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Your search returned over 400 essays for "candide"
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Optimism and Pessimism in Voltaire’s Candide - In Voltaire’s Candide, we are taken by the hand through an adventure which spanned two continents, several countries, and to a multitude of adverse characters. The protagonist, Candide, became the recipient of the horrors which would be faced by any person in the 18th century. But Candide was always accompanied with fellows sufferers, two of which our focus will lay, Pangloss and Martin. In equal respects, both are embodiments of different philosophies of the time: Pangloss the proponent of Optimism and Martin the proponent of Pessimism....   [tags: Voltaire, Candide]
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1176 words
(3.4 pages)
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An Analysis of Candide Story by Voltaire - Voltaire “Candide or Optimism” was written in the enlightenment era. Voltaire story is published in The Norton Anthology of Western Literature. Voltaire’s character, Pangolss, is a philosopher who teaches about God morals. Pangolss is also a mentor to Candide, who is the main character of the novel. Candide has a good heart but is also feel s very hopeless in life. Pangloss takes Candide under his wing and teaches him that “best of all possible worlds.” The enlightenment movement is seen closely in Voltaire writing style on page 378....   [tags: voltaire, enlightment era, candide] 1336 words
(3.8 pages)
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Voltaire's Candide: The Transformation of Candide - Voltaire's Candide: The Transformation of Candide     Candide (1991), which is another version of "Voltaire" by French writer Francois-Marie Arouet, is a short but diverse story that tells of a young man's journey for love and the hardships he faces all the while keeping a very strong, positive and philosophical outlook on life. The book starts in an unknown year, hinted sometime around the Renaissance, with a young man named Candide. Candide loves the princess of a Baron and is banished from the land because of it....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays]
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1089 words
(3.1 pages)
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Women in Voltaire’s Candide - In Candide Voltaire discusses the exploitation of the female race in the eighteenth century through the women in the novel. Cunegonde, Paquette, and the Old Woman suffer through rape and sexual exploitation regardless of wealth or political connections. These characters possess very little complexity or importance in Candide. With his characterization of Cunegonde, Paquette, and the Old Woman Voltaire satirizes gender roles and highlights the impotence of women in the 1800s. Cunegonde is the daughter of a wealthy German lord....   [tags: Exploitation of women in Candide]
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1058 words
(3 pages)
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Essay on Voltaire's Candide - Optimism in Candide - Optimism in Candide Voltaire's Candide uses anti-heroism as an object of mockery against the philosophers of the Enlightenment. Candide, the hero of the novel travels around the world where he encounters many difficulties. During his travels, he sticks to the teaching of his tutor, Doctor Pangloss, believing that "everything is for the best" (3). Voltaire points out the illogicality of this doctrine, "if Columbus had not caught, on an American island, this sickness which attacks the source of generation [...] we should have neither chocolate or cochineal" (8)....   [tags: Candide essays] 802 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Meaning of Eldorado in Voltaire’s Candide - The true meaning of “Eldorado” in Voltaire’s Candide has been debated for some time. The scene of Eldorado is the visual philosophy of Voltaire’s thoughts of what an ideal society would be. It is a land of richness and where there is a state of being equal in status, rights, belief, and opportunity; it is free of greed, claiming titles or importance, religious strife or contention, and there is no suffering (Mason 55). Eldorado also brings the reader’s attention in its scene to show the bad fortune of realities of cultures beyond its land....   [tags: Candide, Eldorado, Voltaire]
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2476 words
(7.1 pages)
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The Nature of Unhappiness in Candide, by Voltaire - Candide is well known for its critique of optimism by Voltaire. The title character, along with his companions, bears many hardships throughout the novel and philosophizes about the nature and necessity of good in the world. Whether there is truly any good in the world is debated between the characters, particularly between the very discouraged Martin and Candide, who carries with him the optimistic words of Dr. Pangloss, a believer in the good nature of the world. While the characters debate why man must carry such burdens, Voltaire shows us that it is dealing with the bad that makes us human....   [tags: Candide Essays] 1316 words
(3.8 pages)
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Intelligent Satire in Voltaire's Candide - Intelligent Satire in Candide      In the story Candide, Voltaire uses the experiences of the character Candide and dialogue between characters to dispute the theory by other philosophers that "Everything is for the best in this best of all possible worlds" (Voltaire). Voltaire believed that the society that he lived in had many flaws, flaws which are illustrated throughout the story. Voltaire uses satire to take aim at the military, religion, and societies' emphasis of physical beauty, to illustrate that we do not live in the best of all possible worlds....   [tags: Candide essays]
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854 words
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Voltaire's Candide: The Prospect of Survival - In Voltaire's Candide, many of the characters share the uncanny ability to go through difficult situations and survive. Some of them are even killed, only to return in the next chapter healthier than ever. In many cases, they narrowly escape death due to the help of a friend who bails them out and asks for nothing in return. After so many close calls, one can't help but speculate if a higher power is in control of their fates, or possibly their survival is solely due to luck. In the first chapter, Candide is caught kissing Cunegonde by her father, the Baron, who banishes him from the castle....   [tags: Candide essays] 604 words
(1.7 pages)
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Voltaire's Candide as an Attack on Optimism - Voltaire's Attack on Optimism in Candide      Leibnitz emphasized, in his Discours de Metaphysique (Discourse on Metaphysics) (1686) the role of a benevolent creator. He called the constituent components of the universe monads, and while the philosophy of monads is of little concern to readers of Candide, the conclusion which Leibnitz drew from these monads is crucial to an understanding of optimism.             Leibnitz argued that all of these monads were linked in a complex chain of cause and effect and that this linking had been done by a divine creator as he created the harmonious universe....   [tags: Candide essays]
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1281 words
(3.7 pages)
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Essay on Satire in Voltaire's Candide - Use of Satire in Voltaire’s Candide            Voltaire successfully uses satire as a means of conveying his opinions about life.  In his novel, Candide, Voltaire satirizes the philosopher Liebnitz's philosophy that this is the best of all possible worlds.  In the novel, the perpetually optimistic and naive character, Candide, travels around the world, having various experiences that prove, at least to the reader, that evil does exist.    In one particular passage, Voltaire uses explicit diction, exaggerated details and manipulated syntax in order to contrast the optimist's romantic view of battle with the horrible reality that is war....   [tags: Candide essays]
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627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Free Essays: Candide's Metamorphosis - Candide's Metamorphosis In Voltaire's novella, we view the main character, Candide, as being sophomoric and rather naïve. Yet, Candide eventually frees himself from the shackles that burden his beloved philosopher Pangloss and other characters befriended along the way. Candide's journey back to Cunegonde become a means for him to emerge from his "self-imposed immaturity." The word "candide," which Cassell's French Dictionary defines as "ingenuous", would greatly summarize who the main character is to be perceived as....   [tags: Candide essays] 796 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Confused Males of Montesquieu’s Persian Letters, Voltaire’s Candide, Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels - The Confused Males of Montesquieu’s Persian Letters, Voltaire’s Candide, Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, and Rousseau’s First and Second Discourses “Now my father was then holding one of his second beds of justice, and was musing within himself about the hardships of matrimony, as my mother broke silence.— —My brother Toby, quoth she, is going to be married to Mrs. Wadman.” —Then he will never, quoth my father, be able to lie diagonally in his bed again as long as he lives.” (Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy) The eighteenth century, what a magnificent time—a contemporary critic is likely to exclaim, and indeed it was....   [tags: Candide]
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2498 words
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Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: Relevance of Candide’s Message Today - Relevance of Candide’s Message in Today's World     Voltaire's Candide is a philosophical tale of one man's search for true happiness and his ultimate acceptance of life's disappointments. Candide grows up in the Castle of Westfalia and is taught by the learned philosopher Dr. Pangloss. Candide is abruptly exiled from the castle when found kissing the Baron's daughter, Cunegonde. Devastated by the separation from Cunegonde, his true love, Candide sets out to different places in the hope of finding her and achieving total happiness....   [tags: Candide essays]
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961 words
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Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: The Accuracy of Candide -     Voltaire is correct in Candide, where he argues that life on earth is hell in many ways. Voltaire accurately describes how selfish people often are and how they inflict misery on others as a result. Voltaire also describes accurately common forms of cruelty in society. Although he may be mistaken that all wars are equally senseless and avoidable, Voltaire is correct in showing that war inevitably produces atrocities, which makes for hell on earth.        In support of these statements, let's examine Voltaire's accurate description of human selfishness.   An example would be the behavior of the sailor who Pangloss and Candide met on their voyage to Lisbon.  This sailor was rescued fr...   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays]
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766 words
(2.2 pages)
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Voltaire's Candide Exposes Extreme Optimism - Philosophy of Extreme Optimism in Candide It is often said that a person's life is shaped when he or she is a child. This is very much so with Candide - Pangloss was his tutor in "metaphysico-theologo-cosmolonigology" (Voltaire 18) since Candide was a child, and instilled into Candide's mind his philosophy of extreme optimism. Pangloss belief that "all is for the best in this world" (24) somewhat stays with Candide throughout his travels and is more of a burden to him than anything else....   [tags: Candide essays]
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2316 words
(6.6 pages)
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Voltaire's Candide as Vehicle to Discredit Optimism - Voltaire's Candide as Vehicle to Discredit Optimism    Optimism was an attractive to many because it answered a profound philosophical question: if God is omnipotent and benevolent, then why is there so much evil in the world. Optimism provides an easy way out: God has made everything for the best, and even though one might experience personal misfortune, God (via your misfortune) is still helping the greater good.               Voltaire's experiences led him to dismiss the idea that this is the best of all possible worlds....   [tags: Candide essays]
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1005 words
(2.9 pages)
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Free Candide Essays: The Human Corruption - Human Corruption in Candide According to Voltaire, Man's goal is his own happiness.  This goal all too often is a mirage. (Gay 26)   Man is the prey of his own passion, victim of his own stupidity.  Man is the play thing of fate. (Gay 26)   The human condition is set with ills that no amount of rationality can cure. (Gay 27)    This human condition translates to human corruption. Voltaire hints of this corruption through Candide.  Candide impacted society as Voltaire knew it.  English Admirals that loose battles are no longer shot as object lessons in military perseverance....   [tags: Candide essays] 346 words
(1 pages)
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Criticism of Religion in Voltaire’s Candide - Criticism of Religion in Voltaire’s Candide In his novel Candide, Voltaire often criticized religious beliefs of the times. His criticism of religion surfaces throughout the entire story. The kindness of the Anabaptist that Candide met showed the silliness of religious prejudices. The old woman's story of her father, Pope Urban X, and the life of wealth she lived as a child shows the corruption of the Catholic clergy. Finally, the conversation Candide and Cacambo had with the old man in Eldorado shows the benefits of a simple religion, a contrast of the European religions of the time....   [tags: Candide essays] 738 words
(2.1 pages)
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Free Candide Essays: Politically Incorrect - The Politically Incorrect Candide Candide is a story that should be added to every canon in literature. It is a story that addresses issues about human nature that other stories choose to ignore. It addresses issues such as human nature, optimism, and religion and state. These elements give an insight and a perspective that readers do not usually get in every day literature. These elements are controversial, but from an honest point of view. Voltaire never tries to be politically correct – he tells it like it is or at least tells it like he sees things....   [tags: Candide essays] 367 words
(1 pages)
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Candide: A Critique - Let me start off by saying that I thoroughly enjoy satires; it is the genre I appreciate most for its employment of wit and militant irony. Upon delving into Candide by Voltaire I was lured in by its display of ridiculously brutal situations that dramatized the many evils of human experience. I think Voltaire wonderfully crafted this particular satire through his conglomeration of themes and symbolisms. Seemingly swiftly Voltaire takes the reader through a manifold of episodes of extreme cruelty that prove both horrible and vividly comic....   [tags: Candide Voltaire Review Critique] 899 words
(2.6 pages)
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Candide: A Satire On The Enlightenment - Candide: A Satire On The Enlightenment Works Cited Missing Candide is an outlandishly humorous, far-fetched tale by Voltaire satirizing the optimism espoused by the philosophers of the Age of Enlightenment. It is the story of a young man’s adventures throughout the world, where he witnesses much evil and disaster. Throughout his travels, he adheres to the teachings of his tutor, Pangloss, believing that "all is for the best in the best of all possible worlds." Candide is Voltaire’s answer to what he saw as an absurd belief proposed by the Optimists - an easy way to rationalize evil and suffering....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays] 596 words
(1.7 pages)
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Use of Satire in Voltaire's Candide - Successful Use of Satire in Voltaire's Candide Voltaire's Candide is the story of how one man's adventures affect his philosophy on life. Candide begins his journey full of optimism that he lives in "the best of all possible worlds," but he learns that it is naïve to say that good will eventually come of any evil.  Voltaire successfully uses satire as a means of conveying his opinions about many aspects of European society in the eighteenth century.  He criticizes religion, the evils found in every level of society, and a philosophy of optimism when faced with an intolerable world.  Candide portrays religious persecution as one of the most worst aspects of society.  Voltaire rejects...   [tags: Candide essays Voltaire ]
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1563 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Effective Satire of Voltaire's Candide - The Effective Satire of Voltaire's Candide      In Candide, Voltaire sought to point out the fallacy of Gottfried Leibniz's theory of optimism and the hardships brought on by the resulting inaction toward the evils of the world. Voltaire's use of satire, and its techniques of exaggeration and contrast highlight the evil and brutality of war and the world in general when men are meekly accepting of their fate. Leibniz, a German philosopher and mathematician of Voltaire's time, developed the idea that the world they were living in at that time was "the best of all possible worlds." This systematic optimism shown by Leibniz is the philosophical system that believed everything already was for...   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays]
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1191 words
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A Freudian Analysis of Voltaire's Candide - A Freudian Analysis of Voltaire's Candide       In Civilization and its Discontents, Sigmund Freud refers to the important role that love plays in the world of Man. Love certainly plays an important role in Voltaire's Candide; throughout Candide's journeys, a constant factor is his love for Lady Cunegonde and his desire to be with her. Freud writes "the way of life which makes love the centre of everything [...] comes naturally to all of us," (Freud, p. 29). Candide's love for Cunegonde is the driving force of his life from the moment they are parted at the beginning of the novel until they are bonded in marriage at the end....   [tags: Candide Voltaire Freud Essays Papers]
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1635 words
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Use of Satire to Attack Optimism in Voltaire's Candide - Use of Satire to Attack Optimism in Voltaire's Candide     In its time, satire was a powerful tool for political assault on Europe's corrupt and deteriorating society. Voltaire's Candide uses satire to vibrantly and sarcastically portray optimism, a philosophical view from the Enlightenment used to bury the horrors of 18th century life: superstition, sexually transmitted diseases, aristocracy, the church, tyrannical rulers, civil and religious wars, and the cruel punishment of the innocent....   [tags: Candide essays]
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1369 words
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Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: Visualizing Perfection - Visualizing Perfection in Candide  "All is for the best...in the best of all possible worlds."  To picture greatness, perfection and brilliance all intertwined into one splendid world -- a utopia, infers visualizing absolute beauty, harmony, and a universal tolerance amongst mankind. Would not such "perfection" designate the "best of all possible worlds?" How could we possibly conceive the sinister world portrayed in Candide to be conveyed as "utopia?" Since the best of all possible worlds indicates that "all is for the best" is it not safe to derive at the conclusion that since our world is clearly not "perfect" it is the...   [tags: Candide essays] 1046 words
(3 pages)
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Essay on Voltaire's Candide - Fallacy of Optimism Exposed - Fallacy of Optimism Exposed in Candide In Candide, Voltaire paints a dismal and satirical view of the world. Voltaire paints a pessimistic portrait of a naïve youth who is raised to believe that this is best of all worlds. Time and again, Voltaire clearly portrays his belief that this is not the best of all possible worlds.   The characters of the story face great adversity. In chapter 10, Cunegonde states that her misfortune is so great that she does not see how the old woman's story of woe can surpass her own....   [tags: Candide essays] 783 words
(2.2 pages)
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Free Essays: The World is Far From Perfect in Candide - The World is Far From Perfect in Candide Candide is a great man that has encountered and accomplished many things. Candide has traveled far and wide through out his quest. He has encountered many things. He has been treated poorly by the government by being flogged multiple times by a two thousand-man army. To have his teacher lynched in front of his very eyes. He has met many people in his quest some nice and some not nice. Over all he was reunited with his friends and his true love....   [tags: Candide essays] 647 words
(1.8 pages)
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Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: A Typical Enlightenment Work - Candide as a Typical Enlightenment Work       Candide on the surface is a witty story. However when inspected deeper it is a philippic writing against people of an uneducated status. Candide is an archetype of these idiocracies, for he lacks reason and has optimism that is truly irking, believing that this is the best of all possible worlds. Thus Voltaire uses a witty, bantering tale on the surface, but in depth a cruel bombast against the ignoramuses of his times.               Candide has reason only in the form of a companion upon which he relies for advice....   [tags: Candide essays]
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673 words
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Free Candide Essays: Impossibility Of The Happy Life - Candide: The Impossibility Of The Happy Life This paper's focus is Voltaire's view of human happiness. Specifically, it will argue that Voltaire, in Candide, says that human happiness is impossible. Voltaire believes this for three reasons. First, Voltaire presents mankind in the novel spending all its life worried about personal problems of the moment. When people in Candide have no problems, Voltaire indicates, they do not feel happy but become bored instead. Their emotional lives swing between worries and boredom with almost no periods of prolonged happiness....   [tags: Candide essays] 645 words
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Voltaire's Candide Character Analysis - Voltaire's Candide Character Analysis Voltaire's Candide seems to display a world of horror, one filled with floggings, rapes, robberies, unjust executions, disease, natural disasters, betrayals and cannibalism. Pangloss, the philosopher, has a constant optimistic view throughout the entire novel even despite all of the cruelty in the world. While looking back on the book I couldn't think of many characters that displayed admirable qualities. Even though Pangloss stuck to his views that everything is for the best in this best of all possible worlds, which is admirable, he is stupid and naive to still believe this after everything he and his family goes through....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays Papers]
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1423 words
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Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: A Freudian Interpretation - A Freudian Interpretation of Candide Voltaire’s Candide is a humorous work depicting the misadventures of a German man who has fallen from pseudo-nobility and is forced to roam the world in search for his love and his identity. In his adventures, he encounters massive fits of violence, both inflicted by himself onto others, and by those around him. This huge amount of violent behavior brings about startling questions about morality and justice in Voltaire’s time. It becomes apparent that Candide, among other things, is a satire which focuses on justice....   [tags: Candide Essays] 1107 words
(3.2 pages)
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Irony, Satire, Symbols, and Symbolism in Voltaire's Candide - Use of Irony, Satire, and Symbolism in Candide In the novel, Candide, Voltaire uses many literary writing tools to prove the points in which he believes. Some of these many literary tools are irony, satire, and symbolism. Through these tools, Voltaire proves that greed is a universal vice, and usually ends in ones own destruction. Voltaire strongly emphasizes his pessimistic view throughout the story. During Chapter 10, he uses his philosophies, as well as other literary tools, to present greed as a devastating factor of society's corruption....   [tags: Candide essays] 447 words
(1.3 pages)
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Voltaire’s Views of Religion and State Expressed In Candide - Voltaire’s Views of Religion and State Expressed In Candide      Throughout Candide, Voltaire uses satire as a tool to reveal his controversial views regarding religion and State. He reveals the corruption, hypocrisy and immorality present in the way in which government and religion operated during his lifetime. Most particularly, he criticizes violent government behaviour (ie; war) and the behaviour of members of the aristocracy, who constituted the bulk of high ranking government and religious leaders....   [tags: Candide essays]
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792 words
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Voltaire’s Candide: Prejudices Against Religion and State - Prejudices Against Religion and State in Candide   Voltaire has strong viewpoints that become very obvious when reading his work Candide.  Candide is a collection of criticisms that immortalize Voltaire's Controversial thoughts and prejudices against religion and state.        Voltaire had a negative view on government as he wrote in Candide: "let us work without arguing, that is the only way to make life endurable." Voltaire accepted the Royalists and rejected the parliamentary interpretation of the French constitution, but he was willing to concede that the legal position was not clear....   [tags: Candide essays]
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717 words
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Essay on Voltaire’s Candide: Use of Language - Use of Language in Candide       A great philosopher Liebnitz once said that this is the best possible of all worlds. Voltaire disagrees. In Voltaire's Candide, the impartial narrator travels to distant lands and experiences a range of extremes. After having spent a great deal of time away from his homeland, and having seen more than most people see in a lifetime, the narrator is forced to conclude that this may not be the best possible world because of the reality of evil. Voltaire relates this point very effectively through his mastery of language and the choices he makes, both gramatically and content-related....   [tags: Candide essays]
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663 words
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Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Voltaire uses many writing techniques, which are similar to that of the works of Cervantes, Alighieri, Rabelais and Moliere. The use of the various styles shows that, despite the passing of centuries and the language change, certain writing techniques will always be effective. One common literary technique is the author's use of one or more of his characters as his own voice to speak out the authors own views on certain subjects. For instance, in Moliere's Tartuffe, the author uses the character of Cleante to speak out against religious hypocrites: "Nothing that I more cherish and admire than honest zeal and true religious fire....   [tags: Voltaire Candide ] 1186 words
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Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Voltaire, whose real name was Francois Marie Arouet, was a man whose cynical style of writing brought attention upon himself, both in the positive aspect and in the negative. Francois associated himself with a group of politically power-hungry people who held a frantic hatred against the duke of Orleans. He was wrongly believed to have printed two libelous poems that defaced the duke and due to the false accusation he was imprisoned in the Bastille....   [tags: Voltaire Candide] 1025 words
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Rising Above a Corrupt World in Voltaire's Candide - Rising Above a Corrupt World in Voltaire's Candide        Society can be, and is, corrupt in many different ways. Within our lives we are subject, but not limited to, corruptions within religion, corruptions of morals, and corruption within the government. Voltaire, the author of Candide, uses a naïve protagonist to illustrate his view of the world. Candide, surrounded by a corrupt society, and bombarded by various character defining events, is able to come to a higher understanding as to his philosophy of life....   [tags: Candide Voltaire Corruption Essays]
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1569 words
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Voltaire's Candide - Voltaires's Candide In Voltaires?s Candide, the main character, Candide, fails to live happily because he is looking outside of himself and his circumstances to do it. Voltaire says through Candide's ultimate discovery that happiness in many ways depends on a person's attitude. Voltaire's philosophy expressed through Candide's final realization is that "We must cultivate our garden," which is the key to happiness(p.585). By cultivating our garden, Voltaire means that we must make the best of our situation in the present moment....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays]
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1143 words
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Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Throughout the novel, Candide, Voltaire repeatedly exploits the nature of humans to consider other's situations and lifestyles to be better than that of their own. Voltaire uses Candide's journeys to portray the human assumption that the grass is always greener on the other side. This theme is shown in Candide's strife for companionship, his experience with wealth, and his interaction with other characters. The situations that develop the theme do so in such a way that the reader is able to understand and relate to the aspirations of Candide....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Essays] 826 words
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Essay on Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Opposition to Optimism - Voltaire’s Opposition to Optimism in Candide Philosophy is a means by which humans search for a general understanding of the world and its concepts. Through experience, thought, and observation, one can arrive at a conclusion that forms the basis of his ideas. However, if one simply thinks and does not act, this conclusion does not make any significant difference on his life. This is a major point that Voltaire tries to make in Candide. He is trying to change society by demonstrating the absurdity of optimism....   [tags: Candide essays pessimism pessimist philosophy]
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1084 words
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Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire's Candide Voltaire’s masterpiece has been read delightfully and with much interest by many people since its scarcely secret publication in Geneva and Paris (1759). When it was first published, there were about twenty copies, most of which were pirated. When Voltaire died (1778) there were already more than fifty, and later on it became the best seller of the eighteenth century. It is true that the local conditions have changed since Candide was written. English admirals are not shot any more as a lesson in military perseverance....   [tags: Voltaire Candide Literature History Essays] 3530 words
(10.1 pages)
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Use of Satire to Target Religion, Military, and Optimism in Voltaire's Candide - Use of Satire to Target Religion, Military, and Optimism in Voltaire's Candide   In his work, Candide, Voltaire uses satire as a means of conveying his opinions about many aspects of European society in the eighteenth century.  Voltaire successfully criticizes religion, the military, and the philosophy of optimism.  Religious leaders are the targets of satire throughout Candide. Voltaire portrays the religious clergy as men who use their positions to further their own causes. In addition, the priests keep the less fortunate oppressed, so the clergy members can continue to enjoy extravagant luxuries....   [tags: Candide Voltaire essays]
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603 words
(1.7 pages)
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Candide by Voltaire - Voltaire was the author of the novella Candide, also known as "Optimism". The the novella, Voltaire portrays the idea of Optimism as being illogical and absurd. In Candide, Voltaire satirizes the doctrine of Optimism, an idea that was greatly used during the Enlightenment time period by philosophers. In this narrative, Candide is a young man who goes through a series of undertakings and ventures around the the globe where he experiences evil and adversity. Throughout his journeys, Candide maintained the ideas of the teachings of his tutor, Pangloss....   [tags: Satire of Optimism Philosophy]
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1219 words
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Candide by Voltaire - ... He saw Anabaptism as a “lesser of evils.” Voltaire expands his views on religion by discussing differences between religions. He exhibits the idea that not every religion can be true, and everything about them is flawed. Voltaire had a strong belief in the idea that religion meant being nice to others. Since not all religions can be true, there will inevitably be arguments between different members of religions. Therefore the arguments leave no room to “being kind to others.” It could not possibly be a rational idea with religion....   [tags: opposing philosophy of Enlightment period] 939 words
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Candide by Voltaire - ... The Baron’s son finds Candide unworthy of his sister, Cunegonde, even though he manages to save her from multiple misfortunes. Through these examples Voltaire expresses his discontent with the nobility and the fact that birthright is meaningless. Even Candide’s experiences in the army emphasize Voltaire’s contempt with nobility. In every war Candide envelops himself with, the lower class people reap the consequences of the aristocracy’s actions. Philosophers of the Enlightenment believed in absolute optimism, meaning even when the worst is to come there is always something positive as a result....   [tags: novel analysis] 862 words
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Candide, by Voltaire - “Candide” by Voltaire is a novel that captures the tumultuous life of Candide, the simple, illegitimate son of the baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh’s sister. Living in the castle in Westphalia, Candide’s realm of knowledge encompasses the ideas presented to him by Pangloss, his tutor, who believes that the world they inhabit is the “best of all possible worlds.” (Voltaire 15) Candide carries the optimism of Pangloss’ belief with him as he is banished from his castle and enters an uncharted terrain. In the unfamiliar world of hardship, suffering and poverty, he discovers the inaccuracy of the many ideas Pangloss presented to him....   [tags: Life Philosophy, Evil] 1214 words
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Candide, by Voltaire - Somewhere out there in the world, a car is being stolen, a child is stealing from his mother's purse, or a bank is being robbed. Why are people stealing and taking things for their own claim. Often the trait of greed is the reason for why a person partakes in such act. The trait of greed is impossible to be seen through appearance but rather by human behaviors itself. In Candide, by Voltaire, greed is expressed in a satirical manner through the actions of the characters in the novel. Through this trait, people are driven to make sacrifices and believe that happiness and satisfaction are only found when they are enriched with wealth....   [tags: Greed, Satire, Character Analysis] 795 words
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Loss of Innocence in Candide by Voltaire - In the novel Candide written by Voltaire there are several symbols throughout the story. One of those symbolic figures that seems to stand out in the story is the character Candide, a gullible and innocent boy who experiences many hardships after being vanished from the castle of the baron von Thunder-ten-tronckh. Candide seems to be a representation of people's innocence and how they tend to lose it throughout their lifetime as they witness and experience new things in the world and grow wary of the consequences that every different situation may hold....   [tags: experiences, adaptation, gentle]
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Summary of Candide by Voltaire - Candide is a story of a boy who lived in world of little to no troubles and how his entire perspective of the world was changed when he was placed in the real world and forced to face conflicts in which he had never faced before. His tutor, Pangloss, taught him Leibnizian optimism but you can see this mindset slowly deteriorate throughout the novella. Candide lived in a castle with his illegitimate uncle, a German baron; the baron’s daughter, Cunedonde; Pangloss, the tutor; and a few other family members....   [tags: voyage, perspective, fortune]
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Candide. Everything Has a Cause - Candide is a novel that makes sarcasm on lots of aspects. For example, it satirizes one philosophical idea that “there is no effect without a cause”. As a philosopher who believes that everything has its own purpose, I feel offended by Voltaire’s Candide after reading this novel at my local Salon, since what Voltaire attacked, cause and effect, had been proved in our real life hundreds of years ago by scientific revolution, from which the idea of cause and effect emerged: events take place for specific reasons and they follow their unique laws, not operated by supernatural force or just happened to be there....   [tags: voltaire, philosophy] 894 words
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Religion in Candide by Voltaire - ... Voltaire said that Jacques was a good Anabaptist in the ‘Candide’ though he was never baptized. The Anabaptist represents a solution or viewpoint of the sufferings. Anabaptist is a member of a radical sixteenth-century Christianity in which is a sect of the Reformation He cares for Candide and Pangloss. Pangloss says Candide that ‘Private misfortunes contribute to the general good, so that the more private misfortunes there are, the more we find that all is well’(pg 31) The kindness of the Anabaptist that Candide meets, shows the stupidity of religious prejudices to us....   [tags: attacks and criticism on religion] 825 words
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Candide, a Novel by Voltaire - ... After he was captured, the Bulgarian King granted Candide’s freedom because he had already a little skin, and was able to march when the King of the Bulgarians gave battle to the King of the Abares. Throughout Candide’s journey, he meets this orator and the Anabaptist and they both treated Candide differently because they took him home, cleaned him, gave him bread and beer, presented him with two florins, and even wished to teach him the manufacture of Persian stuffs which they make in Holland....   [tags: philosophical and literary analysis] 746 words
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Candide by Nate Ziefert - Book Critique of Candide Candide is a French satire novella first published in 1759 by Gabriel Cramer in Paris, France, and written by François-Marie Arouet, or Voltaire, his pen name, a philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment. This book was chosen to show what life was like in France prior to the French Revolution and to provide an overview of the political issues of that period. Reading the book provided context for discussing various themes, including the importance of reason, the corruption of the church, money and power, inequality, which were all-pressing issues in the time period we studied....   [tags: book critique, French satire novella] 910 words
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Analysis of Candide, by Voltaire - The book Candide by Voltaire is a humorous satire constructed of many themes. Through his book, Voltaire expresses his views on life by criticizing many aspects of humanity at that time. He focused in war, religion, and love, but the main target of Voltaire's satire was a certain philosophy. All of the previous topics unite to ridicule the philosophy that, as the character Pangloss said, "things cannot be otherwise than as they are; for as all things have been created for some end, they must necessarily be created for the best end" (1)....   [tags: Theme and Topics]
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Analysis of the Play Candide - ... At the end of the battle when everyone is dead and there is nothing left the music is sad and somber and it has a piano sound and grave tempo, which reflects the mood of Candide when he finds that Cunegonde is dead. During a later part of Scene Two when the cast is dancing the movements match the music, they appeared to be doing the Waltz, so the music had abrupt changes. In Scene Three: Cadiz, the orchestra plays some sad and somber music at the beginning. As the scene progresses the music goes from dark and dismal to happy and cheerful....   [tags: school, voice, music, reflects] 1049 words
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Candide, Macbeth and Oedipus Rex - ... Candide made a final conclusion that people worked for what they wanted, things didn’t just happen, and people had to earn them and deserved their free wills. They were also happier when they could control their lives, even their fates could affect the future, but people got a more meaningful lives. The fate was important for a person’s life, but only free will could make him feel happy. In William Shakespeare’s play, Macbeth, it’s a constant question of whether Macbeth is a victim of witches’ prophecy or he chooses be evil upon his free will....   [tags: fate and free will as opposing themes] 1516 words
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Voltaire's Candide and Moliere's Tartuffe - ... "Pangloss stopped him by demonstrating that the Lisbon harbor was designed expressly for the Anabaptist to drown in" (Voltaire 192). Orgon and Candide were both reliant on a supporting cast within the play to an extreme where the characters began to have the critical thinking skills of a child. Orgon says to Cléante concerning Tartuffe, “to keep his precepts is to be reborn, and view this dunghill of a world with scorn. Yes, thanks to him I’m a changed man indeed” (Moliere 114). Orgon obviously hangs on to every word that comes out of Tartuffe’s mouth that it nears the point of frustration towards Orgon....   [tags: Enlightment literature]
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Analytical Awakening: Voltaire's Candide - Voltaire’s satirical novella Candide tells the story a young man who, having been raised in a secluded utopia and educated in philosophical optimism, is suddenly thrust into the world and forced to make sense of the evil and suffering around him that he has always been taught to reason away. As his journey progresses and he encounters numerous horrors, Candide increasingly struggles to accept his tutor’s theory that all is for the best, and it ultimately becomes apparent that he has lost faith in his tutor’s philosophy....   [tags: pangloss' philosophy, Mr. Vanderdunder]
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Candide by François-Marie Arouet - ... They eventually reencounter some of this lost fortune when a Dutch boat is sunk. Candide sees something bright red swimming near their ship. “It was one of his sheep. There was more joy in Candide at finding this one sheep…(Voltaire, p. 53).” This acts as a parody, or satire, of Christ’s parable of the lost sheep. The finding of this sheep also symbolizes hope for Candide. He perceives this discovery of the sheep as hope that he will be reunited with Cunégonde again just as he was with the sheep....   [tags: catholic church, philosopher, writer] 989 words
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Candide - Today we see sarcasm and satire everywhere. In movies and books, on television, and in our everyday life. We almost do not realize it, because we are so used to sarcasm as a device to show the folly or ludicrousness of something, and public figures today can almost guarantee that they will be parodied at some point in their career; it is completely acceptable for writers and comedians today to go after anyone in jest. In the eighteenth century, however, satire was not as acceptable. Upon publication of his most famous work, Candide, the author Voltaire saw plenty of criticism for the authorities the story questioned....   [tags: Literature] 907 words
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Analysis of Voltaire´s Candide - This epic satire zeroes in on Voltaire’s criticisms against the Catholic Church, related through a dry comedy and swift plot. This is the life of Candide, the main character, his journey around the world and adventures. Candide opens with blatant mockery of society, government, and religion, but he also mocked the philosophy of optimism by philosopher Leibniz. To make the novel more alive, he uses real events that have happened in the world. This mockery of society can lead one to read it as a less blatant commentary on gender roles and xenophobia....   [tags: Catholic Church, mockery, satire, xenophobia]
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Character Analysis: Voltaire's Candide - Enlightenment poem “Candide” translated into Romanticism Voltaire’s “Candide or Optimism” was written in the enlightenment era. Voltaire’s story is published in The Norton Anthology of Western Literature. Voltaire’s character Pangloss is a philosophy who taught about the all-powerful God, who created the world. Pangloss indicated the world must belong to God, for he was the only divine creator. Pangolss was also a mentor to Candide, who was the main character in the novel. Candide had a good heart, but felt very hopeless in life....   [tags: pangloss, romanticism]
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Analysis of Voltaire´s Candide - The age of Enlightenment in France started in the late 17th century, a time during which the absolute monarchy of Louis XIV ruled over all facets of life. The opulence and power of a single ruler led many philosophers of the time to look at life more closely and consider the realities behind the extravagance of the court of Versailles. On the surface of society, reason was seen as the driving force of the civilized world, education was becoming more and more important, the arts and sciences were encouraged, and the values of the Classical Period were at the forefront....   [tags: Irony, France, Enlightenment] 1380 words
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Candide's Growth - In the story "Candide" Voltaire uses satire to criticize the philosophical views of the enlightenment period and illustrate his outlook of how an individual should view their own existence by Candide's character development throughout the story. Voltaire is able to do this by introducing Candide into two contrasting philosophical views of characters that play a large role in his life, Pangloss and Martin. At the beginning of Candide's quest he followed Pangloss's theory of the best of all possible worlds....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Candide Paper - Candide is a fictional satire of the optimism many philosophers had for life in general during the mid 1700’s written in response to Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Man. Written by Voltaire, the literary alias of Francois-Marie Arouet, the satire covers religion, the wealthy, love, why people thought natural disasters occurred and especially, philosophy. The novel even goes on to make fun of the art of literature by giving ridiculous chapter headings. Just about everything Voltaire put into Candide is designed to question and satirize real world injustices....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Candide Essay - The Enlightenment period of the 19th century was a major switch from a center around the Catholic Church to new secular ideas on politics and science, and the works of the writers who lived during this age reflect that. The French philosopher Voltaire, especially, expressed his opinions on society through satire, as in his novella, Candide. He invites his readers to look upon a world in which everything goes wrong and yet, the main character had an abundance of optimism—a contradiction that leads to Voltaire’s commentary in the work on utopias and how to find happiness....   [tags: Philosophy] 690 words
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Voltaire Exposes the Fallacy of Optimism in Candide - Voltaire was the French author of the novella Candide, also known as "Optimism" (Durant and Durant 724). Famous as a playwright and essayist, Voltaire’s Candide is the book where he tries to point out the fallacy of Gottfried William von Leibniz's theory of Optimism. He uses satire, and techniques of exaggeration to contrast highlight the evil and brutality of war and the world in general when men are meekly accepting of their fate. Leibniz, a German philosopher and mathematician of Voltaire's time, developed the idea that the world they were living in at that time was "the best of all possible worlds." This systematic optimism shown by Leibniz is the philosophical system that believed ever...   [tags: Optimism by Voltaire]
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Candide Religion - “Ecrasons l’infame,” which is interpreted, “We must crush the vile thing.” This is the expression Voltaire used to articulate his feelings for organized religion. With many natural theists soon to follow his path, Voltaire expressed his hatred for cultural religions, opting for a universal God of nature. Given a few more centuries, Darwin would have given Voltaire the scientific theory to support his desire for atheism. But alas, with no other theory in place, intelligent individuals of 18th century France were forced to use creationism to explain the world in its beauty and organization....   [tags: Voltaire, Organized Religion]
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The Pitfalls of Philosophical Absolutes in Voltaire's Candide - As a novel which ingeniously skewers the fashionable misinterpretation of doctrinal optimism, Candide succeeds in disgusting, amusing and surprising its audience. With unending bounds of irony and sarcasm, Candide thrusts us into a world where we meet numerous characters that endure rather exaggerated misfortune. As a result, we see several doctrinal beliefs, such as that of Pangloss and Martin. Pangloss, Candide’s mentor and philosopher, is a man of optimistic sentiment. Maintaining the belief that all is for the best in this “best of all possible worlds” (1.4), Pangloss is later found to be rather fool headed in his complacency....   [tags: literary analysis, philosophy, analytical] 872 words
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Commentary and Analysis of Voltaire´s Candide - ... The enlightenment was a period where people view point on the role of the kings changed drastically. The original theory of divine right, which stated that the kings were chosen and ordained by God to be the head of their states, was slowly replaced with the idea that the king was to serve the people and their needs. Enlightened despots such as Catherine the Great and Fredrick the Great enacted policies which were meant to lighten the burdens placed on the people. They built hospitals, decreased the amount of surfs and the harsh conditions, and even in some places built elementary schools....   [tags: Satire, Aristocracy, Catholicism] 521 words
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A Series of Unfortunate Events in Voltaire's Candide - In Candide, a series of unfortunate events befall the main character—Candide—to demonstrate the absurdity of his mentor’s philosophy that he lives in the best possible world. The main tenet of Pangloss’ philosophy is that even from acts that appear evil, or sub-optimal, there is a positive aspect that produces the best of all possible results. In other words, there is no such thing as a sub-optimal outcome or a bad occurrence. Candide demonstrates the absurdity of this mindset when Pangloss contracts syphilis, and when Candide’s benefactor drowns and an earthquake erupts in Lisbon, concluding with Pangloss trying his best to justify both events through the lens of his philosophy....   [tags: philosophy, disease, rationalization]
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Candide: Voltaire against Leibniz’ Optimism? - Candide: Voltaire against Leibniz’ Optimism. François-Marie Arouet, better known under his pen name Voltaire, was one of the leading philosophers of the Age of Enlightenment. He is considered the epitome of the eighteenth century, which has been named le siècle de Voltaire. His philosophical novel or conte, Candide, was published in 1759 and remains one of his most well known and widely read of his works—particularly for the English reader. In one part of his Columbia dissertation “Voltaire and Leibniz,” Richard A....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Savagery in Chronicles of a Death Foretold and Candide - Savagery is when people revert back to their lost human instincts and is often found in situations where people are under extreme circumstances. Savagery can be found in literature especially in the novels Chronicles of a Death Foretold and Candide. Though, both authors are from different time periods and cultures, both utilize the concept of savagery in both their novels, to present problems in their specific societies. The novel Chronicles of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, tells the murder of Santiago Nasar by twin brothers in a small Colombian town....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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Candide by Francoise Marie Arouet - Voltaire - “Candide” was a satire written in 1759 by François-Marie Arouet (commonly referred to as Voltaire) and published that same year by The Cramer Brothers. I believe our teachers wanted us to read this satire because of how deeply you need to analyze what it’s saying. It is certainly not a book you can afford to skim. It took me reading most chapters up to four times to actually understand what took place. I believe this is a great thing because this way I don’t read a 500 page, easy to understand book that leaves no impression on me, but a 30 page, complicated book which really makes me think and want to read it again....   [tags: satire analysis] 1606 words
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Voltaire's Candide versus Gronniosaw's A Narrative - Although Voltaire and Gronniosaw are similar in that their quest for enlightenment and individuality, they are also very different. Candide is a philosophical satirical novel that ingeniously shakes the misinterpretation of doctrinal optimism. Whilst A Narrative of the Life of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw written by himself, (For the purpose of this essay described as, ‘A Narrative.’) is an autobiographical, spiritual account of Gronniosaw’s travels. This essay will look at the narrative techniques, and the distinctive features, of the language used in both extracts....   [tags: narrative techniques and distinctive features] 1466 words
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Candide and Great Expectations: Comparing Candide and Pip - Candide, by Voltaire, and Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens, are two novels written in different periods of time and by authors with different backgrounds. Their main characters are consequently not identical to each other. The fundamental difference between Candide and Pip as characters is that Candide shows us only his outer countenance while Pip lets us know the deepest of his feelings. Candide is one of those "follow the leader" type characters, that doesn't do much thinking for himself....   [tags: Charles Dickens, Voltaire] 286 words
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Candide by Voltaire - Candide Voltaire’s most classic work, Candide, is a satiric assault on most everything that was prevalent in society during the author’s lifetime. The entire novel can be regarded as a bleak story where every character compares life stories to see whose life is worse. Just when the novel cannot get anymore morbid or depressing, it does, to a much greater degree. While Candide is generally considered a universal denunciation, it is optimism that Voltaire is attacking to the greatest degree....   [tags: essays papers] 1725 words
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