Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned 200 essays for "candide":
1  2  3    Next >>

These results are sorted by color rating. You may also sort these by relevance or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Voltaire uses many writing techniques, which are similar to that of the works of Cervantes, Alighieri, Rabelais and Moliere. The use of the various styles shows that, despite the passing of centuries and the language change, certain writing techniques will always be effective. One common literary technique is the author's use of one or more of his characters as his own voice to speak out the authors own views on certain subjects. For instance, in Moliere's Tartuffe, the author uses the character of Cleante to speak out against religious hypocrites: "Nothing that I more cherish and admire than honest zeal and true religious fire....   [tags: Voltaire Candide ] 1186 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Voltaire, whose real name was Francois Marie Arouet, was a man whose cynical style of writing brought attention upon himself, both in the positive aspect and in the negative. Francois associated himself with a group of politically power-hungry people who held a frantic hatred against the duke of Orleans. He was wrongly believed to have printed two libelous poems that defaced the duke and due to the false accusation he was imprisoned in the Bastille....   [tags: Voltaire Candide] 1025 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Voltaire's Candide - Optimism in Candide - Optimism in Candide Voltaire's Candide uses anti-heroism as an object of mockery against the philosophers of the Enlightenment. Candide, the hero of the novel travels around the world where he encounters many difficulties. During his travels, he sticks to the teaching of his tutor, Doctor Pangloss, believing that "everything is for the best" (3). Voltaire points out the illogicality of this doctrine, "if Columbus had not caught, on an American island, this sickness which attacks the source of generation [...] we should have neither chocolate or cochineal" (8)....   [tags: Candide essays] 802 words
(2.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Nature of Unhappiness in Candide, by Voltaire - Candide is well known for its critique of optimism by Voltaire. The title character, along with his companions, bears many hardships throughout the novel and philosophizes about the nature and necessity of good in the world. Whether there is truly any good in the world is debated between the characters, particularly between the very discouraged Martin and Candide, who carries with him the optimistic words of Dr. Pangloss, a believer in the good nature of the world. While the characters debate why man must carry such burdens, Voltaire shows us that it is dealing with the bad that makes us human....   [tags: Candide Essays] 1316 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free Essays: Candide's Metamorphosis - Candide's Metamorphosis In Voltaire's novella, we view the main character, Candide, as being sophomoric and rather naïve. Yet, Candide eventually frees himself from the shackles that burden his beloved philosopher Pangloss and other characters befriended along the way. Candide's journey back to Cunegonde become a means for him to emerge from his "self-imposed immaturity." The word "candide," which Cassell's French Dictionary defines as "ingenuous", would greatly summarize who the main character is to be perceived as....   [tags: Candide essays] 796 words
(2.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free Candide Essays: Politically Incorrect - The Politically Incorrect Candide Candide is a story that should be added to every canon in literature. It is a story that addresses issues about human nature that other stories choose to ignore. It addresses issues such as human nature, optimism, and religion and state. These elements give an insight and a perspective that readers do not usually get in every day literature. These elements are controversial, but from an honest point of view. Voltaire never tries to be politically correct – he tells it like it is or at least tells it like he sees things....   [tags: Candide essays] 367 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free Candide Essays: The Human Corruption - Human Corruption in Candide According to Voltaire, Man's goal is his own happiness.  This goal all too often is a mirage. (Gay 26)   Man is the prey of his own passion, victim of his own stupidity.  Man is the play thing of fate. (Gay 26)   The human condition is set with ills that no amount of rationality can cure. (Gay 27)    This human condition translates to human corruption. Voltaire hints of this corruption through Candide.  Candide impacted society as Voltaire knew it.  English Admirals that loose battles are no longer shot as object lessons in military perseverance....   [tags: Candide essays] 346 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide: A Satire On The Enlightenment - Candide: A Satire On The Enlightenment Works Cited Missing Candide is an outlandishly humorous, far-fetched tale by Voltaire satirizing the optimism espoused by the philosophers of the Age of Enlightenment. It is the story of a young man’s adventures throughout the world, where he witnesses much evil and disaster. Throughout his travels, he adheres to the teachings of his tutor, Pangloss, believing that "all is for the best in the best of all possible worlds." Candide is Voltaire’s answer to what he saw as an absurd belief proposed by the Optimists - an easy way to rationalize evil and suffering....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays] 596 words
(1.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Effective Satire of Voltaire's Candide - The Effective Satire of Voltaire's Candide      In Candide, Voltaire sought to point out the fallacy of Gottfried Leibniz's theory of optimism and the hardships brought on by the resulting inaction toward the evils of the world. Voltaire's use of satire, and its techniques of exaggeration and contrast highlight the evil and brutality of war and the world in general when men are meekly accepting of their fate. Leibniz, a German philosopher and mathematician of Voltaire's time, developed the idea that the world they were living in at that time was "the best of all possible worlds." This systematic optimism shown by Leibniz is the philosophical system that believed everything already was for...   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1191 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free Essays: The World is Far From Perfect in Candide - The World is Far From Perfect in Candide Candide is a great man that has encountered and accomplished many things. Candide has traveled far and wide through out his quest. He has encountered many things. He has been treated poorly by the government by being flogged multiple times by a two thousand-man army. To have his teacher lynched in front of his very eyes. He has met many people in his quest some nice and some not nice. Over all he was reunited with his friends and his true love....   [tags: Candide essays] 647 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free Candide Essays: Impossibility Of The Happy Life - Candide: The Impossibility Of The Happy Life This paper's focus is Voltaire's view of human happiness. Specifically, it will argue that Voltaire, in Candide, says that human happiness is impossible. Voltaire believes this for three reasons. First, Voltaire presents mankind in the novel spending all its life worried about personal problems of the moment. When people in Candide have no problems, Voltaire indicates, they do not feel happy but become bored instead. Their emotional lives swing between worries and boredom with almost no periods of prolonged happiness....   [tags: Candide essays] 645 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Irony, Satire, Symbols, and Symbolism in Voltaire's Candide - Use of Irony, Satire, and Symbolism in Candide In the novel, Candide, Voltaire uses many literary writing tools to prove the points in which he believes. Some of these many literary tools are irony, satire, and symbolism. Through these tools, Voltaire proves that greed is a universal vice, and usually ends in ones own destruction. Voltaire strongly emphasizes his pessimistic view throughout the story. During Chapter 10, he uses his philosophies, as well as other literary tools, to present greed as a devastating factor of society's corruption....   [tags: Candide essays] 447 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide - Candide is a humorous, far-fetched tale by Voltaire satirizing the optimism accepted by the philosophers of the Age of Enlightenment. Candide looks for true happiness, and his ultimate acceptance of life’s disappointments. He grew up in the Castle of Westphalia and was taught by the greatest philosopher of the province and the whole world, Dr. Pangloss. Dr. Pangloss taught Candide that everything that happens is for the best. Candide is exiled from the castle because of his love for the Baron’s daughter, Cunegonde....   [tags: essays research papers] 481 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide 3 - I am not too familiar with the events that occurred in this book. It is set back in the times of kings and queens, barons, lords and other titles. The author, Voltaire, who was born Francios-Marie Arouet, was very critical and suspicious of government and officials. He used his writing talens to make fun of them or criticize abuses of the time. In the middle of the 18th century, Voltaire turned against the popular philosophy of “optimism'; because of a tragic earthquake in Lisbon, Portugal, which killed 30,000 people and did millions of dollars in damage....   [tags: essays research papers] 1061 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - In 1764 Voltaire wrote one of the world's greatest satires, Candide. Candide pokes at much of Europe and attacks simple human follies and frailties. Most of the characters are killed brutally or fiercely hurt for idiotic reasons. The overall message of "Candide" is that every human being has the power to carve out their own destiny. And that each individual is not subject to God's grand plan, or the idea of predestination. Voltaire made his idea of God and divine right clear in Candide....   [tags: essays research papers] 519 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide and Great Expectations: Comparing Candide and Pip - Candide, by Voltaire, and Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens, are two novels written in different periods of time and by authors with different backgrounds. Their main characters are consequently not identical to each other. The fundamental difference between Candide and Pip as characters is that Candide shows us only his outer countenance while Pip lets us know the deepest of his feelings. Candide is one of those "follow the leader" type characters, that doesn't do much thinking for himself....   [tags: Charles Dickens, Voltaire] 286 words
(0.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Candide- A Contrast To Optimism - Candide- A Contrast to Optimism Francis Marie Arouet de Voltaire was the French author of the novella Candide, also known as “Optimism”(Durant and Durant 724). Many of Voltaire’s works were popular in Europe during his time, yet it is his satire, Candide, which is still studied today. In Candide, Voltaire sought to point out the fallacy of Gottfried William von Leibniz’s philosophy by criticizing worldly superiority, the theory of optimism, and the brutality of war. Leibniz theorized that God, having the ability to pick from an infinite number of worlds, chose this world, “the best of all possible worlds”(18)....   [tags: essays research papers] 873 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Critical Analysis of Candide by Voltaire - A Critical Analysis of Candide by Voltaire Defining optimism and redefining the philosophies of the fictional Pangloss and the non-fictional Leibniz, Candid embarks on a mishap journey. From the very onset, Voltaire begins stabbing with satire, particularly at religion. Candide, which has been credited the base for the book and movie Forrest Gump, features a main character teeming with naiveté. Pangloss says all is for the better and Candide lives by this edict with unaltered optimism. Faced with death and fatigue, Candide is befriended only to be enlisted in the Bulgarian army....   [tags: Papers] 336 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Comparison of East of Eden and Candide - East of Eden and Candide In the midst of 80s nostalgia and remembering the greatness that was this decade, I don't want readers to think that "children of the 80s," are oblivious to great, classic literature and today's current events. Recently, I have read two incredibly amazing books. Furthermore, I have noticed some interesting parallels. The first is East of Eden by John Steinbeck. This novel is an unbelievably grandiose recreation of the Book of Genesis. Salinas County is depicted as a place of incredible purity and innocence, in which people have simple values and work hard to sustain them....   [tags: compare and contrast essay examples] 1506 words
(4.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Asylum of Optimists in Candide - The Asylum of Optimists "Philosophy consists very largely of one philosopher arguing that all others are jackasses. He usually proves it, and I should add that he also usually proves that he is one himself." US editor H.L. Mencken summed up the majority of Voltaire's Candide in this humorous statement. He stated Voltaire's ideas toward modern philosophy, specifically the Optimism of the philosopher Leibniz. Candide presents the idea that philosophy is useless without application and yet leaves the idea wide open to interpretation....   [tags: European Literature] 536 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Searching for the Perfect World in Literature - Searching for the Perfect World in Literature Literature often explores the questions raised in life: Who are we. What does it mean to die. What kind of world do we live in. Throughout this course, there seems to have been an underlying theme in most of the works that have been read, concerning human misery. It seems that most of those who experience tremendous suffering, actually allow it to happen to themselves. If one chooses to look at the losses in life, one may never find true happiness, but if one chooses to perceive those losses as an opportunity for growth, one may find the "perfect world" right here....   [tags: Granny Weatherall Raven Candide] 626 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Shaw's "Candida" as a Drama of Ideas - Shaw himself wrote that Candida `is a counterpoint to Ibsen's Doll's House, showing that in the real typical doll's house it is the man who is the doll'.Ibsen in A Doll's House(1879)had shown how men treated their wives as inferior creatures, or dolls,and at the end of the play his heroin rebels and leaves her her husband .In Candida Shaw powerfully and effectively reverses Ibsen's idea. Counterpoint or reversal was Shaw's favourite technique in all of his plays.In Candida,he not only reverses the main idea of a Doll's House but also counterpoints the typical situation of an established type of Victorian domestic comedy.Play about romantic adultery,or its type possibility, were very popular...   [tags: European Literature] 390 words
(1.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Shallow, Fickle, and Arrogant Never Die - All of the negative characteristics portrayed in Voltaire's "Candide" are timeless. The author of this short novel knew this and incorporated that message into the book by using the theme of Resurrection. The characters, Pangloss, Cunegonda, and the Baron all represent traits such as folly, snobbery, and narrow mindedness and are somehow resurrected throughout the story. We see that in our world, no matter how hard we try; we will never get rid of the evil characteristics of the people around us....   [tags: European Literature] 372 words
(1.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Language Analysis of "The Canonization" by John Donne - Voltaire's Candide captures the extremes of human suffering, providing a disparaging account of what many of us would deem an unbearable cross to carry. While the author's message was not to glorify his characters for their resilience, the reader will clearly feel humbled after learning of the intense suffering that Candide and friends endure. In particular, it is the story of the old woman, who perhaps best explains the spirit of the characters, when she says 'A hundred times I wanted to kill myself, but I always loved life more.' Considering that she has been raped repeatedly and essentially gone from riches to rags, her passion for life should remain unquestioned....   [tags: European Literature] 276 words
(0.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Problem with Optimism in Habral and Voltaire - The Problem with Optimism in Habral and Voltaire Bohumil Hrabal’s I Served The King of England follows Ditie, a vertically challenged hotel busboy, through his experiences and adventures, which, in effect, alter his philosophies about life. In an eighteenth century parallel, French satirist Voltaire takes his title character, Candide on a long, perilous journey that results in a similar shift in beliefs. Characteristically, Ditie is similar to Candide, both men are very naïve by nature and eternally optimistic about the worlds they live in....   [tags: Free Essays Online]
:: 20 Works Cited
2102 words
(6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Big Mama's Funeral - Big Mama's Funeral Gabriel García Márquez story, Big Mama's Funeral, is a story filled with fantastical scenes and events much in line with Don Quixote and Candide. The introductory paragraphs of Big Mama's Funeral and Candide sound so similar in voice the two authors could be mistaken for the same. In Candide, one finds a series of episodes that are so far from the truth and yet perfectly explainable. The story of the fate of Dr. Pangloss, the death and resurrection of Cunegund and of her Jesuit brother, and the story of the old woman with one buttock are farcical in the same way as the episodes in Big Mama's Funeral....   [tags: Mama Funeral] 335 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Satire: Enlightened Wit in the Age of Reason - Mad Magazine, The Simpsons, Saturday Night Live. In our society, satire is among the most prevalent of comedic forms. This was not always true, for before the 18th century, satire was not a fully developed form. Satire, however, rose out of necessity; writers and artists needed a way to ambiguously criticize their governments, their churches, and their aristocrats. By the 18th century, satire was hugely popular. Satire as an art form has its roots in the classics, especially in the Roman Horace's Satires....   [tags: Literature Essays Literary Criticism]
:: 4 Works Cited
1466 words
(4.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Semiotics of Covers - The Semiotics of Covers I'm going to buy a book today - but not a school book, a real book - a bestseller. I walk past the harmonica man standing outside of the Brown Office Building, clamping my ears shut against the discordant melodies he's spewing out at me. I enter the Brown Bookstore - my Mecca, my Graceland. I strut past the tables near the door and walk toward the bestseller wall, my being allthewhile bombarded by hardcovers seeking my wandering eyes. Howard Stern in drag screams out at me from the left, something about Colin Powell and a journey crys out from the right....   [tags: Books Reading Essays] 2335 words
(6.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Changes vs. Improvements - Changes vs. Improvements Intolerance, war, inequality and poverty - these are just a few of the issues found in the texts that we have read this semester. Even though some of them were written hundreds of years ago, the same problems still exist in our world today. Many things have changed over time, but they have not necessarily improved. Today, we are still involved in wars and violence with our continued presence in Iraq, Afghanistan and other foreign countries. We still persecute the poor by raising taxes and cutting funds to the programs like Medicaid and Welfare, while making it easier on the upper classes....   [tags: Social Issues Government Essays] 2516 words
(7.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Desensitized America - In Candide by Voltaire, there is an instance in the life of the old woman that outrages her. When she meets up with the Mores and they act abusive and intrusive toward her, she is initially outraged. When she stops to think about it, she exclaims that if she had been a person more knowledgeable about their customs, she would be less upset. This suggests that people everyday overlook acts that would be considered by an outsider to be appalling. In our society I can think of many instances that we accept, and in many ways we become desensitized to their horror because they are so common....   [tags: essays research papers] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
French Literature in the Age of Reason - French Literature in the Age of Reason The Age of Reason, or the Enlightenment, was a period in France during the 1700's following the classical age. Within this time, philosophers placed the emphasis on reason as the best method for learning. It explored issues in education, law philosophy, and politics. It attacked tyranny, social injustice, superstition, and ignorance. This time produced advances in such areas as anatomy, astronomy, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. These were the ideals taken up for both the American and French revolutions....   [tags: European Europe History] 436 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Graduation Speech: Tonight We Cross the Finish Line - Congratulations, County High Class of 2012, our thirteen-year marathon is over. Some of you may know I am a distance runner, part of an immensely successful cross-country and distance track program. We were fourth at the state cross-country championships, and we are the best senior boys team in the state. My involvement in athletics truly linked me with our school and granted me friends whom I will remember for a lifetime. One of the most important aspects of my time in high school was getting involved....   [tags: Graduation Speech, Commencement Address] 510 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing Spinoza’s Ethics and Dostoyevsky’s Notes from the Underground - Comparing Spinoza’s Ethics and Dostoyevsky’s Notes from the Underground Perhaps my choice of the subject may come across as a little eccentric, to say the least. To appear quaint and whimsical, however, is not my intention, so I figured as an introduction, I would explain my choice. From so far as I can tell, philosophy, or the search for truth, has all too often been equated with certainty. This quality of certainty has been especially magnified in the rationalist branch of philosophy. Starting with Descartes’ vision of a philosophy with a mathematical certainty, rationalists claimed to have grasped a rather large portion of reality, including the world, God, consciousness, and whatever f...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 2477 words
(7.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded - Sexuality and the Morally Didactic Novel - Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded - Sexuality and the Morally Didactic Novel We have difficulties as a modern audience appreciating the social anxieties reflected in Pamela, especially those surrounding morality and valuation of individuals within the social framework. The radical stance of even using phrases such as virtue and 'fortune' to denote Pamela's virginity are themselves loaded with a questioning of the social stratification in which she resides. The term 'Fortune' is perhaps the most playful but problematic....   [tags: Pamela Virtue Rewarded Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
2234 words
(6.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Story of Evolution as a Utopia and the Evolution of the Story of Utopia - The Story of Evolution as a Utopia and the Evolution of the Story of Utopia In my first semester I had the college seminar that focused on the idea of Utopia in fiction, politics, and philosophy. Our discussions and readings went through a process of evolution that begin as rather simplistic and then followed a steady path to much more involved. Honestly, a reason that I chose the class was because I had done many of the readings before, but once the work began I realized that myself, and all the others in the class, would be looking at works, such as Candide and 1984, in an entirely different fashion....   [tags: Theory of Evolution Utopia Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1138 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Francois Marie Arouet - Francois Marie Arouet (he would later take the name Voltaire) was born November 21, 1694 as a sickly child who was not expected to live. His father was a rather prosperous lawyer, and was determined that, should he live, his son ought to study law. Thus Voltaire was enrolled in 1704 in the Jesuit College of Louis-Le-Grande. Remaining at the College until his seventeenth year, Voltaire excelled in academics and won much acclaim, while simultaneously receiving a sound liberal education and developing his ability to write....   [tags: Voltaire] 775 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Throughout the novel, Candide, Voltaire repeatedly exploits the nature of humans to consider other's situations and lifestyles to be better than that of their own. Voltaire uses Candide's journeys to portray the human assumption that the grass is always greener on the other side. This theme is shown in Candide's strife for companionship, his experience with wealth, and his interaction with other characters. The situations that develop the theme do so in such a way that the reader is able to understand and relate to the aspirations of Candide....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays] 826 words
(2.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide: A Critique - Let me start off by saying that I thoroughly enjoy satires; it is the genre I appreciate most for its employment of wit and militant irony. Upon delving into Candide by Voltaire I was lured in by its display of ridiculously brutal situations that dramatized the many evils of human experience. I think Voltaire wonderfully crafted this particular satire through his conglomeration of themes and symbolisms. Seemingly swiftly Voltaire takes the reader through a manifold of episodes of extreme cruelty that prove both horrible and vividly comic....   [tags: Candide Voltaire Review Critique] 899 words
(2.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: The Accuracy of Candide -     Voltaire is correct in Candide, where he argues that life on earth is hell in many ways. Voltaire accurately describes how selfish people often are and how they inflict misery on others as a result. Voltaire also describes accurately common forms of cruelty in society. Although he may be mistaken that all wars are equally senseless and avoidable, Voltaire is correct in showing that war inevitably produces atrocities, which makes for hell on earth.        In support of these statements, let's examine Voltaire's accurate description of human selfishness.   An example would be the behavior of the sailor who Pangloss and Candide met on their voyage to Lisbon.  This sailor was rescued fr...   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
766 words
(2.2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide - Candide Essay Compare/Contrast of 2 Characters Throughout the story of Candide, the author Voltaire uses many of the characters to portray important things in life. The two characters that Voltaire used the most were Candide and Pangloss. Voltaire used these two characters to represent a particular idea or folly that he had about the world. In the story Candide, Voltaire is always portraying his own ideas by using the characters to illustrate his own ideas. Candide and Pangloss represent the main idea of the story, which is Voltaire’s folly of optimism....   [tags: Voltaire] 1305 words
(3.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide - CANDIDE By Voltaire Throughout Candide the author, Voltaire, demonstrates the character’s experiences in a cruel world and his fight to gain happiness. In the beginning Candide expects to achieve happiness without working for his goal and only taking the easy way out of all situations. However, by the end of the book the character realized that to achieve happiness a lot of work, compromises, and sacrifices are necessary. Candide is a person of privilege who began life in the Castle of Westphalia....   [tags: essays research papers] 654 words
(1.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide - Candide Candide, written by Voltaire during the 18th century is a celebrated novel known for it's strong criticism of the Middle Ages and Enlightenment expressed by Voltaire. During the transformation from the Middle Ages to The Enlightenment, social, religious and political ideas were rejected and emphasis was placed on rationalism. Three examples of this notion that are expressed in Candide are as follows. Social conduct that was normally practiced during the 18th century was thrown out of the window during the Enlightenment....   [tags: European Literature] 583 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Summary of Candide by Voltaire - Candide is a story of a boy who lived in world of little to no troubles and how his entire perspective of the world was changed when he was placed in the real world and forced to face conflicts in which he had never faced before. His tutor, Pangloss, taught him Leibnizian optimism but you can see this mindset slowly deteriorate throughout the novella. Candide lived in a castle with his illegitimate uncle, a German baron; the baron’s daughter, Cunedonde; Pangloss, the tutor; and a few other family members....   [tags: voyage, perspective, fortune]
:: 1 Works Cited
589 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Optimistic Philosophy in "Candide" by Voltaire - Why do bad things happen to good people. A question often asked by...well, by just about everyone. It is a frequently asked question that philosophers and religious figures have tried to answer for centuries yet no one can pinpoint the answer. Candide is no doubt Voltaire's response to the answer given by some of the philosophers of his time. The philosophy discussed throughout the novel gives meaning to the story itself and contributes to and carries on throughout the entire story. In the Baron's castle somewhere in Germany the main characters reside for a short time....   [tags: European Literature] 909 words
(2.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Role of Providence in Candide and Survival in Auschwitz - The Role of Providence in Candide and Survival in Auschwitz Providence is a main theme in Candide, by Voltaire, and Survival in Auschwitz, by Primo Levi. The word providence literally means foresight, but is generally used to denote God’s preserving and governing all things by means of second causes. Voltaire pokes fun at the notion of providence and mocks the philosopher, Liebniz, for his belief that all things that happen are for the very best. Voltaire uses several characters to portray a different point of view, some are supporters of Liebniz’ philosophy, and others are not....   [tags: Papers] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candide: a Heroic Diatribe of French Institutions - Francois-Marie d'Arouet, the author known as Voltaire, was perhaps the most influential philosopher of the eighteenth century; he was the most widely read philosopher of the Enlightenment and his criticisms of powerful French institutions seeded the resistance to orthodoxy imbued in the French Revolution that occurred eleven years after his death in seventeen seventy-eight. The Renaissance instilled in Voltaire the virtues of science and a respect for the natural world that forced him to examine the institutions of France from an objective eye....   [tags: European History] 1242 words
(3.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Love in Aphra Behn’s Oroonko, and Voltaire’s Candide - In Aphra Behn’s Oroonko, and Voltaire’s Candide, love is a subject of prominence; it serves as a starting point for both of these characters. For example, if Candide hadn’t fallen in love with his insatiable beauty, Cunegonde, he would not have been thrown from his home, castle Thunder-Ten-Tronckh, and sent on his dreadful journey across Europe. “The Baron of Thunder-Ten-Tronckh passed by the screen and, talking note of this cause and this effect, drove Candide out of the castle by kicking him vigorously in the backside (Voltaire 356)....   [tags: Feelings, Betrayal]
:: 1 Works Cited
794 words
(2.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Candida by George Bernard Shaw - Candida by George Bernard Shaw This isn't necessarily a negative thing; they're all well suited to each other, and create a sort of synergy that drives the play. But they're each quite different in their own respect. The main ones, Candida, Eugene and James are all written to be strong characters, and the way they were portrayed in the production our class saw lived up to this classification. However, this doesn't apply to everything. Some of the characters were stretched to make the play appeal to a newer generation in a newer day and age, at the expense of the dignity of at least one of the characters....   [tags: Candida George Bernard Shaw Essays] 577 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Road to El Dorado - Road to El Dorado Explorers always wanted to find the "Golden City." Of course, none of them did. In Candide, Voltaire describes a city that is equivalent to any "Golden City." This world is the ideal world that almost anyone would like to live in. However, when Candide finds his "Golden City," known as El Dorado, he leaves it. One might wonder why Candide left El Dorado, but there were many well justified reasons for Candide's departure from the perfect world he was searching for. Candide gives several arguments for leaving El Dorado....   [tags: Papers] 598 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
A Rational Demonstration of Irrational Thought - Voltaire's work Candide is an absurd, irrational story that takes the reader to almost every part of the world in a critical analysis of enlightenment thought. Readers may view Candide as a work that encompasses enlightenment thought. On the contrary however, Candide is indeed a correction and criticism of popular enlightenment ideals. Mainly, Voltaire focuses on the irrationality of the "best of all worlds" philosophy and in the end, concludes that there will never be a utopia on earth. Through an analysis of Pangloss and Eldorado, this will be demonstrated....   [tags: European Literature] 477 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Voltaire Vs. Hampson - The enlightenment was a period in history where certain ways of thought were developed. There were doubts of the existence of a supreme being and belief in the natural order of things. "The stability of a divinely-created and unchanging order was challenged by a new conception of life as a constant and shapeless flux" (89). Norman Hampson analyzes many famous philosophical books of the time and overall feels that "Only two attitudes seemed to remain: to follow Hume in denying man's access to objective knowledge of any kind, or to accept d'Holbach's conception of a universe of matter in motion, in which everything happened out of necessity and the answer to every question was `because it cann...   [tags: European History] 1343 words
(3.8 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Achebe's Things Fall Apart - Life is never easy; it often takes unexpected turns, where one finds himself in a situation that was unimaginable before. This is what happens to Okonkwo in Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. Okonkwo was one of the great clansmen in the village of Iguedo, where he proved himself to be a prominent contributor as a farmer and warrior to the clan, unlike his father, who was considered a failure in terms of masculinity. Due to an unfortunate accident, in which Okonkwo’s gun fires and kills a young man, Okonkwo is exiled to his motherland, loosing not only his farm and compound, but also the prestige that he has built for himself over the years, which strengthened his own belief in his masculinity....   [tags: story analysis] 555 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Hypocrisy of Religion - Religious leaders ought to be the epitome of goodness and morality and are supposed to live lives worthy of emulation. Yet, in Voltaire’s Candide and Goethe’s Faust, the church is infested with hypocrisy what with religious leaders being hypocritical characters that are corrupt, greedy and immoral. These are seen in so many instances in both texts as will be discussed below. High–ranking church officials, according to Voltaire, are deeply engrossed in promiscuity as depicted in the lines, “I am infact the daughter of Pope Urban the Tenth and the Princess of Palestrina” (535)....   [tags: Literary Themes]
:: 2 Works Cited
674 words
(1.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Different Viewpoints on Human Nature - Different Viewpoints on Human Nature Throughout history there have been arguments about anything and everything that is disagreeable. People innately have there own and often different opinions. A prominent discussion topic throughout history has been the nature of mankind. Many have written works about human nature but few are discussed in greater detail than Candide, The Prince, and Essay on Man. Voltaire, Niccolo Machiavelli, and Alexander Pope, who wrote these three works respectively, concur with each other on many view points....   [tags: Papers] 527 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Voltaire - Voltaire The building blocks of the Enlightenment were formed out of a desire for truth, reason, and freedom – virtually contingent upon the last. An examination of Voltaire’s Candide and La Feyette’s Princess of Cleves, both well recognized pieces of the period, exemplify two views of freedom, the first based on its use in moderation and the latter making it a relative term. Relative freedom meaning it is correspondent to one’s social, economic, and religious place with in society. In Candide, the main character’s own freedom and ability to make decisions is rather dangerous too not only himself but to others as well....   [tags: Papers] 562 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Satire in the 18th Century and in Modern Times - Ridiculous Idea vs. Humorous Laughter The use of humor, exaggeration, irony or ridicule to expose, criticize or make fun people’s stupidity or vices. It is the dictionary definition of satire. The usage of juvenalian satire to criticize was openly and frequently done in the 18th century. Coming to the modern day, horatian satire is used to not only criticize but also make fun of modern times. What must be understood is that the usage of satire in both times was focused on society however; with each particular satire it focused on the different problems within it....   [tags: Irony, Humor] 579 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Intelligent Satire in Voltaire's Candide - Intelligent Satire in Candide      In the story Candide, Voltaire uses the experiences of the character Candide and dialogue between characters to dispute the theory by other philosophers that "Everything is for the best in this best of all possible worlds" (Voltaire). Voltaire believed that the society that he lived in had many flaws, flaws which are illustrated throughout the story. Voltaire uses satire to take aim at the military, religion, and societies' emphasis of physical beauty, to illustrate that we do not live in the best of all possible worlds....   [tags: Candide essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
854 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide: The Prospect of Survival - In Voltaire's Candide, many of the characters share the uncanny ability to go through difficult situations and survive. Some of them are even killed, only to return in the next chapter healthier than ever. In many cases, they narrowly escape death due to the help of a friend who bails them out and asks for nothing in return. After so many close calls, one can't help but speculate if a higher power is in control of their fates, or possibly their survival is solely due to luck. In the first chapter, Candide is caught kissing Cunegonde by her father, the Baron, who banishes him from the castle....   [tags: Candide essays] 604 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Satire in Voltaire's Candide - Use of Satire in Voltaire’s Candide            Voltaire successfully uses satire as a means of conveying his opinions about life.  In his novel, Candide, Voltaire satirizes the philosopher Liebnitz's philosophy that this is the best of all possible worlds.  In the novel, the perpetually optimistic and naive character, Candide, travels around the world, having various experiences that prove, at least to the reader, that evil does exist.    In one particular passage, Voltaire uses explicit diction, exaggerated details and manipulated syntax in order to contrast the optimist's romantic view of battle with the horrible reality that is war....   [tags: Candide essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
627 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Criticism of Religion in Voltaire’s Candide - Criticism of Religion in Voltaire’s Candide In his novel Candide, Voltaire often criticized religious beliefs of the times. His criticism of religion surfaces throughout the entire story. The kindness of the Anabaptist that Candide met showed the silliness of religious prejudices. The old woman's story of her father, Pope Urban X, and the life of wealth she lived as a child shows the corruption of the Catholic clergy. Finally, the conversation Candide and Cacambo had with the old man in Eldorado shows the benefits of a simple religion, a contrast of the European religions of the time....   [tags: Candide essays] 738 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Voltaire's Candide - Fallacy of Optimism Exposed - Fallacy of Optimism Exposed in Candide In Candide, Voltaire paints a dismal and satirical view of the world. Voltaire paints a pessimistic portrait of a naïve youth who is raised to believe that this is best of all worlds. Time and again, Voltaire clearly portrays his belief that this is not the best of all possible worlds.   The characters of the story face great adversity. In chapter 10, Cunegonde states that her misfortune is so great that she does not see how the old woman's story of woe can surpass her own....   [tags: Candide essays] 783 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: A Typical Enlightenment Work - Candide as a Typical Enlightenment Work       Candide on the surface is a witty story. However when inspected deeper it is a philippic writing against people of an uneducated status. Candide is an archetype of these idiocracies, for he lacks reason and has optimism that is truly irking, believing that this is the best of all possible worlds. Thus Voltaire uses a witty, bantering tale on the surface, but in depth a cruel bombast against the ignoramuses of his times.               Candide has reason only in the form of a companion upon which he relies for advice....   [tags: Candide essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
673 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Voltaire’s Views of Religion and State Expressed In Candide - Voltaire’s Views of Religion and State Expressed In Candide      Throughout Candide, Voltaire uses satire as a tool to reveal his controversial views regarding religion and State. He reveals the corruption, hypocrisy and immorality present in the way in which government and religion operated during his lifetime. Most particularly, he criticizes violent government behaviour (ie; war) and the behaviour of members of the aristocracy, who constituted the bulk of high ranking government and religious leaders....   [tags: Candide essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
792 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Voltaire’s Candide: Prejudices Against Religion and State - Prejudices Against Religion and State in Candide   Voltaire has strong viewpoints that become very obvious when reading his work Candide.  Candide is a collection of criticisms that immortalize Voltaire's Controversial thoughts and prejudices against religion and state.        Voltaire had a negative view on government as he wrote in Candide: "let us work without arguing, that is the only way to make life endurable." Voltaire accepted the Royalists and rejected the parliamentary interpretation of the French constitution, but he was willing to concede that the legal position was not clear....   [tags: Candide essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
717 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: Use of Language - Use of Language in Candide       A great philosopher Liebnitz once said that this is the best possible of all worlds. Voltaire disagrees. In Voltaire's Candide, the impartial narrator travels to distant lands and experiences a range of extremes. After having spent a great deal of time away from his homeland, and having seen more than most people see in a lifetime, the narrator is forced to conclude that this may not be the best possible world because of the reality of evil. Voltaire relates this point very effectively through his mastery of language and the choices he makes, both gramatically and content-related....   [tags: Candide essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
663 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candide - Today we see sarcasm and satire everywhere. In movies and books, on television, and in our everyday life. We almost do not realize it, because we are so used to sarcasm as a device to show the folly or ludicrousness of something, and public figures today can almost guarantee that they will be parodied at some point in their career; it is completely acceptable for writers and comedians today to go after anyone in jest. In the eighteenth century, however, satire was not as acceptable. Upon publication of his most famous work, Candide, the author Voltaire saw plenty of criticism for the authorities the story questioned....   [tags: Literature] 907 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Use of Satire to Target Religion, Military, and Optimism in Voltaire's Candide - Use of Satire to Target Religion, Military, and Optimism in Voltaire's Candide   In his work, Candide, Voltaire uses satire as a means of conveying his opinions about many aspects of European society in the eighteenth century.  Voltaire successfully criticizes religion, the military, and the philosophy of optimism.  Religious leaders are the targets of satire throughout Candide. Voltaire portrays the religious clergy as men who use their positions to further their own causes. In addition, the priests keep the less fortunate oppressed, so the clergy members can continue to enjoy extravagant luxuries....   [tags: Candide Voltaire essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
603 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Voltaire's Candide - Candide, written by Voltaire and published in 1759, is based in the Age of the Enlightenment. Candide is a satiric tale of a virtuous man's search for the truest form of happiness and his ultimate acceptance of life's disappointments. The illegitimate son of the Baron's sister; Candide is raised in the Castle of Westphalia and taught by his friend and philosopher of metaphysico-theologo-cosmolo-nigology, Dr.Pangloss. Candide is abruptly cast out from the castle when he and Lady Cunegonde are found indiscreetly kissing behind a screen....   [tags: Voltaire essays research papers]
:: 1 Works Cited
675 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candide Essay - The Enlightenment period of the 19th century was a major switch from a center around the Catholic Church to new secular ideas on politics and science, and the works of the writers who lived during this age reflect that. The French philosopher Voltaire, especially, expressed his opinions on society through satire, as in his novella, Candide. He invites his readers to look upon a world in which everything goes wrong and yet, the main character had an abundance of optimism—a contradiction that leads to Voltaire’s commentary in the work on utopias and how to find happiness....   [tags: Philosophy] 690 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candide, by Voltaire - Somewhere out there in the world, a car is being stolen, a child is stealing from his mother's purse, or a bank is being robbed. Why are people stealing and taking things for their own claim. Often the trait of greed is the reason for why a person partakes in such act. The trait of greed is impossible to be seen through appearance but rather by human behaviors itself. In Candide, by Voltaire, greed is expressed in a satirical manner through the actions of the characters in the novel. Through this trait, people are driven to make sacrifices and believe that happiness and satisfaction are only found when they are enriched with wealth....   [tags: Greed, Satire, Character Analysis] 795 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Loss of Innocence in Candide by Voltaire - In the novel Candide written by Voltaire there are several symbols throughout the story. One of those symbolic figures that seems to stand out in the story is the character Candide, a gullible and innocent boy who experiences many hardships after being vanished from the castle of the baron von Thunder-ten-tronckh. Candide seems to be a representation of people's innocence and how they tend to lose it throughout their lifetime as they witness and experience new things in the world and grow wary of the consequences that every different situation may hold....   [tags: experiences, adaptation, gentle]
:: 1 Works Cited
832 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candide by François-Marie Arouet - ... They eventually reencounter some of this lost fortune when a Dutch boat is sunk. Candide sees something bright red swimming near their ship. “It was one of his sheep. There was more joy in Candide at finding this one sheep…(Voltaire, p. 53).” This acts as a parody, or satire, of Christ’s parable of the lost sheep. The finding of this sheep also symbolizes hope for Candide. He perceives this discovery of the sheep as hope that he will be reunited with Cunégonde again just as he was with the sheep....   [tags: catholic church, philosopher, writer] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Candide. Everything Has a Cause - Candide is a novel that makes sarcasm on lots of aspects. For example, it satirizes one philosophical idea that “there is no effect without a cause”. As a philosopher who believes that everything has its own purpose, I feel offended by Voltaire’s Candide after reading this novel at my local Salon, since what Voltaire attacked, cause and effect, had been proved in our real life hundreds of years ago by scientific revolution, from which the idea of cause and effect emerged: events take place for specific reasons and they follow their unique laws, not operated by supernatural force or just happened to be there....   [tags: voltaire, philosophy] 894 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Religion in Candide by Voltaire - ... Voltaire said that Jacques was a good Anabaptist in the ‘Candide’ though he was never baptized. The Anabaptist represents a solution or viewpoint of the sufferings. Anabaptist is a member of a radical sixteenth-century Christianity in which is a sect of the Reformation He cares for Candide and Pangloss. Pangloss says Candide that ‘Private misfortunes contribute to the general good, so that the more private misfortunes there are, the more we find that all is well’(pg 31) The kindness of the Anabaptist that Candide meets, shows the stupidity of religious prejudices to us....   [tags: attacks and criticism on religion] 825 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of Voltaire´s Candide - This epic satire zeroes in on Voltaire’s criticisms against the Catholic Church, related through a dry comedy and swift plot. This is the life of Candide, the main character, his journey around the world and adventures. Candide opens with blatant mockery of society, government, and religion, but he also mocked the philosophy of optimism by philosopher Leibniz. To make the novel more alive, he uses real events that have happened in the world. This mockery of society can lead one to read it as a less blatant commentary on gender roles and xenophobia....   [tags: Catholic Church, mockery, satire, xenophobia]
:: 1 Works Cited
926 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of Candide, by Voltaire - The book Candide by Voltaire is a humorous satire constructed of many themes. Through his book, Voltaire expresses his views on life by criticizing many aspects of humanity at that time. He focused in war, religion, and love, but the main target of Voltaire's satire was a certain philosophy. All of the previous topics unite to ridicule the philosophy that, as the character Pangloss said, "things cannot be otherwise than as they are; for as all things have been created for some end, they must necessarily be created for the best end" (1)....   [tags: Theme and Topics]
:: 1 Works Cited
658 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of the Play Candide - ... At the end of the battle when everyone is dead and there is nothing left the music is sad and somber and it has a piano sound and grave tempo, which reflects the mood of Candide when he finds that Cunegonde is dead. During a later part of Scene Two when the cast is dancing the movements match the music, they appeared to be doing the Waltz, so the music had abrupt changes. In Scene Three: Cadiz, the orchestra plays some sad and somber music at the beginning. As the scene progresses the music goes from dark and dismal to happy and cheerful....   [tags: school, voice, music, reflects] 1049 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Pitfalls of Philosophical Absolutes in Voltaire's Candide - As a novel which ingeniously skewers the fashionable misinterpretation of doctrinal optimism, Candide succeeds in disgusting, amusing and surprising its audience. With unending bounds of irony and sarcasm, Candide thrusts us into a world where we meet numerous characters that endure rather exaggerated misfortune. As a result, we see several doctrinal beliefs, such as that of Pangloss and Martin. Pangloss, Candide’s mentor and philosopher, is a man of optimistic sentiment. Maintaining the belief that all is for the best in this “best of all possible worlds” (1.4), Pangloss is later found to be rather fool headed in his complacency....   [tags: literary analysis, philosophy, analytical] 872 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A Series of Unfortunate Events in Voltaire's Candide - In Candide, a series of unfortunate events befall the main character—Candide—to demonstrate the absurdity of his mentor’s philosophy that he lives in the best possible world. The main tenet of Pangloss’ philosophy is that even from acts that appear evil, or sub-optimal, there is a positive aspect that produces the best of all possible results. In other words, there is no such thing as a sub-optimal outcome or a bad occurrence. Candide demonstrates the absurdity of this mindset when Pangloss contracts syphilis, and when Candide’s benefactor drowns and an earthquake erupts in Lisbon, concluding with Pangloss trying his best to justify both events through the lens of his philosophy....   [tags: philosophy, disease, rationalization]
:: 1 Works Cited
619 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Sarcasm about Religion in Voltaire´s Candide - Religion has always been something that has been argued for centuries long ago. Voltaire has never been afraid to clearly speak his opinions on how he sees religion really is. Many have argued whether religion is actual belief or just a lot of hypocrisy from religion towards the world. The way Voltaire portrays religion in Candide it is some belief but mostly hypocrisy due to the secrets being held and all of the lies being told. He was never a big fan of religion and he satires it a lot and reveals what some religion really does....   [tags: Satire, Hypocrisy]
:: 1 Works Cited
873 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]


Your search returned 200 essays for "candide":
1  2  3    Next >>