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Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason - ... Rochester seemed quite afraid of. Once things started to settle down, Mason snuck up to the infamous third floor, but ended up getting stabbed and bitten. Jane was asked to tend to Mason’s wounds while Mr. Rochester went to get the doctor. Richard Mason left the house the next morning before anyone can find out what happened. After all of the chaos from the party ended, Mr. Rochester decided to ask Jane to marry him. During the Nineteenth Century, this marriage would not be socially accepted in England....   [tags: unhappyness, struggles, Mr. Rochester]
:: 3 Works Cited
1459 words
(4.2 pages)
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Bertha and Jane in Charlotte Bronte´s Jane Eyre5 - In Victorian times, women played a very small role when interacting with men. Women held a subservient attitude and did as they were told due to their lower position in society. Two women that significantly went around these rules not only with men but also with anyone around them would be Jane and Bertha Rochester. Throughout the novel they have left their own marks with their actions and words. Her stay at Thornfield has made a tremendous impact on those around her especially Mr....   [tags: Marriage, Mental Health, Women]
:: 1 Works Cited
605 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Portrayal of Bertha in "The Lifted Veil" by George Eliot - The Lifted Veil is a novella written by George Eliot, which was originally published in 1859. The novella fits in well with the typical style of the Victorian era. However, George Eliot’s usual style was realistic, so when The Lifted Veil was written, it was the complete opposite of what was expected from her. The Lifted veil is a good example of horror fiction. It explores a wide variety of different themes, including extra sensory perception, foresight, insight, Victorian stereotypes, marriage and the Victorian ideals of womanhood....   [tags: George Eliot] 2198 words
(6.3 pages)
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Bertha Mason in Charlotte Bronte´s Jane Eyre - The Novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte took a surprising twist when Bertha "Mason" Rochester was introduced. Bertha leaves a traumatizing impression on Jane’s conscious. However, this particular misfortunate event was insidiously accumulating prior to Jane’s arrival at Thornfield. Through Bertha, the potential alternative dark turn of events of Jane’s past are realized, thus bringing Jane closer to finding herself. Bertha and Mr. Rochester were set up and pressured into marrying each other. Mr....   [tags: Relationship, Marriage, Madness]
:: 1 Works Cited
720 words
(2.1 pages)
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Bertha must be kept silent - Bertha must be kept silent Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre has been considered as a potentially subversive and revolutionary text because of its – and its author – social and political position. Jane Eyre is a young woman, orphan and low born, who fights for emancipation and liberty. She wants to lead her life independently without any external control. As a little girl, she was the incarnation of rebellion. Having been adopted by the Reed family and being treated unfairly, the prospect of a happy life was particularly little....   [tags: Essays Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
1018 words
(2.9 pages)
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Bertha Mason´s Appearance in Charlote Bronte´s Jane Eyre - Mr. Rochester’s wife, Bertha Rochester has created a twist in Jane’s life. Due to Bertha being married to Mr. Rochester, Jane’s marriage is postponed and it affects her mentally. Jane is affected by Bertha from Mr. Rochester’s dishonesty and Bertha’s madness that drove Mr. Rochester to hide her. From the experience she leaves Thornfield to escape the disappointments instead of taking responsibility. Charlotte Bronte introduces Bertha to strengthen Jane’s character and to show Berthas point of view....   [tags: Twist, Relationship, Marriage]
:: 1 Works Cited
678 words
(1.9 pages)
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Bertha Mason in Charlote Bronte´s Novel: Jane Eyre - Everyone has secrets and in the novel Jane Eyre by, Charlotte Bronte we see how a hidden past disrupts the very future of Jane’s life. Mr. Rochester has made his fair share of mistakes in his life and one of them being keeping a dark past locked and caged up. He literally did have his past subdued in a prison like manor because he kept his wife Bertha Mason locked on the third floor of the Thornfield household. We are introduced to Bertha Mason when Mr. Rochester goes on to tell Jane of his past....   [tags: Wife, Relationships, Mental Illness]
:: 1 Works Cited
637 words
(1.8 pages)
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Bertha Mason´s Appearance in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Charlotte Brontes use if writing is very unique. The way she describes the characters makes you think. She has depicted Bertha mason the first wife if Mr. Rochester. Bertha Mason was a woman who was struck with a mental illness who is then hidden and locked away in the attic of Thornfield. Bertha mason is the wife of Mr. Rochester. She stands in between of Jane and Mr. Rochester's marriage. We first hear of Bertha Mason in chapter 11 when Jane hears a strange laugh. Jane had confused Bertha Mason and Grace Poole....   [tags: Mental health, Marriage, Attic]
:: 1 Works Cited
529 words
(1.5 pages)
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Analysis of Bertha Mason´s Character in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Bertha Rochester’s introduction into Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte had an immense impact on her present life and aligned with the disappointments in her past. Bertha Rochester is the madwoman who lives in Mr. Rochester’s attic. She lives there because she is Mr. Rochester’s wife who was kept a secret from Jane. Mr. Rochester married her, not knowing what he was getting himself into it. Bertha Rochester is also the sister to Mr. Mason who was bitten and stabbed by her. Her existence and secret marriage to Mr....   [tags: Past, Wife, Meltall Illness]
:: 1 Works Cited
676 words
(1.9 pages)
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Commentary on Bertha Mason in Charlotte Bronte´s Jane Eyre - In the novel, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane meets many people each with a different story, reason and each person played a part in her life. Those people have impacted her life in such a way that it changes Jane's life forever. In those parts of her life someone new came in, they impacted her life with something new, and that something new changed how she looks on the world from the past she had. Like one women named Bertha Antoinetta Mason Rochester. In Chapter 26, we discovered more about Bertha, a woman that looks like Jane's inner self, a wild and uncontrollable, and that she was locked away in the mansion for a long time....   [tags: Influence, People, Past]
:: 1 Works Cited
606 words
(1.7 pages)
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Bertha Mason and her Impact in the Novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, Jane has gone through experiences and some which let her down in a few ways. Jane also has people who impact her which hinder her future. She has been through so much and sometimes things and good sometimes they’re bad. Jane’s life has really changed and she experiences many things When Bertha Rochester is first introduced in the novel she is much of a mystery. Her name isn’t stated and it isn’t really clear if she is the one causing trouble. Jane has assumptions of who might be committing all these problems....   [tags: Relationships, Mental Illness]
:: 1 Works Cited
818 words
(2.3 pages)
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Foods of the Foreign Born in Relation to Health, by Bertha M. Cooke - Foods of the Foreign Born in Relation to Health is a cookbook written by dietician Bertha M. Cooke. It was written as a guide for people that immigrated from Europe and other countries into the United States during the 19th Century. Derived from an Americanization study done by The Carnegie Corporation, Cooke dives into the world of understanding foreign cultures through, “studying people in relation to their diets.” Foods of the Foreign Born does draw attention to the cultural differences of immigrants moving into the United States during the 1920s while also focusing on the dietary needs and social characteristics associated with the integration of these immigrants into American society....   [tags: Medical Age, Immigrants In America]
:: 1 Works Cited
1069 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Metamorphosis of Bertha in Katherine Mansfield’s Bliss - The Metamorphosis of Bertha in Katherine Mansfield’s Bliss Katherine Mansfield’s “Bliss” is quite an interesting story full of underlying meanings and themes. Upon a first reading, it seems to be a simple story of a woman who feels uncontainable bliss one day, only to have it end when she discovers her husband is having an affair. Although this is a correct interpretation, after a second reading, much more is apparent. “Bliss” is a story of the revelation of a vibrant young woman, of criticism of society, and of sexual revolution....   [tags: Katherine Mansfield Bliss Essays] 2155 words
(6.2 pages)
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Reactions to Patriarchal Oppression by Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason - Reactions to Patriarchal Oppression by Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason Missing Works Cited   Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason are both oppressed by the British patriarchal system were men are the makers, interpreters, and enforcers of social and political rules. However, these two women differ greatly in the ways that they accept and cope with the reality of their place in society, and it is these differences that ultimately determine their fate. Jane Eyre follows the rules. Although she initially revolts against what she believes to be unfair restrictions at Gateshead and Lowood, she soon discovers that rebellion carries a high price and, over time, she learns to modify her behavior to conform to so...   [tags: Jane Eyre] 3815 words
(10.9 pages)
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Bertha as Jane's Alter Ego in Jane Eyre - Bertha as Jane's Alter Ego in Jane Eyre   "I resisted all the way," (chapter 2)  Jane says as she is borne away to be locked in the red-room of Gateshead, where she will experience a fit of rage that inevitably arises from her physical and emotional entrapment. Jane evinces her refusal to accept passively restrictive male standards as well as the female predilection towards anger early in the novel. That night in the red-room, Jane experiences a vehement anger that she describes as "oppressed" and "suffocated." From this impassioned rage Jane falls unconscious, and upon waking in the nursery, Jane finds herself prepared to challenge both the oppressive patriarchal society in whic...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1471 words
(4.2 pages)
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Living the Blissful Life in Katherine Mandsfield´s Bliss - ... 96). In the spring time, pears begin to blossom on pear trees with white blooms and eventually, pears begin to dangle from the tree. There are many places throughout the story where the reader is meant to compare Bertha to a pear tree. As Bertha dresses for the dinner party, she is described to be wearing "a white dress, a string of jade beans, green shoes and stockings" (pg. 96). With the reader being able to put the images of a pear tree and Bertha into one symmetrical picture, the idea that Bertha is ignoring the problems in her life are beginning to show....   [tags: maturing, life, spring, tree, blissful] 668 words
(1.9 pages)
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Doubles in Jane Eyre - The use of “the double”, or “second self” in literature is a tool often used to represent hidden or repressed aspects of the main character’s identity. “The figure of the literary double proceeds from the Romantic period to the present. It has developed from supernatural origins, harbingers of evil and death, to an element of individual psychology and a domestic feature” (Miller 416). By examining the doubling between and within the characters in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre I consider the various representations of the female gender and how Jane’s doubles, Bertha Mason, Helen Burns, and Mrs....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 7 Works Cited
2193 words
(6.3 pages)
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Ambiguity of Moral Values in Eckbert the Fair by Ludwig Tieck - Ludwig Tieck’s novella, Eckbert the Fair, presents a certain ambiguity of moral values. The story meets a tragic ending where the main couple of the fairytale, Eckbert and Bertha, die as punishment for their crimes of betrayal, theft, and murder. However, an uneasy feeling of injustice remains about the punishment despite the clarity of their guilt. The tale itself strongly resembles a tragic play defined by Aristotle, but the narrative deviates from the structure of standard tragedy. In effect, the unique set-up of the narrative makes the evil deeds seem ultimately inevitable....   [tags: fairytale, injustice, punishment]
:: 2 Works Cited
1752 words
(5 pages)
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The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre      In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë clearly demonstrates the relationship between sexuality and morality in Victorian society through the character of Bertha Mason, the daughter of a West Indian planter and Rochester's first wife. Rochester recklessly married Bertha in his youth, and when it was discovered shortly after the marriage that Bertha was sexually promiscuous, Rochester locked her away. Bertha is called a "maniac" and is characterized as insane....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
899 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Theme of Misunderstanding in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea - The Theme of Misunderstanding in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea In both classical novels Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte a Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys the theme of misunderstanding is represented very widely. Both Victorian era dramatical romantic fictions have some impact in them from their respective authors. Bronte's lonliness is transformed into Jane Eyre's Character whom mostly all characters in the novel misunderstand her until they truly get to recognize her which is towards the end of the novel....   [tags: Literature Analysis, Jane Eyre, Wide Sargasso Sea] 877 words
(2.5 pages)
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Jane and Mr. Rochester in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Nobody lives a perfect life. People will experience certain things that may have a great impact on them. For some, being let down or disappointed might be more normal than being happy. In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, the life lived by the protagonist, Jane, is full of disappointments. She was seldom happy, and when she did find her happiness in the man she loved, even he seemed to cross her. If her life wasn’t such as sad one, the events that occurred wouldn’t have impacted her the way they did....   [tags: Relationships, Marriage, Dissapointment]
:: 1 Works Cited
684 words
(2 pages)
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Katherine Mansfield And Sexuality - One of the themes that can be found in the stories of Katherine Mansfield centres upon the role, status, sexuality, and "place" of women in society. According to Chantal Cornut-Gentille d'Arcy, "Mansfield's succinct narratives … are triumphs of style, a style which challenged the conventional parameters of nineteenth-century realism, constrained to plot, sequential development, climax, and conclusion" (244). More specifically, maintains that "even though Mansfield never acknowledged any profound engagement with Freudian approaches to sexuality or psychic disorder … Mansfield moved in a context which undoubtedly indicates she was aware of Freud's ideas and discoveries" (245)....   [tags: Katherine Mansfield Feminism Sex] 1598 words
(4.6 pages)
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Ways Terror is Cultivated in Chapter 26 of Jane Eyre - Analyse the ways Charlotte Bronte creates a sense of terror in chapter 26 and comment on how this is sustained in the context of the gothic genre elsewhere in the novel. ‘Jane Eyre’ is a 19th century novel written by Charlotte Bronte. Bronte creates a sense of terror in chapter 26 in various ways, including: the rendezvous with Bertha and Bronte’s description. The gothic style also plays a big part in numerous points in the book. “Jane Eyre” is about a young orphan girl called Jane Eyre who is neglected by her aunt and grows up to be a governess, who is well educated....   [tags: essays research papers] 1244 words
(3.6 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Dangers of Secrets In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, the characters come to learn that secrets do more harm than good through Edward Rochester’s secrecy after the fire in his room, Mrs. Reed not telling her about the letter from her uncle, and Edward Rochester’s secret marriage with Bertha. First, Rochester, who really knows what happened during the fire in his room, refuses to tell Jane the full truth so as to not hurt her. Secondly, Mrs. Reed and Jane do not have the best relationship; the hiding of the letter only strains this relationship further....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Jane Eyre, Characters]
:: 1 Works Cited
912 words
(2.6 pages)
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Liberalism, Distributive Subjectivism, and Equal Opportunity for Welfare by Richard Arneson - The desire theory of wellbeing, or preference-satisfaction, traditionally argues that desire-satisfaction adequately measures overall subjective wellbeing. Yet in his article ‘Liberalism, Distributive Subjectivism, and Equal Opportunity for Welfare’ (1990), Richard Arneson alludes to challenges with preference-satisfaction in the analytic discourse, and establishes his own conception of subjective wellbeing. My aim in this essay is to evaluate Arneson's account of hypothetical ideally considered preferences and extended deliberation and argue that, while his conception of wellbeing succeeds in overcoming some issues with preference-satisfaction, it renders one critical issue of its own....   [tags: wellbeing, preference-satisfaction ]
:: 9 Works Cited
1996 words
(5.7 pages)
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Pain, Misery and Dissapointment in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Pain, misery and disappointment are all a significant part of this world’s concepts of both life and love. A prime example of this is displayed in Charlotte Bronte’s novel, Jane Eyre, where the protagonist, Jane, suffers through a particularly difficult life; her love is constantly stripped from her the moment she is relishing it most. With Bronte’s introduction of Bertha Rochester, Jane’s never-ending cycle of disappointment and loss of love. Charlotte Bronte utilizes the character of Bertha Rochester to interrupt Jane’s potential happy ending with Mr....   [tags: Adversity, Relationship, Marriage] 918 words
(2.6 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Woman as Demon - Jane Eyre - Woman as Demon Missing Works Cited Women in Victorian literature often came to be seen as "the other" or in more direct terms, as somehow demonized. This is certainly true in Jane Eyre. Bertha Mason, Rochester's mad wife, is the epitome of the demon in the attic. By virtue of being the first wife she is in continually compared to Jane. Although there are parallels in plot and language between the two women, they are completely different people. In addition, Bronte also depicts other women throughout the novel as something to be feared....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1959 words
(5.6 pages)
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The Purpose of Sati in Jane Eyre - The general image of Sati and the reasoning that surrounded it filled the Western imagination with repulsion as well as admiration. In the nineteenth century, Westerners publishing diaries of their travels always included their experiences when viewing Sati. Although these travelers, usually men, watched with horror, they also admired the courage and the dignity of the women involved (Hawley 3). What was known in England of Sati was from the accounts of the colonial officials and travelers who witnessed it (Courtright 28)....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 2078 words
(5.9 pages)
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Fire and Water Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" - Fire is the process in which materials ignite and combine with oxygen to give off heat, light, and flames. Likewise, water is composed of H20 molecules and acts as a counter to fire by possessing the ability to extinguish it. However, in literary terms, fire is mostly related to passion while water usually represents reason and calmness. Both elements are considered unique because of the ability to destroy and give life. Water can be directly related to life since it is an essential element for survival and makes up most of a human’s body....   [tags: imagery, Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre,] 667 words
(1.9 pages)
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How are Women Presented in "Jane Eyre" - In the novel Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte, women are presented in a wide range of different ways. As Jane is the main character in the story I will be concentrating on how she is presented and particularly, the control men and some women have over her throughout the novel. Right at the very start of the story it almost instantly becomes apparent that Jane is in a place where she is incredibly inferior and has no control over the situation herself, in the second paragraph Jane tells us she is ‘humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John and Georgiana Reed’ this sentence clearly states she is inferior and therefore automatically presents Jane as being diffe...   [tags: Character Analysis] 928 words
(2.7 pages)
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Personification of Oppression in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Personification of Oppression in Jane Eyre       At first glance and under insufficient scrutiny, the persona of Jane Eyre reflects a slightly expanded Cinderella character. But Jane Eyre's personality and life delve much deeper than a superfluous "rags to riches" story. Her identity is as complex as literature can convey and her characteristics are manifested through several subtle parallels. These parallels relate to objects and nature, but mostly to one particular individual in the novel. A seemingly exact opposite of the persona's placid character, the maniacal Bertha Mason actually personifies an inner part of Jane, the part of her personality that longs to live free but goes crazy u...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1557 words
(4.4 pages)
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Rochester as the Rake in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Rochester as the Rake in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre   The rake became one of the most recognized figures of the Restoration Comedies. The rake character was seen as unmarried, cynical, coarse but with the manners of a gentleman, manipulative and self serving. By the twentieth century the rake had given away to the Regency dandy and the dark Byronic hero of Victorian literature. However, the rake does not completely disappear from twentieth century novels. Charlotte Bronte resurrects the Restoration hero in the creation of Edward Rochester in Jane Eyre....   [tags: Jane Eyre essay]
:: 2 Works Cited
1104 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Colonial Implications in Jane Eyre and Great Expectations - "It should not be possible to read nineteenth-century British literature, without remembering that imperialism, understood as England's social mission, was a crucial part of the cultural representation of England to the English." (Spivak, 1985, p, 12) Can these claims of Spivak be applied to Charles Dickens' Great Expectations and Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre and to what extent do these novelists draw from the colonial discourse in their representation of the `non- Western world'. The Victorian novel has performed an important service in Eurocentric epistemologies and colonial ideologies in formulating the colonial discourse and establishing the alterity of `self' and the `Other'....   [tags: European Literature] 3020 words
(8.6 pages)
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Victorian Domestic Architecture and the Implications of the Sequestered Private Spaces - Bertha Mason is the ghost that haunts Thornfield at night. When the sun goes down and the house falls asleep, she rises to explore the house that she is locked within, and yet outside of, by daylight. She roams the corridors, peeping into rooms to take a whiff of the domestic life that she is shunned from. She exists on the threshold of sanity, domesticity, even personhood. This is a character that is simultaneously locked inside of the walls of the mansion and discounted from the everyday domestic life of the household....   [tags: Jane Eyre, Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys]
:: 3 Works Cited
2143 words
(6.1 pages)
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Comparing and Contrasting Charlotte's 19th Century Literature - Within “Jane Eyre” and “The Yellow wallpaper”, both female writers themes focus on similar ideas in how women of the 19th century were manipulated and treated inadequately. Within “Jane Eyre” and “The Yellow Wallpaper,” explore the themes of isolation, male dominance, and sickness the impact that these themes have on the main female characters within the text have similarities but also have there difference that contrast between each of the characters. Jane Eyre, Bertha and Jane all at some point within the texts face the same fate of being sealed in a room against their own will and are isolated from the outside world....   [tags: Jane Eyre, The Yellow Wallpaper]
:: 2 Works Cited
1861 words
(5.3 pages)
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Mansfields Bliss - Katherine Mansfield thoughtfully named her story Bliss, to ask the question, “What is bliss?” Webster’s dictionary defines bliss as, “complete happiness”. In Bliss, the main character, Bertha, feels she is blissful. She has the perfect family, the perfect life, and a party that night. However, that perfect life is a façade, which the reader along with Bertha at times learns. After arranging the fruit for the evening party, Bertha like a child at Christmas runs upstairs to the nursery to see her baby, Little B....   [tags: essays research papers] 400 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Language of Slavery in Jane Eyre - While Bronte’s novel is a story of one woman’s rise from dependant, patriarchal oppression to financial stability and emotional liberation, the narration of that story is often turns to the figurative representation of slavery. Bronte applies the metaphor of slavery to the domestic trials facing British women at the time. Time and again her narrative language turns to this device in order to draw parallels between slavery and other vehicles of oppression, namely gender and class. Just as the majority of issues in the novel are two-sided, the implications of these parallels are two-sided as well....   [tags: Jane Eyre Bronte Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
2611 words
(7.5 pages)
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Violence in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Violence in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte uses violence in several scenes throughout the novel. The violence in the novel is not fatal to anyone, it is just used to catch the readers eye. This novel consists of many emotional aspects. For example, the violence in the scene where Mr. Mason gets attacked. The attack really upsets Jane and Mr. Rochester. In the novel Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte uses several acts of violence to create suspense, mystery, and characterization. This scene is probably the best one to create the suspense of the novel....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 366 words
(1 pages)
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Dissapointment in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Everyone experiences disappointments, however although they may hurt if we learn from them we are able to grow, throughout the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte we see that Jane experiences many disappointments from the start at Gateshead to Lowood and finally Thornfield. However even with as many disappointments she faces she still manages to pick herself up and move on and better herself. One of the biggest disappointments she faced was finding out that her soon to be husband Edward Rochester, had a wife....   [tags: Adversity, Experiences]
:: 1 Works Cited
713 words
(2 pages)
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The Use of Isolation in Two Fairy Tales - The Use of Isolation in Two Fairy Tales The social evolution from the Enlightenment to the Romantic Age altered the usage of reason in literature by instituting elements of imagination and mysticism. Likewise, the usages of certain concepts in literature can reflect social attitudes of the author’s environment. One such concept that is common to both Ludwig Tieck’s “Fair-Haired Eckbert” and Wilhelm Wackenroder’s “A Wondrous Oriental Fairy Tale of a Naked Saint” is the isolation of characters. Isolation, as the cause, or simply as an indicator, of suffering in these two literary fairy tales is a notion that is successfully used to dictate the spiritual fates of the characters in each story....   [tags: Literature Writing Literary Concepts Essays] 1467 words
(4.2 pages)
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Callaway Golf - THE MARKET More than two decades ago, Ely Callaway set out to build a company that would bring more enjoyment and game improvement to golfers of all skill levels. He accomplished much of that goal in 1991, introducing a technological wonder called the Big Bertha Driver. By creating in Big Bertha a larger clubhead without adding weight, the late founder of Callaway Golf Company turned the most-feared club into the most-loved almost overnight. The driver became the fastest-selling club at retail. Many innovations have followed....   [tags: Business Management Analysis Strategy] 1596 words
(4.6 pages)
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Unconscious in James Joyce's ‘Dubliners and Charlotte Bronte's ‘Jane Eyre - Unconscious in James Joyce's ‘Dubliners and Charlotte Bronte's ‘Jane Eyre Although the notion of a human unconscious preceded Freud, his work is certainly most useful for explaining what it actually is. With an understanding of a human unconscious we can apply some of its characteristics to the literature studied thus far. Much of Freud's work on the unconscious is contained within his book ‘The Interpretation of Dreams' but a concise definition is hard to come by. Essentially Freud believes that the unconscious is the ‘part of the mind that is beyond consciousness which nevertheless has a strong influence on our actions' ....   [tags: Dubliners Jane Eyre Joyce Bronte] 1927 words
(5.5 pages)
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Comparing Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea - Comparing Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea Jean Rhys obviously had Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre in mind while writing Wide Sargasso Sea. Each novel contains events that echo other events or themes in the other. The destruction of Coulibri at the beginning of Wide Sargasso Sea reminds the reader of the fire at Thornfield towards the end of Jane Eyre. While each scene refers to events in its own book and clarifies events in its companion, one cannot conclude that Rhys simply reconstructed Thornfield's fall in Coulibri's....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
3183 words
(9.1 pages)
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Reflection on Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Reflection on Jane Eyre "That strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit." This was the painful reaction of young Jane Eyre to her own horrifying ten-year-old reflection in the mirror . This reflection illustrates the harsh and fearful childhood of a strong-willed girl in the beginning of Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte. Set in the mid-nineteenth century on the English countryside Jane Eyre tells the story of one orphan's troubled childhood and her yearning to belong to someone somewhere as she matures into an adult....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 621 words
(1.8 pages)
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Trapped in the Red Room: A Look into the Mind of the Original Mrs. Rochester - ... Motivated solely by greed, he seems to be unwilling to let Antoinette have even a small portion of happiness. He had the option to leave with at least half the dowry and let her move on with her life, but chooses instead to keep both her money and mind locked away in the attic of a cold, colorless castle. Regardless of whether this depiction of our Mr. Rochester is canon or not, Jean Rhys effectively makes us despise the new Rochester all by solely changing the point of view. It is with this technique that she so convincingly tells the tale of Bertha Mason as we explore the depths of her perspective and recognize the parallels to Jane’s own life....   [tags: theme, narrative mode, Jane Eyre, Wide Cosway]
:: 4 Works Cited
1402 words
(4 pages)
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Jane Eyre Paves the Way for Women Advocacy and Class Expulsion - “Prejudices… are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilized by education: they grow there, firm as weeds among stones.” (Bronte 434) The rights and responsibilities women hold in modern society significantly differ from those held in the Victorian time period. Although the transition was a long and slow fought battle it was heroines, such as Jane Eyre in Charlotte Bronte’s classic novel, Jane Eyre that paved the way. Through Jane’s individuality, Bronte critiqued the inclinations of the time, creating an alternative meaning to what beauty is by relating it to an internal depth....   [tags: prejudices, victorian society]
:: 5 Works Cited
1239 words
(3.5 pages)
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Creole as a Third Space in Jean Rhys’ Novel - Jean Rhys writes Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) as a prequel to Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre (1847) in order to give life to Bertha Mason, a Jamaican creole who is locked in the attic as a madwoman by her English husband, Rochester. Rhys thinks that Bertha is completely undermined and negated in Bronte’s novel. Bronte’s silences over Bertha’s identity and history enforce Rhys to break the unspoken and deliberately neglected white creole’s identity; and give her a voice that humanizes this supposedly inferior creole, and validates her quest for identity and belonging while also challenging Western hegemonic expectations and conditions....   [tags: jean rhys, jean eyre, wide sargasso sea]
:: 11 Works Cited
1988 words
(5.7 pages)
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A Society of Unequal’s Just Won’t Do - Everyone has the right to govern oneself in how to act, where to live, and who to associate with. In Jane Eyre, Jane is controlled and structured by an underlying social and economic critique of conventional patriarchal authority. First, we will examine the various patriarchs that Jane encounters with John Reed, Mr. Brocklehurst, Mr. Rochester, and St. John. Then, we can turn our attention to the economics of social class and how Jane conducts herself where she resides rather it be at Gateshead, Lowood or Thornfield and then we will look at how Jane becomes an equal....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Jane Eyre]
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Post-colonial Criticism of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre - A broad focus on Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre reveals multiple perspectives in which postcolonial criticism could be angled. For the most part, this study will explore the representation of a selection of foreign cultures as a foil to Europe’s presumed magnificence. Additionally, focus will be trained on the gender relations as an indicator of patriarchal colonialism. On this second point, the study will attempt to illustrate the various ways in which the character of Jane Eyre is deliberately constructed to counter the male colonialist ego....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Class and Gender Warfare]
:: 4 Works Cited
2198 words
(6.3 pages)
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Hypochondriasis and Munchausen by Proxy - For my research paper I chose the two mental illnesses of hypochondriasis and Munchausen by proxy. I chose these topics because I have an aunt related by marriage who is thought to have hypochondriasis and Munchausen by proxy because like hypochondriasis it can be used as a way to gain attention or sympathy from others. I will start off with hypochondriasis since it is the illness I have the most familiarity with. Hypochondriasis is defined in the DSM-IV-TR under somatoform disorders as “Preoccupation with fears of having, or the idea that one has, a serious disease based on the person’s misinterpretation of bodily symptoms.” This preoccupation of having an illness will persist even after m...   [tags: Mental Health ]
:: 6 Works Cited
2005 words
(5.7 pages)
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The Ecology of Jane Eyre: Surviving the Struggles - The Ecology of Jane Eyre: Surviving the Struggles Wild, calm, fierce, gentle, damaging, nurturing – nature, such an unpredictable force, can be paralleled with Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre. Many of Jane Eyre’s characters resemble nature, and many of the novel’s events are supported or foreshadowed by occurrences in nature. Jane Eyre’s main character, Jane, is shown maturing from child to adult. Jane’s metamorphosis throws her from the fairytale escape she has created, into real life that she must adapt to in order to survive....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1218 words
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Immigration and Language in Call it Sleep - Immigration and Language in Call it sleep Immigrant Allegory: Language and the Symbolism of Being Lost The symbolism of being lost is a universal immigrant theme that occurs throughout many immigrant literatures, particularly in Henry Roth’s Call it Sleep. Language, or lack of understanding it, has a profound contribution to the process of being lost. This contribution is shown earlier in the book, in a passage where David is lost trying to find his way home (Passage 1) and is mirrored later on in the book, when David and Aunt Bertha are lost in a museum (Passage 2)....   [tags: essays papers]
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The Presentation of Women in Story of an Hour, Bliss, and The End of Something - The Presentation of Women in Story of an Hour, Bliss, and The End of Something Within the three short stories studied all the women move from happiness in the main part of the story to being miserable and sad at the end. In ‘Story of an Hour’ throughout the main part of the story Louise (Mrs Mallard) was happy, happy due to the loss of her husband. ‘Free body and soul free!’ This shows that she is happy he is not alive and happy to be single and free. There is no one telling her what to do....   [tags: Papers] 922 words
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Katherine Mansfield's Bliss - Katherine Mansfield's "Bliss" Katherine Mansfield¡¦s short story Bliss is filled with a lot of underlying mean-ings and themes. There are as well many symbols that Mansfield uses and among those the pear tree is an important one. In this essay I will prove that the pear tree is both a symbol for for Bertha and her life and the awakening of her sexuality. First I will sketch on the symbolic meanings of a pear and a tree as they are described in symbolic books and I will then focus on the pear tree in relation to Ber-tha throughout the story....   [tags: Katherine Mansfield Bliss Essays]
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The House of Mirth - Lily Bart lived in the upper part of New York society. She loves nice things and extravagance. However, throughout the House of Mirth Lily plays a game. She wants to be virtuous, stay in the social circle, and have the money to keep up with the demands of her so called friends. She involves herself so much into the social life she loses all chance of gaining her riches virtuously or through true love. She misses her chances inevitably: from Percy to her dear aunt to her indecisiveness of men and marriage....   [tags: Lily barth, Literary Analysis, New York]
:: 2 Works Cited
1302 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Gothic as an Outlet for the Repression of the Society - The Gothic as an Outlet for the Repression of the Society The gothic is shown as an outlet for the repression of the society in many ways. In Jane Eyre, immorality, women, madness and sexual desires/passions are being suppressed to ensure that they do not occur on the surface. However, the Gothic uses archetypal symbols, unexpressed passions, the double, madness, death, darkness and supernatural as an outlet for repression. Irrational and aberrant desires are shunned upon in any conservative society that functions on reason and logic....   [tags: Papers] 676 words
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Comparing Jane Eyre and Yellow Wallpaper - Similarities Between Jane Eyre and Yellow Wallpaper    There are notable similarities between Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper and Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. These similarities include the treatment of space, the use of a gothic tone with elements of realism, a sense of male superiority, and the mental instability of women. There is a similar treatment of space in the two works, with the larger, upstairs rooms at the summer lodging and at Thornfield Hall being associated with insanity and the smaller rooms below being safer and saner....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
1645 words
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Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Imagery in Jane Eyre     Charlotte Bronte wrote the novel Jane Eyre in the mid-eighteen hundreds. In her novel she expresses her views on many important factors present during this time including social problems such as race, class, gender, and the role of religion. Each of these factors affects the way that the protagonist, Jane Eyre, grows as a person. Throughout the novel Charlotte Bronte uses images and symbols that either influence or represent Jane's growth. Bronte uses a common imagery throughout the novel reflecting images of "fire and ice." She also uses symbols in Jane's life such as the red-room, from her childhood, and the character Bertha Mason Rochester, during her t...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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1086 words
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Gothic Themes Portrayed by Religious Ceremony in Wuthering Heights with Reference to Jane Eyre - The gothic theme become wildly popular after the publication of Horace Walpole’s ‘The castle of Otranto’ in 1764, this theme is prominent throughout the whole of ‘Wuthering Heights’, although it is most apparent during religious ceremony. Religious ceremony in this novel is mainly conveyed through death; ‘Jane Eyre’ also includes this in the novel. Each death is conveyed different but all have quite an eerie element, whether it’s how they die, the description of them after death, the reaction of loved ones or also where they rest such as their graves....   [tags: death, cannibal] 1365 words
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Antoinette’s Search for Home in Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea - Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) presents some of the complicated issues of postcolonial Caribbean society. Rhys’ protagonist, Antoinette Cosway, a white Creole in Jamaica, suffers racial antagonism, sexual exploitation and male suppression. She is a victim of a system, which not only dispossessed her from her class but also deprived her as an individual of any means of meaningful, independent survival and significance. Postcolonial Caribbean society is not able to address and enhance the expectations of the colonized people after its emancipation but lingers on and sustains in the older residues of colonial project....   [tags: caribbean, jamaican society,sexual exploitation]
:: 14 Works Cited
2026 words
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Jane´s Reason to Leave Thornfield in Charlote Bronte´s Jane Eyre - Jane, Mrs. Fairfax, and Mr. Rochester “entered the quiet and humble temple; the priest waited in his white surplice at the lowly altar with the clerk beside him” (Bronte. 306). The wedding had no groomsmen, no bridesmaid, nor any relatives it was all done in secret. The service began shortly after the explanation of the matrimony. Suddenly a clergyman walked a step farther forward and looked at Mr. Rochester. The Priest continued with the ceremony, “that if either of you know any impediment why ye may not lawfully be jointed together in matrimony, ye do now confess it; for be ye well assure that so many as are coupled together otherwise than God’s Word doth allow, are not joined together b...   [tags: Marriage, Insane, Relationships]
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Analysis of Chapter 18 of Jane Austen by Charlotte Bronte - In Chapter 18 of the novel Jane Eyre, Jane attends an engagement party for the soon to be wed Edward Rochester and Blanche Ingram. She feels that their arrangement is too rash and highly inappropriate. Jane has come to her own conclusion that two are only getting married to each other because Mr. Rochester is in love with Blanche's beauty and she with his wealth. Despite her feelings on their engagement she keeps to herself and goes to the party. Before she is able to blend in with the crowd, she becomes a topic of discussion amongst the guests....   [tags: Relationships, Marriage, Wealth]
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Adverstity and Shattered Dreams in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane has lived a miserable life since childhood, until she met Edward Rochester. Living a miserable childhood after her parents passed away Jane had to live with her aunt and cousins. Ms. Reed detested her and resented because she was aware of the love that the late Mr. Reed had for Jane. On his deathbed he asked Ms. Reed to take care of Jane like if she was her own child. This angered Ms. Reed because his last words for Jane instead of her, Ms. Reed, or their children....   [tags: Relationships, Past]
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Delia Jones' Transformation in Sweat - Delia Jones' Transformation in Zora Neale Hurston's Sweat Through external conflict exhibited by three significant occasions with the antagonist and husband, Sykes Jones, Zora Neale Hurston takes her leading character, Delia Jones, through an internal change from a submissive character to an aggressive and defensive character in her short story, "Sweat." When the story opens, one finds Delia Jones on a Sunday evening washing clothes, as was her profession, and humming a tune, wondering where her husband had gone with her horse and carriage....   [tags: Sweat Essays]
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Intertextual Exchange in Carmilla, Dracula and the Historian - “Writers seldom duplicate their influential precursor(s); rather, they often work within a certain framework established by other writers or generic conventions, but vary aspects of it in significant ways.” (Clayton, 155). Sheridan Le Fanu’s, Carmilla, Bram Stoker’s, Dracula and Elizabeth Kostova’s, The Historian, clearly engage in this intertextual exchange, as evidenced by their use of narrative structure, striking character parallels and authors choice of language. Published in 1872, Le Fanu relates the story of Carmilla from a first person point of view, through four distinct perspectives....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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Intertextual Exchange in Carmilla, Dracula and the Historian - “Writers seldom duplicate their influential precursor(s); rather, they often work within a certain framework established by other writers or generic conventions, but vary aspects of it in significant ways” (Friedman 155). Sheridan Le Fanu’s, Carmilla, Bram Stoker’s, Dracula and Elizabeth Kostova’s, The Historian, clearly engage in this intertextual exchange, as evidenced by their use of narrative structure and striking character parallels. Published in 1872, Le Fanu relates the story of Carmilla from a first person point of view, through four distinct perspectives....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu - Carmilla Reading Response Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu is a tale about two young women from different walks of life. One of the two young ladies named Laura, plays the role of the narrator and the victim. She begins her story by describing her life and why she was so easily influenced by the antagonist, Carmilla. Laura lives with her father an English widower, retired from the Austrian Service. Laura also makes mention of the other residents in her home, her gouvernantes, who took care of her after the death of her mother....   [tags: reading response and tale review] 1573 words
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Symbolism in Charlotte Bronte´s Jane Eyre - Dialectical Journal: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Moon Bronte uses the moon as a metaphor to symbolize change in the novel. It is a representation of foreshadowing, because it is cuing that a change is about to occur before it actually does. Bronte mentions the moon when a new change is about to occur, such as when Jane first meets Rochester. I believe that the fact that the moon is waxing in the sky, rather than waning, is a metaphorical foreshadow that there is about to be a good change in her life....   [tags: Fire, Moon, Love] 875 words
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Women and Equality - Women, for decades, have strove for complete equality with men. This fight is not a new fight, it is a fight that started long ago and is still going today. Many times when we think of the life of women in the past we draw to the Victorian age, an age with great female writers, like the Bronte sisters. Charlotte Bronte, author of many great works, served as a critic and wrote many satire of society and the treatment of women in the Victorian era. The story of Jane Eyre is a bidungsroman, or a coming of age story....   [tags: Jane Eyre, Victorian] 643 words
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Callaway Golf Company History - Callaway Golf Company History Callaway Golf Company CEO Ron Drapeau told CBSMarketWatch, "We have become known as the company that brings innovation to the game for the average golfer. We're not focused on the elite professional players. It's been a very successful approach for us." But that is not to say that Callaway clubs are spurned by professionals. By the end of the 2000 professional tour, Callaway Golf ranked as the most-played manufacturer of drivers, fairway woods and irons on the world's five major professional tours combined....   [tags: Golf Business] 1387 words
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Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre chronicles the growth of her titular character from girlhood to maturity, focusing on her journey from dependence on negative authority figures to both monetary and psychological independence, from confusion to a clear understanding of self, and from inequality to equality with those to whom she was formerly subject. Originally dependent on her Aunt Reed, Mr. Brocklehurst, and Mr. Rochester, she gains independence through her inheritance and teaching positions. Over the course of the novel, she awakens towards self-understanding, resulting in contentment and eventual happiness....   [tags: self-knowledge, equality, independence]
:: 7 Works Cited
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(5 pages)
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Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth as Satirical Commentary on Society -        Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth creates a subtle, ironic, and superbly crafted picture of the social operation of turn-of-the-century New York. In her harsh expression of community, she succeeds in portraying a world of calculation operating under the pretenses of politeness. The characters become competitors in the highly complex game of social positioning with an amorphous body of socially formed laws. Through her presentation of Lily Barton's ongoing struggles to "recover her footing-each time on a slightly lower level" in this game of skill, Wharton forces her audience to question this social order (272)....   [tags: House Mirth Essays Edith Wharton Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
2110 words
(6 pages)
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The Bluebeard Reference in Jane Eyre - The Bluebeard Reference in Jane Eyre   Within Jane Eyre lies an explicit reference to the tale of Bluebeard. When first exploring the dark hall of Thornfield’s third floor Jane tells us, "I lingered in the long passage to which this led [. . .] with only one little window at the far end, and looking, with its two rows of small black doors all shut, like a corridor in some Bluebeard’s castle" (114; ch. 11). This allusion is not a casual one, for the plot of Jane Eyre has much in common with the tale of Bluebeard....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays]
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I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings - In the autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the main character Marguerite Johnson, is influenced by a preponderance of characters including Bailey Jr. , Momma Henderson, and Mrs. Bertha Flowers. One of the primary influences is her older brother, Bailey Jr.. Momma, or Annie Henderson, the parental grandmother, also plays an important role for Maya. Additionally, Mrs. Flowers, the black aristocrat of Stamps, saves Maya during an especially difficult time. All in all, these three characters act as important role models in the development of Marguerite through her juvenile years....   [tags: I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings] 500 words
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‘Surface Appearance is not Everything’ Discuss the Representation of the Undersides of Life Exploring Madness and the Supernatural in Charlotte Bronte - “Nineteenth-century Britain has been described as the ‘first industrial nation’ (Mathias 1983)” (Guy & Small. 2011: 13). Britain’s industrialisation during the eighteenth and nineteenth-century brought about significant changes transforming society as the technological advancements affected all aspects of life, that of cultural, social, political and economic circumstances. In particular the modern advancements of steam power technology expanded the industrial processes of printing which stimulated the economic growth within the writing industry, opening up forms of literature to a wider readership....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 18 Works Cited
1844 words
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Being the Meat in the Sandwich: Implications of the double colonisation of empire and patriarchy by the female characters in Wide Sargasso Sea - One of the many ways that postcolonial literature accomplishes the task of challenging the hegemony of western imperialism is through the use of a ‘canonical counter-discourse,’ a strategy whereby ‘a post-colonial writer takes up a character or characters, or the basic assumptions of a canonical text [where a colonialist discourse is developed directly or indirectly], and unveils [its colonialist] assumptions, subverting the text for post-colonial purposes’. (Tiffin, 1987) Such a revolutionary literary project is evidently realised in Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys, a prequel that ‘writes back the centre’ of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847)....   [tags: Book Analysis, Colonialism, Oppression of Women]
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2185 words
(6.2 pages)
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The Sargasso Sea as an Underlying Metaphor in Wide Sargasso Sea - The Sargasso Sea as an Underlying Metaphor in Wide Sargasso Sea Why did Jean Rhys name her novel about the Creole madwoman in the attic from Jane Eyre after a mysterious body of water in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. As there is no mention made of the Sargasso Sea in the novel itself, one might wonder why she chose to title her novel after it. In a 1958 letter to a friend and colleague, she describes her changing titles for the novel: “I have no title yet. ‘The First Mrs. Rochester’ is not right....   [tags: Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys]
:: 6 Works Cited
1162 words
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Untraditional Families in Ibsen’s "Ghosts" and Strindberg’s "The Father" - With both author’s realistic description and depiction of two dysfunctional families, Ibsen and Strindberg really both push the envelope on how realistic they may seem. They are not afraid to portray families how the truly are, many times ugly and unseemly. In Ghosts everyone’s roles as mom, dad, son, and daughter is abandoned and narrate to each other as normal human beings, but especially those of mothers. In Strindberg’s The father there is no denying that the conception of a feminist household exist....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1311 words
(3.7 pages)
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Reconstruction of Agency and Humanity in Female Protagonists - Lutchmee and Dilloo: A Story of West Indian Life by Edward Jenkins was the first attempt to influence public opinion against the indenture servitude system by making the victims into characters that the reader could empathize with. Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys explores the one-dimensional character, Bertha Mason of Bronte’s Jane Eyre. In her version Rhys attempts to develop Antoinette into an individual and portray her not as the Madwoman from the attic, but as a victim of the external forces of a patriarchal society....   [tags: Literature]
:: 4 Works Cited
1616 words
(4.6 pages)
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The House of Mirth, by Edith Wharton - Irony is common in realist novels that reveal the fall and/or rise of characters among other aspects. It is mostly shown at the end which is usually tragic but tell readers the fate of the characters. Realist novels have plausible events, with cause and effect in their stories — what the characters desire and the consequences they receive because of that. Realism in the novel, The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, was clearly shown through Lily Bart's character with its ironic ending that had both her fall and rise as a character....   [tags: Irony in Realism] 1109 words
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