Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned over 400 essays for "candide"
<< Previous  1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
Candide - Candide is the illegitimate nephew of a German baron. He grows up in the baron’s castle under the tutelage of the scholar Pangloss, who teaches him that this world is “the best of all possible worlds.” Candide falls in love with the baron’s young daughter, Cunégonde. The baron catches the two kissing and expels Candide from his home. On his own for the first time, Candide is soon conscripted into the army of the Bulgars. He wanders away from camp for a brief walk, and is brutally flogged as a deserter....   [tags: essays research papers] 2034 words
(5.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Candide - Candide Essay Compare/Contrast of 2 Characters Throughout the story of Candide, the author Voltaire uses many of the characters to portray important things in life. The two characters that Voltaire used the most were Candide and Pangloss. Voltaire used these two characters to represent a particular idea or folly that he had about the world. In the story Candide, Voltaire is always portraying his own ideas by using the characters to illustrate his own ideas. Candide and Pangloss represent the main idea of the story, which is Voltaire’s folly of optimism....   [tags: Voltaire] 1305 words
(3.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide - CANDIDE By Voltaire Throughout Candide the author, Voltaire, demonstrates the character’s experiences in a cruel world and his fight to gain happiness. In the beginning Candide expects to achieve happiness without working for his goal and only taking the easy way out of all situations. However, by the end of the book the character realized that to achieve happiness a lot of work, compromises, and sacrifices are necessary. Candide is a person of privilege who began life in the Castle of Westphalia....   [tags: essays research papers] 654 words
(1.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide - CANDIDE Candide was a true believer in Pangloss’ theory that all was well in the world. “Pangloss proved admirably that there is no effect without a cause and that in this best of all possible worlds…things cannot be otherwise for since everything is made for an end, everything is necessarily for the best end. Observe that noses were made to wear spectacles; and so we have spectacles. Legs were visibly instituted to be breeched, and we have breeches.”(p.4) Even though these ideas can be considered illogical in real life....   [tags: essays research papers] 2096 words
(6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Critical Analysis on Voltaire’s Candide, “Eldorado” - The story of Candide, “Eldorado” and what the meaning is, has been one of debate as to what Voltaire was interpreting in the story by some authors. The scene of Eldorado is the visual philosophy of Voltaire’s thoughts of what an ideal society would be. It is a land of richness and where there is a state of being equal in status, rights, belief, and opportunity; it is free of greed, claiming titles or importance, religious strife or contention, and there is no suffering (Mason 55). Eldorado also brings the reader’s attention in its scene to show the bad fortune of realities of cultures beyond its land....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
:: 4 Works Cited
2016 words
(5.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide - Candide is a humorous, far-fetched tale by Voltaire satirizing the optimism accepted by the philosophers of the Age of Enlightenment. Candide looks for true happiness, and his ultimate acceptance of life’s disappointments. He grew up in the Castle of Westphalia and was taught by the greatest philosopher of the province and the whole world, Dr. Pangloss. Dr. Pangloss taught Candide that everything that happens is for the best. Candide is exiled from the castle because of his love for the Baron’s daughter, Cunegonde....   [tags: essays research papers] 481 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Optimistic Philosophy in "Candide" by Voltaire - Why do bad things happen to good people. A question often asked by...well, by just about everyone. It is a frequently asked question that philosophers and religious figures have tried to answer for centuries yet no one can pinpoint the answer. Candide is no doubt Voltaire's response to the answer given by some of the philosophers of his time. The philosophy discussed throughout the novel gives meaning to the story itself and contributes to and carries on throughout the entire story. In the Baron's castle somewhere in Germany the main characters reside for a short time....   [tags: European Literature] 909 words
(2.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Sarcasm about Religion in Voltaire´s Candide - Religion has always been something that has been argued for centuries long ago. Voltaire has never been afraid to clearly speak his opinions on how he sees religion really is. Many have argued whether religion is actual belief or just a lot of hypocrisy from religion towards the world. The way Voltaire portrays religion in Candide it is some belief but mostly hypocrisy due to the secrets being held and all of the lies being told. He was never a big fan of religion and he satires it a lot and reveals what some religion really does....   [tags: Satire, Hypocrisy]
:: 1 Works Cited
873 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide Look at the Spanish (Holy) Inquisition - Voltaire once said, “Of all religions, the Christian [religion] should of course inspire the most tolerance, but until now Christians have been the most intolerant of all men.” The quote was once true for the Catholic Church. Catholics have the ten commandments, one of them being, “Thou shalt not kill.” As long as the commandments are followed, it would guarantee a one way ticket to heaven. However, what if the Catholic Church and the Pope grant permission for thousands of innocent people to be killed or punished just because they have their own beliefs that do not follow those of the Catholic religion....   [tags: Voltaire, Analysis, Christianity, Religion]
:: 9 Works Cited
1693 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Asylum of Optimists in Candide - The Asylum of Optimists "Philosophy consists very largely of one philosopher arguing that all others are jackasses. He usually proves it, and I should add that he also usually proves that he is one himself." US editor H.L. Mencken summed up the majority of Voltaire's Candide in this humorous statement. He stated Voltaire's ideas toward modern philosophy, specifically the Optimism of the philosopher Leibniz. Candide presents the idea that philosophy is useless without application and yet leaves the idea wide open to interpretation....   [tags: European Literature] 536 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide - Francois Marie Arouet de Voltaire’s novella, Candide, incorporates many themes, yet concentrates a direct assault on the ideas of Leibniz and Pope. These two well-known philosophers both held the viewpoint that the world created by God was the best of all possibilities, a world of perfect order and reason. Pope specifically felt that each human being is a part of God’s great and all knowing plan or design for the world. Voltaire had a very opposite point of view in that he saw a world of needless pain and suffering all around him....   [tags: essays research papers] 1646 words
(4.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide - Candide Candide, written by Voltaire during the 18th century is a celebrated novel known for it's strong criticism of the Middle Ages and Enlightenment expressed by Voltaire. During the transformation from the Middle Ages to The Enlightenment, social, religious and political ideas were rejected and emphasis was placed on rationalism. Three examples of this notion that are expressed in Candide are as follows. Social conduct that was normally practiced during the 18th century was thrown out of the window during the Enlightenment....   [tags: European Literature] 583 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Commentary on Candide by Voltaire and Irrational Man by William Barrett - The first item I will be discussing is Candide which is a satire written by the philosopher François Marie Arouet who is known by his pseudonym Voltaire. Candide main characters adapt the idea that everything happens for the best, no matter how bad it is. It talks about a man who falls in love with a woman and after that he goes through a lot of hardships as he travels the world with his many companions. The novelattacks the church through irony and satire, it mentions how the church punishes people for having heretical ideas, which contradicts the aims of the Enlightenment as the latter supports explaining the world through science in a way that separates the ideas from those mentions in th...   [tags: Enlightenment, Philosophers, Science]
:: 1 Works Cited
1416 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Voltaire’s "Candide" - Voltaire’s Candide portrays an exaggerated image of human cruelty and suffering in the world. Specifically, Voltaire criticizes people’s lack of willingness to prevent suffering, and their tendency to accept the idea that there is nothing anyone can do about human outcomes. He upholds his belief that practical ways of solving problems generate improvement. He believes that human indifference and inaction cause suffering to carry on. Voltaire’s believes that naïve optimism, absolute pessimism, cruel indifference, and lack of reason hinder positive and constructive change....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1320 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - Candide, written by Voltaire and published in 1759, is based in the Age of the Enlightenment. Candide is a satiric tale of a virtuous man's search for the truest form of happiness and his ultimate acceptance of life's disappointments. The illegitimate son of the Baron's sister; Candide is raised in the Castle of Westphalia and taught by his friend and philosopher of metaphysico-theologo-cosmolo-nigology, Dr.Pangloss. Candide is abruptly cast out from the castle when he and Lady Cunegonde are found indiscreetly kissing behind a screen....   [tags: Voltaire essays research papers]
:: 1 Works Cited
675 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Candide is a reflection of the philosophical values of the Enlightenment. Voltaire’s novel is a satire of the Old Regime ideologies in which he critiques the political, social, and religious ideals of his time. A common intellectual characteristic of the Enlightenment was anti-feudalism. Philosophers were against the separations in the Old Regime and pushed for equality among human beings. Voltaire parodies the pompousness of the nobility several times throughout his novel....   [tags: Enlightenment Voltaire Essays] 982 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide 3 - I am not too familiar with the events that occurred in this book. It is set back in the times of kings and queens, barons, lords and other titles. The author, Voltaire, who was born Francios-Marie Arouet, was very critical and suspicious of government and officials. He used his writing talens to make fun of them or criticize abuses of the time. In the middle of the 18th century, Voltaire turned against the popular philosophy of &#8220;optimism'; because of a tragic earthquake in Lisbon, Portugal, which killed 30,000 people and did millions of dollars in damage....   [tags: essays research papers] 1061 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Naive Protagonists of Candide and Forrest Gump - The Naive Protagonists of Candide and Forrest Gump      Society can be, and is, corrupt in many different ways. Within our lives we are subject, but not limited to, corruptions within religion, corruptions of morals, and corruption within the government. Voltaire, the author of Candide, and Robert Zemeckis, the director of "Forrest Gump", both use grotesquely naïve protagonists to illustrate their view of the world in which they live. Nevertheless, Candide and Forrest, surrounded by a corrupt society, and bombarded by various character defining events, are able to come to a higher understanding as to their philosophy of life....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 8 Works Cited
3385 words
(9.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
A Comparison of a Hobbsian World and the World of Candide - The Disparity between a Hobbsian World and the World of Candide   In an anarchistic Hobbsian world, man leads a purely selfish existence, perpetually waging war against his fellow men.  In this world Nature subsists as a playing field for evolution: only the strong and cunning survives, and even survival results in life that is "nasty, brutish, and short" (Hobbes).  However, with restraints (that is, government), a Hobbsian world can blossom into society.  According to Hobbes, those who wish to subside from natural anarchy must implicitly surrender some personal freedom in exchange for societal order....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
2250 words
(6.4 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - Candide On November 21, 1694, Francois-Marie Arouet, otherwise known as Voltaire, was born in Paris. The youngest of five, son to Francois and Marie Arouet, Voltaire grew up in a household that had come to know the pleasantries of upper class french society. Marie, his mother, had gained the family access to Louis XIV court through her realtives. Because of Voltaire’s priviledged lineage he was able to study under the Abbe de Chateaneuf, at the Louis-le-Grand Jesuit College in Paris. Voltaire spoke very highly of his Abbe in later years....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1515 words
(4.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - In 1764 Voltaire wrote one of the world's greatest satires, Candide. Candide pokes at much of Europe and attacks simple human follies and frailties. Most of the characters are killed brutally or fiercely hurt for idiotic reasons. The overall message of "Candide" is that every human being has the power to carve out their own destiny. And that each individual is not subject to God's grand plan, or the idea of predestination. Voltaire made his idea of God and divine right clear in Candide....   [tags: essays research papers] 519 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Role of Providence in Candide and Survival in Auschwitz - The Role of Providence in Candide and Survival in Auschwitz Providence is a main theme in Candide, by Voltaire, and Survival in Auschwitz, by Primo Levi. The word providence literally means foresight, but is generally used to denote God’s preserving and governing all things by means of second causes. Voltaire pokes fun at the notion of providence and mocks the philosopher, Liebniz, for his belief that all things that happen are for the very best. Voltaire uses several characters to portray a different point of view, some are supporters of Liebniz’ philosophy, and others are not....   [tags: Papers] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide: a Heroic Diatribe of French Institutions - Francois-Marie d'Arouet, the author known as Voltaire, was perhaps the most influential philosopher of the eighteenth century; he was the most widely read philosopher of the Enlightenment and his criticisms of powerful French institutions seeded the resistance to orthodoxy imbued in the French Revolution that occurred eleven years after his death in seventeen seventy-eight. The Renaissance instilled in Voltaire the virtues of science and a respect for the natural world that forced him to examine the institutions of France from an objective eye....   [tags: European History] 1242 words
(3.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Civilization in Aeschylus' The Orchesteia and Voltaire's Candide - Man’s continual search for a perfect civilization attributes the history of human progress. From Plato to Locke to Marx, man has always sought to order society to provide justice for himself and for his children. In this everlasting quest for perfection and utopia, many writers have suffered the penalties of imprisonment, exile, or even death. In time, most critical writers learned that in order to avoid such brushes with the authorities, they must use imagination, sarcasm and irony, as in satire, and/or use aliases so that their identity remains undisclosed....   [tags: essays research papers] 1440 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Women´s Situation in Early Modern Time: Candide by Francois-Marie Arouet - Francois-marie Arouet, known as Voltaire lived in an age of turmoil. Born in a middle-class family in Paris, Arouet witnessed general public in state of crushing poverty while French aristocracy governs with strict law relentless hierarchy. Meanwhile, the Enlightenment movement spread across Europe and spurred challenges of intellectual ideas, human equality, basic rights, etc. The movement emphasized importance of objectivity and scientific reasoning. Such a mixed environment lent Voltaire multifaceted knowledge of the society....   [tags: woment, french aristocracy, poverty] 1054 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A Comparison of A Modest Proposal, Tartuffe, and Candide - Writers use personality traits and events to change the classical ideals. Majority of the writer's focus is to change people's attitude's. Jonathan Swift, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Moliere, Francois-Marie Arquet de Voltaire use characterization and plot to challenge the themes of the Neo-Classical period. In A Modest Proposal, Jonathan Swift challenges the Neo-classical period by creating a sense of instability in their way of thinking. He attacks the society by carelessly endorsing cannibalism in hopes to help Ireland through their economic crisis....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1124 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Use of Satire in Voltaire’s Candide by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - ... The article states: “Leibniz isn't concerned with the world he observes but with the world his mathematical formula can prove”. Leibniz ignored the problems and flaws in society that were so clearly in front of him because his logic rendered them impossible. This is where the conflict first began to arise between Leibniz and Voltaire. Voltaire believes, as communicated in Candide, that what humans are able to observe directly does not match up with the mathematical formula Leibniz backs so strongly....   [tags: philosophical optimism, god] 760 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Jonathan Swift’s Essay A Modest Proposal, and Voltaire’s Novella, Candide - There are two vastly differing works of literature that employ similar elements of satire, whether the story is long or short, essay or novella. In these two works, the authors bring light to ongoing social, political, and philosophical issues of their time and age. The two works I am referring to are Jonathan Swift’s satirical essay, A Modest Proposal, and Voltaire’s novella, Candide, or Optimism. In both A Modest Proposal and Candide, there is a portrayal of irony, cold logic and reasoning rather than emotion, and misguided philosophy....   [tags: literature, similar elements, genocide]
:: 1 Works Cited
1010 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Love in Aphra Behn’s Oroonko, and Voltaire’s Candide - In Aphra Behn’s Oroonko, and Voltaire’s Candide, love is a subject of prominence; it serves as a starting point for both of these characters. For example, if Candide hadn’t fallen in love with his insatiable beauty, Cunegonde, he would not have been thrown from his home, castle Thunder-Ten-Tronckh, and sent on his dreadful journey across Europe. “The Baron of Thunder-Ten-Tronckh passed by the screen and, talking note of this cause and this effect, drove Candide out of the castle by kicking him vigorously in the backside (Voltaire 356)....   [tags: Feelings, Betrayal]
:: 1 Works Cited
794 words
(2.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Exaggeration of Issues in Society - Exaggeration is something Voltaire Candide, Anonymous writer of Song of Roland, and Jonathan Swift "A Modest Proposal"have in common. In Voltaire's Candide, Candide travels through Europe and South America to understand the meaning of "the best of all possible worlds." In the end Candide decides that the best thing in the world is to "cultivate one's own garden." Song of Roland is about how Ganelon betrayed France which led to the Battle of Roncesvalles. Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal is an essay about how children at the age one should be to sold to butcher shops as meat....   [tags: literary analysis, candide]
:: 3 Works Cited
1109 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Attitude on War Between Swift´s Travels and Voltaire´s Candide - Satirical works cause the reader to delve into the story and search for the message, rather than telling a story straightforwardly like newspaper articles do. Both Swift and Voltaire succeed in using and applying satire to their work in order to explain to the readers the life-hood of the eighteenth century. Even though, their stories might be fictional you can certainly recognize some events that really did happen in the past, for example, the idea of Spanish colonization of the Americas to search for gold, the idea of wars, and many other similarities....   [tags: satirical work, voyages, violence]
:: 2 Works Cited
1057 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide and Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther - Voltaire's Candide and Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther In the literary `movements' of neo-classicism and romanticism, Voltaire's Candide and Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther represent the literary age in which they were written. In the following composition, textual evidence will be provided to demonstrate how each book accurately represents either the neo-classicism age or the romanticism age. Candide and The Sorrows of Young Werther will be examined separately, and then examined together....   [tags: neo-classicism vs romanticism]
:: 2 Works Cited
2108 words
(6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Voltaires Candide Through My Present Day View - The world as I see it is not perfect. In this present day and age there are some people that like to believe that god created a beautiful planet, but I believe the devil should receive some credit for its creation also. One of the world’s greatest satires, Candide by Voltaire, some characters feel the same way that I do. However others do not. Martin, a skeptic thinks this is not “the best of all possible worlds” (“Candide”102), as Dr. Pangloss would say. My present worldview is more close to the view of the eighteenth century character Martin, in the book Candide....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 1 Works Cited
1048 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Comparison of the Ideals of Bronte in Jane Eyre and Voltaire in Candide - The Ideals of Bronte in Jane Eyre and Voltaire in Candide        Subjective novelists tend to use personal attitudes to shape their characters. Whether it be an interjection of opinion here, or an allusion to personal experience there, the beauty of a story lies in the clever disclosure of the author's personality. Charlotte Bronte and Voltaire are no exceptions. Their most notable leading characters, Jane Eyre and Candide, represent direct expressions of the respective author's emotions and impressions....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2667 words
(7.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Old Woman and Miss Cunegund - Candide is a satirical piece written by Voltaire, the great French historian and philosopher during the Age of Enlightenment. There are two contrasting female characters in the literature. Cunegund is the daughter of a baron who experiences unbearable miseries. An unnamed old woman is a servant of Cunegund who was born as a daughter of a Pope. Candide, who is Cunegund’s lover, is also a traveling companion. While Cunegund and the old woman both possess admirable strength, the old woman is pessimistic although realistic, whereas Cunegund is optimistic but impractical....   [tags: Candide, Voltaire, Analysis] 778 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Fate and Free Will in Literature - ... The big picture is that despite all these books being written in different eras with different ideals, they all have that same ambivalence about fate and freewill. And even now, that ambivalence remains. People are unsure of whether we have freewill, or all of our actions are part of a predetermined plan. So, why is it that throughout history and the present, the debate between fate and freewill remains. Predetermined fate is a hard thing to believe in because everyone has a different view on life....   [tags: oedipus rex, candide, macbeth] 758 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A Comparison of the Quest for Enlightenment in Candide and Dream of the Red Chamber - Quest for Enlightenment in Candide and Dream of the Red Chamber      Seventeenth-century Europe saw the end of the Renaissance and ushered in the Neoclassic era. During this period, which is also called the Enlightenment and "The Age of Reason," society advocated rationalism and urged the restraint of emotion. Writers modeled their works after the Greco-Roman satires and picaresque novels. At around the same time in China, the author of Dream of the Red Chamber explores a different kind of enlightenment, whose roots are in religion....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1220 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay Comparing Candide and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Comparing Voltaire's Candide and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein   Voltaire's Candide and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein are classics of western literature, in large part, because they both speak about the situation of being human. However, they are also important because they are both representative of the respective cultural movements during which they were written - the Enlightenment and the Romantic Era. As a result of this inheritance, they have different tones and messages, just as the Enlightenment and Romanticism had different tones and messages....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 1175 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Comparison of Satire in Voltaire's Candide and Gulliver's Travels - A Comparison of the Satire of Candide and Gulliver's Travels An impartial observer has the ability to make the most critical and objective observation on society and the behavior of man. This impartial observer would see the truth as it is. This same premise may be applied to literary works. A naive character or narrator may be used as an impartial observer, who reveals social truths to the audience through his or her naivete. As Maurois has noted, in writing about Candide, by Voltaire," It was novel of apprenticeship, that is, the shaping of an adolescent's ideas by rude contact with the universe" (101)....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2203 words
(6.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
How Voltaire utilizes Candide, Pangloss,and Martin to satirize how blind optimism hinders the perception of reality - Blind optimism has concealed the eyes of human beings from the defects of the world since the age of Enlightenment. Defying the archaic thinking of society, Voltaire searched for practical and useful knowledge to explain the world he lived in. Voltaire mocked philosophers, such as Leibniz ,who believed in the “best of all possible worlds” ,and presupposed that all things happen for a reason rather than convincing himself that good and bad are one and the same( 12). The term blind optimism refers to naievty, or having a tendency to expect the best of all possible outcomes and never accepting conclusions in a negative way....   [tags: Age of Enlightenment, Character Analysis]
:: 1 Works Cited
1262 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Movie Essay - A Comparison of Satire in Voltaire's Candide and the Film Lexx - Satire in Candide and Lexx Voltaire's Candide is a story about a young man learning about the realities of the world; realities he never could have believed to happen in life because his education heavily involves the idea that this is the "best of all worlds." Salter Street Films' Lexx is a story about a group of misfit adventurers and the calamity that befalls them after they steal the Lexx, a Manhattan-sized insect with the ability to destroy planets. Though the two stories have more in common than one might expect, given the difference of medium, much more is different between the two, even with satire present in both The first and most obvious difference between Candide and...   [tags: Movie Film comparison compare contrast] 1098 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing Views on Life in Thoreau’s Walden and Voltaire's Candide - Comparing Views on Life in Thoreau’s Walden and Voltaire's Candide Is the glass half full or half empty. This clichéd measure of optimism versus pessimism describes our society's base understanding of possible outlooks on life. In Candide by Voltaire, ultimately Candide rejects both blind optimism and absolute pessimism. He goes on a quest to discover how to live well, which is the same thing Thoreau prescribes in Walden and Other Writings. For this paper, in accordance with Voltaire and Thoreau, "living well" means aligning one's actions with one's ideals in order to achieve satisfaction....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1123 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Imperialistic Attitude Conveyed in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels and Voltaire’s Candide - One must sometimes wonder what an ideal utopian world would be like. The first things to come to mind would probably rather trivial, such as golden roads, chocolate fountains, etc. However, the underlying core of what a utopian society would be like is one that would have an abundance of two seemingly unknown words, morality and humanity. Morality and humanity would be the greatest grace for any society to have, for any government to be driven by. Sadly, this is usually not, nor has it really ever been, the case....   [tags: utopia, government, Literary Comparison] 1548 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Comparing the Social Criticism of Voltaire's Candide and Samuel Johnson's Rasselas - Comparing the Social Criticism of Voltaire's Candide and Samuel Johnson's Rasselas       Samuel Johnson and Voltaire were both writers of enormous social conscience in the eighteenth century. It is not surprising then to discover that both men wrote short tales dealing primarily with criticism of the human condition. Ironically, these books were written and published within weeks of each other in 1759 (Enright 16). Johnson's Rasselas and Voltaire's Candide are strikingly similar in their use of the episodic and romantic picaresque motifs....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2001 words
(5.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Comapring Naivete and Satire in Jonathan Swifts' Gulliver's Travels and Voltaire's Candide - Naivete and Satire in Jonathan Swifts' Gulliver's Travels and Voltaire's Candide     A child has the ability to make the most critical and objective observation on society and the behavior of man. How is this possible. A child has yet to mature and lacks proper education and experience. However, it is for this very reason that a child would make the perfect social scientist; his or her naivete may provide an excellent means of objective criticism and most often satire. A child's curious nature and hunger for knowledge would bring about an unbiased questioning of social structures, minus the brainwashing of these very institutions, and his or her vulnerability would expose any soc...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
2286 words
(6.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Searching for the Perfect World in Literature - Searching for the Perfect World in Literature Literature often explores the questions raised in life: Who are we. What does it mean to die. What kind of world do we live in. Throughout this course, there seems to have been an underlying theme in most of the works that have been read, concerning human misery. It seems that most of those who experience tremendous suffering, actually allow it to happen to themselves. If one chooses to look at the losses in life, one may never find true happiness, but if one chooses to perceive those losses as an opportunity for growth, one may find the "perfect world" right here....   [tags: Granny Weatherall Raven Candide] 626 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide, the Fredrick Douglass Narrative, and The Fisher King as Works in the Picaresque Form -     Storytellers use the picaresque form and the quest motif as standard literary devices in film, song, and the written word. The characters in such a story encounter many trials, setbacks, and triumphs on their quest to find what they so diligently seek. There is often much adventure and drama along they way, leading to their ultimate test. The three works discussed in this essay embody these themes. Voltaire's Candide, A Narrative of a Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, and Terry Gilliam's masterpiece The Fisher King present very different journeys using vastly different characters and time periods....   [tags: Essays on Picaresque Form]
:: 19 Works Cited
2036 words
(5.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Satire in Moliere’s Tartuffe, Voltaire’s Candide, and Swift’s A Modest Proposal - The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines satire as: “literary work holding up human vices and follies to ridicule or scorn.” Besides this definition satire can also be seen as the particular literary way of making possible the improvement of humanity and its institutions. In the three works: Moliere’s “Tartuffe,” Voltaire’s “Candide,” and Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” the authors indirectly criticize and ridicule human behavior and characteristics but with the goal for improving these faults rather than just demolishing them.                          In Moliere’s “Tartuffe,” although many things and behaviors are satirized, the play focuses mainly on the issue of religious hypocrisy....   [tags: Swift Voltaire Moliere] 915 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candida by George Bernard Shaw - Candida by George Bernard Shaw This isn't necessarily a negative thing; they're all well suited to each other, and create a sort of synergy that drives the play. But they're each quite different in their own respect. The main ones, Candida, Eugene and James are all written to be strong characters, and the way they were portrayed in the production our class saw lived up to this classification. However, this doesn't apply to everything. Some of the characters were stretched to make the play appeal to a newer generation in a newer day and age, at the expense of the dignity of at least one of the characters....   [tags: Candida George Bernard Shaw Essays] 577 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
How to Stop Candida Yeast Infections - ... As discussed earlier, spores and molds procreate on left-over food items during night, even in the refrigerator, it is better to stay away from them in order to enjoy safe candida diet. I have noticed that a candida patient are susceptible to various types of allergies and also vulnerable to many chemicals along with breathing-in sensitivities. With reduction of yeast and sugary food items and drinks, these allergies and sensitivities get better and over a period of time they get eradicated totally, which in turn improve, espicially, the digestive system....   [tags: alcohol, body, children, behavior] 883 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Shaw's "Candida" as a Drama of Ideas - Shaw himself wrote that Candida `is a counterpoint to Ibsen's Doll's House, showing that in the real typical doll's house it is the man who is the doll'.Ibsen in A Doll's House(1879)had shown how men treated their wives as inferior creatures, or dolls,and at the end of the play his heroin rebels and leaves her her husband .In Candida Shaw powerfully and effectively reverses Ibsen's idea. Counterpoint or reversal was Shaw's favourite technique in all of his plays.In Candida,he not only reverses the main idea of a Doll's House but also counterpoints the typical situation of an established type of Victorian domestic comedy.Play about romantic adultery,or its type possibility, were very popular...   [tags: European Literature] 390 words
(1.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Controversy Between Chinua Achebe and Candice Bradley Over Conrad's Heart of Darkness - Conrad's HEART OF DARKNESS has initiated controversy for numerous years. One side of the argument is that the novella was very racist while other ones assertion that it wasn't racist at all. Although I personally don’t think it's racist, for persons like Chinua Achebe the novella is nothing but, while others like Candice Bradley fight back the text. Chinua Achebe composed an essay titled "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's HEART OF DARKNESS" interpreting his attitude on the novella. In his essay, Achebe states that “Heart of Darkness projects the likeness of Africa as “the other world”, the antithesis of Europe and thus of civilization, a place where a man’s vaunted intelligence and refi...   [tags: racist, africa, humanity] 777 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candida albicans - Candida albicans Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus. This means that that C. albicans has to different phenotypic forms, an oval shaped yeast form and a branching hyphal form. C. albicans normal habitat is the mucosal membranes of humans and various other mammals including the mouth, gut, vagina, and sometimes the skin. Normally C. albicans causes no damage and lives symbiotically with the human or animal host, even helping to breakdown minute amounts of fiber that are eaten in the host’s diet....   [tags: Essays Papers] 639 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candie's Foundation is on a Mission of Safe Sex for Teenagers - Living in the modern world full of people trying to persuade, sell or advocate for many different things people usually do not pay attention to what they are perceiving subconsciously. When viewing an advertisement like that of the Candie’s Foundation, whose mission is to create awareness of teen pregnancy and safe sex, cannot be overlooked because of the strong persuasion used in the Candie’s advertisement. Though there are many forms of advertising, the basic foundations of a good argument are ethos, pathos, and logos....   [tags: advertisement, persuade, pregnant] 875 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Virulence Factors and Evasion of the Human Defense System of Fungus - A dimorphic fungus known as Candida albicans is the highest investigated and most common fungal pathogen in humans, capable of evading the human complement system. It populates the oral and genitourinary cavity surfaces, the digestive tract and triggers an array of infections that are dependent upon the character of latent imperfections in the host. As a former hospital employee that has witnessed firsthand accounts of the increasing degree of such infections, it sparked my curiosity to investigate the reason and manner in which this fungi can achieve such virulence....   [tags: Candida Albicans, fungi, immune system]
:: 13 Works Cited
1210 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Life and Work of Francois-Marie Arouet, a.k.a. Voultaire - Many classic books of literature of the French Enlightenment era comes from the famous author Francois-Marie Arouet, better known as his pen name, Voltaire.The French author was born on November 21st, 1694 and died May 30th, 1778 in the city of Paris. He started school at the Jesuit College of Louis-le-Grand at the age of 10 and graduated in 1711 with a motive of being a writer. However, Voltaire’s father did not agree with his choice of study and wanted Voltaire to study law. He went back to school to study law for another two years after his graduation....   [tags: french, author, classics] 1731 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Road to El Dorado - Road to El Dorado Explorers always wanted to find the "Golden City." Of course, none of them did. In Candide, Voltaire describes a city that is equivalent to any "Golden City." This world is the ideal world that almost anyone would like to live in. However, when Candide finds his "Golden City," known as El Dorado, he leaves it. One might wonder why Candide left El Dorado, but there were many well justified reasons for Candide's departure from the perfect world he was searching for. Candide gives several arguments for leaving El Dorado....   [tags: Papers] 598 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Use of Satire to Compare Europe and El Dorado - Voltaire's Use of Satire to Compare Europe and El Dorado The late seventeenth century was a time of change, a time of ushering out the old and bringing in the new. This was a period of exploring logic and understanding instead of religion to answer one's questions. Otherwise known as the Age of Enlightenment, society was out to seek reason rather than to find all of their answers from the Catholic Church or other faiths. Voltaire's story Candide displays his thoughts on the Enlightenment by mocking the monarch and currency system of a small village....   [tags: catholic church, utopian village]
:: 1 Works Cited
1279 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Symbolic Objects in Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar - Francois-marie Arouet, known as Voltaire lived in an age of turmoil. Born in a middle-class family in Paris, Arouet witnessed general public in state of crushing poverty while French aristocracy governs with strict law relentless hierarchy. Meanwhile, the Enlightenment movement spread across Europe and spurred challenges of intellectual ideas, human equality, basic rights, etc. The movement emphasized importance of objectivity and scientific reasoning. Such a mixed environment lent Voltaire multifaceted knowledge of the society....   [tags: birdcage, fear, madness] 1149 words
(3.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
All Is Not For The Best - "All is Not for the Best" 10-K Candide Voltaire's Candide is the story of an innocent man's experiences in a mad and evil world, his struggle to survive in that world, and his need to ultimately come to terms with it. All people experience the turmoil of life and must overcome obstacles, both natural and man-made, in order to eventually achieve happiness. In life, "man must find a medium between what Martin (scholar and companion to Candide) calls the "convulsions of anxiety" and the "lethargy of boredom"" (Richter 137)....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 2 Works Cited
1120 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Shallow, Fickle, and Arrogant Never Die - All of the negative characteristics portrayed in Voltaire's "Candide" are timeless. The author of this short novel knew this and incorporated that message into the book by using the theme of Resurrection. The characters, Pangloss, Cunegonda, and the Baron all represent traits such as folly, snobbery, and narrow mindedness and are somehow resurrected throughout the story. We see that in our world, no matter how hard we try; we will never get rid of the evil characteristics of the people around us....   [tags: European Literature] 372 words
(1.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Rational Demonstration of Irrational Thought - Voltaire's work Candide is an absurd, irrational story that takes the reader to almost every part of the world in a critical analysis of enlightenment thought. Readers may view Candide as a work that encompasses enlightenment thought. On the contrary however, Candide is indeed a correction and criticism of popular enlightenment ideals. Mainly, Voltaire focuses on the irrationality of the "best of all worlds" philosophy and in the end, concludes that there will never be a utopia on earth. Through an analysis of Pangloss and Eldorado, this will be demonstrated....   [tags: European Literature] 477 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Influence of Voltaire’s Philosophical Works on the French Revolution - The Influence of Voltaire’s Philosophical Works on the French Revolution The philosophical works of Voltaire, such as Candide, influenced the beginning of the French Revolution, promoting new ideas and concepts. Voltaire used both wit and sarcasm to prove his points against injustice and cruelty. Voltaire was exiled to England for many years, and while there, he became influenced by the English government systems, associated himself with Sir Isaac Newton, John Locke, and Sir Francis Bacon. Voltaire wrote many well known works, but Candide is the most widely read and considered to have the most profound impact on the French Revolution....   [tags: Philsophy]
:: 8 Works Cited
1139 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Understanding Concepts of Humor - A good way that people describe a society would have to be through satirical devices. Voltaire is one of those many authors that use humor through his book, Candide, in order to make fun of his society. This is satirical books depicts many different topics in a society. To begin with in the book Candide, the main character goes through a series of adventures and murders in order to preserve his love to Cunegonde. Then again Candide can’t go through all of this without his partner D.r Pangloss from the beginning of the book....   [tags: Society, Humor, Satirical Devices, Voltaire]
:: 5 Works Cited
1489 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Language Analysis of "The Canonization" by John Donne - Voltaire's Candide captures the extremes of human suffering, providing a disparaging account of what many of us would deem an unbearable cross to carry. While the author's message was not to glorify his characters for their resilience, the reader will clearly feel humbled after learning of the intense suffering that Candide and friends endure. In particular, it is the story of the old woman, who perhaps best explains the spirit of the characters, when she says 'A hundred times I wanted to kill myself, but I always loved life more.' Considering that she has been raped repeatedly and essentially gone from riches to rags, her passion for life should remain unquestioned....   [tags: European Literature] 276 words
(0.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Problem with Optimism in Habral and Voltaire - The Problem with Optimism in Habral and Voltaire Bohumil Hrabal’s I Served The King of England follows Ditie, a vertically challenged hotel busboy, through his experiences and adventures, which, in effect, alter his philosophies about life. In an eighteenth century parallel, French satirist Voltaire takes his title character, Candide on a long, perilous journey that results in a similar shift in beliefs. Characteristically, Ditie is similar to Candide, both men are very naïve by nature and eternally optimistic about the worlds they live in....   [tags: Free Essays Online]
:: 20 Works Cited
2102 words
(6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Everything happens for a reason - Voltaire and Kosinski’s literature works are two of the significant artistic work of the eighteenth and twentieth century. Although the artistic works were produced during different periods, they have strong basis of numerous human nature which demonstrates the human association. Flipping from one page to the next of the products of two shrewd authors, many related thematic issues are revealed including stupidity, foolishness, optimism among others. However, one of the most important themes espoused in the contents is that of “everything that happens in human life has a reason” (Voltaire, 1950)....   [tags: Voltiare and Kosinski] 2025 words
(5.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Analysis of Satirical Literature - During the Age of Enlightenment, people began believing in and relying upon rational thought instead of religious dogma to explain the world. This newfound emphasis on rationality promoted a breadth of freedom in speech that was previously unknown, a fact which was utilized by philosophers such as John Locke, Rousseau, and Sir Isaac Newton. In addition, the Age of Enlightenment produced famous writers who didn’t agree with the irrational politics and old traditions of their respective countries, and instead relied upon wit and satire to expose the corruption and poor human condition existing around them....   [tags: Enlightenment Writers, Rationality] 798 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Enlightenment: An Incredible Change - The Enlightenment is known as the age of reasons because of its gradual changes or transitions from traditional to modern societies. It was a big change from faith or religion towards science and the intellectual reasoning. Also, many societies or people changed their styles of living and beliefs such as they went from rural to urban, agriculture to commerce, believe to reason, religion to science, and so on. During the Neo-Classical era, many world famous writers such as Jean-Baptiste Poquelin known by Moliere, Jonathan Swift, and Francois-Marie Arouet know by Voltaire wrote some incredible stories, poems, plays and articles about the age of reason....   [tags: Social Studies]
:: 3 Works Cited
1172 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Irony and Humor - Irony and Humor Two popular writing techniques used by many of the enlightenment’s great were irony and humor. Great writers such as Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Moliere and Francois-Marie Arouet De Voltaire made excellent use of these techniques. With humor, both writers wrote stories which kept their audience involved in funny situations, while with irony the writers were able to explain their underlying messages. Born seventy-two years apart, they are a superb example of how these techniques were carried out over time....   [tags: essays papers] 1692 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Achebe's Things Fall Apart - Life is never easy; it often takes unexpected turns, where one finds himself in a situation that was unimaginable before. This is what happens to Okonkwo in Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. Okonkwo was one of the great clansmen in the village of Iguedo, where he proved himself to be a prominent contributor as a farmer and warrior to the clan, unlike his father, who was considered a failure in terms of masculinity. Due to an unfortunate accident, in which Okonkwo’s gun fires and kills a young man, Okonkwo is exiled to his motherland, loosing not only his farm and compound, but also the prestige that he has built for himself over the years, which strengthened his own belief in his masculinity....   [tags: story analysis] 555 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Comparing Dostoyevsky and Voltaire's Views on the Role of Art in Humanity - The role of social commentary in art and literature is an often controversial one. After the publication of Salman Rushdie’s Satanic Verses – a book which comments on the experience of Muslims in Britain – a fatwā calling for the author’s death was put out. While contemporary examples of commentators being beset by hardship are not uncommon, artists in the past were regularly censured for their views and artworks. Dostoyevsky, for example, was put into exile for years and nearly put to death for his views....   [tags: Philosophy] 1665 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Comparsion of Voltaire and Gronniosaw´s Philosophy - ... Voltaire’s choice of character names is also significant. For instance, Candide implies pureness and simplicity. Indeed, Voltaire portrays him, as a naive two-dimensional character, with great peace of mind and sound judgement. However, despite ‘sound judgement,’ he is over optimistic, and no matter what conflict he endures, it never affects his enthusiasm. However, when faced with a crisis Candide does not know how to react, subsequently his naivety completely paralyses his sound judgement....   [tags: language, techniques, religion, satrical] 1488 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Knowledge and Power - The free dictionary online defines knowledge as “an awareness, consciousness, or familiarity gained by experience or learning”. Power, on the other hand, means “the ability or official capacity of a person, group or nation to exercise great influence or control and authority over others”. In Voltaire’s “Candide”, Goethe’s “Faust”, and Shelley’s Frankenstein, the quest for more knowledge and power sets the stage for the story yet the characters, Candide, Frankenstein, and Faust remain unhappy after acquiring the much desired knowledge and power....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
:: 3 Works Cited
816 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Fate in Voltaire and Kosinski's Literature: Everything happens for a reason - Voltaire and Kosinski’s literature works are two of the significant artistic work of the eighteenth and twentieth century. The work have strong basis of numerous human character and nature, by demonstrating how human beings associates. As one flips from one page to the next of the products of two shrewd authors, many thematic issues are revealed including stupidity, foolishness, optimism among others. However, one of the most important themes espoused in the contents of the two famed writers is that everything that happens in human life has reason (Voltaire, 1950)....   [tags: Voltaire, fate, literature, Kosinski,]
:: 3 Works Cited
2090 words
(6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Human Nature - Many people pnder on the purpose of life; what is humanities goal in life or purpose in life. Different religions offer different insights however most believe in being “humane”. What does being humane mean though. Can humans as we know them (human nature) “humane”. Voltaire and Alexander Pope discuss this idea of human nature and the essence of life as they perceive it in “Candide” and “An Essay on Man” respectively. Although Alexander Pope and Voltaire present conflicting views on the purpose of man, both Pope and Voltaire in characterize humans as greedy, egoistical and constantly dissatisfied beings....   [tags: Purpose of Life, Voltaire, Alexander Pope] 1030 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Philosophy: The Problem of Evil - ... Voltaire mocked the statement, “metaphysical considerations concern the nature of the possible and of the necessary; they go against my fundamental assumption that God has chosen the best of all possible worlds” (Leibniz and Farrer 228). Within the Candide, Pangloss, a character in the book, maintains the idea that "…all is for the best. For if there’s a volcano at Lisbon, it couldn’t be anywhere else. For it’s impossible for things not to be where they are. For all is well" (Voltaire 30). Voltaire portrayed the romanticist mentality as so ridiculous and extreme through Pangloss, who has gone through so much pain (or evil), to believe the idea of God created all this suffering for “the b...   [tags: freedom, god, christianity] 983 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Hypocrisy of Religion - Religious leaders ought to be the epitome of goodness and morality and are supposed to live lives worthy of emulation. Yet, in Voltaire’s Candide and Goethe’s Faust, the church is infested with hypocrisy what with religious leaders being hypocritical characters that are corrupt, greedy and immoral. These are seen in so many instances in both texts as will be discussed below. High–ranking church officials, according to Voltaire, are deeply engrossed in promiscuity as depicted in the lines, “I am infact the daughter of Pope Urban the Tenth and the Princess of Palestrina” (535)....   [tags: Literary Themes]
:: 2 Works Cited
674 words
(1.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Old Woman and Miss Cunegund - Candide is a satirical piece written by Voltaire, the great French historian and philosopher during the Age of Enlightenment. There are two contrasting female characters in the literature. Cunegund is the daughter of a baron who experiences unbearable miseries. An unnamed old woman is a servant of Cunegund who was born as a daughter of a Pope. Candide, who is Cunegund’s lover, is also a traveling companion. Even though both Cunegund and the old woman share similarities in their respective lives, and possess admirable strength, they contrast in that the old woman is pessimistic and realistic while Cunegund is optimistic and impractical....   [tags: Character Anlysis, Comparisons] 853 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
All Actions Bear Consequences - According to Dictionary.com, Karma is defined as “the cosmic principle according to which each person is rewarded or punished in one incarnation according to that person’s deeds in the previous incarnation; fate; destiny;” hence, one person’s actions, whether positive or negative, will result in some reward or punishment in the future. Nonetheless, characters in both Voltaire’s and H.G. Wells’ novels undoubtedly believe that they are able to conduct an experiment that will alter the future, not knowing that something similar to what many call “karma” will come around to haunt their actions....   [tags: Literary Themes] 1545 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]


Your search returned over 400 essays for "candide"
<< Previous  1  2  3  4  5    Next >>