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Your search returned over 400 essays for "aids epidemic"
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The Obesity Epidemic - In 1990, obese adults made up less than 15 percent of the population in most U.S. states. By 2010, 36 states had obesity rates of 25 percent or higher, and 12 of those had obesity rates of 30 percent or higher. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015) Even more alarming, the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents is on the rise, and youth are becoming overweight and obese at earlier ages. One out of six children and adolescents ages 2 to 19 are obese and one out of three are overweight or obese....   [tags: Obesity in America]
:: 4 Works Cited
1028 words
(2.9 pages)
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Obesity: An Epidemic - Obesity is a medical condition that affects children, teenagers and adults, and in recent years has caused many disorders that are potentially life-threating. All individuals consist of fat in their body, but sometimes body can store more fat than needed in the body due to a disorder or excessive eating, therefore they would be classified as obese. According to Professor Jane Wardle, obesity rates started to rise soon after 1984 and she explained that it steadily raised under one percentage a year....   [tags: medical condition, fat, technology, fast food]
:: 13 Works Cited
1526 words
(4.4 pages)
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The Outbreak of AIDS - In 1981, a disease was discovered that no one knew about before. It caused so much fear that people were scared to talk, hug, or shake hand with those who were affected by the disease. This terrifying disease was AIDS. This paper explains the origin, the symptom, the treatment and the prevention of AIDS. According to Nicoli Nattrass (2013) “Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) originated from cross-species transmission of the simian immunodeficiency virus from primates to humans. When they first saw it in 1981 scientists didn’t know what this new disease was (Nattrass,” 2013)....   [tags: Origin, Symptoms, Treatment, Prevention]
:: 6 Works Cited
1170 words
(3.3 pages)
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HIV/AIDS - HIV/AIDS No one can be certain about how or when the AIDS virus emerged. The closest related disease would be a simian immunodeficiency virus. This is where the suggestion arose that this disease was first contracted from a primate. It has also been thought that this once primate-only disease had evolved and somehow became transmitted to people. On June 5, 1981, the first report of AIDS hit the United States. The people weren't quite sure of what they were dealing with, so mistakenly, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released an article concerning a strange outbreak of pneumonia within the male homosexual community....   [tags: HIV and AIDS] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
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Aids and HIV - Aids and HIV HIV and Aids are sexually transmitted diseases. HIV and Aids can be transmitted several different ways. Some of those ways include sexual intercourse, sharing needles, and bodily fluids. You cannot get Aids or HIV from insect bites, donating blood or casual contact. Aids and HIV were thought to have come from monkeys.HIV can turn into Aids if you don’t know you have it.HIV takes about ten years to turn into AIDS. That is why it is important to get tested for the disease. HIV is what causes AIDS....   [tags: disease, medical, medicine] 555 words
(1.6 pages)
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AIDS and HIV - HIV, or the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a virus which damages and kills cells of the immune system. It attacks the T-cells, key cells of the immune system, and uses them to make copies of itself. After being infected with the virus it progressively interferes and eventually destroys the immune system's ability to fight the anti-genes. HIV may develop into the syndrome AIDS, the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV is an STD - a sexually transmitted disease - and therefore most commonly it is spread through sexual contact, and the virus mainly enters the body through the penis, mouth, lining of the vagina or vulva during sexual activity....   [tags: health, inmune system]
:: 11 Works Cited
1517 words
(4.3 pages)
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The Epidemic of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity - Every year in the United States, obesity rates among adolescents and children continue to steadily increase. It was calculated that in 2010, nearly 17 percent of children throughout the United States were considered obese, (U.S. Obesity Trends). Bearing in mind these statistics, and this escalating dilemma, parents encouraging their children to engage in physical activity can help prevent weight problems, which could eventually result in possible health risks in the future. Childhood obesity rates, as well as the potential for health risks, have increased over the past few decades as a result of inactivity, poor nutrition, and unfortunately genetics....   [tags: Health, adolescent, children]
:: 7 Works Cited
1471 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Epidemic of M.R.S.A. in Our Hospitals - Public Health Problem The health problem is that M.R.S.A., an antibiotic resistant bacterium, has become an epidemic in hospitals worldwide (WebMD, 2012). This is because it is a location that many people come to that has become ill or some part of their health is faltering. This means that this place is overcome with many people who have weakened immune systems and even some with some type of infection (MNT, 2013). This makes the perfect circumstance for a disease to overwhelm and infect the area, thus M.R.S.A....   [tags: Public Health Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
1171 words
(3.3 pages)
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Overview and Nature of the Obesity Epidemic - It is common to crave the many delicious foods that are found in today’s markets and restaurants. Some may enjoy them more than others and create an unhealthy eating behavior. For this reason it is not surprising that many Americans face an obesity epidemic. The great debate is whether obesity should be labeled as a disease or simply an individual choice due to a person’s lifestyle. The obesity epidemic, recently labeled a disease, continues to rise in America. However, alternative solutions and preventative measures show that obesity is not a disease....   [tags: Nutrition, Health, Overeating]
:: 19 Works Cited
1999 words
(5.7 pages)
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Hijras and AIDS - What are Hijras. Are they male or female. Hijras believe that they are neither male nor female (Patel, 2010). Hijras struggle with their social status, some are accepted and some are excluded, it depends on the location (Patel, 2010). Because of the struggle with social status, some Hijras go into sex work, which brings into play HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infection’s. According to Abdullah, Hijras are a major source of spreading various STIs (Abdullah, et al., 2012). In 1999, there were somewhere between 2.5 and three million people with HIV or AIDS in India (Patel, 2010)....   [tags: Transgenders, Social Status]
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1446 words
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Factors that Causes Obesity Epidemic - Obesity is a highly flexible disease, it can be found in all parts of the world and in all types of living environments. Obesity has many causes ranging from eating habits, food preparation, unhealthy physical lifestyles, transportation and more. Culture plays a huge role in the epidemic since with every culture there are different shared and learned behaviors. Wealth cannot save you from genetically being cursed with obesity, if there are traces of obesity in your family history. Ethnicity, smoking, and the environment also have taken their part in this epidemic....   [tags: eating habits, physical activity, nutrition]
:: 5 Works Cited
1470 words
(4.2 pages)
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Analysis of the Epidemic of Male Suicide - “Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem.” - Phil Donahue. As a complex, tragic public health issue, suicide occurs in men significantly more often than in women. Suicide is simply defined as the act of intentionally ending one’s own life, however, the factors that play into a person making that decision are anything but simple. The most evident and severe effect of suicide is the loss of a valuable, meaningful human life. According to Harvard School of Public Health (n.d.), suicide affects parents, children, siblings, friends, lovers, and spouses; the loss to society is psychological, spiritual, and financial....   [tags: suicide rates, depression, suicide prevention]
:: 5 Works Cited
1479 words
(4.2 pages)
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Mass Shootings: The Rise of an Epidemic - "I'm angry someone would do this to us. There are lives ruined, families ruined, and our whole school year is ruined" (Brackely 1). Casey Brackely, once a student that attended Columbine High School, remembers the tragedy of the horrific Columbine shooting that killed and injured many students. Mass shootings in the United States have been on the rise since the 1980’s, especially in the last decade. These shooters motives and profiles are almost all terrifyingly alike. Many of these shooters try to imitate and parallel the tragic shooting of the Columbine High School in 1999....   [tags: violence, colombine, shooters]
:: 8 Works Cited
1931 words
(5.5 pages)
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Cosmetic Surgery is a Worldwide Epidemic - Everywhere you look; from billboards to TV the effects of plastic surgery have left its mark. In fact, a couple of weeks ago, a famous music icon passed, and for a whole week all the media did was talk about the plastic surgery done to his face. These days’ people are having rhinoplasty, liposuction, tummy tucks, face lifts, and most commonly breast augmentation. Science is making it easier to change the appearance of ones self. This brings me to believe, cosmetic surgery is an epidemic that has affected the whole world....   [tags: Plastic Surgery Essays] 456 words
(1.3 pages)
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Teenagers and the Plastic Surgery Epidemic - Today, an overwhelming number of American teenagers choose to alter their body in order to fit the unrealistic standard of physical attractiveness created by our beauty-obsessed culture. Teens feel an immense amount of pressure to look “beautiful” from the media, peers and even parents. Teenagers are going to extreme lengths to reach this physical perfection, but when it comes down to it, just how far is too far. The numbers of teens going through with plastic surgery is startling and will continue to rise as America falls in to a beauty obsessed epidemic....   [tags: Cosmetic Surgery Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1100 words
(3.1 pages)
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Epidemic of Violence in the USA - Violence, one of the biggest problem in the world right now, especially in America, where the gun control law are barely enforced, every citizen is at constant risk, considering the amount of people in this country that own guns. Crime and violence are rapidly becoming the prime epidemic in the U.S today, but what can we do to ensure our future generation’s safety. Gun violence is a big problem everywhere, in poor rural neighborhoods to prosperous urban cities like Malibu, it can happen anywhere at any time....   [tags: violence, gun control]
:: 14 Works Cited
1442 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Obesity Epidemic Sweeping the Nation - Repeatedly the news will highlight a story about the obesity epidemic sweeping the nation. Although the news and health experts bombard the common citizen with quick and easy ways to eat healthier and exercise more, the source of the issue is kept hidden behind closed doors. Before placing blame on the eating habits, it’s essential to take a closer look at what is being consumed. With rapid change in the food industry, progress must be met with caution because “The way we eat has changed more in the past fifty years than in the past 10,000” (Pollan and Schlosser)....   [tags: food industries, physical activities]
:: 4 Works Cited
901 words
(2.6 pages)
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Paralysis Epidemic of the 1950s: Poliomyelitis - Poliomyelitis was declared an epidemic in the early 1950s in the United States. It caused primarily children and young adults to develop paralysis, led to social stigma around being crippled. To this day there is still no cure for this disease, poliomyelitis can only be prevented with vaccination. Poliomyelitis is a virus that infects the nerves of the spinal cord, and brain which leads to paralysis and or death (Piddock, 2004). Poliomyelitis is best known today as Polio, and Infantile Paralysis....   [tags: children, young adults, virus, nerves]
:: 4 Works Cited
970 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Epidemic of Childhood Obesity - There is an epidemic so fierce, it is impacting families from California to Maine. It is not the Ebola epidemic. It is childhood obesity. An estimated 1 in 7 children between the ages of 6 to 17 are overweight and/or obese. That is a staggering 14 percent. Compared to 5 percent almost 20 years ago. Hispanics, African-Americans, and American Indians, females to males are more prone to this devastating medical condition. So many divided on an issue that everyone can see; the health and welfare of children....   [tags: Obesity in Children]
:: 4 Works Cited
933 words
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Obesity Epidemic and Nation's Health - Argument paper The obesity epidemic and our nation’s health as a whole have many factors that include socioeconomic status in particular. Socioeconomic Status and Childhood Obesity will always shape our nations vision and mission with what we do with healthcare. Healthcare in America is in a major reconstruction faze, and is in much need of it, obesity and socioeconomic status are going to be the major contributors to this reconstruction. The ability to have access to better resources for sure allows one to explore better options, but for children in a low socioeconomic life style options are limited....   [tags: Socioeconomic Status, Obesity, Health, Nutrition]
:: 12 Works Cited
1691 words
(4.8 pages)
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Overview of the Obesity Epidemic - Public Health Problem: There is no doubt that obesity has taken its seat as one of the top disease that strikes the world today. In America, obesity has now spread through the country leaving 2 out of 3 adults either overweight or obese, and worldwide 1.5 billion are overweight or obese (Overweight). The cause of this disease stems from multiple reasons such as the increase in modern food production, putting out ample amounts of food causing the prices for meat, groceries, and especially junk food to plummet....   [tags: Eating Habits, Health]
:: 6 Works Cited
1810 words
(5.2 pages)
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The Obesity Epidemic in America - Obesity among Americans has been a growing issue in the United States predominantly over the past decade. Many may argue American’s are obese because of poor food choices, over-eating, genetic disposition, lack of exercise, or the environment which one lives, while others blame it all on fast-food chains and restaurants. Throughout my research I have come to find a lot of facts and statistics about fast food consumption causing obesity. Statistics show that without a doubt the United States is the most obese country in the world....   [tags: Fast Food]
:: 8 Works Cited
1077 words
(3.1 pages)
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Solving the Childhood Obesity Epidemic - Obesity has increased drastically in today’s society. Alarmingly, present day generations show childhood obesity to be a growing crisis. Viewed as an epidemic, childhood obesity is sweeping across the United States and creating a public health crisis (Henry). Obesity in young children is contributed by different factors. Many are based off of lifestyles and peer pressure in schools and in households. “According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2004), over 16 percent of children and adolescents from 6 to 19 years of age are overweight and/or obese” (Green 915)....   [tags: overweight, nutrition, children, physical activity]
:: 6 Works Cited
1870 words
(5.3 pages)
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The Obesity Epidemic in Canada - Obesity is a growing concern in Canada and due to the increased time spent in one’s place of employment, there is an augmented importance placed on healthy living in the workplace. In 2004, approximately 6.8 million Canadian adults between the ages of 20 and 64 were overweight, and an additional 4.5 million were obese as recorded by the Canadian Policy Research Networks (Pierre, N., Pollack, N., & Fafard, P. 2007), further emphasizing the need to reduce obesity rates and to improve overall health....   [tags: Health Policy Paper]
:: 9 Works Cited
933 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Obesity Epidemic in America - Obesity does not discriminate against social status, sex, or race; it can take a person’s life and turn it upside down in the blink of an eye if they are not careful. Some people think of obesity as a worldwide killer because there is no outrunning it if it overtakes a person’s body. Every 1 in 3 adults are obese right here in America, that should give each and every individual some type of hint that there is a major problem occurring. The obesity epidemic is not something that has just caught the attention of people recently; it has been going on since the 1950’s....   [tags: Public Health Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1054 words
(3 pages)
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Understanding the Domestic Violence Epidemic - Domestic violence is an epidemic in our society with dramatic, negative effects on individuals, families and communities. Domestic violence is a crime that knows no economic, racial, ethnic, religious, age or gender limits. Women who are victims of domestic violence most likely are also victims of sexual assault and, stalking. A domestic violence victim may experience systematic rape in addition to physical and psychological abuse. According to Backman, (p.54) nearly one in every four women are beaten or raped by a partner during adulthood....   [tags: Violence Against Women, women's rights]
:: 9 Works Cited
1573 words
(4.5 pages)
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Child Abuse: A Hidden Epidemic - How do we define “abuse” when we discuss child abuse. “Abuse” is defined as Treating a person or animal with cruelty or violence, especially when it occurs regularly and repeatedly.” When you add “child” it becomes “child abuse.” “Child Abuse” is defined as “physical maltreatment or sexual molestation of a child.”(Oxford Dictionary online) “Child abuse” may also be defined as “a crime of inflicted physical or emotional injury on a child....   [tags: Child Neglect, Physical Abuse]
:: 2 Works Cited
1206 words
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Suicide Epidemic in South Korea - Among the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development signed countries, South Korea leads with the highest rate of suicide. More than fourteen thousand South Koreans took their own lives in 2012 (Brown). During the years 2009 and 2010, a total of nearly thirty thousand people committed suicide. These thousands of suicides are often caused by issues within the social structure, almost unreachable standards of South Korea and other miseries. South Korea’s people consider suicide a growing and major problem of their society and culture and take many initiatives to aid in the possible saving of many lives....   [tags: South Korea, Suicide Rate, People, Culture]
:: 20 Works Cited
991 words
(2.8 pages)
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Truancy: Epidemic or Controllable Rebellion? - Truancy: Epidemic or Controllable Rebellion? Audience: Parents, police officers and the students. Introduction In recent discussions of juvenile delinquency, a controversial issue has been whether students being arrested or penalized for truancy is successful or not. On one hand police and other authoritative figures argues that this is a great way to make them an example for other kids to not follow their path. On the other hand, many contends that this will not affect the students and the issue will keep reoccurring....   [tags: Juvenile Delinquency, Controversy]
:: 6 Works Cited
1313 words
(3.8 pages)
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Cyber Bullying: An Uncontrollable Epidemic - In the 21st century, cyber bullying has grown to be a major crime and motive for suicide for those victimized due to bullies who yearn to overpower others with the convenience of technology. Unfortunately even with today’s anti-bullying chant and progressive technology, this crime will continue in young adults. Compared to a century ago, cyber bullying has grown to a scale that cannot be controlled. With new handheld devices that have the ability to send a message to another’s device in no more than 15 seconds, it is easier than ever to bully over the cyber waves....   [tags: teen violence, bullies, internet]
:: 7 Works Cited
1781 words
(5.1 pages)
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Obesity Epidemic in America - There is an epidemic festering in America’s streets today. It is not one of violence, nor is it one of drugs or abuse; instead it is a silent epidemic that is centered on our nation’s growing number of obese children. For the first time in the history of the United States, and perhaps in world history, the children of our future are expected to live a shorter life than that of their parents. The obesity rate in America has tripled in the last twenty years fostering three hundred thousand deaths per year with a growing number of obese children (greenblatt)....   [tags: Health]
:: 3 Works Cited
1036 words
(3 pages)
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The Childhood Obesity Epidemic - In today's modern era, the prevalence of childhood obesity is ubiquitous. It is an epidemic plaguing the lives of many young children and adolescent worldwide. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014), in the United States, close to 17% (or 12.5 million) of all children and adolescents aged 2-19 years are obese (CDC, 2014). Furthermore, the American Heart Association (2013) stated that "childhood obesity is now the No.1 health concern among parents in the United States topping drug abuse and smoking" (AHA, 2013, para....   [tags: Childhood Obesity Essays]
:: 11 Works Cited
1974 words
(5.6 pages)
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Stabilizing the Foreclosure Epidemic - Let me first state that in order to solve this crisis we must not only think outside the box ( an overused cliche that makes no sense) but outside Washington D.C.. With all of the lobbyist and special interest groups who fight against any type of change that would not fill up their wallets, this will be an extremely arduous task. But it can be done, should be done, and will be done ...The American people have already bailed out Wall Street. We now have to bail out the people on "Main street". The people that built this country and made this country great....   [tags: Economics] 963 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Childhood Obesity Epidemic - Childhood obesity it is a huge problem. Over the past years, the number of obesity in children has increased. The number of obese children in the U.S. has increased over the past years. The number has obviously also grown due to the video games, computers, and televisions, which are considered to be needed now-a-days, and have begun to take over the importance of exercising. The lack of exercise can lead to obesity, which approaches lots of negative effects. Obesity continuously puts these children at a very high risk of developing many serious illnesses like high blood pressure, asthma, and many more....   [tags: Childhood Obesity Essays]
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1249 words
(3.6 pages)
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Breast Cancer: The Epidemic - Are you a woman over 40. If so, do you get regular mammograms. Breast cancer is an epidemic that plagues women, even though some men can get it. According to the American Cancer Society, “breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts in the cells of the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that can grow into (invade) surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body. The disease occurs almost entirely in women, but men can get it, too” (Breast Cancer). Today many women are becoming diagnosed with breast cancer....   [tags: Diseases, Disorders]
:: 5 Works Cited
1327 words
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Obesity: An American Epidemic - The last decade has welcomed, with open arms, a new epidemic: obesity. Currently in the United States, more than one-third of adults, 35.7%, and approximately 17% of children and adolescents are obese. Obesity is not only a problem in the US but also worldwide with its prevalence doubling in high income and economically advanced countries and is also growing in under-developed areas. Its incidence rate is continually increasing with each successive generation and in each age group, including the elderly (Byles, 2009; Dorner and Rieder, 2011)....   [tags: Obesity in Adolescents]
:: 5 Works Cited
1206 words
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Teenage Pregnancy: The Epidemic - ... In today’s times, there are television shows such as 16 & Pregnant and Teen Mom that attempt to discourage teenage pregnancy, but in return has encouraged some teenagers. Both television programs showcase the everyday lives of teenage mothers and the trials that they endure (Friedman). Some of these trials include; attempting to complete high school, raise their children, and find a job, while the bulk of their finances are on their parents. The aspect of the everyday struggle discourages most teenage girls and shows them firsthand how it is to raise a child on their own because majority of the fathers leave....   [tags: sex education, unplanned conception]
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1245 words
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The 1918 Influenza Epidemic - What would later become one of the deadliest plagues the world had ever seen started innocuously enough in the spring of 1918 spreading through populations on both sides of the Atlantic. Remarkable for its highly infectious nature, the spring strain was relatively non-lethal, rarely killing infected individuals (Kolata, 1999). Thus little more than average attention was paid to the precursor of a virus that would eventually kill between twenty-one and one-hundred million individuals worldwide (Barry, 2004)....   [tags: Disease ]
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1587 words
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The Devasting Effects of The AIDS - Many believe AIDS to be a horrific infection, thus AIDS is an infection that does not effect one unless one catches other infections or sicknesses from it. One can still live a normal life, but one has more risks. Also, at risk, thus AIDS is a devastating infection that not only effects people's health, but also their life around them. AIDS stands for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (Houle 8). “Acquired” means that the disease is inherited from somebody else who has it (Houle 7). “Immuniodefienciency” means there is an issue with the body's immune system, one's immune system is what cures somebody when they get a cold or any kind of sickness (Houle 8)....   [tags: horrific infection, blood, HIV]
:: 5 Works Cited
862 words
(2.5 pages)
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AIDS and Heterosexuals in the Australian - Study Overview The study entitled From complacency to panic: AIDS and heterosexuals in the Australian press, July 1986 to June 1988 (Lupton, 1992) reports on the preliminary findings from a content analysis of AIDS news coverage in Australian press from June 1986 to July 1988. When revealing the preliminary varying ideologies in press, Lupton stresses the importance of evaluating how the popular media selects and presents news according to societal interests. Lupton (1992) seeks to point out the common situation in Australia that most people lies on information reported by the media rather than by health professionals....   [tags: homosexual, health, social construction]
:: 5 Works Cited
1625 words
(4.6 pages)
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Origin and Evolution of the AIDS Virus - Introduction: A virus is an infective agent that typically consists of a nucleic acid molecule in a protein coat. It is too small to be seen by light microscopy and is able to multiply only within the living cells of a host. One virus that has received global attention over the last thirty years or so is the HIV/AIDS virus. This virus attacks the body’s immune system, which in turn stops the body’s ability to be able to fight off illness. Thus, people who contract HIV/AIDS are susceptible to death by sicknesses that a healthy individual is able to recover from easily....   [tags: cell, HIV, immune system, HIV-1, health, treatment]
:: 4 Works Cited
1133 words
(3.2 pages)
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Pornography -- An Epidemic? - Pornography -- An Epidemic. The subtopic being examined in this segment of pornography as a whole, is that of violent pornography. In order to understand what is going to be discussed and the examples that will be cited, one must understand the context of violent pornography in relation to Pornography as a whole. But as this section will conclude, it is actually the widespread viewing of pornography as represented through the media, which leads to violent actions. To begin with, the words violence and pornography must be separated and distinguished between....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 1422 words
(4.1 pages)
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AIDS: The Mystery Behind the Curtain - Human beings will always obtain viruses that try to attack their immune system, but no other virus is as deadly at doing so as the AIDS virus. AIDS is derived from its earlier version known as HIV, once a healthy body acquires HIV it is prone to advancing towards the more deadly version of the virus, AIDS. Viruses are one of the key divisions of minuscule agents which trigger transferable disease. To be put into simple terms, viruses are organisms which contain an inherited operator that permits them to take control of the regular performance of the cells they infect....   [tags: Disease/Disorders]
:: 4 Works Cited
1971 words
(5.6 pages)
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HIV and the Condition of AIDS - Introduction HIV has been a major global issue for over 100 years. It is estimated that 1.6 million people died as a result of this virus in 2012 (“Fact sheet”, 2012). Due to statistics such as the one I just cited, I decided to write this review essay on HIV and the condition of AIDS. As an up and coming scientist, I feel it is imperative that we strive to grow in our understanding of diseases, such as AIDS, so that we can do our part in slowing its spread; also, so that more individuals may be inspired to devote their life’s work to producing a cure....   [tags: health, diseases, prevention]
:: 10 Works Cited
1449 words
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AIDS - Research Paper: AIDS Did you know that in the United States of America the sixth leading cause of death in people from their mid 20’s through their mid 40’s is AIDS (Zuger, 2010). AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is a disease derived from the virus known as Human Immunodeficiency Virus. The immune system gets broken down when someone has AIDS and it is basically the highest form of HIV. When a person has HIV, the CD4 cells get infected and start to deteriorate and once the CD4 count is below 200, the person is considered to have AIDS rather than HIV (“Living”, 2005)....   [tags: Medical Conditions]
:: 10 Works Cited
1536 words
(4.4 pages)
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Life As An HIV/Aids Counselor - Becoming a Mental Health Counselor for a patient with HIV/Aids is a position of dignity that can be often skewed or unwarranted due to the negative realm our society has placed upon the diagnosis. The main function of the HIV/Aids counselor is to be supportive of his or her infected and affected clients, to listen to their problems and to empower them to solve their problems and better their lives. These abilities can come easy for some; harder for others. I, as an HIV/Aids counselor, will embrace my future clients that seek my services....   [tags: Counseling ]
:: 1 Works Cited
1043 words
(3 pages)
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Spread of HIV Aids - Aids is becoming a very common disease throughout the World. The disease is growing more and more as the years go by. There are many ways to prevent Aids but many choose not too. I will be talking about the facts and figures of Aids. The history behind the disease Aids, and the origins the disease Aids follows. Just over 30 years ago, Aids became one of the leading killing disease worldwide. In the early years of the Aids many people feared it. Aids is common and with lots of money scientist finally found the cure to Aids....   [tags: Disease, Prevention, Facts and Figures]
:: 15 Works Cited
1248 words
(3.6 pages)
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HDI and HIV AIDS Namibia - On the rest of the years (2010-2012) the situation is not different from the comparison established between 2005 and 2009. African countries having abysmal gap between them and the European countries. The European level of prevalence does not even reach the one percent while in the African countries, the HIV prevalence is rampant. It is important to note that the correlation calculation for these last three years has just kept increasing: 95% in 2010, 96% in 2011 and 98% for 2012. An utterly strong correlation between HDI and HIV....   [tags: pandemic, namibia africa]
:: 17 Works Cited
1003 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Immune System: HIV/AIDS - HIV is a world pandemic that has caused the death of “30 million” (CDC – Statistics Overview – Statistics Center – HIV/AIDS, CDC) innocent lives. HIV is devastating virus that destroys people’s immune systems and leaves them vulnerable to other diseases. HIV is an acronym for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, which means that the virus is found only in humans and targets the immune system. The virus kills CD4 cells, cells in the immune system that fight off infections and diseases. HIV has been around since the “1950’s.” (AIDS, 6) About “34.2 million” (CDC – Statistics Overview – Statistics Center – HIV/AIDS, CDC) people are living with HIV today....   [tags: virus, pandemic]
:: 11 Works Cited
892 words
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Japan's Suicide Epidemic - For the last decade, Japan has been facing an epidemic of suicides. The reasons why the Japanese people commit suicide are numerous and the Japanese government is struggling to slow this sweeping trend while having only limited success. Japan’s suicide rate is one of the highest rates among industrialized countries, sitting currently at 51 per 100,000 people per year (WHO). With an average of one suicide every fifteen minutes in Japan, a complete societal change must occur for the epidemic of suicide to be reduced....   [tags: japanese, health] 1093 words
(3.1 pages)
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An Epidemic of Mass Proportions, The Black Death - An epidemic of mass proportions: The Black Death Across the sands of time, the world has experienced diseases and pestilences; however one stands alone as being the most devastating across the European nation. Imagine an illness that could sweep across Europe, killing one-third of the population and leaving a path of death and economical destruction in its wake; this devastation was known as the Black Death. In this paper the researcher will attempt to divulge how and where the illness began, who was affected, and what ramifications it had on the population, economy, and the ecologic system of the region....   [tags: Disease ]
:: 10 Works Cited
1948 words
(5.6 pages)
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The Crack Cocaine Epidemic of the Mid 1980s - “Just Say No!” A statement that takes us deep into yet another decade in the history of the United States which was excited by controversies, social issues, and drug abuse. The topic of this statement is fueled by the growing abuse of cocaine in the mid 1980s. I shall discuss the effects of the crack cocaine epidemic of the mid 1980s from a cultural and social stand point because on that decade this country moved to the rhythms and the pace of this uncanny drug. Cocaine took its told on American society by in the 1980s; it ravaged with every social group, race, class, etc....   [tags: Drugs ]
:: 4 Works Cited
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Understanding the Childhood Obesity Epidemic in America - The human body requires the intake of food in order to function properly. The foods that we decide to eat has an effect on the ability to use are mind, are strength, and even how prone we are to getting sick or hurt. Eating to much of the wrong foods, with little or no exercise can cause the silent but deadly epidemic of obesity in children and in teens. In the past, obesity was just known as a condition that only affected adults. In this generation the youths are becoming more prone to obesity....   [tags: Childhood Obesity Facts]
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2200 words
(6.3 pages)
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The Global Epidemic of Violence Against Women - In today’s global society violence against women is a grave issue of epidemic proportions. “Violence against women takes a variety of forms, all of which are violations of the fundamental rights of women,(50 Nnadi)” and the unequal position of women compared to men directly relates to violence against women, including sexual abuse (UN).Through this patriarchy women’s lack of individual rights and freedoms has been the largest correlating aspect to violence against women. Some key examples of how a lack of women’s rights has created ideal circumstances for violence against women to take over include Crimes of Honor, Genital Manipulation, Femicide, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Widowhood...   [tags: Violence Against Women is Global]
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3098 words
(8.9 pages)
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Peanut Epidemic: A Case of Media Exaggeration - Peanuts are one of the most prevalent food allergens worldwide, and it has become a nemesis for many in recent years. Peanut allergies have been known to be life threatening, but only a few sufferers react with such extreme severity when exposed to peanuts. While peanut allergies have long-existed, it seems like it was very rarely heard of prior to the 1980s. In the last decade, peanut allergies have become the focus of media attention and controversy. However, the media is not as accurate as the public understands it to be....   [tags: Food Allergens, Peanut Allergies]
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1379 words
(3.9 pages)
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Diabetes and Native Americans: A Cultural Epidemic - A major problem facing people of the United States is the increase in diabetes rates, with some of the highest rates fall upon people of Native American origin. Food, language, and traditions are three big components that define the Native American culture, but could alterations to the very components that define these indigenous people also be contributing to their demise. Many factors have contributed to the declining health of Native Americans, but most notably, changes in eating habits and inactive lifestyles are the two of the main culprits leading to the high diabetes rates among the Native American population....   [tags: health, genetics]
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Solutions to the Pediatric Obesity Epidemic in America - The Encyclopedia Britannica emphasizes the increasing significance of the epidemic of childhood obesity and its complex biological, social, and health in today’s American Children with just increases year over year since the early nineteen eighties from just fewer than twenty percent from the adolescent and childhood life stages into adult transition. {Britannica} One out of every three children in the U.S. are obese, with the majority facing higher risks of developing medical, social and academic problems as a result of this health crisis....   [tags: Childhood Obesity]
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2388 words
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Child Abuse: The Epidemic That Must Cease - Child abuse is epidemic in many countries as well as the United States. It is estimated that every thirteen seconds a child is abused in some manner: physically, sexually, emotionally or by neglect (Friedman). Each year, there are over 3 million reports of child abuse in the United States involving more than 6 million children. Child abuse can be reduced with proper education of the parents and with greater public awareness. Child abuse is the physical, sexual, emotional mistreatment, or neglect of a child....   [tags: Abuse]
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Canadian Aboriginals and HIV/AIDS - The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its deriving acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are devastating conditions that currently affect approximately 35.3 million individuals globally (WHO, 2012). In the Canadian context, the prevalence of HIV/AIDS ascended to 71,300 cases in 2011, with 8.9% of the affected individuals being aboriginal peoples (PHAC, 2011). This number not only indicates an overrepresentation of the aboriginal population among the totality of HIV/AIDS cases in the country, but it also illustrates an elevated incidence of 17.3% from the numbers reported in 2008 (PHAC, 2011)....   [tags: canada, public health, virus]
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2596 words
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HIV/AIDS and Group Therapy - History of HIV/AIDS The first main cases started coming up around the early 1980s from those of homosexual males in New York and California. At the time, AIDS did not even have a name in the United States until later on after the cases were connected. The origin of HIV is believed to be a descendant of a similar disease that affected primates, or Simian Immunodeficiency Virus. This was discovered from a group of researchers at the University of Alabama in 1999 through a ten-year study of the virus....   [tags: Diseases/Disorders]
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1486 words
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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, AIDS - HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus and is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. HIV is unlike other viruses in the sense that the human body cannot get rid of HIV, in other words, once you have HIV you have it for life. There are two types of the HIV virus, HIV-1 and HIV-2. AIDS was first recognized in 1981, but the causative virus was not identified until 1983 when a reverse transcriptase containing virus was recovered from the lymph node of a man with persistent lymphadenopathy syndrome at the Pasteur Institute (Levy, 1993)....   [tags: HIV, retrovirus, thrush]
:: 11 Works Cited
2194 words
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Fighting the AIDS Prejudice - Nkosi Johnson was South Africa’s longest surviving kid born with HIV positive. If Gail wasn’t his foster mother then he couldn’t become an icon of aspiration and courage. He always thankful and seek for a better way to live his life. Furthermore, Gail stood behind and supported him to go front of people. They were reliant on each other. They loved each other so much. If there was no faith among them, then their great accomplishments would never happen. In South Africa, Gail was white women who have been against the obnoxious system called apartheid system, which separated people by their races....   [tags: Disease] 638 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Epidemic of Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) - One of the growing epidemics of young adults in the United States is the dependence and/or abuse of alcohol, which is commonly referred to as alcoholism. The condition is described by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V, as an alcohol use disorder (AUD), a type of substance abuse disorder, which encompasses both alcohol abuse and dependence. More specifically AUD is defined as, “medical conditions that doctors can diagnose when a patient’s drinking causes distress or harm (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2007).” When the reliance or use of alcohol interferes with daily functioning, or causes greater harm to the one’s self, it can then be looked at...   [tags: Alcohol Use Disorder Essays]
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2532 words
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AIDS and Healthcare Workers - The case of Doctor David Acer and his HIV infected patients reads as a question of ethical and legal dilemmas as well as a murder mystery. According to authorities, Dr. Acer either knowingly or unknowingly infected five of his patients with the strain of the AIDS virus he himself was infected with (Altman, 1993). Whether or not Dr. Acer was guilty of intentionally infecting his patients is not able to be answered beyond any reasonable doubt, however the ethical questions it presents merit discussion....   [tags: HIV, ethics, homosexuals]
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No Cure for AIDS - No Cure for AIDS What is AIDS. How do you cure it. Find out by reading this report on cures and preventions for the AIDS virus. In this report some of the topics covered will be a small report on AIDS, preventions, and possible cures. This report was written to prove if there is a cure for the AIDS virus, and if there are any ways to prevent contracting AIDS. I mean who does AIDS think it is just killing people. AIDS is a virus that kills your immune system. The letters in AIDS stand for Acquired, Immune, Deficiency, Syndrome....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Essays] 1102 words
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The Invisible Epidemic - The Invisible Epidemic The rise of asthma in urban communities is beginning to reach epic proportions. It is a disease that is not limited to the United States, but is endemic to all developed nations and is especially prevalent in urban communities. The drastic rise in asthma and related pulmonary illnesses is surprising because benchmark studies have resulted in an as yet unknown understanding of the disease. All scientists agree, however, that this is a pathology whose etiology can be traced as an overt effect of a modern Western culture....   [tags: Papers] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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An American Epidemic - An American Epidemic In modern times, nobody who reads the newspapers or watches television can avoid the chilling fate that our country faces. School violence is a rapidly growing trend in America, and it seems to be there is nothing we can do to stop it. The offenders are from all races and social classes. They range from the high school hero to the high school dropout. It often seems the only thing they have in common is an utter disregard for their own life and the lives of others. In the following accounts, taken straight from American headlines, harrowing events fit for blockbuster fiction prove that our country is becoming victim to a new criminal: youthful rage....   [tags: essays research papers] 1732 words
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The Game Epidemic - Andrew, Chuck, and Kevin played all night and skipped class the next day. They, along with thousands of others across the country, purchased Halo 2 at midnight the day the much-anticipated game was released in stores. Students and company employees called in sick that next day claiming the Halo 2 flu as their reasoning. Halo 2 is only one of a multitude of games distributed for use on Microsoft’s Xbox, Sony’s Playstation 2, and Nintendo’s Gamecube. American society is experiencing an epidemic as a result of many young people spending hours upon hours playing video games....   [tags: essays research papers] 658 words
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AIDS 101 - Aids The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is responsible for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and attacks the T-4 lymphocytes, which are a fundamental part of the immune system of man. As a result, reduces the responsiveness of the organism to cope with opportunistic infections caused by viruses, bacteria, protozoa, fungi and other microorganisms. At the moment in which the AIDS virus is spreading with frightening speed and very dangerous and that there is a collective concern about AIDS, we must cling to developing our greatest means of defense known so far, which is information....   [tags: Disease/Disorders]
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2080 words
(5.9 pages)
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HIV AIDS - Today millions of people globally are plagued with HIV/AIDS; some of which were contracted unknowingly through heterosexual sexual contact, others unknowingly through homosexual contact and surprisingly some who set out to contract HIV/AIDS purposefully. Bareback sex refers to intercourse without the use of any barrier protections to prevent the transmission of bodily fluids between participants. This is an extremely high risk behavior given the number of sexually transmitted diseases, and not knowing the status of HIV in them or in their partners....   [tags: Gay Community, Homosexuals] 850 words
(2.4 pages)
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Living with HIV/AIDS - HIV and AIDS are pandemics here in the United States and spread across the world. The disease originated in the 1800's in Western Africa came from a specific kind of chimpanzee. The infected chimpanzee was once hunted and ingested by the people in the area. Since the 1981, approximately 619,000 Americans alone have passed away due to this disease (What is HIV/AIDS?). Also, in addition to the 1.1 million living with the disease already, about 56,000 Americans are infected each year (Going the Distance 6)....   [tags: Disease, History, America]
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1736 words
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ACA and HIV/AIDS - The government is changing again this time it will affect the medical care and housing that HIV/AIDS patients get. It has been announced that as of January 1, 2014, that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will come into action (Munar 25). This action will change many people’s lives that live with HIV/AIDS. Their rent will be paid and distributed differently under a new program guidelines through Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) which is paid through Housing and Urban Development (HUD) (HUD.org)....   [tags: Medical Care, Housing Patients]
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1183 words
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HIV/AIDS Is No Longer a Death Sentence - I am positive; the simplest statement suddenly carries a huge weight when the words HIV or AIDS are followed right after. In the 1980’s HIV meant AIDS and AIDS meant a rapid and awful death. Death always seemed to be the end result in a world where we did not understand the disease that seemed to come from nowhere but was killing at an expedited rate. Thirty plus years later there is still no cure but there is now hope. Having HIV or AIDS is no longer an immediate death sentence. People infected with the virus can live a long and relatively normal life (2)....   [tags: Disease/Disorders]
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2145 words
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Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS - 1. Introduction As ravaging effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic spreads, many businesses are realizing that the spread negatively affects their workforce, market and ultimately ability to earn profits (Sithole, 2007). Organizations now realize that HIV/AIDS is not simply a health issue, but a core business issue, as it affects the performance of infected employees and the company’s production and investments (Lisk, 2002; IFC, 2002). In response to this problem, many organizations are setting up on-site HCT facilities at their work places as a strategy to improve knowledge of HIV/AIDS which is critical to both prevention and treatment goals (DoH, 2009) of the debilitating infection....   [tags: Medical Procedure, Health Care Logistics]
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2012 words
(5.7 pages)
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President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief - Bush wanted to resolve global issues rather than domestic issues at hand, at the expense of America’s taxpayers’ money. His program, President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR, was designed to help lower the AIDS/HIV infection rates in Africa by providing condoms, antiretroviral drugs, and programs for abstinence and fidelity. In the beginning, the outlook seemed to show a promising potential but once it boiled down to the details, it crumbled apart. For the first two years of the program, Bush did not purchase the low-cost, generic fixed-dose combinations of antiretroviral drugs but instead bought brand-name, double the price of generic drugs, multi-drug regimens....   [tags: abstinence, weapons, Bush] 546 words
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Summary of Man-made Epidemics and The Rise of Superbugs - ... With our intervention we – unconsciously– exacerbate the problem and give rise to a frictionless increase in white-footed mice, for instance, which unfortunately are great reservoirs for the Lyme bacteria. Encroachment into wild lands and thus eroding biodiversity is exceedingly precarious, as we encourage species that play reservoirs roles. Disease is a product of human-changes to the environment, yet with exceptions, as the West Nile virus, for example, had a significant influence on human health in the US, as it took advantage of species that do well around people....   [tags: nature, altering ecosystems, ebola] 728 words
(2.1 pages)
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Aids To The Growth of Christianity in The Roman Empire - Aids to the Growth of Christianity in the Roman Empire In the Roman Civilization where the prevalent worship of Roman gods were impersonal and did not provide a moral base or a message of hope, in the fourth century Christianity was formed, born as a movement within Judaism. Christianity emphasized the personal relationship between God and people, slowly spread through the Roman Empire until ultimately dominating the western culture. Three of the several factors that aided to the growth of Christianity in the Roman Empire were: the central beliefs and value of Christianity, prominent figures, and Christianity appeal to women....   [tags: Christianity]
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1533 words
(4.4 pages)
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The Influenza and Pneumonia Epidemic of 1918-1919 - The Influenza and Pneumonia Epidemic of 1918-1919 In the ten months between September 1918 and June 1919, 675,000 Americans died of influenza and pneumonia. When compared to the number of Americans killed in combat in World War I, World War II, Korea, and Vietnam combined- 423,000- it becomes apparent that the influenza epidemic of 1918-1919 was far more deadly than the war which it accompanied. (Crosby, 206-207) The United States and the rest of the world had been exposed to such epidemics in the past, but never at such a severe cost in human life....   [tags: American America History]
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2976 words
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The NEH Must Take Action to Reduce Obesity - In recent years, portion sizes have continued to increase, and over 190 million citizens are obese. According to the CDC, in the Appalachian region of the United States more than 81 percent of people suffer from obesity related health problems. These statistics are shocking. At some point the government and the NEH has to step in and do something for the sake and health of citizens, specifically children. “Many researchers have theorized that media use by children, excessive snacking during media use, food-marketing practices in food advertisements, cross promotions, food away from home, supersizing and increased portion sizes can all contribute to childhood obesity” (Kavas)....   [tags: Obesity Epidemic]
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1445 words
(4.1 pages)
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HIV and Aids - HIV and Aids In Junior High, when we were in sex education class, we were told about AIDS and HIV. We learned that being HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) positive eventually led to AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), which eventually led to death. We were taught this and never really doubted it. The AIDS pandemic is global and an estimated 40 million people are infected. None of them have been cured. The amount of funding for AIDS research is not small. A plentiful amount of drugs are available to patients diagnosed with AIDS or HIV....   [tags: Medical Health Medicine Essays]
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1138 words
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