered and understood from the social learning perspective (Reinecke, Dattilio, & Freeman, 2003)....   [tags: Psychology, Depression, Mental Disorder] 594 words
(1.7 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Two of these will be described in detail. Behavioural strategy consists of two parts: activity scheduling and graded task assignment. Activity scheduling in CBT for depression is one of the core therapeutic methods. (Beck et al., 1979). The Weekly Activity Schedule (WAS) is an essential tool for activity scheduling. Basically it is a simple timetable with the slot for every hour of every day. The first step in activity scheduling is as a self-monitoring tool starting to use WAS, then the therapist can gather the information about the patient’s activity....   [tags: Psychology, Depression, Anxiety] 1070 words
(3.1 pages)
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy And Exposure With Response Prevention In The Treatment Of Bulimia Nervosa - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy And Exposure With Response Prevention In The Treatment Of Bulimia Nervosa Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder with psychological, physiological, developmental, and cultural components. The disorder is commonly characterized by binge eating followed by inappropriate compensatory behaviors, such as self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, fasting, and the misuse of diuretics, laxatives or enemas. Patients properly diagnosed with bulimia nervosa endure many psychological and physiological problems....   [tags: Eating Disorder Weight Health Essays]
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Advantages of Employing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... be: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and have a Time farm (a date for completion) (Beck et al, 1979). Examples of the real life experience will clarify the situation. For example, if patient suffers from depression, the therapist would ask he/she to describe exactly how he/ she feels and how this problem has affected his/her life. It helps the patient identify the underlying reason to why certain behaviours occur or why the feelings are there. Compared to most psychological therapeutic approaches, CBT is more structured (Brewin, 1996).For example in the beginning of each session the therapist and patient would set an agenda for what they should do in the session and they would try to stick to it....   [tags: Psychology, Anxiety] 866 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Treating Depression - ... There is considerable opposition to this viewpoint, particularly from proponents of other methods of counselling, such as pyschodynamic or person centred therapists (Wake 2007). Now we will go on to look at specific research papers that have been selected for this literature review. Before doing that though it is worth mentioning that some of these studies look at specific demographics in their studies. The IAPT scheme does not discriminate against any particular groups, and it’s recommendations are to cover all ages, ethnicities and genders....   [tags: Psychology] 2035 words
(5.8 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children - ... The literature reveals that sleep related issues as a result of PTSD affects as many as 70% of those individuals with the condition (Ohayon & Shapiro, 2000). In a study that examined whether sleeping disturbances including insomnia and nightmares persisted after competition of CBT for PTSD, Zayfert & DeViva (2004) concluded that a significant portion (48%) of this sample of remitted PTSD patients reported persisting insomnia sufficient to be coded as a symptom, where for the majority of patients, the insomnia remained severe....   [tags: Child Psychology ]
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Cognitive Behavior Therapy For PTSD - ... M. Rauch and Shawn P. Cahill’s article “Treatment and Prevention of Post traumatic Stress Disorder”, psychological debriefing is applied immediately after a traumatic event; usually 48-72 hours later (2003). It is a very brief intervention consisting of one or two sessions that includes a discussion of the facts surrounding the event. The individual’s cognitive thoughts are also assessed and discussed. This allows the individual an opportunity to express any thoughts they may have about the event and a chance to plan on how to cope with what happened (Rauch & Cahill, 2003)....   [tags: Therapy]
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Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral, and Reality Theories - ... The cognitive behavioral therapy is founded on several characteristics that involve multimodal therapy and behavioral changes. Most of the behavioral therapists consider their work dynamic because they address different problems among different clients. Anxiety disorder is one of the disorders addressed through cognitive behavioral therapy. In addition, this approach addresses several characteristics, one of them being cognitive development. Phobia, anxiety and other socials problems are also addressed through this process....   [tags: Psychology]
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The Integration of Cognitive and Behavior Therapy - ... Cognitive-behavioral therapy by far does not in any way tell people how they should feel. In other words, it is not the stimulus itself which somehow elicits an emotional response directly, but our evaluation of or thought about that stimulus. However, when most people seek this type of therapy, they want to rid themselves of the ways they have been feeling. CBT also puts emphasis on the fact that we have our undesirable situations whether we allow them to upset us or not. Basically saying that if we are upset about our problems, we then have two problems: #1 the original problem, and #2 ourselves being upset about it....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Group Therapy - ... The relationship between therapist and client is collaborative and caring. Goals are set by the client with the help of the therapist. The therapy is very goal-orientated and specific. They then work together to assess and then change faulty beliefs that interfere with accomplishing these set goals. The basic goal is to remove biases or distortions that hinder the client from functioning effectively. Changing cognitive schemas can be done in three different ways; reinterpretation, modification, and restructuring....   [tags: Psychology]
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A Look at Human Behavior: Cognitive-Behavioral Frame of Reference - ... While behavioral theory suggests that behavior is elicited by learned consequences or by modeling actions based on another individual’s behavior, social learning theory views behavior as the determinant of the consequences or response. The way an individual reacts to and perceives an environment affects the environment as much as the environment affects them. In social learning theory, it is the “correlation rather than the pairing of events that determines behavior” (Bruce & Borg, 2002). Social learning theory also suggests that cognition plays a role in modeling behavior....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder - ... The therapist’s role, in prolonged exposure, is to help the client identify “hot spots” or the most distressing aspect of the memory. The therapist and the client then develop a hierarchy of memories to address, from least to most distressing. These memories are addressed one at a time until habituation of anxiety to the memory occurs, which is determined by the decreases reported in subjective distress (McDonagh, et al., 2005). Although the empirical research has supported the efficacy of prolonged exposure for PTSD (Foa et al., 1999;Roman, 2010), there is currently a considerable debate in regards to the change mechanisms that operate during prolonged exposure (Harvey, Bryant, & Tarrier, 2003)....   [tags: Health Care, Anxiety Disorder, Treatment] 1531 words
(4.4 pages)
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Brief Therapy - ... Changing the mind, leading the client to solutions through specific questioning techniques will allow the client to formulate ideas. "Furthermore, Selekman believed there are assumptions that benefit those who deal with resistant adolescents and their families. The assumptions are extremely practical and provide therapists a new lens for viewing the tough adolescent case. Each of the guiding assumptions provides a wellness perspective on adolescent problems, families, and brief therapy. Matching our treatment to the state of change will foster a cooperative relationship....   [tags: Counseling/Therapy]
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The Road Through Music Therapy - Upon many different techniques of health restorations music therapy has been known to have a great effect on people. This therapy reduces physical, emotional, and mental pain. Stretching a hand to those who are battling against cancer, or to those who have last someone close and are now dealing with depression and suicide thoughts. Those who have dedicate their lives into educating them selves for music therapy have a desire to help those who are in need, combining with a compassionate personality....   [tags: Music Therapy] 1110 words
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Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy - ... With the irrational thoughts laid out in front of the client, the therapist can begin asking questions like, “are these thoughts true to the best of my knowledge?” and “does it help me to think like this.” When these questions are answered some irrational thoughts should come to surface and those can be changed into rational thinking and therefore change thoughts from unhealthy to healthy, from irrational to rational. Once rational thoughts have been realized the therapist should challenge the client to begin examining their interpretation of negative events that occur in their life in hopes that rational thoughts occur rather than irrational ones....   [tags: Therapy/Counseling]
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Behavioral Therapy - ... He contributed to our awareness of the unconscious, hypnosis and the relationship between psychology and health. At the very least, he has contributed his inquisitiveness and modeled his stance as a scientist and practitioner in undertaking to improve the qualities of the lives of others. Such qualities have thankfully become the hallmark of prominent practitioners of psychology today. Above all Mesmer opened the way for people to understand the power of the imagination in therapy (Kroger, 2008)....   [tags: Psychology, Illness, Hypnosis , Pain] 1841 words
(5.3 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Psychodynamic Theory - ... This was mostly applied with cases dealing with anxiety disorders or phobias. After this method of work was surfaced it was apparent that it only dealt with the surfaced symptoms and problems, it did not face or deal with the underlying issues that may have caused this behaviour in the first place. Aaron Beck evolved this theory into Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in the 1960s (Payne, 2005). This was initially a short-term solution for disorders such as depression aimed toward solving the current problem and then changing the way the client thinks about it and in turn changing their behaviour also....   [tags: Psychology]
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Forgiveness Therapy - ... Although the title is specific, concise and provides a theory, it does not supply the reader with results. Also, the authors have presented an appropriate title free of yes-no question and jargons (Pyrczak 2008, pg17). Critique of the Abstract According to Pyrczak, presents a summary of a research report. The summary is a brief description of the entire article conduced to approximately 100 to 220 words. The abstract of this article, Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Anger, Mood, and Vulnerability to Substance Use Among Inpatient Substance-Dependent Clients, gives the purpose of the study....   [tags: Article Analysis ]
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Behavioral Treatment Programs for Methamphetamine Addiction - ... The actual treatment involves life skill training, prevention of relapse, and 12 step oriented programs that assist the clients. The protocol also includes random drug testing throughout the program. The clients also learn about and develop vocational skills. The program is immensely intensive and provides structure with the clients attending the program up to five hours per day. This usually lasts about the first twelve weeks. Then it is gradually reduced, but the timeframe of the program could last up to a year....   [tags: Drugs]
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Effection Depression Therapy - The variable mix is age, between the ages of 18 and 65, level and diagnosis of unipolar depression, occupation, stress level, race, cognitive issues (I.Q.), adequate or inadequate sleep, physical limitations, previous knowledge of study, type of questionnaires given, whether cooperative, patient/counselor relationship, and other extraneous variables not mentioned therein. These are purposeful sampling requirements with this qualitative study using specific case studies with patients with unipolar depression....   [tags: Research Analysis ]
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Major Forms of Therapy - Therapy has long been thought of as taboo. In this paper, I will discuss the major forms of therapy and their characteristics along with the strategies that are also used. This essay will also cover examples of each disorder and show which therapeutic method is best used in caring for individual(s). Psychological Disorders have been around for centuries, back then they did not know how to treat various disorders. Throughout much of human history, people linked abnormal behavior to witchcraft....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy - ... The process helps the individual accept the situation as it is for now because eventually the feeling will change. For example, if a person is disturbed by events of their past then he/she first has to admit that the event took place and the feelings associated with that will eventually go away. “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things that I can; and the wisdom to know the difference. This statement is the best application of ACT. First step is to identify areas in one’s life that can and cannot be change....   [tags: Psychology]
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Person-Centered Therapy - ... Since the client has made the request and is clear that he wants the therapist to provide suggestions the therapist might propose a homework assignment that involves having the client identify their thoughts that occur right before they feel angry. It is important that counselors do not suggest such interventions due to their frustrations with the clients’ progress but rather after their clients have made requests for such interventions known (Tursi & Cochran, 2006). CBT homework can be a helpful addition to the person-centered framework and the counselor can still work in a traditional person-centered approach within sessions by maintaining a focus on providing deep, genuine empathy and unconditional positive regard....   [tags: Psychology, Rogers, Informative] 2572 words
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Bulimia Nervosa: The Disease, Diagnosis and Therapy - Bulimia, known as Bulimia Nervosa, is a deadly eating disorder in which an individual believes they are fat or overweight. Those individuals lose weight through unhealthy and dangerous methods. The overall desire to be thin and accepted appears to be the main cause of Bulimia. The attitudes about diet and appearance expressed by parents can be a factor. Teens may temporarily become slightly overweight and parents who react negatively may cause their children to become fearful or anxious about the way they look....   [tags: Diet, Nursing, Eating Disorders, Weight, Medical] 876 words
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Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - ... Thus, from the survey of the literature examined, the underlining issues to be considered in this regard are the substantive questions as to the significance of the contributions these approaches offered and their dimensions. In understanding the origins of the development of the Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, the model’s evolution, according to the account of Kristy Hall, Furhan Iqbal (2010), has been painstakingly greeted with intensively incessant disputes, adoptions and adaptations of the psychoanalysis and behaviourism....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Therapy] 2101 words
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Horse Therapy - There are a few different types of therapy that uses horses. Hippotherapy means- “treatment with the help of a horse” (Naomi Scott). The word hippo is used because this term is derived from the greek word hippo which means horse. “Hippotherapy is generally indicated for children and adults with mild to severe neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction.” (Naomi Scott). This type of therapy uses the horses motion to improve on the neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction of the patient. These dysfunctions can include “abnormal muscle tone., impaired balance responses, impaired coordination, impaired communication, impaired sensorimotor function, postural asymmetry, poor postural control, decreased mobility, and limbic system issues related to arousal, motivation, and attention....   [tags: Psychology ] 1133 words
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Discussing the Four Main Methods of Psycho Therapy - Have you ever needed to conduct psycho therapy on someone but you didn’t know how. Fear no more, because I am about to tell you about the 4 main methods of therapy, which will let you help your friends and relatives in ways that you never thought possible before. The four types of therapy I will be talking about today are psychoanalytical, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral. You may want to determine what method best suits you, or what method will best suit the situation you or your friend is faced with....   [tags: psychology, mental health] 775 words
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Cognitive Research and Reasons Schizophrenics Have Auditory Hallucinations - Cognitive Research and Reasons Schizophrenics Have Auditory Hallucinations Schizophrenia is a common illness. "Schizo", Latin for "split" and "phrenic", "mind" describes the split from reality experienced by the schizophrenic mind. The personality loses it unity and wholeness as a result of unorganized, incoherent thinking, shifting emotional moods and strange perceptions. It has approximately 1-% population prevalence in all cultures....   [tags: essays research papers] 2157 words
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Music Therapy - Music Therapy During the past thirty years, concepts in the mental health profession have undergone continuous and dramatic changes. A relatively new type of therapy is musical therapy, which incorporates music into the healing process. Music therapy also is changing, and its concepts, procedures, and practices need constant reevaluation in order to meet new concepts of psychiatric treatment. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato....   [tags: Papers] 1432 words
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Cinderella In Therapy - Cinderella in Therapy In the movie “Cinderella,” Cinderella is a maid to an evil stepmother and two very heartless and obnoxious stepsisters. The only reason that Cinderella still puts up with their orders is an example of the Behavioral perspective. The Behavioral Perspective puts emphasis on learning by experience with rewards and punishments. She knows that if she does not do the chores, she will be punished or thrown out of the household. She does not have anywhere to go because her mother and father have passed away....   [tags: essays research papers] 661 words
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Offender Classification and Therapy - ... No longer are risks assessments conducted solely for the institutionalized but also are used to foresee new transgressions with needs that are similarly elements of offender risks (Van Voorhis et al., 2009). The new models are used in a way that allows for scores to change over time by assessing offenders with criteria that is subject to change over time. Technology is also more widely used for assessment in what is considered the third generation. The purpose of current models is to not only assess offender recidivism, but also to suggest possible treatment options such as cognitive-behavioral therapies....   [tags: Social Studies]
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Roger’s Theory as compared to that of Ellis’ Theory - ... Irrational beliefs are unhealthy, negative emotions in the conscious that clouds your judgment in yourself, others and the environment. According to REBT therapists, only hard work and practice can make rational beliefs. Rational beliefs represents reasonable, flexible, and constructive conclusion about reality. As Rogers’ and Ellis’ both established “core conditions” in their theories. Rogers argued that each component is essential for therapeutic change; on the other hand, Ellis believed that therapeutic change can take place in the absence of these conditions....   [tags: Psychology, Therapy] 957 words
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The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety - ... (2008) performed a pilot study on the efficacy of seated massage on stress, aggression level, and anxiety of young adults in an inpatient psychiatric setting. In non-blind non-randomized study, 15 to 25 year-old psychiatric patients received a 20-minute massage while seated in a special chair. Gardener et al. (2008) found 60% of the patients responded favorably and exhibited less aggression and reported less anxiety. Although they found MT to be helpful in treating the aggression and anxiety, based on the method of the study and the small sample size discretion is needed when interpreting the findings....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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The Grinch - ... Another pro that I feel would be good for this therapy when working with the Grinch would be free association. In this area clients are urged to open up and say whatever comes to mind regardless of how painful or hurtful this may be. Corey (2009) goes into the term death instincts in his reading that say says “at times, people manifest through their behaviors an unconscious wish t die or to hurt themselves or others. Managing this aggressive drive is a challenge to the human race” (pg. 61)....   [tags: Psychoanalysis Therapy, Video] 1439 words
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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Family Interventions for Psychosis - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Family Interventions for Psychosis Psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia are not new in the research literature. Psychological treatments have been previously used in the treatment of schizophrenia. For example in terms of behaviour therapy, operant approaches such as token economy programmes were used in the 1960s and 1970s to improve the behaviour of patients in long stay hospitals. However, the evidence suggests that the clinical gains were limited and did not generalise beyond the therapeutic setting and also did not address delusional convictions (Alford 1986; Himadi et al 1991)....   [tags: Papers] 7800 words
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Effectiveness of Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Individuals Experiencing Auditory Hallucinations - Critical Review Summary This paper reviews two studies on the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for individuals experiencing auditory hallucinations. The first study (Newton, Larkin, Melhuish, & Wykes, 2007) aims to elicit the positive and negative aspects of group CBT treatment by listening to the perspectives of young people undergoing such treatment. The second study (Penn et al. 2009) seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of group CBT for auditory hallucinations compared to an active control group of enhanced supportive therapy (ST)....   [tags: Psychology]
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Biopsychosocial Therapy - ... These are a few examples of the importance of having the knowledge necessary in Biology that will help with approaches to different clients. (Kolb) Social Therapy is important too because it includes the nurturing side of humans and how their behaviors and thoughts are influenced. Is it, the person or their situation or both that cause a certain behavior. The Attribution Theory explains this as internal dispositions and external situations that cause certain behaviors. For example, social norms have to do with people and where they grew up, what their race, gender and social economic statuses are, etc....   [tags: Therapy]
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Music Therapy and Children - ... 4). So, it is significant for children who have had limitations in communication in the past. The other illness that music therapy has beneficial effects on is language skills problems (speech disorder). Speech disorder as MedicineNet.com defined it is “a disorder affecting the ability to produce normal speech” (Anonymous, 2011). Referring to Grob et al. (2010), in this illness children are suffering from these issues: speaking, reading, spilling, and other learning difficulties. In addiction, 50-75% of children with those issues face emotional and behavioral problems (p....   [tags: Therapy]
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Benefits and Challenges of Play Therapy - ... Equally, Esman (1983 in Gil, 1994, p.7) outlines the view to why play is a vital aspect of a child’s psychological development, as “it allows the communication of wishes, fantasies’, and conflicts in the ways that child can tolerate affectively and express at the level of his or her cognitive capabilities”. As a result, play is observable as one of the primary factors in cognitive and socio-emotional development. Since children develop at different levels, play can change and as a result children go through variable development, thus stages of play can be different to the individual child....   [tags: Therapy]
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The Theories of Albert Bandura - The Theories of Albert Bandura Albert Bandura was influenced by behaviorism while at the University of Iowa studying for his PhD in the early 1950s, he developed his own theories called reciprocal determinism, he believed that not only does the environment influence behavior, but behavior influences the environment, or to put it in his own words ’the world and a persons behavior cause each other‘. Bandura is often considered a ‘father’ of the cognitive movement, he looked at personality as three things that interact, the environment, behaviour and the person’s psychological processes....   [tags: Behaviorism Behavioral Psychology]
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Cognitive Therapy - Beck and his theories of cognitive therapy seem to provide a good balance between the amount of direction and authority the client and therapist each have. I like that Beck does provide direction and insight, but in a way that does not make him seem like he is just dictating a diagnosis. Beck discusses what he thinks is going on with the client and explains what he thinks and why. The idea of collaborative empiricism is one that empowers the client to go out into his or her world and test his or her biases, but this is also done with the help of the therapist who can guide the process....   [tags: Psychology] 436 words
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Actions Caused by Cognitive Dissonance - “If I chose to do it or say it, I must believe in it.” asserts the psychologist Leon Festinger (as cited in Psychology: Eighth Edition in Modules, 2007, p.731). When we become aware that our actions contradict our attitudes, we tend to revise our attitudes. This statement fits Festinger’s cognitive dissonance theory that asserts that we act to reduce discomfort or dissonance, an unpleasant tension, we experience when two of our thoughts or cognitions are inconsistent. Mkimmie, et al. (2003) investigated the impact of social support on cognitive dissonance arousal in their experiment, “I’m a Hypocrite, but So Is Everyone Else: Group Support and the Reduction of Cognitive Dissonance.” The psychologists aimed to test the impact of social support on dissonance by testing two hypotheses....   [tags: Cognitive Dissonance, psychology, ] 915 words
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Craniosacral Therapy - ... There are three basic types of ADHD; inattentive, hyperactive/impulsive and a combination of the previous two. Typical signs of ADHD are talking excessively, inability to sit still, trouble paying attention, and hyperactivity. (8) The craniosacral system consists of the cerebrospinal fluid and membranes that surrounds and protects the spinal cord and brain. (2) The craniosacral rhythm of the cerebrospinal fluid flows throughout the body at 6-12 cycles per minute. This motion can be most easily felt on the back of the head, but trained clinicians can find the pulse almost anywhere on a body....   [tags: Health, Physical Therapy, Medical] 2082 words
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The Root Cause of Depression: Biological, Cognitive-Behavioral, or Both? - ... If this were true, when her parents conceived her, she would inherit the genes predisposing and increasing her risk of having depression as well. Nevertheless, the genes lay dormant showing no signs or symptoms of depression until the tragic death of her father. This tragic event activated these genes resulting in the development of chronic depression as well as a bipolar disorder. Therefore, making any children she would have predisposed to develop symptoms of depression as well. (The claim of a genetic blueprint predisposing future generations is evident in the fact three out of four of this learner’s children received a clinical diagnosis of depressive disorders.) Further evidence supporting the genetic influences in families involves a study of five families (with and without major depression) by Sullivan, Neale, and Kendler (2000)....   [tags: Diseases/Disorders]
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The Analysis of Behavior Centered and Person Centered Therapy and the Benefits of the Integration and Synthesis of Both in Counseling - The long-term goal of any counselling session is to aid the client in their overcoming and defeat of obstacles they may face through the facilitation of psychological tools and theories. The evolution of psychology over the last 100 years has seen numerous theories put forth for application to therapy in the clinical setting. Two widely used and well-founded methods include Behaviour Therapy and Person Centered Therapy. The dynamics of Behaviour Therapy were first discovered by the famous researcher and psychologist B.F Skinner, through his findings on operant conditioning (Lindsley; Skinner & Soloman, 1953)....   [tags: Behaviour Therapy ]
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Cognitive Behavioral Theory - ... The role of behaviors based on thoughts and feelings. That is, the role of positive thoughts versus negative thoughts. Proverbs 4:23 tells us to “be careful how we think, our life is shaped by our thoughts.” Additionally, Proverbs 17:22 states that “being cheerful keeps you healthy. It is a slow death to be gloomy all the time.” It can be said that CBT emphasizes truthfulness rather than focusing on happiness. As clients learn to develop critical thinking skills, they also learn to determine whether or not their thinking is factual and true....   [tags: Psychology]
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Comparing the Behavioral Perspective and the Cognitive Perspective - Comparing the Behavioral Perspective and the Cognitive Perspective The behavioral perspective is the idea that if psychology was to be a science, then it must focus on events, which are directly observable on behavior, rather than on mental life. The behavioral perspective maintains the primary emphasis on observable behavior and its relation to environmental events. Behavioral perspective is through reinforcement, which is the idea that patterns of emitted behavior can be selected by their consequences....   [tags: Psychology] 302 words
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Cognitive Behavior Therapy - Cognitive Behavior Therapy Cognitive Behavior Therapy for body image has been proven an effective way to improve body dissatisfaction. It has been applied to persons with eating disorders, obesity, body dysmorphic disorder, and normal weight, all of whom harbor negative feelings toward their bodies. It is critically important to target body image for specific treatment, as negative feelings about one's body are often a major precipitous to eating disorders. What is body image. Body image can be defined as the picture one has in his mind about the appearance (i.e....   [tags: Self Image Weight Papers]
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The Evolution of Cognitive Psychology - The Evolution of Cognitive Psychology Definition of Cognition Cognition is the mental process or faculty of acquiring knowledge by the use of perception, reasoning or intuition. This is the mental process of knowing, which including aspects such as; perception, judgment, attention, reasoning, producing language, remembering, understanding, decision making and solving problems. Cognition is generally defined as the mental process and activity used in perception, remembering and thinking....   [tags: Cognitive Psychology]
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Cognitive Theories of Human Development - ... He was said to be a Marxist who believed that we can understand human beings only in the context of the social-historical environment. Believing that his life would be cut short, he began to research diligently. Many of his writings were published—not long after his death, only to be banned in 1936 by the Soviet Government; the ban lasted until 1956. The Communist Party condemned his research, however, his colleagues and students have kept his work alive. Paiget and Vygotsky’s works have proved to be significant in the area of cognitive learning and human development....   [tags: Cognitive Development]
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Behavioral Management and the Hawthorne Effect - Behavioral management is “the study of how managers should behave to motivate employees, encourage them to perform at high levels and to be committed to the achievement of organizational goals” (Waddell et al. 2007, p. 52). A number of intellectuals explored possible theories that would explain the basis and effect of behaviours of both the management and staff. Some theorists whose ideas are still prominent today include Fredrick Taylor, Mary Follett, Douglas McGregor and Elton Mayo et al. This piece, however, focuses on the ‘Hawthorne effect,’ conducted by Elton Mayo alongside associates F.J....   [tags: Behavioral management, Business Management]
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Couples Therapy for Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse - ... By doing this she was “mastering” defense of the traumatic experience that she learned to protect herself. However, in her adult relationship, it did not protect her but caused isolation and barriers to her ability to be intimate and enjoy sexual pleasure. She felt that he did not know much about her or her past abuse because she did not tell him, similar to how she did not tell her mother as a child. She did this in order to protect and preserve her relationships with both her mother and her husband in fear that they would blame, not respect, and reject her....   [tags: Therapy]
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Music Therapy - Music therapy is used to treat people for various reasons and there are multiple styles of treatment presently being used. Music therapy is an effective form of therapy that is used on people of all ages to improve quality of life. Music therapy has been used in the medical industry for more than 60 years and there are many people who have no idea what it is. During W.W.I., music therapy in the United States began to develop when music was used in the Veterans Administration Hospitals as an intervention to address traumatic war injuries....   [tags: History Music Therapy Descriptive] 1713 words
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Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) within Social Psychology - ... Additionally, there are several Social Psychology techniques which can be applied to CBT. I believe that these five techniques which are used with Social Psychology can be used with CBT: goals, cognitive dissonance, conscious override, belief and coping, and moral inclusion. In Social Psychology, goals can be defined as the meaningful connection between action and values (Locke & Kristof, 1996; Locke & Latham, 1990). Goal setting is common amongst several therapeutic theories. For example, in CBT client should define an area that they would like to work on in therapy and the set a goal for what they would like to change their behavior to....   [tags: Psychology]
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The Cognative and Behavioral Effects of Nicotine: An Argument for Brain=Behavior - The Cognative and Behavioral Effects of Nicotine: An Argument for Brain=Behavior For the majority of this class I have been a fence-sitter with 'mystical' leanings. However when I decided to do my paper on smoking, I found in the phenomina of addiction a very strong argument for our brain=behavior hypothesis. In the following essay, I will describe the biological effects of nicotine on the Central Nervous System and some of the resulting behavioral effects. Afterwards I will present thoughts as to why I believe addiction is a very important point to be considered in the question we've been asking since the first day of class....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Dance Therapy - Dance Therapy Dance therapy is a type of psychotherapy that uses movement to further the social, cognitive, emotional, and physical development of the individual. Dance therapists work with people who have many kinds of emotional problems, intellectual deficits, and life-threatening illnesses. They are employed in psychiatric hospitals, day care centers, mental health centers, prisons, special schools, and private practice. They work with people of all ages in both group and individual therapy....   [tags: History Health Therapy Dancing Essays] 1813 words
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Foundational Assumptions of Psychoanalytic Family Therapies - ... Cognitive-behavioral therapy aims to change specific negative or unhealthy behavior patterns, when the patterns are altered through positive reinforcements not only the individual but the entire family system is capable of functioning in a healthy, beneficial manner. The models are also very different in several ways, the first being that psychoanalytic family therapy seeks to find what is hidden. There is an assumption that unconscious thoughts drive and motivate an individual as well as family behavior; but there must be a search first to attempt to discover the unconscious thoughts that are directing behaviors....   [tags: Psychology, Psychiatry ]
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Animal-Assisted Therapy - ... There are different cases where the courthouse provides a dog to comfort children to be able to speak out during the trail. When the child is on the stand and is stressed out about what s/he is about to state, the dog will let the child know that s/he is there for the child, “When they start talking about difficult things,” Dr. Crenshaw said, “Rosie picks up on that and goes over and nudges them. I’ve seen it with my own eyes.” (Glaberson, 2011). Sometimes the child would need the support to be able to proceed, the dog is able to provide the support without saying anything....   [tags: Therapy, Animals]
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Emotional Release: Benefits of Art Therapy  - ... As the art show starts, patients of the Children’s Advocacy Center admire their art pieces in the exhibit. Art instructor Dan Mish provides intervention, prevention, and treatment services to abused children. One of her patients, a little girl who suffered from sexual abuse, broke down in tears during the final days of the classes. Mish explains that one year ago when this girl began her art therapy program, she drew a self-portrait with sad eyes peeked from behind prison like bars. Her last picture of herself at this art show was her with a big smile and long lashes....   [tags: Art Therapy]
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Massage Therapy - Massage Therapy The practice of massage therapy is rapidly growing in the United States. It has numerous benefits to offer and is becoming more widely accepted as a medical practice by doctors and the general public. Massage is defined as: …the systematic manual or mechanical manipulations of the soft tissues of the body by such movements as rubbing, kneading, pressing, rolling, slapping, and tapping, for therapeutic purposes such as promoting circulation of the blood and lymph, relaxation of muscles, relief from pain, restoration of metabolic balance, and other benefits both physical and mental (Beck 3)....   [tags: Massage Therapy Essays]
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Mechanism of Transfer in Gene Therapy - Mechanism of Transfer in Gene Therapy Abstract: Gene therapy is the transfer of “normal” genes into the body to replace defective or undesired genes. The transfer may be in somatic or germline cells and may take place in vivo or in vitro. The DNA may be inserted in a retrovirus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, herpes simplex virus, or liposome, or it may be naked DNA. The vector travels to a target cell and inserts the gene, which goes to the host cell’s nucleus and may integrate into the genome....   [tags: Gene Therapy]
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A Career in Massage Therapy - Massage Therapy What kind of career is Massage Therapy. A very interesting and productive career which I would enjoy pursuing. Some reasons that this would be a good career for me are that it pays well, education is not extensive, it helps others, and it is something I am good at and enjoy doing. There are as many options when it comes to a career in massage as there are people in the field. It can be a full or part-time occupation. There are a variety of places to do massage, many kinds of massage to do, and many different types of patients....   [tags: Massage Therapy]
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The Role of Mental Variation in Cognitive Science - The Role of Mental Variation in Cognitive Science ABSTRACT: What is the role of mental variation in cognitive science. I will attempt to answer this question by dividing it into two separate questions: (1) what role does mental variation already (or implicitly) play in cognitive science. and (2) would cognitive science benefit by inquiring (explicitly) into the role of mental variation. I will attempt to show that mental variation already plays an important (though not always explicit) role in cognitive science....   [tags: Cognitive Sciences Scientific Essays]
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