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Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists - Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists From 1787-1790 the development of the American Constitution was a battle between two opposing political philosophies. America’s best political minds gathered in Philadelphia and other cities in the Northeast in order to find common ground in a governmental structure. The Federalists and the Anti-Federalists had both some political thoughts that agreed as well as some political thoughts that disagreed. However, both parties would compromise and ultimately come together....   [tags: essays research papers] 348 words
(1 pages)
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The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists - The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists had found themselves free of British domination. Due to the fact that they were free from British control, they wanted to create their own system of government where tyranny would be practically diminished. Originally, the separate states were connected by The Articles of Confederation. But this document gave the central government no power of their own. Because of this, the states had many problems in international politics since they had just found freedom and did not have the respect of other countries....   [tags: Papers] 664 words
(1.9 pages)
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Federalists and Anti-Federalists - Federalists and Anti-Federalists The Constitution, when first introduced, set the stage for much controversy in the United States. The two major parties in this battle were the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists. The Federalists, such as James Madison, were in favor of ratifying the Constitution. On the other hand, the Anti-Federalists, such as Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee, were against ratification. Each party has their own beliefs on why or why not this document should or should not be passed....   [tags: History Historical Politics Political Essays Comp] 1662 words
(4.7 pages)
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The Framers: Federalists and Anti-Federalists - When the United States declared itself a sovereign nation, the Articles of Confederation were drafted to serve as the nations first Constitution.Under these Articles, the states held most of the power; but due to an almost absent centralized government, colonists were ill-equipped to deal with such practices as regulating trade both between states and internationally, levying taxes, solving inter-state disputes, negotiating with foreign nations, and most importantly enforcing laws under the current notion of "Congress"....   [tags: Early American History] 701 words
(2 pages)
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Beliefs of the Anti-Federalists - The name, Anti-Federalists is not the best-suited name for what they truly are, or what they believe in. “They are called the Anti-Federalists, but it should be made clear at once that they were not Anti-Federal at all.” (Main xi) Originally, the word federalist, meant anyone who supported the Articles of Confederation. The term “Anti-Federalist” was placed on them to portray them as people who did not agree with the Federal Government, which was exactly opposite of what they are. According to the proper definition, the Anti-Federalists were really more “Federal” than the so-called Federalists....   [tags: essays research papers]
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722 words
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Arguments Of Fedrealists V. Anti-Federalists - When the members of the Constitutional Convention, after several months of vigorous debating, finally finished their work, many of the members still objected to this document. The Federalists were the group of people who desired to get the finished new constitution ratified and the Anti-Federalists were the group of people who disliked the new constitution and believed it shouldn't be ratified because it was missing several key parts. The Anti-Federalists formulated arguments based on the weaknesses they found in the new constitution and used them against the Federalists in order to gain support, while the Federalists convinced citizens of the righteousness of the new constitution in order to gain their support....   [tags: United States History Constitution] 1104 words
(3.2 pages)
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A Comparison of the Federalists and the Republicans - A Comparison of the Federalists and the Republicans Federalism a central feature of the American political system has long been an important issue. The nature of federalism has been shaped through the years by debates between prominent statesmen, laws, and Supreme Court decisions. When the colonies declared their independence from the Britain in 1776, they reacted against the British unitary system in which all political and economic power was concentrated in London. A major source of friction between the colonies and the mother country was the British attempt to reclaim powers previously granted to the colonial governments....   [tags: Papers] 346 words
(1 pages)
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Were the Federalists Democratic? - Were the Federalists Democratic. The idea of democracy is both vague and is often over-simplified to mean "majority rules". In theory, such a notion sounds both just and efficient. However, in practice, the concept of "majority rules" is much more complex and often difficult to implement. Modern-day versions of democracy, such as the one utilized in the United States, simply guarantees a person's right to voice his or her opinion in all matters involving the public. American democracy merely provides a forum for the expression of such viewpoints; it does not guarantee the ability of any individual to bring about change....   [tags: Papers] 1002 words
(2.9 pages)
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Anti-Federalist - Most Americans were very suspicious of government, but the Anti- Federalist was really mistrustful of the government in general and strong national government. This mistrust was the basis of their opposition to the constitution. They feared it had created a government the people could not control. Many distinguished Americans were Anti-Federalists. Leaders included George Mason and Elbridge Gerry. Both attended the Philadelphia Convention but had refused to sign the constitution....   [tags: essays research papers] 661 words
(1.9 pages)
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Federalist vs. Anti-Federalist - Federalist vs. Anti-Federalist The road to accepting the Constitution of the United States was neither easy nor predetermined. In fact during and after its drafting a wide-ranging debate was held between those who supported the Constitution, the Federalists, and those who were against it, the Anti-Federalists. The basis of this debate regarded the kind of government the Constitution was proposing, a centralized republic. Included in the debate over a centralized government were issues concerning the affect the Constitution would have on state power, the power of the different branches of government that the Constitution would create, and the issue of a standing army....   [tags: Papers] 852 words
(2.4 pages)
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Federalist Vs Anti-Federalist - John Adams stated that “Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.” Federalists believed this, and fought verbal and written battles against the Anti-Federalists, who disagreed with John Adams....   [tags: US History Constitution] 912 words
(2.6 pages)
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Constitutional Framers - ... Members present were unified by desire for a stronger national government with bicamel legislature however ideological differences emerged between Federalist and anti-Federalists. Both groups agreed on the importance of avoiding corruption within government, but held widely differed opinions on how to achieve this goal. The main arguments occurred due to the differences in views about the nature of representation and the importance of a psychologically distant Senate. Federalist supported the idea of a senate removed from state politics and united in the public national interest....   [tags: American History, The Federalists] 1368 words
(3.9 pages)
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Constitutional Authority Of The President - Constitutional Authority Of The President One of the greatest debates in the short history of the United States was over the proposed Constitution and did not solely take place inside the walls of the Constitutional convention. Throughout our great nation many individuals from different class levels and occupations became involved in the question over the new plan of government. Many views were expressed through the distribution of pamphlets, sermons, and the release of newspaper essays to sway citizens on the changes proposed....   [tags: US Government Political Science] 1926 words
(5.5 pages)
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City on a hill: A new nation is born - City on a hill: A new nation is born The city on a hill idea was first taught by the puritans that came from Europe, that wanted America to be a shining example to all the world. It was to be a place built on new rules and new ideas. Overall, it was supposed to be a nation that rose above all the others so that it could be marveled at and copied. In this paper it will be proven that the federalist approach to how the “City on a Hill” idea should be put into action was superior to the ways of the anti-federalists because of three things that they did:1....   [tags: essays papers] 708 words
(2 pages)
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Anit-federalism - Perhaps the greatest document of all time, the Constitution of the United States of America was not easily created. Fifty-five great men were needed to hammer out all the details of the Constitution in a long grueling process. As James Madison, architect of the constitution said, “The [writing of the Constitution] formed a task more difficult than can be well conceived by those who were not concerned in the execution of it. Adding to [the difficulty] the natural diversity of human opinions on all new and complicated subjects, it is impossible to consider the degree of concord which ultimately prevailed as less than a miracle.” The “natural diversity of human opinions” which Madison spoke of can be split into two basic groups, Federalists, and Anti-Federalists....   [tags: essays research papers] 669 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Threat of the Constitution - The Threat of the Constitution The fundamental point of contention between the Federalists and anti-Federalists in their debates over ratification of the Constitution surrounded the question of what powers were necessary in order to insure the security of the nation as a whole. The federalists, of course, believed that a strong central government was necessary, for reasons of national security and economic prosperity. The anti-Federalists were strongly opposed to the centralization of power, rather, they were concerned with retaining the sovereignty of the states and, in turn, their secured political freedom....   [tags: Papers] 2564 words
(7.3 pages)
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Early government - In early American government there were two emerging political views that were blatantly obvious in the new states; federalists and anti-federalists. In this paper two main topics of interest for each of the parties will be discussed, the role that government should have according to the differing views and the subject of foreign policy. The role of government as a according to the Federalists They support a stronger federal government. They felt that people can't govern themselves and that a nation must have a way to get rid of debts....   [tags: essays research papers] 1537 words
(4.4 pages)
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Creating the Constitution - ... Constitution. The Federalists realized there was a need for a central government that could more effectively defend against a foreign force. The Federalists sought to improve many of the deficiencies of the Confederation through the establishment and ratification of the United States Constitution of America. The Federalists believed the Confederation was insufficient in preserving the Union (Hamilton). The Federalists strongly believed that “…a cordial Union, under an efficient national government” provided them “the best security that can be devised against HOSTILITIES from abroad” (Jay)....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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2111 words
(6 pages)
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constitution - The Constitution itself did not mention political parties, and it was assumed that none was going to arise. But this was soon proven wrong when the debates between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists in 1787 and 1788 stir into a two party system. This soon led to a permanent feature in American policies. In early times, groups of people formed temporary assembly and voted together either for or against a specific policy. When the policy was settled, the assemblies would dissolve. The Federalists and Anti-Federalist was sort of like these assemblies, but they didn’t dissolve that easily....   [tags: essays research papers] 386 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Constitutional Convention of 1787 - ... Hamilton contended that since it was not specifically prohibited by the constitution, that the establishment of a bank was an implied power of the government. Hamilton’s argument was successful and the National Bank was established. While the Federalists were successful in establishing a National Bank, they were forced to compromise on other issues including the Virginia Plan. The Virginia Plan sparked debate over its legislative representative proposals. The plan proposed representation of the states by population....   [tags: US History] 819 words
(2.3 pages)
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Bill Of Rights To Protect From Tyranny - After the Constitution was written, the new born nation was immediately split into two political sides, the federalists and the anti-federalists, over the ratification. Federalists, southern planters or people that tended to hold interest in trade, advocated a strong executive. On the other hand, anti-federalists, back country people or people involved in business but not in the mercantile economy, opposed the ratification of the constitution. The two sides, after much debate, were able to come to a compromise after the Bill of Rights was included into the Constitution....   [tags: Political Science] 768 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Party System: Democracy Is Disagreement - The Party System: Democracy is Disagreement The founding fathers based this country on freedom. Freedom of speech, freedom of religion, press, assembly, petition. Freedom to have your own opinion about the founding fathers. Freedom to have your own opinion on how our government should run. So with this much freedom, it's obvious someone's going to disagree. And that's where political parties come in. The Federalists versus the Anti-Federalists, a 210-year battle which still carries on today with the Democrats and Republicans....   [tags: Political Science] 1106 words
(3.2 pages)
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Constitutional Arguments - Government Paper One When the Constitution was written two factions developed during the ratification process. The Federalist's were staunch supporters of the Constitution as it was. The Anti-federalists wanted the Constitution to contain stronger restrictions on the National government and wanted a Bill of Rights added. In thinking about this paper I tried to decided what I side I would have fallen on during the Constitution debates. After some thought, I came to the conclusion that I would have been an Anti-federalist....   [tags: Political Science] 1440 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Federalist Party - If I was a citizen in the United States of America back in 1790, I would want to be part of the Federalist Party. The Federalist Party was created by Alexander Hamilton, and his party wants a strong central government in America with power given to the wealthy and political leaders. The only other party back then was the justly named Anti-Federalist party. The Anti-Federalist party was started by Thomas Jefferson and this party had completely opposite views to the Federalists. Anti-Federalists focused on power among the individual states, as opposed to having a powerful central government....   [tags: American Government] 825 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Different American Political Parties - The Different American Political Parties There have been many different political parties since the beginning of the American political system. A political party is made up of a group of people that share common goals and ideals, and these people work together to help elect people to offices that share these goals to represent them. Political parties work to try to control the government and their ultimate goal is to win as many elections and to gain as many offices as possible. During the time when the Constitution was being debated over the first two political parties surfaced in the United States, the Federalists, and the Anti-Federalists....   [tags: Politics Political System Essays] 1555 words
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Party Politics: An Analysis on Factions in American Government - ... A representative republic is better suited for furthering the interests of the nation as a whole because it is comprised of representatives who will “refine and enlarge the public views” and not likely “sacrifice [justice] to temporary or partial considerations,” as factions are inclined to do. In short, representatives can speak for the people better than the people can themselves because the people are generally too self-interested to understand the interests of the community. The only danger in this system is that of men of “sinister designs” obtaining seat in the government and betraying the interests of the people....   [tags: Political Science] 1458 words
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The First Political Parties - ... Hamilton in comparison to Jefferson held a far more negative stance, regarding the majority of people as inadequate to regulate the government and essentially the economy.13 Again, this responsibility was to be left to the more social elite, which would act in the best interests of the people. Much of Hamilton’s plans reflected this philosophy of bettering the common people through the use of the elite. Economically, Hamilton felt the prosperity of the majority would be stimulated by the wealthiest through promoting their wealth by the central government....   [tags: Political Science]
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The Ratification of the Constitution - The Ratification of the Constitution      In 1787, the Constitution was created to replace the Articles of Confederation, because it was felt that the Articles weren’t sufficient for running the country. However, the Constitution was not very well liked by everyone .      The constitution created was very much liked by the majority of the country. This included the farmers, the merchants, the mechanics, and other of the common people. However, there were those who were very important people in the revolution who felt that the Constitution would not work, most notably Patrick Henry and Thomas Paine, who felt they were the backbone of the revolution....   [tags: American History] 390 words
(1.1 pages)
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Articles of confederation - Articles of Confederation vs. Constitution The Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, although vastly different in their philosophies of governing the nation, both played a big role in setting the stage for America’s economy in the upcoming nineteenth century. A few years after the Articles of Confederation were drafted many politicians and economists, such as Alexander Hamilton, began to see problems with the decentralized form of government that was created by this document. These advocates of a more centralized government were referred to as federalists, and although they were not in favor of a dictatorship, like that of England’s, they saw the need for a central governing system to reside over the individual states....   [tags: essays research papers] 533 words
(1.5 pages)
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Senate - ... One such conclusion was a widely shared belief in the desirability of a two-chamber legislature, with an upper house to check the more popular lower house” (Wirls, p. 60). Members present were unified by desire for bicameral legislature however ideological differences emerged between Federalist and anti-Federalists. Both groups agreed on the importance of protecting against corruption within government but disagreed on the means of achieving this goal. The main arguments were due to differences between views of the nature of representation and the importance of a psychologically distant Senate....   [tags: American History, The Confederation Congress] 1255 words
(3.6 pages)
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Threats to Democracy - Threats to Democracy What threats to "Democracy" presented themselves during the first few decades of independence. How did leaders of the U.S. solve these problems. During the first decades of our premature nations' existence, it is hard to imagine that the United States would evolve to become such a great democracy. A democracy others would prefer to believe with hypocrite reasoning. When the U.S. first won its independence it was a united group of people left to fend for themselves. This group was to become a nation and creating it involved more than winning independence from Great Britain....   [tags: essays papers] 1797 words
(5.1 pages)
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The American Two Party Political System - The American Two Party Political System Since the administration of George Washington two political parties have dominated the United States political system, but they have not always been the same two parties. The first two parties were the Federalists and Anti-Federalists. Federalists were those who supported a strong federal government and the Anti-Federalists were those who did not. The leaders of the Federalists were Alexander Hamilton and John Adams. Both were from the Northeast where the Federalist line of thinking was strongest....   [tags: Papers] 1294 words
(3.7 pages)
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Us Constitution Vs The Articles Of Confederation - United States Constitution vs. Articles of Confederation The move from the Articles of Confederation to the United States Constitution caused several people to be unhappy. For 6 years the Articles weakened the United States in more ways than one. In the summer of 1787 a new form of government was created, a radical move from the Articles of Confederation. The United States Constitution and the Articles have several ever present difference that some considered to be too radical. In terms of levying taxes, the Articles Congress could request states to pay taxes while with the Constitution; the Congress has the right to levy taxes on individuals....   [tags: Political Science] 919 words
(2.6 pages)
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Federalist - After winning their independence in the American Revolution, America's leaders were hesitant to create a strong centralized government in fear that it would only replace King George III's tyranny. As a result, the first constitution, the Articles of Confederation, gave the national government hardly any power over the states, and created chaos within the nation. Because of the Articles' inefficiency, a new document called the Constitution was drafted. The Constitution created a more centralized government with the separation of powers among executive, legislative, and judicial branches....   [tags: Political Science Politics] 1448 words
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Influenced by Republicanism, but not a True Republican - Influenced by Republicanism, but not a True Republican The philosophy of a republican form of government was certainly not a creation of James Madison and the Federalists. The idea of such a government has been around since the beginning of political philosophy. While the definition has changed over the centuries, certain constants continue to define a strictly republican regime. The goals and priorities of a republic are distinct yet dissimilar from those of James Madison’s philosophy. Generally, a republican government is defined as one which idealizes the public interests as the highest good and imposes a duty on each citizen to work toward the public interests before individual ones....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Politics Of Founding Fathers - Politics of the Founding Fathers Both the Federalists, those promoting a strong central government, and the Anti-federalists, those believing that liberties including the right of self-rule would be protected best by preservation of local self-government, agreed that arms and liberty were in no doubt linked. The first discussion in which these views were articulated occurred in the context of Article 1, section 8 of the Constitution concerning the powers of Congress to raise a standing army and its power over the militia....   [tags: Political Science] 1330 words
(3.8 pages)
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Confederation and Constitution - ... Another strength that the Article of Confederations had was to coin and borrow money. The Article of Confederations even detailed with foreign countries and sign treaties. Even though the Article of Confederation had its strength, it also had its weaknesses. The Articles of Confederation was the first official government of the United States and there were lots weaknesses. The national government could not power the states to follow its laws. It did not have the authority to implement laws. Congress did not have a strong and steady leadership....   [tags: U.S. History ]
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Alien And Sedition Acts - In the late 1780's to the 1790's there were many different controversial topics, in the United States, including both domestic and foreign policies. American’s reactions were heightened due to the fighting between political parties and sense of distrust with other nations. This time of instability and turbulence set the stage for the passing of the Alien and Sedition Acts. In order to understand all of these events, the basis of the two political parties that started the conflict must be explained....   [tags: Alien Sedition Act AP US History Document Based Qu] 1581 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Revolution of 1800 - ... The election of 1800 and subsequent deadlock between Jefferson and Burr also exposed a flaw in the U.S. Constitution that the original Founders did not expect. The Founders originally gave each elector in the Electoral College two ballots to cast for a President and a Vice President. They had hoped that the two candidates with the most votes would set aside their differences and assume the roles of President and Vice President, regardless of whether or not the candidates were from opposing political parties, as had happened in the election of 1796 where Adams became President and Jefferson became Vice President even though they were Federalist and Republican respectively....   [tags: US History]
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Bill of Rights - In 1791, the Bill of Rights, consisting of 10 amendments, was ratified into the constitution. The document’s purpose was to spell out the liberties of the people that the government could not infringe upon. Considered necessary by many at the time of its development, the Bill of Rights became the cause for a huge debate between two different factions: The Federalists and the Anti-Federalists. The Federalists were those who thought that there should be a new Union created with a strong centralized government and individual regional governments....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Republican Attacks Against Alexander Hamilton - Republican Attacks Against Alexander Hamilton Hamilton's Federalist Party and the Democratic Republicans led by Thomas Jefferson had polarized views on the majority of the important political issues. These two political parties which possessed differing opinions and views pertaining to the future of the U.S. government were persistent in their respective arguments against each other. The strongly contrasting views of these two parties are the foundation of the puissant and sometimes callous attacks by the Republicans against Hamilton and his economic plan....   [tags: American History] 767 words
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Federalism - Federalism The term "federalism" describes the changing relationship between the national and state governments as they sort out their roles and responsibilities within the federal system. America has a decentralized government; there is no single source of power or center of government. Federalism goes well with pluralism, because of the multiple centers of power that exist in the government, and also the many divisions of power. There are several levels of government including the federal government, the 50 states, county and city governments and independent school districts....   [tags: Papers] 2586 words
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The Clashing Interests of The Founding Fathers - The Clashing Interests of The Founding Fathers The framing of the American Constitution resulted in several conflicts dealing with economic issues, political concerns and dynamic conflicts of interest between the delegates. Each separate force had a perspective, usually clouded by personal motives, on how the new governmental system should operate. During the framing of the Constitution, the central conflicts were between the small states and the big states while in the ratification period the struggle involved the anti-federalists and the federalists....   [tags: American History Essays Constitution]
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Branches Of Government - Branches of Government When the Constitution of the United States of America was signed and ratified the people had a self sustaining government made up of three equal, but distinct, branches. The legislative branch, made up of a House of Representatives and Senate; The executive branch, which includes the President, Vice President, and the executive cabinet members; Finally, the judicial branch, consisting of the state and federal courts. The framers believed that all three branches in theory, would work together to govern not only for the good of the people, but for the good of the states, and the nation as a whole....   [tags: Political Science] 1823 words
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Constitutional Convention - During the Constitutional Convention, and the years to follow, the Anit-federalists heavily disputed with Federalist Party. One of the longest and most important arguments throughout this time period were the debates between Alexander Hamilton of the Federalists and Thomas Jefferson of the Anti-Federalists. The controversial issue discussed was over the establishment of a national bank. Alexander Hamilton, at the time George Washington’s Secretary of Treasury, explained before the Congress that the U.S....   [tags: essays research papers] 397 words
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The Whiskey Rebellion - ... Once it was obvious to the militia that using force would not help them achieve their goals, they voted to disband and went home peacefully. The Whiskey Rebellion showed the government that the people would rise up against the government if they felt it was needed. While not really a bad thing, it did lead to fears of an incident like the French Revolution occurring in the United States. Many American originally supported the French Revolution as an extension of the American Revolution. Men wore cockades as an outward demonstration of their support of the French Republic....   [tags: American History]
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The Press and Media Cause Rampant Swaying of the Election Votes through Their Opinions and Reports - The Press and Media Cause Rampant Swaying of the Election Votes Through Their Opinions and Reports Today, the press and media cause rampant swaying of the vote through their own opinions and reports. People are often misled with half-truths and believable rumors that can aid or ruin an election. Journalists and the newspapers often print things too hastily, without first investigating the truth or at least both sides of a story. Candidates abuse the media, using money as a pass to publicly slander and deface the character of their opposition, his ideals, and even the innocent people related to him....   [tags: essays research papers] 2666 words
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Political Transitions in America - ... As the final touches have been made to the new Constitution there was a struggle for ratification. Two factions were created during the struggle known as the Federalists and Anti-federalists. The Federalists did not like the idea of a supreme national authority, instead they believed in a confederation of states. They envisioned a strong centralized government able to create a formidable army. The Anti-Federalists were people of low class, poor, and less educated and they were deeply suspicious of centralized political power....   [tags: American History, Politics and Power] 2834 words
(8.1 pages)
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People Who Influence the Government - ... If the group has a hard time working together, it is very difficult for them to agree on ideas and get their point across to the public because of arguing over whose idea may be better or worse. These people come together for a common interest they all share, and they should work together toward getting the publics’ attention. There are direct techniques and indirect techniques that interest groups tend to use. A direct technique includes groups paying lobbyists to get their message out and meet and persuade important people of their message....   [tags: Politics] 1117 words
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The Importance of The Bill of Rights in Society Today - When the Second Constitutional Convention wrote the Constitution in 1787, there was a controversy between the federalists and the anti-federalists surrounding whether or not to have a Bill of Rights. The anti-federalists claimed that a bill of rights was needed that listed the guaranteed rights that the government could never take away from a person i.e. “inalienable rights.” A Bill of Rights was eventually deemed necessary, and has worked for over 210 years. There are many reasons why the ten amendments are still valid to this day, and the best examples are the First Amendment, concerning the freedom of religion, the Fifth Amendment, and the Sixth Amendment....   [tags: American History, Constitution] 621 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Bill of Rights: Americas Last Defense Against the Federal Suffocation of Civil Liberties? - Is our Bill of Rights necessary. Does it put a limit on our government, or on our liberty. Do these ten amendments hold the same meaning today as they did two-hundred and fourteen years ago. Are they now or have they ever been relevant. These questions were debated by our nation’s founding fathers in the eighteenth century and continue to be debated by the historians, academics, and political scientists today. Over the course of the last two centuries, its meaning has been twisted and stretched by the interpretation and misinterpretation of our legislature and, most of all, by the Supreme Court wielding its power of judicial review....   [tags: essays research papers] 1836 words
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Federalism in America - Federalism in America Federalism is a concept that started many years ago during the times of the ratification of the document we live by called the Constitution. This concept basically states that there will be two levels of government, the national and the state. Federalism states that the national and state governments are separate entities and have formal authority over the same area and people. With its largest effect was during the Civil rights movement. Federalism isn’t a natural outgrowth of the Articles of Confederation....   [tags: Papers] 430 words
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Arguments Regarding the US Economy from Conservative and Liberal Mindsets - Arguments Regarding the US Economy from Conservative and Liberal Mindsets Introduction The Republicans and Democrats have similar and different views on how to handle the United States of America and its immense economy. Both of the parties are more ideologically alike than different. Both parties support the United States Constitution, private property, free enterprise, and our individual freedom. Both view government's role as a limited one, to varying degrees. They support majority rule and the due process of law....   [tags: Economics Politics Government Essays Papers]
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Alien And Sedition Acts - The debates that built up over the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 revealed bitter controversies on a number of issues that existed since the making of the Constitution. If something went wrong with the Constitution, the Founding Fathers planed to amend it, but they did not consider how they would amend a splitting nation’s views. It became evident that the nation was tearing apart due to opposing view points. These differences could not be changed by the amendment of the Constitution. On numerous accounts they did not see eye to eye: on the meaning of the Constitution itself, on many Domestic Issues, and became evident in Foreign Policy....   [tags: Political Science] 1202 words
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The Birth of the United States from the Colonies - During the time period from 1765 to 1800, the government of the Colonies and eventually that of the United States, dealt with countless issues to create the system which governs the citizens of the United States today. Starting in 1765 with the passage of the Stamp Act by the British monarchy up to 1798 with the election of Thomas Jefferson as President in 1800 by the Colonial government, the aforesaid government, fought to rid itself of constant threats to the liberties and freedoms of the American people and the greater good as well as to preserve its intended purpose for as long as it is able....   [tags: American Colonies, Revolutionary War] 1475 words
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Economic Interpretaion (C. A. Beard) - Charles Beard's "Economic" Interpretation In 1913, Charles A. Beard (1913 [1935]) consolidated various scholarly views of the Constitution and, in the process, offered what became identified as "the" economic interpretation of the Constitution. Beard (pp. 16-18) argued that the formation of the Constitution was a conflict based upon competing economic interests - interests of both the proponents and opponents. In his view, the Federalists, the founders who supported a strong, centralized government and favored the Constitution during its drafting and ratification, were individuals whose primary economic interests were tied to personal property....   [tags: essays research papers] 358 words
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Jacksonian Era Free - Jacksonian Era Free Ever since the second term of George Washington's presidency, America's politicians have worked within a two party political system. The first two parties were the Federalists and Anti-Federalists. The Federalist Party supported a strong centralized federal government, while the basis of Anti-Federalists political platform was exactly the antithesis. The two party system has survived for so long, because for every idea set-forth there are always those who will argue against it....   [tags: Papers] 1179 words
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John Marshalls Court - By the early 1800s, the debate over Federal power which had been so tactfully postponed when it surfaced in previous efforts at unification (i.e., the Constitutional Convention) had again inevitably reared its head once the government was established and the neutral greatness of Washington's reign had ended. As the major issue of the day, the controversy of States' rights versus big government permeated politics in a profound depth and completeness: it was reflected in the core beliefs and platforms of the major political parties of the day, and most issues were at unobtrusive levels reflections of this central conflict....   [tags: essays research papers] 774 words
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How The War Of 1812 Reflect The Same Tensions That Led To The American Civil War - September, 2005 Internal Assessment Plan of the investigation How the war of 1812 reflect the same tensions that led to the American civil war. For this assignment I will start out by researching my topic on the internet with two websites. Then I will give evidence for my topic by stating what the authors from the websites concluded. Afterwards I will then give my analysis on the topic and answer the question in my conclusion. To conclude my paper I will provide a bibliography that gives credit to the sources I have used....   [tags: American History] 1038 words
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Solutions to the Growing Bureaucracy - The overgrowing demand for governmental agencies has grown tremendously since the 18th century. Originally George Washington in 1789 had only three government departments, Treasury, Foreign Affairs, and War. With the end of the Civil War, many problems arose and so did the bureaucracy. In 1870 much of the problems were remedied with the creation of the Department of Justice. Starting in the 19th century the size of the federal executive branch and the bureaucracy expanded as demand for new departments also grew....   [tags: essays research papers] 373 words
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The Founding of Our Nations Government - The Founding of Our Nations Government The Articles of Confederation were extremely important in the founding of our government today. The Articles gave us a sort of good base to start from, and was ground breaking in the shaping of our new nation. The Articles of Confederation were written by a Second Continental Congressional committee during the early part of the American Revolution in 1777. A report of the proposed articles was presented to the committee by John Dickson (committee head) just eight days after the signing of the Declaration Of Independence....   [tags: Papers] 1177 words
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The Dysfunction of American Politics: How the Debasement of the American Citizenry has Facilitated Political Chaos - ... Conflict arises and friction is created between ideologies and inside political parties when an individual institution is driven to align all of its colors on one side without regard to the others. If one institution gets all of its colors on one side, the rest are still left in disorder. To reach the final goal of getting all of the individual colors together on their appropriated sides of the cube, each facet of the block must compromise some of its immediate interests for the greater good of a completed Rubik’s puzzle and functional political system....   [tags: U.S. Politics ]
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The Revolution of Incorporation - ... The Court, however, finds that the Fifth Amendment is not an aspect of local governments since the Bill of Rights does not apply to state or local governments. The Court, therefore, does not have jurisdiction in the case because it cannot apply the Fifth Amendment to state or local governments. Barron v Baltimore has yet to be overturned and has even been reaffirmed in later cases such as Permoli v New Orleans in 1845 and Mattox v United States in 1894 (329). Though, the 1868 ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment created a means of extending the Bill of Rights to state governments (329)....   [tags: Law]
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The Bill of Rights and Protection of Civil Liberties - The Bill of Rights and Protection of Civil Liberties When the English came to America to escape religious persecution, things commenced at a shaky start. For example, Puritans fled from England because of religious persecution. They were being physically beaten because of their religious beliefs therefore they attempted to create a Utopia or "City upon a hill" in the New World. There "City upon a hill" began with a government based on religious beliefs. It developed into a government which condemned those who did not believe in the Puritan beliefs....   [tags: American America History] 843 words
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Bill of Rights & Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen - The Bill of Rights and Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen are based on the same principles of natural rights; therefore each document is similar in protecting the people's natural rights. However, despite their similarities, their differences are apparent due to the social situations in which they were adopted. The Bill of Rights stood to protect the freedoms of each individual by establishing a democratic government. The French Revolution eliminated the hierarchy of class and established equality among men with the Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen....   [tags: European History] 1278 words
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The Creation Of The Constitution - In creating the Constitution, the states had several different reactions, including a rather defensive reaction, but also an understanding reaction. As a document that provided the laws of the land and the rights of its people. It directs its attention to the many problems in this country; it offered quite a challenge because the document lent itself to several views and interpretations, depending upon the individual reading it. It is clear that the founders’ perspectives as white, wealthy or elite class, American citizens would play a role in the creation and implementation of The Constitution....   [tags: The Constitution] 1073 words
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federalism - Federalism The United States Government is beloved to all Americans, in the simple fact that all men are created equal and all men are given equal opportunity, to aspire to achieve success and make their dreams come true. Although the percentage of people who achieve all of their goals in life is fairly small, they have the freedom to chase them and America for the most part is a pretty content place. The “law of the land” that sets the standards for our rights and privileges is the U.S. Constitution....   [tags: essays research papers] 1206 words
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history - In 1790 a new nation was on the rise. With the help of the French, the people of the thirteen colonies of America had united together to defeat the greatest empire of the world. This was the shining moment of America. Freedom was theirs, and this is what they have been wanting since the pilgrims arrived almost two centuries before. They were now going to take on an even greater task then fighting the British: establishing a system of government that would be fair and that would be accepted throughout all of America....   [tags: essays research papers] 1629 words
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Interpreting the Constitution - When the Federalist party was organized in 1791, those people who favored a strong central government and a loose constitutional interpretation coagulated and followed the ideals of men such as Alexander Hamilton. The first opposition political party in the United States was the Republican party, which held power, nationally, between 1801 and 1825. Those who were in favor of states rights and a strict construction of the constitution fell under the leadership of Thomas Jefferson. These Jeffersonian republicans, also known as anti-federalists, believed in strict adherence to the writings of the constitution....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Value Of A Jury System - The Value of a Jury System The Founders of our nation understood that no idea was more central to our Bill of Rights -- indeed, to government of the people, by the people, and for the people -- than the citizen jury. It was cherished not only as a bulwark against tyranny but also as an essential means of educating Americans in the habits and duties of citizenship. By enacting the Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Amendments to the Constitution, the Framers sought to install the right to trial by jury as a cornerstone of a free society....   [tags: essays research papers] 1633 words
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Alexander Hamilton's Contribution to America - ... The Anti-federalists were characterized by favoring urbanization while the Federalists were characterized by enhancing agriculture in America. Alexander Hamilton strongly wanted a powerful federal government that could effectively work for the wellbeing of commerce and trade (Scott, 2008). In the American nation, he developed love of regulation, efficiency and organization. Hamilton strongly showed that America must possess credit for the development of government operations, trade, industry and business activities....   [tags: U.S. History ]
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Democratic and Undemocratic Aspects of the Constitutional Convention - Democratic and Undemocratic Aspects of the Constitutional Convention The Articles of Confederation was the first government of the United States. The Articles had created a very weak national government. At the time the Articles were approved, they had served the will of the people. Americans had just fought a war to get freedom from a great national authority--King George III (Patterson 34). But after this government was put to use, it was evident that it was not going to keep peace between the states....   [tags: American America History]
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Comparing the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution - Comparing the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution The founding Fathers consists of Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, John Adams, George Washington, James Madison, and James Monroe. These were the most known contributors of all the founding Fathers. Each framer has equal contribution to the development of the Constitution and the articles of Confederation. The three greatest contributors to the Constitution in the United States were the founding Fathers in the Constitution and the Articles of the Confederation....   [tags: American History Documents Governmental Essays]
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civics- the constitution - PART ONE- the definitions are done on the notebook along with the matching and multiple choice. SHORT ANSWER 2. A. A democracy is a form of government where the people govern themselves. A republic is a form of government where the people elect officials to make their decisions for them. A democratic republic is a form of government where the people elect officials to represent them in the affairs of the government. B. The united states government is a democratic republic. 3. A. Abraham Lincoln was describing the fact that without the consent of the people there would be no government....   [tags: essays research papers] 3739 words
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Human Nature and the Opposing Forces That Redeem It - Human Nature and the Opposing Forces That Redeem It The Federalist Papers provide priceless insight into the spirits of both human government and human nature. In fact, The Federalist Papers repeatedly acknowledge a basic truth of human existence: humans are naturally selfish, hostile, and full of such characteristics that hinder the continuation of peaceful, harmonious existence. The corruption of the human race permeates even the strongest governments, as history has shown time and again. Ironic as it is, governments must take precautions to guard themselves, even from their very own members, from the very thing that all governments are meant to remedy: the shortcomings of human nature....   [tags: American Literature] 1101 words
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Constitutional Interpretation of Checks and Balances - Constitutional Interpretation of Checks and Balances The problem of interpreting the Constitution and framer’s intent is a constantly permeating and troublesome question in the minds of Supreme Court Justices, judges, prominent politicians, and policy makers alike. It is a problem that has been pondered for years and years in the courtrooms and on paper with no real conclusion. One such essay arguing this dilemma is “How Not to Read the Constitution” by Laurence H. Tribe and Michael C. Dorf, who explore the questions “Is reading the text just a pretext for expressing the reader’s vision in the august, almost holy terms of constitutional law?” and “Is the Constitution simply a mirror in which one sees what one wants to see?” (Tribe, 49)....   [tags: Papers] 1683 words
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An Examination of America's Two Party System - An Examination of America's Two Party System Democracy in the United States is based on the indirect representation of the people by elected officials who are usually chosen by direct vote. Almost from the beginning of the United States' history, however, two parties have shared the great majority of the elected positions from the local level to the presidency. However, up until the mid-1850's when the Republican party was formed, other parties such as the Whigs, Federalists, and Anti-Federalists did not last very long....   [tags: Papers] 1709 words
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A History of the Early Assertion of Judicial Power - A History of the Early Assertion of Judicial Power Once upon a time there were several men planning out the best way to divide the power in a fledgling new country. Some of them wanted one big power, and others wanted three smaller ones where the power was roughly equally divided. Eventually they went with the idea of the three powers and everyone appeared to be relatively content with that. However, the two bigger and “more important” powers, the Executive and Legislative, started getting quite power-hungry and way too big....   [tags: Papers] 841 words
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John Marshall, Defender of the Constitutio - In Francis N. Stites' book, John Marshall, Defender of the Constitution, he tells the story of John Marshall's life by breaking up his life into different roles such as a Virginian, Lawyer, Federalist, National Hero, and as Chief of Justice. John Marshall was born in Virginia in 1755. Stites describes him as a Virginian "by birth, upbringing, disposition, and property (Stites 1)." His father, Thomas Marshall, was one of the most prominent and ambitious men of his time, and had a major impact on John....   [tags: Francis N. Stites] 1613 words
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Drafting the Constitution - ... As for the term of the presidency there were suggestions from three to seven years with ineligibility afterward, or three years with the chance of holding the office for three terms, a total of nine years. There was fear by some that seven years would be too long, Gunning Bedford, of Delaware, feared an Executive that “did not possess the qualifications ascribed to him,” noting the Executive could be impeached for “misfeasance” not ineptness. On the first vote it was decided the term for the Executive would be 7 years....   [tags: American History] 2555 words
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