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James Joyce's Araby - An Analysis of Araby - An Analysis of Joyce's Araby "Araby" is a short complex story by Joyce that I believe is a reflection of his own life as a boy growing up in Dublin. Joyce uses the voice of a young boy as a narrator; however the narrator seems much more mature then the boy in the story. The story focuses on escape and fantasy; about darkness, despair, and enlightenment: and I believe it is a retrospective of Joyce's look back at life and the constant struggle between ideals and reality. I believe Araby employs many themes; the two most apparent to me are escape and fantasy though I see signs of religion and a boy's first love....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 528 words
(1.5 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Setting and Atmosphere in Araby - Setting and Atmosphere in Araby   Each of the stories in Dubliners consists of a portrait in which Dublin contributes to the dehumanizing experience of modem life. The boy in the story "Araby" is intensely subject to the city's dark, hopeless conformity, and his tragic yearning toward the exotic in the face of drab, ugly reality forms the center of the story. On its simplest level, "Araby" is a story about a boy's first love. On a deeper level, however, it is a story about the world in which he lives a world inimical to ideals and dreams....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 844 words
(2.4 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Auditory Imagery in Araby - Auditory Imagery in Araby     I noticed a lot of auditory imagery in "Araby" that helped to enhance the meaning of the story. The first is the description of the sound in the streets when the young man is walking by thinking of the girl he loves. He hears the "curses of laborers," the "shrill litanies of shop boys," and "nasal chantings of street singers." All of these images, besides just making the street seem busy, also make it seem like an unpleasant and intruding scene, almost like you would want to cover your ears and hurry through as fast as possible....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 399 words
(1.1 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Lack of Insight in Araby - Araby – Lack of Insight   Readers of "Araby" often focus on the final scene as the key to the story. They assume the boy experi­ences some profound insight about himself when he gazes "up into the darkness." I believe, however, that the boy sees nothing and learns nothing--either about himself or others. He's not self- reflective; he's merely self-absorbed. The evidence supporting this interpretation is the imagery of blindness and the ironic point of view of the narrator. There can seem to be a profound insight at the end of the story only if we empathize with the boy and adopt his point of view....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 1076 words
(3.1 pages)
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An Analysis of Araby in James Joyce's Dubliners - An Analysis of Araby         There are many statements in the story "Araby" that are both surprising and puzzling.  The statement that perhaps gives us the most insight into the narrator's thoughts and feelings is found at the end of the story.  "Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger. (32)"  By breaking this statement into small pieces and key words, we can see it as a summation of the story's major themes....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 609 words
(1.7 pages)
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James Joyce's Dubliners - Analysis of Joyce's Araby - An Analysis of James Joyce's Araby James Joyce's "Araby" may seem at first glance to be only a story about a young boy's first love. However, there is an underlying theme of his effort to escape an inimical reality by transforming a neighbor girl into something larger than life, a spot of light in an otherwise dark and somber environment. Joyce's description of North Richmond Street evokes images of a vacuous, joyless, and stagnant environment. The house in which the young boy lives seems equally cold and gray....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Things They Carried and Araby - ... He thought she was asking him to buy her a gift because she could not go. Due to his strong love for her, the narrator wanted to make her happy and he believed buying her a gift would make her happy. He put a lot of pressure on him going to the Bazaar and buying her a gift. He associated him buying her a gift with him being with her. They both took encounters they had with the girls they loved and made them more than they actually were. In both stories, Lieutenant Cross and the boy in “Araby” both had methods of thinking about and feeling close to the girls they loved....   [tags: Comparative, O'Brien, Joyce] 1351 words
(3.9 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Araby: Joycean Romanticism of the Church Life is filled with loneliness and times when a person feels unsure. When these times arise is when most people turn to their faith in the church or faith in fate. Certain events in one’s life can send them reeling for something that they can find solace in. Security from the turbulent world is given through faith and hope. When times are at there hardest what can you do. Without faith you can get stuck, and slowly dragged down by the world decaying around you....   [tags: essays research papers] 723 words
(2.1 pages)
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Comparing The Sisters, An Encounter, and Araby - The Sisters, An Encounter, Araby:  Themes, Symbolism, and Change          The short stories collected in Dubliners are mostly predecessors and characterizations of James Joyce's later works. "The Sisters" is no different. It, along with "An Encounter" and "Araby," are drawn from Joyce's personal memories and sentiments. The young boy and the characteristics of these short stories are an indirect sampling of Joyce's next published work, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, a novel mostly written from his own memory....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 748 words
(2.1 pages)
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James Joyce, Symbolism In Story Araby - James Joyce: Symbols of Religion in his short story Araby Alongside the dawn of the twentieth century appeared an author by the name of James Joyce. Joyce introduced the idea that language can be manipulated and transformed into a new original meaning. 'Some critics considered the work a masterpiece, though many readers found it incomprehensible' (The Literature 1). Joyce’s stories were not welcomed with open, inviting arms; instead they were undesired by publishers and his books were immensely misunderstood by the majority who gave them a glance....   [tags: James Joyce] 1293 words
(3.7 pages)
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Coming of Age in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby - Coming of Age in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby In reading Hemingway's "Indian Camp" and Joyce's "Araby", about 2 young boy's not so ceremonial passage to life's coming of age. The protagonist Nick in "Indian Camp" witnessed in one night the joy of going on a journey to an unknown destination with his father and uncle Charlie. Later, Nick receives an expedited course in life and death. Joyce's "Araby" protagonist whis friends with Mangan but has a secret desirable infatuation with his sister....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 618 words
(1.8 pages)
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Comparing Mortality in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby - The Subject of Mortality in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby Nick came face to face with his own mortality in Hemingway's "Indian Camp" and, like most of us, denied its inevitability, evidenced by the last line of the story: "In the early morning lake sitting in the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt sure that he would never die." (31) His first experience with the beginning of life was far from the joyous occasion most of us are taught to associate with birth. Coupled with his first experience with a violent suicide in the same setting, his feeling that he would never die is understandable....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 400 words
(1.1 pages)
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Motorcycle - Araby "Anyone still capable of wondering aloud whether the last word on Joyce has not already been published demonstrates an ignorance of the scope of the problem comparable to assuming that the Model T Ford is the last word in locomotive possibilities" (Benstock 1). This quote of Bernard Benstock serves as evidence to the complexity and the brilliance of James Joyce's works. In fact, some would say that his works were too brilliant and complex, as it took ten years for his collection of short stories, Dubliners, to be published because his publishing company refused to print it....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1351 words
(3.9 pages)
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Common Themes In Short Stories - James Joyce, a most prestigious author of many titles, has incorporated into his works many different thoughts, life experiences, as well as themes. Those three things that he used in his works I believe are what made him the awesome author he is today. The main focus of this paper is to inform you of the themes that reoccur in many of his short stories. Some themes that I noticed were: family, frustration, dreams of escape, love infatuations, and finally, sin. Family is a strong theme in Joyce’s writings for in Araby, the young teen finds himself obeying his uncle and asking his permission to go to the festival showing his sense of respect and need for family....   [tags: essays research papers] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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Epiphany - ... The comparison between the epiphanies of both short stories reveals the relationship amongst the similarities and differences regarding theme, symbolism and setting. Most importantly, comparing the themes of both epiphanies reveals they can simultaneously be similar and different. An important common theme in both epiphanies is facing reality. In Araby, the protagonist realizes “[his] stay was useless” (Joyce 6) since the young lady only “spok[e] to [him] out of a sense of duty” (Joyce 6)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Joyce and Calvino] 820 words
(2.3 pages)
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World War I and World War II - ... An important common theme in both epiphanies is facing reality. In Araby, the protagonist realizes “[his] stay was useless” (Joyce 6) since the young lady only “spok[e] to [him] out of a sense of duty” (Joyce 6). Likewise, in The Flash, the protagonist realizes he “accepted everything: traffic lights, cars, posters, uniforms, monuments, things completely detached from any sense of the world, accepted them as if there some necessity, some chain of cause and effect that bound them together” (Calvino 1)....   [tags: Comparative] 778 words
(2.2 pages)
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Essay on the Search for Truth or Meaning in James Joyce's Dubliners - The Search for Truth or Meaning in Dubliners     Several of James Joyce's stories in Dubliners can read as lamentations on a frustrating inability of man to represent meaning by external means, including written word. When characters in "Araby," "Counterparts," and "A Painful Case" attempt to represent or signify themselves, other characters, or abstract spiritual entities with or through words, they not only fail, but end up emotionally ruined. Moreover, the inconclusive endings of the three stories correspond with the fates of their characters....   [tags: Dubliners Essays]
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1799 words
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Dubliners and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock - Dubliners and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Several of Joyce's stories in Dubliners can read as lamentations. They are showing the frustrated inability of man to represent meaning by external means, including written word. When characters in ^Araby^, and ^A Painful Case^ attempt to represent or signify themselves, other characters or abstract spiritual entities with or through words, they not only fail, but end up emotionally ruined. In T.S. Eliots^ poem, ^ The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,^ the feeling relates to one overall issue of emotional investment in representation....   [tags: essays papers] 844 words
(2.4 pages)
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Human Nature/Cycles of Life and Escape and Adventure - Human Nature/Cycles of Life and Escape and Adventure Throughout the life everyone goes through cycles of events that inevitably lead them to new directions in life. It leaves one wanting to explore a life greater than what he or she has. Such cycles can include the creation of new friendships, longing for love or lust, boredom or simply wanting something more from life. In the book Dubliners by James Joyce, stories of escape and adventure are clearly evident in "Araby" and "Eveline" and "The Dead"....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1392 words
(4 pages)
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The Downgrading Demise of Love - The Downgrading Demise of Love “North Richmond Street, being blind, was a quiet street.” (198). Ignorance is a harmful state of mind, which gives a false sense of happiness to those consumed by it. Ignorance does not allow one to mature by experience of actual events. It shelters one’s perception of actual events by giving illusions of hope. It allows the imagination to instill more meaning into an incident, where there is none. In “Araby,” James Joyce illustrates how the boy overcomes his oblivious state through irony, epiphany, and symbolism....   [tags: English Literature] 627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Horse Dealers Daughter - The short story, “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter,” by D. H. Lawrence is about Mabel Pervin and her three brothers who are left with debts to pay after their father’s death. Once the horses are sold Mabel’s brothers decide where their lives would lead them and advice her to seek the home of her sister. Realizing their rejection and acknowledging an uncertain future, she visits the graves of her mother and father. Feeling depressed and helpless, Mabel walks into a mucky pond not cognizant of Jack Fergusson’s presence....   [tags: essays research papers] 367 words
(1 pages)
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Terrorism - A Peaceful Jihad is an Oxymoron - Terrorism - A Peaceful Jihad is an Oxymoron In June of 2002, when asked to give a graduation speech at Harvard, Zayed Yasin, a Muslim, wrote a speech in which he explained his definition of a Jihad. In accordance with the subject matter, Yasin titled his speech “My American Jihad.” When Harvard requested him to change the title, he complied. This action, though, stirred up many who believed Yasin had a right to use his original title. From the stance John Milton takes in his essay, Aeropagitica, one can clearly see that he would argue against Harvard’s decision to censor the title of Yasin’s speech....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 979 words
(2.8 pages)
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Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners - Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners Within the body of literary criticism that surrounds James Joyce's Dubliners is a tendency to preclude analysis beyond an Irish level, beyond Joyce's own intent to "create the uncreated conscience of [his] race." However, in order to place the text within an appropriately expansive context, it seems necessary to examine the implications of the volume's predominant thematic elements within the broader scope of human nature. The "psychic drama" which places Dubliners within a three-tiered psychological framework ² desire, repression, agression ² lies at the root of a larger triangular structure that pervades many of our most fundamental belief systems and life processes....   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners Essays] 1963 words
(5.6 pages)
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What Love Is Not - When I was Thirteen, I couldn’t wait until I was sixteen so that I could drive. Once I was sixteen I couldn’t wait until I was eighteen. I wanted to be considered an adult. When I reached the age of eighteen, I couldn’t wait to turn twenty-one. I wanted to be able to drink and gamble, legally. I am now twenty-two years old, and I wish that I could be a child again. I look back and feel that I grew up too quickly. I think the reason that I grew up so quickly, was due to the fact that I was friends with people who were older than myself....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1139 words
(3.3 pages)
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Eveline, Dubliners and James Joyce - Eveline, Dubliners and James Joyce   "Eveline" is the story of a young teenager facing a dilemma where she has to choose between living with her father or escaping with Frank, a sailor which she has been courting for some time. The story is one of fifteen stories written by James Joyce in a collection called "Dubliners". These stories follow a certain pattern that Joyce uses to express his ideas: "Joyce's focus in Dubliners is almost exclusively on the middle-class Catholics known to himself and his family"(the Gale Group)....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Essays] 1498 words
(4.3 pages)
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Hope and Despair in Poetry - The dictionary definition of hope is ‘a desire accompanied by expectation of or belief in fulfillment.’ The meaning of despair according to the dictionary is ‘the utter loss of hope.’ So we can see how these two terms are related. In Kundera’s “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” the first time we see Tomas go through both of these emotions is when he dealing with the issue of his son. After his divorce he has some hope that he will remain a part of his son’s life with scheduled visits....   [tags: Poets, Poetry, Prose] 838 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Beatles - When doing the reading for this weeks class I was struck by a quote form a deleted scene of my favorite movie, Pulp Fiction. Consequently, I went back to my Pulp Fiction DVD and watched this deleted scene. The quote is “there’s only two kinds of people in the world: ‘Beatles people’ and ‘Elvis people’. Now Beatles people can like Elvis, and Elvis people can like the Beatles...but nobody likes them equally. Somewhere you have to make a choice, and that choice tells you who you are.” - Mia Wallace....   [tags: Music Bands] 1308 words
(3.7 pages)
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Araby - Araby In his short story "Araby", James Joyce portrays a character who strives to achieve a goal and who comes to an epiphany through his failure to accomplish that goal. Written in the first person, "Araby" is about a man recalling an event from his childhood. The narrator's desire to be with the sister of his friend Mangan, leads him on a quest to bring back a gift from the carnival for the girl. It is the quest, the desire to be a knight in shining armor, that sends the narrator to the carnival and it's what he experienced and sees at the carnival that brings him to the realization that some dreams are just not attainable....   [tags: European Literature] 673 words
(1.9 pages)
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Love and Disillusionment in Araby and A and P - Love and Disillusionment in “Araby" by James Joyce and “A and P" by John Updike “Araby" by James Joyce and “A and P " by John Updike are both short stories in which the central characters are in love with women who don’t even know it. The Araby story started sad and ended sadder, however, the “A and P” story started happy and ended with a heroic act that went unnoticed. The main characters both experience new situations and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both stories will be examined with contemplation according to the type of initiation that took place, the similar and different features of both characters and various elements of the short stories....   [tags: Araby James Joyce A and P John Updike] 982 words
(2.8 pages)
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Ugliness in the Short Novel "Araby" - "Araby", a short story by James Joyce, is a despondent memory of adolescence narrated by a now grown man. The narrator recalls his first love, the older sister of his friend Mangan. He relates to us how he waited for her to leave her house for school before he would leave his house, trailing behind her until their ways parted, then passing her and going on his way. They had not had a conversation, until one day she asked him if he was going to Araby. Araby was the name of a bazaar that took place in Dublin in May 1894 (Beatty et al....   [tags: American Literature] 686 words
(2 pages)
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Araby(loss Of Innocence) - Loss Of Innocence In James Joyce’s Araby the boys loss of innocence may be confusing and even painful but at the same time it is important . It begins his journey into adulthood . The boy in Araby is experiencing something all young men experience , the first crush . It is a time in his life where he is having new feelings, and trying to express those feelings to the object of his affection is next to impossible . Even the simple act of watching Mangan’s sister brings up emotions in the boy ....   [tags: essays research papers] 644 words
(1.8 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - James Joyce's Araby      The story “Araby,” by James Joyce, shows how people often expect more than that which ordinary reality can provide and consequently feel disappointed when they do not receive what they expect. Another fascinating piece of literature is the poetry collection The Black Riders and Other Lines by Stephen Crane. What, if anything, does one have to do with the other. This paper will compare one of Crane’s poems to Joyce’s story. “Araby” tells the story of a young boy’s disillusionment with life as he experiences his first adult feelings of love for a girl, but is then denied expression of his feelings for her by the adult world....   [tags: essays research papers] 842 words
(2.4 pages)
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Analysis of Joyce's Araby - An Analysis of James Joyce’s “Araby” A love sick, or obsessed, boy. Or a little bit of both. Either way, James Joyce’'s story, “Araby”, is about growing up, and how things do not always turn out how we would like, or expect them to. The main character, a young boy, seems to be about twelve or thirteen years of age. He lives on a dead end street with his aunt and uncle in the Irish city of Dublin. The author is constantly using imagery to convey how mundane the young boy’s life is, and how dark it is living in Dublin....   [tags: James Joyce] 519 words
(1.5 pages)
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Sheik of Araby in the Great Gatsby - The presence of the popular 1920’s song “The Sheik of Araby” in The Great Gatsby is a sign that represents a wide range of cultural instances and relational symbols throughout the novel. The sign in the novel, a portion of the song called “The Sheik of Araby”, is sung by a group of little girls in Central Park, a song about a rich man who covets beautiful women and attracts them from all races, and who claims that he is basically the embodiment of love and knows what love is all about. Nick and Jordan pass the children after their date at the Plaza Hotel....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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2046 words
(5.8 pages)
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Compare / Contrast "Araby" & "Lust" - Joyce’s Araby begins as a story about a young boy and his first love, his neighbor referred to in the story as Mangan's sister. However, the young boy soon turns his innocent love and curiosity into a much more intense desire, transforming this female and his journey to the bazaar into something much more intense and lustful. From the beginning, Joyce paints a picture of the neighborhood in which the boy lives as very dark and cold. Even the rooms within his house are described as unfriendly, "Air, musty from having long been enclosed, hung in all the rooms, and the waste room behind the kitchen was littered with old and useless papers.” The young boy sees all of this unpleasant setting around him, and we see Mangan’s sister portrayed as being above all that, almost as the one and only bright spot and positive thing in his life....   [tags: essays research papers] 790 words
(2.3 pages)
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Themes in James Joyce's Araby - In the story of, "Araby" James Joyce concentrated on three main themes that will explain the purpose of the narrative. The story unfolded on North Richmond Street, which is a street composed of two rows of houses, in a desolated neighborhood. Despite the dreary surroundings of "dark muddy lanes" and "ash pits" the boy tried to find evidence of love and beauty in his surroundings. Throughout the story, the boy went through a variety of changes that will pose as different themes of the story including alienation, transformation, and the meaning of religion (Borey)....   [tags: European Literature] 653 words
(1.9 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Araby Even under the best of circumstances the transition from childhood into adulthood is a long and dreary journey that all young men must encounter in life. A road that involves many hardships and sacrifices along the way; and when that road is a lonely one, with only oneself to rely upon, the hardship intensifies to become destructive to those involved. This is particularly true in the story “Araby,” where James Joyce portrays the trials and tribulations of a young boy’s initiation into adulthood....   [tags: essays research papers] 581 words
(1.7 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Araby by James Joyce In "Araby" James Joyce explores the theme that adulthood is not always what it seems. The narrator in the story is the main character and he demonstrates this theme when he falls in love with the girl in his neighborhood. In the beginning the young boy is too shy to express his feeling towards her. Later in the story he tells her of a present that he is going to bring her from the bazzar. Lastly he realizes that he has failed and now has lost his chance with this girl and is "driven by anguish and derided by vanity" (Joyce)....   [tags: essays research papers] 744 words
(2.1 pages)
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Comparison of A & P by John Updike and Araby by James Joyce - Comparison of A & P by John Updike and Araby by James Joyce John Updike's “A & P” and James Joyce's “Araby” are very similar. The theme of the two stories is about a young man who is interested in figuring out the difference between reality and the fantasies of romance that play in his head and of the mistaken thoughts each has about their world, the girls, and themselves. One of the main similarities between the two stories is the fact that the main character has built up unrealistic expectations of women....   [tags: Compare Contrast compare/contrast] 675 words
(1.9 pages)
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THE INTERPRETATION OF “SONNY’S BLUES” AND “ARABY” AS QUEST NARRATIVES - ... It is the devotion to achieve a desire that represents the Holy Grail; in the case of “Sonny’s Blues”, it is the Narrator’s penis. Whereas it was the protagonist’s devotion to achieve a desire that marked the Holy Grail in “Sonny’s Blues”, it is the protagonist’s obsession to get the girl in that defines the Holy Grail in “Araby”. The Holy Grail is embodied in Mangan’s sister, with whom the Narrator seeks a romantic relationship with. In its broadest sense “Araby” is the quest for the girl. Joyce establishes the Narrator’s fascination with Mangan’s sister as an obsession, to the point where it interferes with his daily activities....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1491 words
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The “Othering” of One Female Character in “Frankenstein” and “Araby.” - ... There are many instances within the story referring Elizabeth as an “insect” and an “animal”. These words signify that Frankenstein does not consider Elizabeth as a normal human being; in better words, he thought of Elizabeth as a stereotypical woman of the 19th Century. He expected her to be like a "Heidi" who would "lug goat milk up the hills and not think twice"(Moore, 277). Throughout the novel, Elizabeth is described as a perfect, obedient, and submissive woman. She was destined to marry Frankenstein from a very young age, not that she opposed it, but nobody ever asks her consent....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1485 words
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The Truth of a Young Boy’s Romance - Many men are naïve when it comes down to them being in love. Men begin their experimental stage with women when they are young. Most boys learn or get an understanding of male and female relations from observing their parents, guardians, movies, or even reading books. In the story “Araby” a young boy has a crush on his friend Mangan’s sister. His crush on the girl is typical with young boys of his age. The young boy is hesitant to approach her or even speak with her because of his shyness. The young boy's idea of romance quickly begins to fade after his delayed trip to Araby....   [tags: relationships, ] 553 words
(1.6 pages)
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Dubliners by James Joyce - Although "Araby", "Eveline", and "The Dead" from Dubliners by James Joyce are three different stories, the author uses similar elements to convey each message, and so develops a strong connection between chapters. Internal conflict and epiphany are used to dramatize the characters in three stories. In "Araby", the narrator takes a fancy to his friends Mangan's sister. Since then, he thinks of her day and night, " Her images accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance..." (25). One night, she asks him if he will go to Araby....   [tags: American Literature] 418 words
(1.2 pages)
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Analyzing Two Short Stories - ... Sammy's philosophical differences culminate with him quitting his job because of the way his boss, Lengel, treated the girls. Even though Lengel states its the store policy and it applies to everyone, Sammy views this as unfair treatment of the girls and uses this to take a stand for his beliefs and quits. Sammy realizes the magnitude of his philosophical decision when he walks out and finds the girls are gone and nothing has changed. Sammy realizes he has made a choice and he must stick to that choice even though nothing has changed....   [tags: Fictional Literature]
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847 words
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Epiphanies in Joyce's Dubliners and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Missing Works Cited James Joyce’s Dubliners is a compilation of stories that all rely on character epiphanies in order to develop each story. These epiphanies change the tone of each story because each yields a negative change or reaction. In both “Araby” and “The Dead”, the characters realize or learn something about the world around them, which makes them second guess either themselves or the reason behind their actions. Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales contains at least one tale that relies on an epiphany to help develop theme but it doesn’t change the tone or course of the story, it just helps to portray the true meaning of the character....   [tags: James Joyce Geoffrey Chaucer] 1192 words
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Oppression in Literature - ... The author suggests that the society is oppressive and like most tyranny’s the people with power use the regular people for their own purpose. The people in the story are also afraid to stand up for what they believe. It is obvious this is true because it is always easier to sit back than stand up for something. He ends up trying to stand up for what he thinks is right, but everybody thinks he is crazy rather than a leader. The last story is “Araby” by James Joyce. This story has very similar viewpoints like the previous two stories while dealing with financial and religious oppression....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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2042 words
(5.8 pages)
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The Futility of Conflict in three Pieces of Literature - In this paper, we take a look at the following pieces in an effort to see the conflict in short stories and poems: Astronomer’s wife by Kay Boyle, Araby by James Joyce and lastly The Battle by Louis Simpson. The short story Astronomer’s Wife by Kay Boyle, portrays a wife to a man who stays up late watching the stars and dreaming about being “up there”. It would seem that the astronomer spent longer in bed then his wife, and that his wife took care of him while he kept his head in the sky. The astronomer and his wife had started to grow apart due to his eccentric attitude; his wife felt that she was almost alone, with just her duties to take care of but no one to actually have conversation that meant anything....   [tags: conflict, James Joyce, Kay Boyle, Louis Simpson,]
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1398 words
(4 pages)
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James Joyce's The Dubliners - "Epiphany" refers to a showing-forth, a manifestation. For Joyce, however, it means a sudden revelation of the ¡°whatness of a thing¡±. Joyce's tales about Dublin portray impotence, frustration and death. Their meaning is provided not so much by plot but by the epiphanies. Aiming either to illustrate an instant of self-realization in the characters themselves, or to raise the trivial existence of his characters to a level of conscious significance for the reader. The figures inside the story whom are rapped by their environment are shown the truth about their lives, whereas readers are shown the whole process which, in its turn, becomes an epiphany for them....   [tags: essays research papers] 507 words
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Exchanging Love for Death in James Joyce's Eveline from Dubliners - Exchanging Love for Death in Eveline   Like "Araby," "Eveline" is a story of young love, but unlike Mangan's sister, Eveline has already been courted and won by Frank, who is taking her away to marry him and "to live with him in Buenos Ayres" (49). Or has she. When she meets him at the station and they are set to board the ship, Eveline suddenly decides she cannot go with Frank, because "he would drown her" in "all the seas of the world" (51). But Eveline's rejection of Frank is not just a rejection of love, but also a rejection of a new life abroad and escape from her hard life at home....   [tags: Dubliners Essays] 831 words
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The Yellow Wall Paper - Stettler Hour 5 2/15/00 Modern Lit. Essay #1 In the early twentieth century a writers work usually represented ones surroundings. In the stories “Araby” by James Joyce and “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charolotte Gilman there are examples of their immediate surroundings taking affect in there writings. In most cases a person becomes what there surroundings are because that was the way they were raised....   [tags: essays research papers] 709 words
(2 pages)
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Themes Of Betrayal In James Jo - Origins of the Theme of Betrayal in James Joyce's Dubliners Throughout his early years, certain people and events heightened Joyce's awareness of the hopelessly corrupt environment of Ireland that had betrayed so many of its own. The more profound of these enlightening inspirations were the betrayal and downfall of Charles Stewart Parnell, the indifference of Henrik Ibsen towards literary protests, the neglected native artistry of James Clarence Mangan, and Joyce's own role as Prefect. These occurrences provoked Joyce's bitter resentment towards Ireland, initiating the gradual alienation towards his church and homeland....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Inexistence of Father Christmas in "Araby" - “Araby” tells a story about a little boy’s romance and his disillusionment in the end. While people tend to focus on the ending of the story trying to find some clue from Araby the market alone, I believe there is another site that we should not forget—the room where the priest died. It seems Araby symbolizes the numb, dark adult world while the room is holy, romantic; but as I read more, I find they are quite the same. Comparing the two buildings, one of the hidden reasons for the boy’s anger dawned on me: he is deceived by both sites....   [tags: Araby, James Joyce, ] 568 words
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Light and Dark Symbolism Illustrated in Joyce's Araby - Since symbolism first began to be used in the English language, Light has always represented a theme of hope and optimism. The phrase “Light at the end of the tunnel” best encompasses this, implying an opportunity or relief after difficulty or chaos. In the same way, Darkness has represented confusion or despair. James Joyce expands on the traditional connotations of Light and Darkness in his short story “Araby”. The narrative follows a young boy on his futile quest to find love with a girl much older than himself whom he hardly knows....   [tags: araby] 656 words
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Araby by James Joyce - “Araby” by James Joyce      There seems to be a great deal of controversy surrounding the short story, “Araby” by James Joyce. This isn’t controversy dealing with various political issues or controversy involving issues of free speech or anything related to these things. It is of a more simple matter: whether the young boy in this story is capable of having a deep emotional realization at the conclusion of the story. It is obvious to me via the final sentence, (Araby, 398), that he does not make a startling realization, rather, the narrator, as the boy many years later, looks back on how foolish he was....   [tags: James Joyce Araby] 629 words
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James Joyce's Araby - James Joyce's "Araby"      Passion, adolescence, foolishness, and maturity are the first words that come to one’s mind to describe James Joyce’s short story, “Araby.” In it, he writes about a boy who falls deeply in love with his best friend’s sister, who through the story, doesn’t seem to notice him or care about him. The boy, who has yet to be named, lives in a poor and run-down town. During the story, certain characters contribute to the boy’s developing sense of maturity, and eventually, lead him into adulthood....   [tags: James Joyce Araby Essays] 1142 words
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Realizing Mistakes in James Joyce's Araby - Many times in life, people set unrealistic expectations for themselves or for other people. This is not a very wise thing to do because people often feel disappointed and embarrassed for getting their hopes up so high. One good example of this is the narrator in the short story, Araby, by James Joyce. In the story Araby, a young man develops an infatuation with his friend, Magan’s, sister. Because his infatuation is so strong, he fears he will be unable to express his feelings to her, so when she mentions she cannot go to the local bazaar she has wanted to attend, he seizes this as a perfect opportunity and volunteers to buy her a gift....   [tags: James Joyce, Araby, ] 745 words
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James Joyce's Araby - The Tragedy of Araby In James Joyce’s Araby, a young boy finds himself in love with an older girl. The girl, Mangan’s sister, refuses to love him back and instead ignores him. This crushes the boy and makes his hunger for her even more stronger. He sometimes finds himself hopelessly alone in the darkness thinking about her, awaiting for the day she would recognize his devotion to her. “ At night in my bedroom…her image came between me and the page I strove to read (805).” “At last she spoke to me (805).” She asked him if he was going to attend a popular carnival called Araby....   [tags: essays research papers] 1190 words
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Araby by James Joyce - The story, "Araby" by James Joyce, is a short story about a young boy's life and his quest to impress the young girl for whom he has feelings. The protagonists to the young boy, including the young girl, are the boy's uncle, and the people at the Bazaar booth. The initial point of conflict occurs when the girl informs the boy that she cannot attend the bazaar, as she has every other year. "She could not go, she said, because there would be a retreat that week in her convent" (Joyce 106)....   [tags: essays research papers] 951 words
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Dublin and its People in Araby - What impression of Dublin and its people does James Joyce give in his story Araby ‘Dubliners’ is a book written by controversial Irish writer James Joyce, Dubliners was published in 1914 although the various stories in it were actually written between 1904 and 1907. James Joyce despised his homeland and every thing about it; he rejected Christianity, his family and Ireland, his country. In 1904, James left Ireland to live in Switzerland where he began to write Dubliners. James also rejected Irish literature and subsequently his favourite writers were Chekov, a Russian writer, Ibsen, a Norwegian writer and Zola, a French writer....   [tags: English Literature] 1309 words
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Comparison of "Araby" and "The Garden Party" - In the introductions of James Joyce's Araby and Katherine Mansfield's The Garden Party the main themes of the stories are immediately introduced, as in any effective short story. Through the detailed descriptions of the settings, the central themes of each story are presented. The relationships between the main characters and their respective families are introduced and provide background information which helps to further understand the themes of each story. The main themes of the stories are further developed when the characters are introduced....   [tags: Comparative Literature] 1260 words
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James Joyce's Eveline and Araby - James Joyce's Eveline and Araby James Joyce uses similar themes and language devices in both 'Araby' and 'Eveline.' Although this is so, there are also important differences to be noted. Joyce wrote these stories over one hundred years ago but yet we can still relate to the issues covered in the modern world today. James Joyce could have written these short stories as an inspiration from his own background or based them on the events happening in Dublin at that time. These stories were written as a new century was beginning....   [tags: Papers James Joyce] 1630 words
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Joyce's Araby: a Double Focus - Boy or Man: the Double Focus On one hand "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy's quest for the ideal. Although the quest ends in failure, it results in an inner awareness and the boy's first step into manhood. On another hand the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for the story is told in retrospect by a man who reflects back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight. James Joyce's fascinating double focus: the boy's first experience, and the man's reflection to the unforgotten moments of his childhood provides for the dramatic rendering of a simple story of first love told by a narrator who, with his wider adult vision, can employ the sophisticated use of irony and symbolic imagery necessary to open a window to his soul telling us more about him now than about the child that lives in his memory....   [tags: American Literature] 790 words
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James Joyce's Araby - James Joyce's Araby I doubt there are book logs that commence with a note directing a reader, specifically you, even though I get the impression from Mr. Little to whom riding between pairs of glasses suggesting that in order to gather a bounty against my beloved head I must be obliged to fathoming on how to receive topic sentences with cradling arms and craters of dimples (have to love formalities, even of those lolling head-stumps, after all, it keeps NATO all trite and content with tying bow ties as a substitute for tying "no comments" with the press, or if there are annotations, they habitually orbit around: NATO headquarters dinner order for "take out the Chinese" was grossly misunderstood)....   [tags: Papers] 3501 words
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Symbolism in A Good Man is Hard to Find and Araby - Symbolism In the short story, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”, by Flannery O'Connor, every object including the characters are symbols. The Grandmother for example is the one and only dynamic character, represents all of us who have had to feel grief or needed to ask for forgiveness. As Flannery O'Connor has suggested, the story is a spiritual journey because of the Grandmother's quandaries. In the beginning of the story the Grandmother is obsessed with everything worldly and superficial. She cares only about how others perceive her, “Her collars and cuffs were white organdy trimmed with lace and at her neckline she had pinned a purple spray of cloth violets containing a sachet....   [tags: Flannery O'Connor James Joyce]
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Growing Up in Araby by James Joyce and Boys and Girls by Alice Munro - Growing Up in Araby by James Joyce and Boys and Girls by Alice Munro In the stories “Araby” by James Joyce, and “Boys and Girls” by Alice Munro, there is a common theme of growing up. In both of these stories the characters came to a realization of who they were and what they wanted to be. They both are of the age when reality strikes and priorities take on meaning. The characters in both stories evolve through rites of passage but the way in which these revolutions occur differ with each character....   [tags: James Joyce Boys and Girls Development Essays] 972 words
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Bubbles in James Joyce's Short Story Collection, Dubliners - Many of Joyce’s characters in Dubliners are trapped in a bubble, where they are paralyzed and confined to a world that they want to escape. The first example of this is in “Araby” where the narrator is attracted to a young girl. He can hear her, see her, and dream and wish about her. He always thinks about her, and longs to be with her: “Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance (Joyce, 25).” However, he is unable to escape from himself and talk to her or get to know her....   [tags: Araby, literary analysis] 921 words
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The Sisters and An Encounter - Like the two previous stories, The Sisters and An Encounter, Araby is about a somewhat introverted boy fumbling toward adulthood with little in the way of guidance from family or community. The truants in An Encounter managed A young boy who is similar in age and temperament to those in “The Sisters” and “An Encounter” develops a crush on Mangan’s sister, a girl who lives across the street. One evening she asks him if he plans to go to a bazaar (a fair organized, probably by a church, to raise money for charity) called Araby....   [tags: English Literature] 1218 words
(3.5 pages)
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Arby - Arby James Joyce's use of religious imagery and religious symbols in "Araby" is compelling. That the story is concerned somehow with religion is obvious, but the particulars are vague, and its message becomes all the more interesting when Joyce begins to mingle romantic attraction with divine love. "Araby" is a story about both wordly love and religious devotion, and its weird mix of symbols and images details the relationship--sometimes peaceful, sometimes tumultuos--between the two. In this essay, I will examine a few key moments in the story and argue that Joyce's narrator is ultimately unable to resolve the differences between them....   [tags: essays papers] 1404 words
(4 pages)
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James Joyce's Dubliners - Dubliners In the story Dubliners by James Joyce, he writes about a few different themes, some of these being autonomy, responsibility, light, and dark. The most important of the themes though must be the individual character in the story against the community and the way they see it. I have chosen to take a closer look at “Araby,” “Eveline,” and “The Dead” because the great display of these themes I feel is fascinating. Many things affect the way the individual characters see the community, for example their family, friends, fellow citizens, or even new places....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1429 words
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An Analysis of Religion as a Captor in Dubliners by James Joyce - An Analysis of Religion as a Captor in Dubliners by James Joyce A collection of short stories published in 1907, Dubliners, by James Joyce, revolves around the everyday lives of ordinary citizens in Dublin, Ireland (Freidrich 166). According to Joyce himself, his intention was to "write a chapter of the moral history of [his] country and [he] chose Dublin for the scene because the city seemed to [b]e the centre of paralysis" (Friedrich 166). True to his goal, each of the fifteen stories are tales of disappointment, darkness, captivity, frustration, and flaw....   [tags: Papers] 1175 words
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James Joyce - In selecting James Joyce's Ulysses as the best novel of the twentieth century, Time magazine affirmed Joyce's lasting legacy in the realm of English literature. James Joyce (1882-1941), the twentieth century Irish novelist, short story writer and poet is a major literary figure of the twentieth-century. Regarded as "the most international of writers in English¡K[with] a global reputation (Attridge, pix), Joyce's stature in literature stems from his experimentation with English prose. Influenced by European writers and an encyclopedic knowledge of European literatures, Joyce's distinctive writing style includes epiphanies, the stream-of-consciousness technique and conciseness....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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James Joyce - Genius In short stories the narrator plays the most crucial role in the interaction between writer and reader. The choice of a narrator should help smoothly transfers the author's intentions. Joyce's story "Araby" is narrated in past tense and in first person by the protagonist. Joyce's decision to tell the story through this mouthpiece creates an avenue for Joyce to drive home his more complicated themes running through the story. The institution of religion is found throughout the entire plot as well as broader occult relations....   [tags: American Literature] 1150 words
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Growing Up in Dublin in The Dubliners - Growing Up in Dublin in The Dubliners Q) What picture do you think that Joyce gives of growing up in Dublinin the era when the book was written. A) While Joyce was growing up in Ireland he became disenchanted with his nation and the oppressive influence the Catholic Church had over the country. Joyce's intention when writing the book was to write a moral history of his country and he chose Dublin as it seemed to him to be the "centre of the paralysis" that seized it. The stories at the beginning of Dubliners are about youth and as the story progresses they concern older people and the last book is called The Dead....   [tags: Papers] 3035 words
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Reading - For as long as I can remember, I've loved to read: short stories, fiction, nonfiction sometimes, even philosophy if nothing else were available. This term I've been given more reading assignments than I can ever remember having to deal with. This term has been extra special because we studied no less than three types of literature: short stories, poetry, and drama. While I was in high school, a short story was a book with less than three hundred pages. This term I learned that even though a short story may be only a few pages long, there are chapters of interpretation, ambiguity, and symbolism to understand....   [tags: essays research papers] 448 words
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James Joyce - James Joyce James Joyce, an Irish novelist and poet, grew up near Dublin. James Joyce is one of the most influential novelists of the 20th century. In each of his prose works he used symbols to experience what he called an "epiphany", the revelation of certain revealing qualities about himself. His early writings reveal individual moods and characters and the plight of Ireland and the Irish artist in the 1900's. Later works, reveal a man in all his complexity as an artist and in family aspects....   [tags: essays research papers] 1720 words
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James Joyce's Araby - The Symbol of the Church in Araby - James Joyce's Dubliners - The Symbol of the Church in Araby Joyce's short story "Araby" is filled with symbolic images of a church. It opens and closes with strong symbols, and in the body of the story, the images are shaped by the young), Irish narrator's impressions of the effect the Church of Ireland has upon the people of Ire-land. The boy is fiercely determined to invest in someone within this Church the holiness he feels should be the natural state of all within it, but a succession of experiences forces him to see that his determination is in vain....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 1200 words
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James Joyce's Araby - The Ironic Narrator of Araby - The Ironic Narrator of "Araby" Although James Joyce's story "Araby" is told from the first per-son viewpoint of its young protagonist, we do not receive the impression that a boy tells the story. Instead, the narrator seems to be a man matured well beyond the experience of the story. The mature man reminisces about his youthful hopes, desires, and frustrations. More than if a boy's mind had reconstructed the events of the story for us, this particular way of telling the story enables us to perceive clearly the torment youth experiences when ideals, concerning both sacred and earthly love, are destroyed by a suddenly unclouded view of the actual world....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 882 words
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James Joyce's Araby - Loss of Innocence in Araby - Loss of Innocence in Araby In her story, "Araby," James Joyce concentrates on character rather than on plot to reveal the ironies inherent in self-deception. On one level "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy’s quest for the ideal. The quest ends in failure but results in an inner awareness and a first step into manhood. On another level the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for the story is told in retrospect by a man who looks back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 874 words
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James Joyce's Araby and Eveline - James Joyce's "Araby" and "Eveline" In 'Araby' and 'Eveline' Joyce uses religious symbols to show the importance of the Catholic religion in both of the main characters' lives. Both of these stories take place in Dublin, Ireland, a place that is very strong in its belief in the Catholic religion. In 'Araby,' the imagery of the infamous 'Fall' is presented to the reader within the second paragraph to indicate its importance. The themes of religious masses can be found in 'Eveline.' The concept of the Catholic Ash Wednesday is presented throughout both 'Araby' and 'Eveline.'      The second paragraph of ?Araby....   [tags: James Joyce Araby Eveline Essays] 1063 words
(3 pages)
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“Araby” Lesson in Adolescence - “Araby” Lesson in Adolescence In his brief but complex story "Araby," James Joyce concentrates on character rather than on plot to reveal the ironies within self-deception. On one level "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy's quest for the ideal. The quest ends in failure but results in an inner awareness and a first step into manhood. On another level the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for a man who looks back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight tells the story in retrospect....   [tags: James Joyce Araby Essays Papers]
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