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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Ellis became dissatisfied with practicing traditional psychoanalysis and psychotherapy and began to focus more on philosophical beliefs including those that clients could change self defeating behaviors by changing their point of view (p333. Sharf, 2012). Ellis was the first to connect the impact of thoughts as they relate to behaviors when he published in 1962, Reason and Emotion in Psychotherapy (Walsh, 2010). Ellis's work asserted that an individual's underlying thinking about him or herself directly effected his/her behavior, and as a therapist, his goal was to help the client become more reasonable in thought, and ultimately in the followed behaviors....   [tags: Psychology, Rational Behavioral Therapy] 2449 words
(7 pages)
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Cognitive Behavior Therapy For PTSD - ... M. Rauch and Shawn P. Cahill’s article “Treatment and Prevention of Post traumatic Stress Disorder”, psychological debriefing is applied immediately after a traumatic event; usually 48-72 hours later (2003). It is a very brief intervention consisting of one or two sessions that includes a discussion of the facts surrounding the event. The individual’s cognitive thoughts are also assessed and discussed. This allows the individual an opportunity to express any thoughts they may have about the event and a chance to plan on how to cope with what happened (Rauch & Cahill, 2003)....   [tags: Therapy]
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Person Centered Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - ... It was originally developed to treat depression and anxiety but is now used for many different disorders. It is a very effective type of therapy because it is time limited. The amount of sessions is usually between four and fourteen. CBT focuses on schemas or core beliefs which are usually negative thoughts like “I’m worthless” or “I’m not loveable” (Beck, 1970). In order to treat cognitive distortions the negative thoughts need to be addressed. First, the individual needs to “recognize idiosyncratic cognitions”....   [tags: Therapy/Rehabilitation]
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The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy - ... It helps the client show the actual situation by focusing on facts. The therapist uses an inductive method to help the client determine the elements that upset him. For support, the therapist can also introduce homework to the patient or client (Alexander, 2007). In general a lot can be said about the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy but almost all literature states a positive effect for this kind of therapy. The effectiveness holds for both clinical and non clinical settings. It hold also for people of all ages, although differences in how people react to the therapy can be contributed partially to the age of the person....   [tags: Health, Treatment] 2559 words
(7.3 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... There are several forms of cognitive behavioral therapy such as: rational emotive therapy, cognitive therapy, and multimodal therapy” (Dobson and Dozois - Paraphrase). There are multiple components of cognitive behavioral therapy. People develop faulty beliefs throughout trials in life. Thoughts and feelings can become a dysfunctional part of a person’s character. Faulty belief systems can affect a person’s life in a multitude of ways. Faulty belief systems can develop into problematic behaviors that negatively affect a person’s relationships with family, friends as well a person’s work relationships....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Depression - ... Cognitive behavioral therapy combines techniques of behavior modification into a cognitive reconstructive approach. Beck combined his own understanding and observation of schema with Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalysis to further develop the cognitive behavioral theory. He also developed the “Beck Hopelessness Scale, Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation, Beck Youth Inventories and Beck Anxiety Inventory to treat different mental disorders.” (whitfield, 2007). His methods are highly used throughout the clinical world....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... (Stress Inoculation Therapy) and David Burns, M.D. David Burns, M.D. popularized CBT with his 1980's best-selling book, Feeling Good. More recently, cognitive-behavioral therapy has been influenced by the work of Aldo Pucci, Psy.D. (Rational Living Therapy), Michael Mahoney, Ph.D., Marsha Linehan, Ph.D., and Arthur Freeman, Ed.D.” (National Association of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy 2011) Cognitive Behavior therapy is not a distinct therapeutic technique it is actually a mix of approaches that have the following characteristics, its based on the cognitive model of emotional response, its briefer and time limited, it’s a collaborative effort between the therapist and client, some is based on aspects on stoic philosophy, (Beck’s is not)....   [tags: Counseling ]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Effectiveness - ... According to Amaya et al. (2011) forty-seven percent of the participants were female and 83% were Caucasian. The methods of this study were similar to Jacob et al. (2010) study because the sample was conducted from the same national study. Data from the TADS indicated that unhealthy family functioning has a negative impact on acute treatment outcome of adolescents’ depression, and these effects were greater among youth who received CBT than for fluoxetine or a combination of CBT and fluoxetine (Amaya et al., 2011)....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Depression - ... Cognitive appraisal is another approach in which the patient evaluates circumstances and situations while reinforcing the fact that our emotions are based on perception of a situation (Anaparti, 2010). Rumination Another behavior effecting depression sufferers is called rumination. Rumination is a “style of thinking in which, like a hamster in a cage, you run in tight circles on a treadmill in your brain. It means obsessing about problems, about a loss, about any kind of a setback or ambiguity without moving past thought into the realm of action” (McGrath, 2003, para....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy For Bulimia Nervosa - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy For Bulimia Nervosa INTRODUCTION Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating as well as by self-induced vomiting and/or laxative abuse (Mitchell, 1986). Episodes of overeating typically alternate with attempts to diet, although the eating habits of bulimics and their methods of weight control vary (Fairburn et al., 1986). The majority of bulimics have a body weight within the normal range for their height, build, and age, and yet possess intense and prominent concerns about their shape and weight (Fairburn et al., 1986)....   [tags: Eating Disorders Medical Treatment Essays]
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The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy - The Clinical Application of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is based on the concept that behavior change may be achieved through altering cognitive processes. The assumption underlying the cognitively based therapeutic techniques is that maladaptive cognitive processes lead to maladaptive behaviors and changing these processes can lead to behavior modification. According to Mahoney (1995), an individual's cognitions are viewed as covert behaviors, subject to the same laws of learning as overt behaviors....   [tags: Papers] 2421 words
(6.9 pages)
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Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Key points: There were several key points described in this chapter that validated psychosocial treatments. This analysis will only focus on the discussion of the research study that focused on the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bipolar affective disorder. This chapter discussed a study of twenty-eight people (Cochran, 1984) who received outpatient CBT for a bipolar disorder diagnosis. The study was designed to change the way half of the participants (14) would think and behave so that they would better comply with their medication regime....   [tags: Papers] 5098 words
(14.6 pages)
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COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF ADHD - ... The therapist will look at the problem area, and better ways of dealing with the situations. It is hands on and needs commitment because you have to carry it through between sessions. It helps retrain the way the child thinks. It is most helpful in aiding in self esteem and relationship difficulties. Most sessions are one hour per week and require six to twenty sessions varying per persons needs. CBT can teach things like how to solve problems, make lists and use them, use calendars and to list distractions instead of focusing on them....   [tags: Medical Research]
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Beck in the 1960s. As defined by Emery & Tracy (1987), CBT is “a series of strategies that relieve psychological suffering by correcting distorted and maladaptive thinking. The therapy is based on a theory of psychopathology that recognises the reciprocal interrelationship among the cognitive, behavioural, somatic and emotional systems”. Although CBT is often referred to as a unitary treatment, it is actually a diverse collection of complex and subtle interventions that must each be mastered and understood from the social learning perspective (Reinecke, Dattilio, & Freeman, 2003)....   [tags: Psychology, Depression, Mental Disorder] 594 words
(1.7 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Two of these will be described in detail. Behavioural strategy consists of two parts: activity scheduling and graded task assignment. Activity scheduling in CBT for depression is one of the core therapeutic methods. (Beck et al., 1979). The Weekly Activity Schedule (WAS) is an essential tool for activity scheduling. Basically it is a simple timetable with the slot for every hour of every day. The first step in activity scheduling is as a self-monitoring tool starting to use WAS, then the therapist can gather the information about the patient’s activity....   [tags: Psychology, Depression, Anxiety] 1070 words
(3.1 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Management of Anorexia - ... Therapeutic Process The Cognitive Behavior Therapy for anorexic individuals involves several steps. As with many therapeutic processes, assessment is usually the initial step. During this stage of treatment objective and subjective symptoms are noted. After a definitive diagnosis of AN, families must work to acknowledge the characteristics and origin of the disorder. This is deemed as part of the treatment process and often entails that work is done outside of clinical sessions. (Treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa....   [tags: Diseases/Disorders]
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Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral, and Reality Theories - ... The cognitive behavioral therapy is founded on several characteristics that involve multimodal therapy and behavioral changes. Most of the behavioral therapists consider their work dynamic because they address different problems among different clients. Anxiety disorder is one of the disorders addressed through cognitive behavioral therapy. In addition, this approach addresses several characteristics, one of them being cognitive development. Phobia, anxiety and other socials problems are also addressed through this process....   [tags: Psychology]
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The Integration of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... Clinicians use three important techniques when working on resolving the client’s current depressive episode: role-play, encouraging affect, and communication analysis. Role-playing is used as a way to change the client’s behavior, and to uncover the client’s communication style. Once the client can see the ways in which they communicate ineffectively, they can work on new communication strategies in role-plays with the therapist. For example, if during role-plays the client discovers they are passive aggressive during fights with their partner, they can act out fights with the therapist and try different ways to communicate that change the outcome of the fight....   [tags: Psychology]
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Brief Therapy - ... Changing the mind, leading the client to solutions through specific questioning techniques will allow the client to formulate ideas. "Furthermore, Selekman believed there are assumptions that benefit those who deal with resistant adolescents and their families. The assumptions are extremely practical and provide therapists a new lens for viewing the tough adolescent case. Each of the guiding assumptions provides a wellness perspective on adolescent problems, families, and brief therapy. Matching our treatment to the state of change will foster a cooperative relationship....   [tags: Counseling/Therapy]
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The Road Through Music Therapy - Upon many different techniques of health restorations music therapy has been known to have a great effect on people. This therapy reduces physical, emotional, and mental pain. Stretching a hand to those who are battling against cancer, or to those who have last someone close and are now dealing with depression and suicide thoughts. Those who have dedicate their lives into educating them selves for music therapy have a desire to help those who are in need, combining with a compassionate personality....   [tags: Music Therapy] 1110 words
(3.2 pages)
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy And Exposure With Response Prevention In The Treatment Of Bulimia Nervosa - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy And Exposure With Response Prevention In The Treatment Of Bulimia Nervosa Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder with psychological, physiological, developmental, and cultural components. The disorder is commonly characterized by binge eating followed by inappropriate compensatory behaviors, such as self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, fasting, and the misuse of diuretics, laxatives or enemas. Patients properly diagnosed with bulimia nervosa endure many psychological and physiological problems....   [tags: Eating Disorder Weight Health Essays]
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Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy - ... With the irrational thoughts laid out in front of the client, the therapist can begin asking questions like, “are these thoughts true to the best of my knowledge?” and “does it help me to think like this.” When these questions are answered some irrational thoughts should come to surface and those can be changed into rational thinking and therefore change thoughts from unhealthy to healthy, from irrational to rational. Once rational thoughts have been realized the therapist should challenge the client to begin examining their interpretation of negative events that occur in their life in hopes that rational thoughts occur rather than irrational ones....   [tags: Therapy/Counseling]
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Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Sexually Abused Children - ... Working with a child who has experienced a traumatic event can be difficult for even the most competent parents. The parenting skills included in TF-CBT have been found to be effective in helping parents with their child’s behavior problems (Cohen, Deblinger, Mannarino, & Steer, 2004). TF-CBT components include Psychoeducation, Parenting skills, Relaxation skills, Affective modulation skills, Cognitive coping skills, Trauma narrative and cognitive processing of the traumatic events (Cohen 2008)....   [tags: Psychology, argumentative, persuasive]
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The Integration of Cognitive and Behavior Therapy - ... Cognitive-behavioral therapy by far does not in any way tell people how they should feel. In other words, it is not the stimulus itself which somehow elicits an emotional response directly, but our evaluation of or thought about that stimulus. However, when most people seek this type of therapy, they want to rid themselves of the ways they have been feeling. CBT also puts emphasis on the fact that we have our undesirable situations whether we allow them to upset us or not. Basically saying that if we are upset about our problems, we then have two problems: #1 the original problem, and #2 ourselves being upset about it....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Group Therapy - ... The relationship between therapist and client is collaborative and caring. Goals are set by the client with the help of the therapist. The therapy is very goal-orientated and specific. They then work together to assess and then change faulty beliefs that interfere with accomplishing these set goals. The basic goal is to remove biases or distortions that hinder the client from functioning effectively. Changing cognitive schemas can be done in three different ways; reinterpretation, modification, and restructuring....   [tags: Psychology]
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The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Treating Depression - ... There is considerable opposition to this viewpoint, particularly from proponents of other methods of counselling, such as pyschodynamic or person centred therapists (Wake 2007). Now we will go on to look at specific research papers that have been selected for this literature review. Before doing that though it is worth mentioning that some of these studies look at specific demographics in their studies. The IAPT scheme does not discriminate against any particular groups, and it’s recommendations are to cover all ages, ethnicities and genders....   [tags: Psychology] 2035 words
(5.8 pages)
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Behavioral Therapy - ... He contributed to our awareness of the unconscious, hypnosis and the relationship between psychology and health. At the very least, he has contributed his inquisitiveness and modeled his stance as a scientist and practitioner in undertaking to improve the qualities of the lives of others. Such qualities have thankfully become the hallmark of prominent practitioners of psychology today. Above all Mesmer opened the way for people to understand the power of the imagination in therapy (Kroger, 2008)....   [tags: Psychology, Illness, Hypnosis , Pain] 1841 words
(5.3 pages)
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Advantages of Employing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - ... be: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and have a Time farm (a date for completion) (Beck et al, 1979). Examples of the real life experience will clarify the situation. For example, if patient suffers from depression, the therapist would ask he/she to describe exactly how he/ she feels and how this problem has affected his/her life. It helps the patient identify the underlying reason to why certain behaviours occur or why the feelings are there. Compared to most psychological therapeutic approaches, CBT is more structured (Brewin, 1996).For example in the beginning of each session the therapist and patient would set an agenda for what they should do in the session and they would try to stick to it....   [tags: Psychology, Anxiety] 866 words
(2.5 pages)
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A Look at Human Behavior: Cognitive-Behavioral Frame of Reference - ... While behavioral theory suggests that behavior is elicited by learned consequences or by modeling actions based on another individual’s behavior, social learning theory views behavior as the determinant of the consequences or response. The way an individual reacts to and perceives an environment affects the environment as much as the environment affects them. In social learning theory, it is the “correlation rather than the pairing of events that determines behavior” (Bruce & Borg, 2002). Social learning theory also suggests that cognition plays a role in modeling behavior....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder - ... The therapist’s role, in prolonged exposure, is to help the client identify “hot spots” or the most distressing aspect of the memory. The therapist and the client then develop a hierarchy of memories to address, from least to most distressing. These memories are addressed one at a time until habituation of anxiety to the memory occurs, which is determined by the decreases reported in subjective distress (McDonagh, et al., 2005). Although the empirical research has supported the efficacy of prolonged exposure for PTSD (Foa et al., 1999;Roman, 2010), there is currently a considerable debate in regards to the change mechanisms that operate during prolonged exposure (Harvey, Bryant, & Tarrier, 2003)....   [tags: Health Care, Anxiety Disorder, Treatment] 1531 words
(4.4 pages)
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children - ... The literature reveals that sleep related issues as a result of PTSD affects as many as 70% of those individuals with the condition (Ohayon & Shapiro, 2000). In a study that examined whether sleeping disturbances including insomnia and nightmares persisted after competition of CBT for PTSD, Zayfert & DeViva (2004) concluded that a significant portion (48%) of this sample of remitted PTSD patients reported persisting insomnia sufficient to be coded as a symptom, where for the majority of patients, the insomnia remained severe....   [tags: Child Psychology ]
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Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Psychodynamic Theory - ... This was mostly applied with cases dealing with anxiety disorders or phobias. After this method of work was surfaced it was apparent that it only dealt with the surfaced symptoms and problems, it did not face or deal with the underlying issues that may have caused this behaviour in the first place. Aaron Beck evolved this theory into Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in the 1960s (Payne, 2005). This was initially a short-term solution for disorders such as depression aimed toward solving the current problem and then changing the way the client thinks about it and in turn changing their behaviour also....   [tags: Psychology]
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Psychotherapy - ... CBT is open to using techniques from other approaches that fit the needs of the client, and the empirically validated techniques of CBT, when individualized for the client, work well in other approaches (Corey, 2009). These aspects of CBT make it a useful approach that can be adapted for individuals from different cultural and economic backgrounds (Corey, 2009; Kellogg & Young, 2008). In general, CBT is a structured approach and includes techniques and outcomes (e.g., behavior changes) that are easily measured, which provides it with a substantial amount of empirical support (Corey, 2009)....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy] 941 words
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Psychotherapy - ... CBT is open to using techniques from other approaches that fit the needs of the client, and the empirically validated techniques of CBT, when individualized for the client, work well in other approaches (Corey, 2009). Overall, CBT is a structured approach that emphasizes learning, empowerment, brevity, and focusing on the individual. These aspects of CBT make it a useful approach that can be adapted for individuals from different cultural and economic backgrounds (Corey, 2009; Kellogg & Young, 2008)....   [tags: Psychology, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy] 1037 words
(3 pages)
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Forgiveness Therapy - ... Although the title is specific, concise and provides a theory, it does not supply the reader with results. Also, the authors have presented an appropriate title free of yes-no question and jargons (Pyrczak 2008, pg17). Critique of the Abstract According to Pyrczak, presents a summary of a research report. The summary is a brief description of the entire article conduced to approximately 100 to 220 words. The abstract of this article, Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Anger, Mood, and Vulnerability to Substance Use Among Inpatient Substance-Dependent Clients, gives the purpose of the study....   [tags: Article Analysis ]
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Music Therapy - Music Therapy During the past thirty years, concepts in the mental health profession have undergone continuous and dramatic changes. A relatively new type of therapy is musical therapy, which incorporates music into the healing process. Music therapy also is changing, and its concepts, procedures, and practices need constant reevaluation in order to meet new concepts of psychiatric treatment. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato....   [tags: Papers] 1432 words
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Horse Therapy - There are a few different types of therapy that uses horses. Hippotherapy means- “treatment with the help of a horse” (Naomi Scott). The word hippo is used because this term is derived from the greek word hippo which means horse. “Hippotherapy is generally indicated for children and adults with mild to severe neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction.” (Naomi Scott). This type of therapy uses the horses motion to improve on the neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction of the patient. These dysfunctions can include “abnormal muscle tone., impaired balance responses, impaired coordination, impaired communication, impaired sensorimotor function, postural asymmetry, poor postural control, decreased mobility, and limbic system issues related to arousal, motivation, and attention....   [tags: Psychology ] 1133 words
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Cinderella In Therapy - Cinderella in Therapy In the movie “Cinderella,” Cinderella is a maid to an evil stepmother and two very heartless and obnoxious stepsisters. The only reason that Cinderella still puts up with their orders is an example of the Behavioral perspective. The Behavioral Perspective puts emphasis on learning by experience with rewards and punishments. She knows that if she does not do the chores, she will be punished or thrown out of the household. She does not have anywhere to go because her mother and father have passed away....   [tags: essays research papers] 661 words
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Behavioral Treatment Programs for Methamphetamine Addiction - ... The actual treatment involves life skill training, prevention of relapse, and 12 step oriented programs that assist the clients. The protocol also includes random drug testing throughout the program. The clients also learn about and develop vocational skills. The program is immensely intensive and provides structure with the clients attending the program up to five hours per day. This usually lasts about the first twelve weeks. Then it is gradually reduced, but the timeframe of the program could last up to a year....   [tags: Drugs]
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Major Forms of Therapy - Therapy has long been thought of as taboo. In this paper, I will discuss the major forms of therapy and their characteristics along with the strategies that are also used. This essay will also cover examples of each disorder and show which therapeutic method is best used in caring for individual(s). Psychological Disorders have been around for centuries, back then they did not know how to treat various disorders. Throughout much of human history, people linked abnormal behavior to witchcraft....   [tags: Psychology ]
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Effection Depression Therapy - The variable mix is age, between the ages of 18 and 65, level and diagnosis of unipolar depression, occupation, stress level, race, cognitive issues (I.Q.), adequate or inadequate sleep, physical limitations, previous knowledge of study, type of questionnaires given, whether cooperative, patient/counselor relationship, and other extraneous variables not mentioned therein. These are purposeful sampling requirements with this qualitative study using specific case studies with patients with unipolar depression....   [tags: Research Analysis ]
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Person-Centered Therapy - ... Since the client has made the request and is clear that he wants the therapist to provide suggestions the therapist might propose a homework assignment that involves having the client identify their thoughts that occur right before they feel angry. It is important that counselors do not suggest such interventions due to their frustrations with the clients’ progress but rather after their clients have made requests for such interventions known (Tursi & Cochran, 2006). CBT homework can be a helpful addition to the person-centered framework and the counselor can still work in a traditional person-centered approach within sessions by maintaining a focus on providing deep, genuine empathy and unconditional positive regard....   [tags: Psychology, Rogers, Informative] 2572 words
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Offender Classification and Therapy - ... No longer are risks assessments conducted solely for the institutionalized but also are used to foresee new transgressions with needs that are similarly elements of offender risks (Van Voorhis et al., 2009). The new models are used in a way that allows for scores to change over time by assessing offenders with criteria that is subject to change over time. Technology is also more widely used for assessment in what is considered the third generation. The purpose of current models is to not only assess offender recidivism, but also to suggest possible treatment options such as cognitive-behavioral therapies....   [tags: Social Studies]
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy - ... The process helps the individual accept the situation as it is for now because eventually the feeling will change. For example, if a person is disturbed by events of their past then he/she first has to admit that the event took place and the feelings associated with that will eventually go away. “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things that I can; and the wisdom to know the difference. This statement is the best application of ACT. First step is to identify areas in one’s life that can and cannot be change....   [tags: Psychology]
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Cognitive Research and Reasons Schizophrenics Have Auditory Hallucinations - Cognitive Research and Reasons Schizophrenics Have Auditory Hallucinations Schizophrenia is a common illness. "Schizo", Latin for "split" and "phrenic", "mind" describes the split from reality experienced by the schizophrenic mind. The personality loses it unity and wholeness as a result of unorganized, incoherent thinking, shifting emotional moods and strange perceptions. It has approximately 1-% population prevalence in all cultures....   [tags: essays research papers] 2157 words
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The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety - ... (2008) performed a pilot study on the efficacy of seated massage on stress, aggression level, and anxiety of young adults in an inpatient psychiatric setting. In non-blind non-randomized study, 15 to 25 year-old psychiatric patients received a 20-minute massage while seated in a special chair. Gardener et al. (2008) found 60% of the patients responded favorably and exhibited less aggression and reported less anxiety. Although they found MT to be helpful in treating the aggression and anxiety, based on the method of the study and the small sample size discretion is needed when interpreting the findings....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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Bulimia Nervosa: The Disease, Diagnosis and Therapy - Bulimia, known as Bulimia Nervosa, is a deadly eating disorder in which an individual believes they are fat or overweight. Those individuals lose weight through unhealthy and dangerous methods. The overall desire to be thin and accepted appears to be the main cause of Bulimia. The attitudes about diet and appearance expressed by parents can be a factor. Teens may temporarily become slightly overweight and parents who react negatively may cause their children to become fearful or anxious about the way they look....   [tags: Diet, Nursing, Eating Disorders, Weight, Medical] 876 words
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Discussing the Four Main Methods of Psycho Therapy - Have you ever needed to conduct psycho therapy on someone but you didn’t know how. Fear no more, because I am about to tell you about the 4 main methods of therapy, which will let you help your friends and relatives in ways that you never thought possible before. The four types of therapy I will be talking about today are psychoanalytical, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral. You may want to determine what method best suits you, or what method will best suit the situation you or your friend is faced with....   [tags: psychology, mental health] 775 words
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Roger’s Theory as compared to that of Ellis’ Theory - ... Irrational beliefs are unhealthy, negative emotions in the conscious that clouds your judgment in yourself, others and the environment. According to REBT therapists, only hard work and practice can make rational beliefs. Rational beliefs represents reasonable, flexible, and constructive conclusion about reality. As Rogers’ and Ellis’ both established “core conditions” in their theories. Rogers argued that each component is essential for therapeutic change; on the other hand, Ellis believed that therapeutic change can take place in the absence of these conditions....   [tags: Psychology, Therapy] 957 words
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The Grinch - ... Another pro that I feel would be good for this therapy when working with the Grinch would be free association. In this area clients are urged to open up and say whatever comes to mind regardless of how painful or hurtful this may be. Corey (2009) goes into the term death instincts in his reading that say says “at times, people manifest through their behaviors an unconscious wish t die or to hurt themselves or others. Managing this aggressive drive is a challenge to the human race” (pg. 61)....   [tags: Psychoanalysis Therapy, Video] 1439 words
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The Theories of Albert Bandura - The Theories of Albert Bandura Albert Bandura was influenced by behaviorism while at the University of Iowa studying for his PhD in the early 1950s, he developed his own theories called reciprocal determinism, he believed that not only does the environment influence behavior, but behavior influences the environment, or to put it in his own words ’the world and a persons behavior cause each other‘. Bandura is often considered a ‘father’ of the cognitive movement, he looked at personality as three things that interact, the environment, behaviour and the person’s psychological processes....   [tags: Behaviorism Behavioral Psychology]
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The Most Effective Form of Treatment For People With OCD - ... Compulsions on the other hand are a ritual a person performs to try to get rid of or counteract their obsessive thoughts. Compulsive rituals will RUNNING HEAD: MOST EFFECTIVE FORM relieve some of the anxiety but only temporarily then the obsessions return and unfortunately, compulsions only end up reinforcing the symptoms. There are several common obsessions and compulsions that people experience. The fear of contamination is one of the biggest obsessions. Suffers often fear becoming contaminated and contracting diseases such as AIDS....   [tags: Psychology]
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Strokes - Strokes Neurologic clinics: Provides an overview of stroke rehabilitation covering patient management in the acute, subacute, and chronic phases of poststroke treatment. Cognitive, behavioral, and functional assessment in the subacute poststroke phase is discussed, neuropsychiatric problems occurring during this phase are identified, and cognitive deficits and perceptual deficits encountered during occupational therapy are described. Speech, recreational, and music therapy and social support services are also considered....   [tags: Papers] 785 words
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Psycho Dynamic Psychology - The psycho dynamic approach is a form of depth psychology, the objective of this technique for the psychotherapist is to open up the unconscious content of the mind in order to treat the psychic anxiety of the patient. Even though this method stems from the psychoanalysis it is a smaller amount comprehensive technique. The humanistic/existential approach associated with the conviction that human beings are alone in this world, for the reason of this belief is that a person may perhaps feel a sense of meaningless, this roundabout approach does offers positive growth, the opportunity for the patient to recognize his or her problems furthermore encourages themselves to create his or her own values in addition to meanings and to make changes....   [tags: Psychology]
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Binge Eating in Bulimia Nervosa - Binge Eating in Bulimia Nervosa In our Western society, we have several different types of eating dysfunction, all of which are unique and tragic in their own right. Despite their individuality, however, they all have several overlapping symptoms that are key to their classification and severity. For Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED), one of the core features is binge eating, which can be defined objectively by number of calories eaten in a given time or subjectively by the feelings of the binger....   [tags: Causes of Bulimia, Eating Disorders]
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Recreational Therapists - ... Bureau of Labor Statistics. 17 Dec. 2009. Web. 21 Feb. 2011. <http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos082.htm>. ) “There are more than 100 academic programs that prepare students to become recreational therapists. Most offer bachelor's degrees, although some offer associate’s, master's, or doctoral degrees..” ("Recreational Therapists." U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 17 Dec. 2009. Web. 21 Feb. 2011. <http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos082.htm>. ) Along with a bachelor's in recreational therapy, prospective3 therapists, may study human anatomy, or perhaps abnormal psychology....   [tags: Career Research ]
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Diagnosing the Bipolar Disorders - Bipolar disorder, or manic-depressive disorder, is a disorder characterized by extreme mood changes. A person suffering from this disorder can go from being energetic and outgoing to feeling worthless and irritated anywhere between a few days to a couple of months, or even years. Diagnosis, treatment, and the dramatic changes cause a threat to the victim. People with bipolar disorder may try to kill themselves or engage in reckless behaviors depending on which stage they are in (Hassel et al 2009.)....   [tags: bipolar disorder, psychology, ] 1299 words
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Literature Review of "Interventions Used to Help with Emotional Eating" - ... There are distinct goals used for the multimodal therapy for overeating which includes “acquisition of behavioral and cognitive behavioral weigh loss skills, insight into the function of the individual’s eating problem, and development of emotional need fulfillment strategies” (Kilmartin & Robbins, 1987). This can be done by developing plans for dealing with weight loss and the related developmental, social, and emotional issues. The multimodal therapy approach is usually conducted in a three-phase model for conceptualizing treatment that is similar to McCullough’s (1984) model....   [tags: Literature Review]
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Social Anxiety Disorder - Social Anxiety Disorder "Social Anxiety Disorder/Social Phobia: The Least Understood Anxiety Disorder" By Thomas A. Richards, Ph.D., Psychologist PURPOSE: In my opinion the author of this article has expressed two reasons for writing the article. First, he explains the symptoms and diagnoses of social anxiety disorder and how it relates to humans. Secondly, he illustrates some of the possible treatments or ways to live with what he titles "The Least Understood Anxiety Disorder." SUMMARY: Social anxiety disorder or Social phobia, as called by some, is labeled by Richards as the fear of public interaction with other people for feelings of criticism or self-consciousness....   [tags: Papers] 364 words
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Insomnia - ... “Progressive muscle relaxation, paradoxical intention, and biofeedback are 3 treatments that have the next best scientific evidence for effectiveness, while sleep restriction and multi component cognitive behavioral therapy are recommended as options” (Fogel, 2003). Centering on sleep hygiene and single component cognitive therapy may also be successful, but these approaches do not presently have adequate scientific evidence to recommend them as evidence-based treatment. This is due to the inadequate number of clinical trials studying the effectiveness of these treatments alone, without their being part of any collective treatment regimen (Fogel, 2003)....   [tags: Health, Sleeping Medication] 2497 words
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The War on Drugs - ... & Lester, D. 2009) Another step in the social learning model is group sessions which are also beneficial to treatment of addicts. Surrounded by people who support and understand an addict is crucial for an addict’s treatment. Groups tend to hold each other accountable, which teaches responsibility to offenders. Peer groups also steer addicts from “hanging around” the same crowd that could lead to the same destructive pattern. Programs that involved the social learning model are financially responsible, and could save tax payers money....   [tags: Drugs ]
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Short-term or Brief CounselingTherapy and the Current Mental Health System - Short-term or Brief CounselingTherapy and the Current Mental Health System Abstract “Short-term” or “Brief Counseling/Therapy” and the current mental health system seem to be inexorably linked for at least the foreseeable future. This paper discusses the history, objectives, appropriate clientele, efficacy, and the other benefits, and short comings, of this therapeutic/counseling modality and its relevance to my present career direction, College Counseling....   [tags: Papers] 3043 words
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Anorexia Nervosa - ... This has significant ethical and legal implications for counselors who may not be aware of this obligation to protect. Although there is a debate about involuntarily hospitalizing clients with anorexia, this is a necessary action for clients whose behavior places them at extreme risk of death. According to Werth et al. (2003), counselors should be aware of high-risk behaviors and factors that contribute to the steady decline of the client’s health. These indicators include a BMI below 15, serious medical conditions, an imbalance in electrolytes, comorbid psychiatric conditions, and previous hospitalizations (Werth et al., 2003, p....   [tags: Disease/Disorders]
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Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - ... Cognitive behavioral therapy has been found to have highly effective and can provide tools that can be carried on into the clients day to day lives. Pharmacotherapy, which is treating the disorder with medication, is commonly used route of choice. It is believe that PTSD is linked to extreme alterations in many psychobiological systems that have evolved for coping adaption, and survival (Foa, Keane, & Friedman, 2000, p. 84). According to Foa, Keane, and Friedman (2000), some of the abnormalities that could possibly be associated are: Adrenergic hyperreactivity appears t o be associated with hyper-arousal, reexperiencing, panic/anxiety symptoms, and probably associated with dissociation and rage/ aggression....   [tags: Diseases, Disorders]
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Methods of Treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - ... Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can be treated using various methods and all focus on helping the affected person cope or overcome the traumatic experience through a gradual process. In essence, treatment does not aim at keeping the trauma or the reminder of it at bay; instead, it aims at helping the patient remember and process sensations and emotions that were originally experienced during the event (Smith & Segal, 2011). Besides offering an escape route for the emotions that have accumulated over time, therapy helps in restoring the sense of control in the patient and in reducing the negative impacts of the traumatic memories on the patient’s life....   [tags: Health Care] 918 words
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Obsessive Compulsive DIsorder - ... He also admits that he cannot control these thoughts that come about randomly. Whether or not the patient has existing personality or developmental disorders is unknown. The patient does seem to have normal interpersonal relationships based on the information given. Francis does not have any known physical or medical conditions that may have influenced the above mentioned diagnosis. I believe that this diagnosis describes the patient enough that no other diagnosis can be assigned that accurately embodies the patient's symptoms....   [tags: Psychology]
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Online Psychological Intervention: A Feasible Measure to Reduce Treatment Barriers - ... (2000) compared the responses of participants with and without social anxiety disorder. The most common barriers to treatment as indicated by participants with social anxiety symptoms are uncertainty over where to go for treatment (39%), inability to afford treatment (24.5%), fear of what others might think or say (19.7%), and lack of insurance (16.6%). Fear of what others might think or say is a unique barrier to treatment for social anxiety disorder as it is reported by a significantly higher percentage of people with social anxiety symptoms (19.7%) than those without social anxiety symptoms (6.0%)....   [tags: Psychology]
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Psychology Annotated Bibliography - ... Psychotherapy Research 15(1-2), 25-33. The authors of this article wanted to examine the relationship conditions, outcome, and working alliance significance in process-experiential psychotherapy (PET) and/or (CBT) cognitive behavioral psychotherapy. By examining the bond between a therapist and his client we can further understand how important the role of therapeutic alliance is in treatment outcome. The authors point out that therapeutic alliance plays a major positive impact on the outcome of therapy....   [tags: Bibliography ]
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Sex Offender Treatment: A Literature Review - ... Treatment modules include high, moderate, and low intensity institutional programs, community-based relapse-prevention, individual counseling, and community-based self-help groups (Turner, Bingham & Andrasik , 2000) Programs of moderate intensity are usually institutionally-based, and may last up to five months. Treatment providers are typically psychologists and / or sexologists, employed either through contract or a combination of institutional staff and contract workers. In 2004/2005, there were approximately 350 intermediate intensity treatment spaces available....   [tags: Sex Crimes]
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Treatment Methods for Depression - Depression is mental illnesses characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, despair and worthlessness that interfere with daily functioning and personal relationships. It is an illness caused by an imbalance of the chemicals in the brain. It affects about 19 million people and cost billions in any given year (Ford-Martin). Some of the symptoms of depression are having a hard time focusing, constant crying, and loss of interest or pleasure in ordinary everyday activities, sleep problems, problems with eating and weight (gain or loss)....   [tags: mental illness, psychology, ] 975 words
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The Diagnosis and Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - The Diagnosis and Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder There are many factors to consider in the evaluation and treatment of Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This paper will discuss the strategies that have proven most effective in treating the disorder, including: drug therapy, cognitive therapy, and family-based therapy. It will focus on the benefits of flexibility, emphasizing combination therapy, especially with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT).      Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has become an increasingly familiar disorder within the world of health and medicine....   [tags: OCD Medicine Medical Disorder]
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Psychological Treatment for Eating Disorders - Psychological Treatment for Eating Disorders *Missing Works Cited* Eating disorders have had a substantial affect on today's society. In a recent study of female high school and college students, it was found that 15.4% of these women met the clinical criteria for an eating disorder (Lemberg and Cohn 7). Anorexia and bulimia are the two main eating disorders that these students suffered from. Anorexia is defined as being the cycle of self-starvation and the fear of gaining weight as well as low self-esteem....   [tags: Papers] 783 words
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Juvenile Sex Offenders - ... The boys, who stay an average of 18 months, are either referred by the juvenile justice system or come to the program on the recommendation of family, school or social service agency. Boys who are deemed prone to violent behavior, and those who don't demonstrate a motivation to change, are screened out of the program. Data collected for a 2003 Counterpoint program assessment show that 62% of all the boys were sexually abused themselves, 42% were physically abused, 79% experienced some form of abuse or neglect, and 40% were victims of multiple forms of abuse....   [tags: Sexual Crime, argumentative, persuasive]
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Musical Performance Anxiety - ... Overall, authors found that the behavioral rehearsal subjects did not show improvement in state anxiety or subjective stress, but did demonstrate significant pre- to post-treatment improvements in performance quality and self-statements about their performance anxiety (measured by the Performance Anxiety Self- Statement Scale: PASS). This group also showed improvements in visual signs of anxiety (such as sweaty palms) than did control subjects....   [tags: Psychology]
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Major Depressive Disorder - Major Depressive Disorder or MDD is a very common clinical condition that affects millions of people every year. According to the Agency for Health Care Policy & Research, “ depression is under diagnosed & untreated by most medical doctors, despite the fact that it can almost always be treated successfully. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV); A person who suffers from this disorder must have a depressed mood, or have lost interest in things that would have normally brought them pleasure; for a minimum of two weeks....   [tags: Mental Disorders Psychology]
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The Affects of Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia - ... The SFT group had a positive total weight gain of twenty pounds and the CFT group had a positive total weight gain of eighteen pounds. The conjoined family therapy was not as effective in comparison to separate family treatment. This may be due to the presence of treatment following a possibly aggressive intervention. It may also be related to taking part in conjoined family therapy without consent or desire of the adolescent with the disorder. The conclusions drawn from this study state that separate family therapy was highly effective, and in most cases in which the subject had an improved weight gain allowed them to stay healthy....   [tags: Case Study]
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Treating Schizophrenia - ... These drugs go to the same receptor sites as normal dopamine would do – but because they are not exactly the same as dopamine, they do not have the same effect. Yet because they are at the sites, real dopamine cannot access the sites. (Passer and Smith, 2004) The use of antipsychotic drugs definitely reduces the severity of schizophrenia symptoms, which suggests that the theory that schizophrenia is caused by over activity of the dopamine system is correct. Unfortunately, while the drugs decrease the active symptoms of schizophrenia, such as delusions and hallucinations, they do not decrease the negative symptoms, which include withdrawal and apathy....   [tags: Mental Health ]
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Youth and Family Services - ... But new research indicates that integrated treatment of mental health and substance use disorders may produce better outcomes than those reported in previous research that targeted mental health or SUD alone. There is even a growing international interest in integrated care. Internationally, countries with universal health insurance provide incentives at a national level that may “integrate” treatment by mandating access to and delivery of a broad array of needed treatment services (Libby, A....   [tags: Social Work]
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Psychotherapy for Anorexia Nervosa - Psychotherapy for Anorexia Nervosa What is anorexia. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that consists of self-regulated food restriction in which the person strives for thinness and also involves distortion of the way the person sees his or her own body. An anorexic person weighs less than 85% of their ideal body weight. The prevalence of eating disorders is between .5-1% of women aged 15-40 and about 1/20 of this number occurs in men. Anorexia affects all aspects of an affected person's life including emotional health, physical health, and relationships with others (Shekter-Wolfson et al 5-6)....   [tags: Health Disorders Weight Loss Medical Essays]
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Hypochondriasis as A Mental Disorder - Hypochondriasis as A Mental Disorder Headache = Tumor. Cough = Tuberculosis. Mole = Skin Cancer. Such is the thought process of a hypochodriac. As defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV), hypochondriasis is an unrealistic interpretation of one's bodily sensations as abnormal, leading to the fear and belief that one has a serious disease (1). This preoccupation with having a serious medical condition is one of the somatoform disorders and may be considered more as a symptom than a disease....   [tags: Psychology Disease Illness Essays]
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