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Your search returned over 400 essays for "agamemnon"
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Agamemnon - Agamemnon Communication In Aeschylus’s, Agamemnon, there is a great possibility that the death of Agamemnon could have been prevented, had the Chorus simply listened to Cassandra’s prophecy. But the words spoken between the two parties seem to have loss it’s meaning when it fell upon the Chorus; yet, they were obviously hearing what she was saying. But while they were hearing what she had to say, they did not listen to her words. Ironically, in this story, it is the women who posses all the knowledge....   [tags: Agamemnon] 880 words
(2.5 pages)
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A Conversation Between Women of Agamemnon, The Decameron, and The Thousand and One Nights - GRISELDA: Good afternoon Clytemnestra, Shahrazad; do you mind if I sit with you. SHAHRAZAD: Please join us Griselda; I am glad you could come to the party. I heard about the current events between you and your husband; I am glad that everything worked out in the end. CLYTEMNESTRA: Yes, please sit Griselda. How are you doing after everything that has happened. GRISELDA: I am doing well. I am sure you know that Gualtieri felt he had to test me to see if I was worthy of being his wife. I am just glad I was able to keep my word because I had sworn to him that I would “always try to please him and never be upset by anything he said or did” (1636)....   [tags: Agamemnon, The Decameron, Thousand and One Nights]
:: 3 Works Cited
895 words
(2.6 pages)
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A Brief Look at Agamemnon - ... After many horrific crimes in the House of Atreus, there seemed to be an end to the blood feud, but it was only a pause. Agamemnon reignited the blood feud by sacrificing Iphigenia, which began the events shaping the transition of the blood feud into law. The Chorus warned about a later event saying, “For patient, terrible, never to be laid, is the wrath of the wife still plotting at home revenge for the unforgotten child” (19). Because of the reignited blood feud, the sacrifice of Iphigenia leads to the shedding of Agamemnon’s blood by the hands of Clytemnestra, further shaping the replacement of the blood feud....   [tags: ancient Greek mythology]
:: 1 Works Cited
572 words
(1.6 pages)
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Agamemnon a Tragedy by Aeschylus - Aeschylus’ well-known tragedy of Agamemnon allows one to closely look at the treasured polytheistic religious ideas of Ancient Greece and how the Grecians relied heavily on the thought of free will versus fate determined by their gods. With the play being set and written in Greece, the polytheistic lifestyle is apparent and unabashed as the culture of the time would have seen the play to be easily believable; the entire audience would have been familiar with the various gods and goddesses as well as being familiar with the situation that begins the play: the Trojan War....   [tags: polytheistic ideas, grecians, trojan war]
:: 10 Works Cited
1538 words
(4.4 pages)
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Presumptuous is Agamemnon's Note - THESIS STATEMENT In Aeschylus’ The Agamemnon, as well as other literary works, Agamemnon suffers from the sin of hubris. PURPOSE STATEMENT Through the play The Agamemnon, as well as research and other literary works based upon the play, evidence shows that Agamemnon suffers from the sin of hubris. INTRODUCTION Imagine thousands of people cheering for you as you return from battle victoriously. Upon your arrival a parade is being held in your honor. Your spouse is so excited to see you and there is a huge dinner prepared....   [tags: literary works, playwrights]
:: 8 Works Cited
1489 words
(4.3 pages)
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The Agamemnon of Aeschylus - The Agamemnon of Aeschylus Prologue: The Watchman on the roof of the Palace of Agamemnon at Mycenae presents the facts. He has been watching a year for the fire signal that will announce Troy's capture, and all is not well within the house. He sees the beacon at last and will tell Clytemnestra, Agamemnon's wife. He rejoices at the news for it means his master will be coming home. Parodos or Entry of the Choros, who are Elders of Argos, counsellors to the Queen Regent. They chant about the expedition against Troy....   [tags: Papers] 1519 words
(4.3 pages)
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Summary of the Greek Play Agamemnon by Aeschylus - ... Aeschylus creates this feeling of pity by his choice of dialogue and the tone of the Herald. Aeschylus’ diction is this passage consists of emotion-full words, which create the feeling of pity towards the Herald. In particular, he uses “dreamed, hopes, light, salute, loving, shining, warm, [and] cherish.” This diction corresponds to the tone of this passage. For example, in the first five lines of the passage the audience is introduced to the Herald as a very sympathetic character because of the way he is describing how proud and happy he is: “I’m home at last./Never dreamed I’d die in Greece.” This, in effect shows the audience how he is a passionate character....   [tags: Tragedy, Troy, Plot] 686 words
(2 pages)
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Zezus versus Agamemnon - ... 22-32; pg. 426-427) Zeus respects his fellow Olympians and holds a fair level of value to their feelings and opinions. When Zeus had known the fate of (his) son Sarpadon he very much struggled with the decision whether or not he should intervene to save(d) his son’s life, (you could put a period an then say On the other hand, after consulting …. its a lil long) but after consulting with Hera he realized how unfair and selfish it would be to save Sarpadon knowing there are other Olympians gods and goddess whose son’s were as well fighting in the battle of Troy....   [tags: authoritative fugures in Greek mythology] 650 words
(1.9 pages)
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Gender Roles in the Play: Agamemnon by Aeschylus - ... Cassandra was chosen by Apollo to inherit the ability of comprehending prophecies. When Apollo has fallen in love with Cassandra, but she refuses, he cursed her by allowing her to continue to see the future, but nobody would believe her. This is the torture that Apollo wants to see where Cassandra has the ability to change or transform a tragic event, but was not trusted by anyone. Cassandra’s death seem tragic because she can be seen as a stranger who unfortunately enter between the drama of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, thus ended her life....   [tags: War, gods, Death]
:: 1 Works Cited
901 words
(2.6 pages)
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Antagonism Between Heroes in Agamemnon and Othello - In Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, as well as, in Shakespeare’s Othello, the audience sees the tragic downfall of the protagonist, which is the question of fate or justice. If one refers to the titles of these plays; Agamemnon and Othello are the protagonists. First Agamemnon thinks more as a king than as a father, when he chooses to kill his daughter to take Troy. Then the general Othello commits suicide having assassinated his wife, whom he loved so much. Indeed, these changes from a good to a bad destiny are respectively the work of two characters: Clytaemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife and Iago, a soldier under Othello’s orders....   [tags: Literary Characters]
:: 2 Works Cited
2049 words
(5.9 pages)
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Diomedes in Agamemnon - Since Agamemnon refused to return the daughter of a priest of Apollo, Agamemnon agrees to release Helen only if Achilles gives him his prize of honor. This is when Achilles found it unfair and withdraws from the battle including all his soldiers. Achilles then asks the gods to grant him revenge. Agamemnon the had attacked because a dream had encouraged him to. Paris flees the battle with the help of a divinity and Menelaus rages on with his brother demanding the release of Helen. As the battle continues, Diomedes makes a heroic stand and kills many Trojans, bringing his Time', Kudos and Arete' up high....   [tags: essays research papers] 459 words
(1.3 pages)
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Clytemnestra: Not Another Homeric Savage - ... This rationale that Clytemnestra displays contradicts the idea that she has a savage mind intent solely on bloodlust. She does not kill for the sake of killing like the Cyclops or the Syrens of Homer; she kills to restore a very civilized notion of human justice. Another convincing motive Clytemnestra has for killing the king stems from his rampant infidelity while away at Troy which is perceived as an act of impropriety in modern society. According to the Greeks, Agamemnon has achieved the height of social status by marrying successfully —though not necessarily happily— and establishing a productive home....   [tags: Aeschylus's Agamemnon] 1333 words
(3.8 pages)
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Agamemnon - Agamemnon Agamemnon is the first book in the Orestiean Trilogy written by the famous Greek tragedy writer, Aeschylus. Agamemnon is a story of justice and revenge. The story takes place in a city called Argos. It starts with Agamemnon, the king of Argos, away at the Trojan War. The city is eagerly awaiting the news of their king’s welfare and the outcome of the war. Watchmen are posted in the city, watching for the beacon that would report the capture of Troy and Agamemnon’s return. Beacons are set up from Troy to Argos; when one beacon is lit, the next one will be lit, until the last....   [tags: essays research papers] 711 words
(2 pages)
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Agamemnon - In Aeschylus’ Agamemnon there are many different opinions about what kind of king and commander Agamemnon was. Some argued that he was good, while others dispute that his motives were wrong. Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife, gained a strong hatred for him, after he sacrificed his own daughter so he could go to war. Many believe that this was not necessary and could have been overcome. The chorus seems to agree with this to an extent, and feels that Agamemnon could have prayed and requested that he not sacrifice his daughter....   [tags: essays research papers] 736 words
(2.1 pages)
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Agamemnon - Aeschylus was born in 525 B.C. and died in 466 B.C. He was the first of the three Athenian dramatists, the other two being Sophocles and Euripides. The first of Aeschylus’ plays were laid open in 499. He was established as the founder of tragedy, according to Aristotle. He diminished the importance of the chorus and introduced a second actor. Between the years of 484 and 458, he won awards at the festival in the City Dionysia. He wrote more than ninety plays, but only seven survive. The oldest of these is The Suppliant Maidens....   [tags: essays research papers] 1113 words
(3.2 pages)
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Agamemnon - Agamemnon Agamemnon is the first play of Aeschylus’ trilogy, the Oresteia. Aeschylus was the first of Athens’ three great tragedians; the others: Sophocles; Euripides. The Oresteia was also the first Greek tragedy trilogy written. As Greeks of this epoch focused on humanist ideas, so did Aeschylus. He devoted his genius to serious contemplations of humanistic questions, such as the nature of justice. Other humanistic values are honor, truth, compassion, loyalty, devotion to family and gods. He credits much of his success to Homer’s epics....   [tags: Papers] 615 words
(1.8 pages)
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Review of Agamemnon by Aeschylus - Review of Agamemnon by Aeschylus *No Works Cited The play Agamemnon, a Greek playwright written by Aeschylus, starts out after the fall of Troy at the palace of King Agamemnon. A watchman watching for a flare in the distance spots a light in the distance, signaling that the end of the war has finally come after many years. After the King comes home, the “chorus” (high authorities I think?) talks about the war and about the fact that it was fought over a woman. Around this time, the chorus is doubting whether or not the signal flare was true or not, but soon a messenger comes along and confirms the word....   [tags: Papers] 506 words
(1.4 pages)
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Agamemnon - Agamemnon was the son of Atreus, the brother of Menelaus and the brother-in-law of Helen; he was told to sacrifice his daughte Agamemnon was the son of Atreus, the brother of Menelaus and the brother-in-law of Helen; he was told to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia to atone for the killing of a deer sacred to Artemis so that the Greek fleet could have wind to sail to Troy. However, Artemis snatched Iphigenia away at the last second and transported her to Tauris (now known as the Crimea) to serve as her priestess....   [tags: Classics] 953 words
(2.7 pages)
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Agamemnon, Symbolism Of Darkne - Throughout the ages of literature, darkness has often been used as symbolic in representation for evil, concealment, and blindness. In the opening of Agamemnon, the darkness that consumed the scene was used for effect in order to convey indirectly, themes of evil, concealment, and blindness. The theme of evil was clearly supported by the actions of the character. The play was one of murder and revenge, both of which are traditionally sinful in nature. Agamemnon is murdered in the play by his wife Clytaemestra, who does so in hopes of avenging the death of her daughter, among other reasons....   [tags: essays research papers] 645 words
(1.8 pages)
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Analysis of Aeschylus Agamemnon - Analysis of Aeschylus Agamemnon Characters- The Watchman Clytaemnestra The Herald Agamemnon Cassandra Aegisthus The Chorus 1). The Watchman: • The watchman sets the time and place for the play (Agamemnon’s palace in Argos, the house of Atreus); he describes the many miserable nights he has spent on the rooftop of the palace watching for the signal fires that will herald the fall of Troy. • The watchman is one Aeschylus’s small characters, but like the herald he serves an important role as he not only sets the scene but also perhaps portrays the mood of Argos awaiting their king and soldiers return....   [tags: Greek Dramatist Plays Literature Essays] 4506 words
(12.9 pages)
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Agamemnon and Gender Roles - Throughout the years, history has tried to examine how gender roles have changed over time and views of how women should be have changed. However there are many examples of current stereotypes of women that linger in today's society. Following the play Agamemnon we will examine the three female characters and how their stereotypes apply to the current day society. A watchmen being the person who must stay awake to watch out for any urgencies quotes a few key factors that show the stereotypes of women....   [tags: Personal Essays] 800 words
(2.3 pages)
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Agamemnon Vs. The Clouds - Despite their different genre, Agamemnon and The Clouds present contrasting images on the place of individuals in their families. While the tone of Agamemnon creates a more serious picture than the comical atmosphere of The Clouds, the relationships are based on the same precepts and share several aspects. Images of the gods, their prophetic messages, and their execution of justice massively influence the images of relationships while love and memory more directly affect the actions of individuals....   [tags: Comparative Literature] 1170 words
(3.3 pages)
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Chorus Intervention in Aeschylus' the Eumenides and Agamemnon - In The Eumenides and Agamemnon of The Oresteia trilogy, Aeschylus constructs an over-arching metaphor for elements of the new Athenian democracy. The chorus in each play represents the people who feel under-represented and disrespected, by the society's changing values. In The Eumenides, the chorus of Furies is frustrated with the younger gods and infringements on their power; in Agamemnon the chorus fears more the control of an effective woman in Clytemnestra rather than the leadership of fruitless Agamemnon....   [tags: Comparative Literature] 764 words
(2.2 pages)
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Comparing the Portrayal of Clytemnestra in Agamemnon and Electra - Comparing the Portrayal of Clytemnestra in Agamemnon and Electra In both Electra and Agamemnon, Euripides and Aeschylus have chosen to represent Clytemnestra as a complex character being neither all bad nor all good - the signature of a sophisticated playwright. In Agamemnon, Clytemnestra is a morbidly obsessive woman, utterly consumed by the murder of her daughter for which the audience cannot help but sympathise; she is capable only of vengeance. In the Electra, Clytemnestra is placed in an even more sympathetic light, victimised by her own daughter who in turn is driven by an obsessive desire, similar to that of her mother's, to avenge her father's death....   [tags: Papers] 1441 words
(4.1 pages)
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Agamemnon as a Tyrant as Described by Plato's "The Republic" - Many societal ills in a given culture can be attributed to the pride that develops in leaders and the aggressive effect this nature has on the need for personal gain. In his work The Republic, Plato spends a great deal of time outlining his vision of a society in which man's arrogant and competitive nature is unable to root itself into the government of the city, thus creating a completely just and good society. Nevertheless, even Plato realized that because of the inevitable influence of man's lust for power, no society could retain a perfectly just government forever....   [tags: World Literature] 1274 words
(3.6 pages)
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Emasculation of Men Leads to Deaths of Women - Women, like men, are accountable for all of their deeds. However, in Greek literature, in which male-dominated societies are common, women who take personal responsibility for their actions often face unfair consequences. For example, in Aeschylus's The Oresteia and Sophocles' Antigone, Clytaemnestra and Antigone both took justice into their own hands to honor their respective families. As a result, they died at the hands of men who had difficulty accepting their justifications. The reason for this is because the men felt emasculated by these two women's actions....   [tags: antigone, oresteia, agamemnon]
:: 1 Works Cited
1423 words
(4.1 pages)
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Clytemnestra and Aphrodite - Clytemnestra is one of Greek literature’s most famous villains while Aphrodite is seen as one of the most desirable women in literature. Greek Goddesses are celebrated for their manlike traits where as human females are thought to be undesirable for them. This relationship further proves that gods and goddesses are superior not only in power but also in social status. By comparing Aechylus’ Agamemnon with The Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite we can see how in ancient Greece, literature taught women to be inferior by showing them consequences of female actions to keep women in their subordinate positions in society....   [tags: greek goddesses, the agamemnon]
:: 4 Works Cited
1114 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Iliad by Homer: Book 1 - ... At first Agamemnon didn’t want it but the people round him persuaded him that it would be best to let her go so they could be released from the plague that Apollo put on them. Agamemnon then poised to Achilles that he is going to steal Achilles prize, Briseis. This is when Achilles’ rage shows at its best. He nearly draws his sword to kill Agamemnon but he is stopped by the goddess, Athena. The Iliad presents its subject clearly from the beginning of the text. The book focuses mostly on the rage of Achilles but other factors as well....   [tags: conflict between Achiles & Agamemnon, Trojan War] 698 words
(2 pages)
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Destiny, Fate, Free Will and Free Choice - Prophecies in Oedipus, Antigone, and Agamemnon - The Damning Prophecies in Oedipus, Antigone, and Agamemnon Oracles, seers, and prophets are used in Greek tragedy to provide foreshadowing for the audience and characters. The seers' wisdom is conveyed through the pronouncement of oracles or prophecies. They confer forecasts to principal characters that affect the characters' future. Although not always believed, and often endeavored to be foiled, seers, oracles, and prophets in Greek tragedies foretell events that greatly affect the lives of prominent characters....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 1011 words
(2.9 pages)
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Agamemnan, The Inferno, Don Quixote - Agamemnon, The Inferno, and Don Quixote may seem to be vastly different stories written across centuries of time and within incongruous cultures but the three tales share related themes. * Set among the ruling family of Argos, Aeschylus’s Agamemnon examines the topic of justice: ancient eye-for-an-eye progressing toward modern disinterested justice, attributing all to the gods. Similarly, in Dante Alighieri’s Inferno each sinner is placed in a punishment to fit his crime: divine perfection of justice....   [tags: Comparisons, Themes, Stories] 1230 words
(3.5 pages)
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Tragic Hero: Agamenon by Aeschylus - ... Agamemnon was just doing his job, but for very selfish reasons. He was being self serving, not only in Aulis, bur also in Troy, in Argos, and in Elysium. In the Illiad, after having sacked a city near Troy, women were taken as war prizes. A prize of war is considered property that was seized by the victors. While winning these prizes is an incentive to fight, it is not ethical to take war prizes. An ideal war (forgive the statement) is fought fairly and ethically, so the two sides can mend and forgive their grievances once the war has ended....   [tags: ancient Greek playwrights] 1462 words
(4.2 pages)
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Struggling Veteran in the Odyssey by Homer - ... He is not the king of a tiny dominion in an obscure part of the Greek world. It is clear from the descriptions of “widely ruling Agamemnon” that the king had power and his loss was significant (III, 248). Agamemnon shows that he is honor-bound in a way that contrasts with the treachery of Aigisthos. Achilleus fell in battle in Troy and Agamemnon ensured that he was properly memorialized. Achilleus’ body was brought away from the fighting after he was killed and was anointed with unguents. The Greeks cut their hair short and mourned the death for days....   [tags: war, treachery, warrior] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Serpent and the Eagle: From Darkness to Light - Yet as we journey from the dark to the light in Aeschylus, we cannot leave the dark behind – the darkness breeds the light. ⎯ Robert Fagles and W. B. Stanford, “Introduction: The Serpent and the Eagle” It is without fail that throughout Aeschylus’ trilogy, The Oresteia, the presence of light and dark can be found in the characters, the plot and the themes. The trilogy follows the House of Atreus its emergence from darkness into the light. However, the light and darkness are often presented symbolically throughout the trilogy and often appear as pairs, which are constantly at odds with each other like Clytaemnestra versus Orestes and Apollo verses the Furies....   [tags: literature, Aeschylus trilogy]
:: 2 Works Cited
1617 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Iliad: Achilles' Rage - `Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles' The first line of the Iliad describes a human emotion that leads to doom and destruction in Homer's poetic tale of the Trojan War. Achilles' rage is a major catalyst in the action in the Iliad. It is his rage that makes him both withdraw from and, later, rejoin the war with a fury. Why is Achilles enraged. Is his rage ignited solely by his human adversaries or do the gods destine him to the experience. Achilles' rage has many facets....   [tags: The Iliad Essays] 1042 words
(3 pages)
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Murder and Revenge in Aeschylus’s Play, Libation Bearers - ... Pylades urges Orestes to kill his mother, and Orestes takes her to the palace and kills her. Orestes then opens the palace doors to reveal the two dead bodies of Clytemnestra and Aegisthus. Orestes instructs the Furies to cover their bodies with the fabric they threw over Agamemnon. Soon after, Orestes begins to go crazy believing that the Furies are pursuing him. The Chorus tries to calm him down, but they do not succeed. Orestes then runs off to Delphi to be purified. In Aeschylus’s Libation Bearers, there are several references to Greek gods, but the most important Greek gods in Libation Bearers are Apollo and Hermes....   [tags: prayer, vengeance, rivalry]
:: 1 Works Cited
1394 words
(4 pages)
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Revenge and Violence in Cassandra - Revenge and Violence in Cassandra        In "Mycenae Lookout," Seamus Heaney tells the story of Agamemnon, Clytemnestra and Cassandra after the Trojan war. "Cassandra" is the second part of "Mycenae Lookout" and chronicles Cassandra, Apollo's ill-fated prophetess, who is captured by Agamemnon at the war's end and brought back to Mycenae as a slave. The fates of Cassandra and the House of Atreus collide with Agamemnon's return to Mycenae, where his wife Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus plot his murder.  Aegisthus and Clytemnestra both seek revenge: Clytemnestra for her daughter's sacrifice and Aegisthus for the overthrow of his father and the sins of Agamemnon's father Atreus...   [tags: Cassandra Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1096 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Change of Achilles - In The Iliad, Achilles faces many decision-making situations. He shows a human side like any other person, but when fate takes over, he goes in a series of changes. The all mighty Achilles turns into a weeping child when his prize is taken away. His long lasting anger against Agamemnon turns into camaraderie after his friend Patroklos is killed and finally his wrath against Hector's body turns into compassion when Priam begs for the body to be returned. Many could argue that when something is taken away from a person, that person will not make a problem, especially when that person is a fearless warrior....   [tags: Greek Literature] 538 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Scepter or Staff - I would argue the scepter and staff are metaphors for defined authority, a representation of the rule of law and Guardianship of public weal. Furthermore, I would argue that not all sectors are made equal, nor do all bearers process and equal position of ascendancy, ability to compel obedience, or Dominion. For instance Agamemnon’s royal scepter represents an authority that has come down to him from Zeus through several generations of Argive kings, meaning divine right, and heritage. They are tools of distinction, imparting a special honor, and denoting superiority of character on the individual who wields it....   [tags: Analysis, Odysseus] 1660 words
(4.7 pages)
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Pride Fueled Rage: Achilles - Achilles, the hero and great warrior of the Trojan War, is son of the goddess Thetis and mortal Peleus. He is extremely courageous and has tremendous honor, within his character however, is a juxtaposing inherent flaw of pride entwined with anger. Is it a necessary pride. Do all heroes have this character flaw. In The Iliad, the anger of Achilles is presented from the first line, “ Rage: / Sing Goddess, Achilles’ rage / Black and murderous…” (Line 1-3; p. 107). Here Achilles’ anger is described as rage, a term suitable to describe the anger of a God....   [tags: The Iliad Essays]
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1449 words
(4.1 pages)
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Good and Evil in Greek Mythology - Light and dark, heaven and hell, winning and losing, victor and defeated, they all share something, they are the balance of good and evil, and glory and shame in a hero’s journey; for every light, there is darkness; for every heaven, there is a hell; for every win, there is a loss; and for every victor someone is defeated. This constant battle of good and evil, and glory and shame is seen through many cultures mythology, especially in ancient Greece, men were to have glory associated with their name, and there were to fight for good; their mythology reflects this, with their battling Gods, and warring cities....   [tags: Hero, Glory, Shame] 962 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Iliad by Homer - The Iliad by Homer The Iliad, by Homer, tells a part of the tale of the conquest of Troy by the Greeks. In the Greek army there are many prominent figures. These important Greeks have distinct personalities. This paper hopes to demonstrate that certain famous Greeks each get some form of comeuppance based on their respective bad character traits and actions. In essence, this paper will show that justice is served against the Greeks for their actions. It seems appropriate to start with the head of the Greek army, Agamemnon....   [tags: Papers] 1197 words
(3.4 pages)
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Tragic Heroines: Medea and Clytemnestra - Aristotle (384-322 B.C. believed that tragedy, as an imitation or mimesis of life as it could be, held more importance than history, which simply records the past. He considered that performance of a tragedy provided the perfect cathartic experience for an audience, leaving them spiritually purified and inspired. He felt spectators seeing and experiencing great hardship befall the play’s hero or heroine would achieve this emotional state and benefit from it. The tragic hero, according to Aristotle, must be essentially good and be of high or noble birth....   [tags: Aristotle, Greek tragedies, literature]
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981 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Cycle of Vengeance in Aeschylus’s Oresteia - The Cycle of Vengeance in Aeschylus’s Oresteia   The cyclic thread of vengeance runs like wild fire through the three plays in Aeschylus’s Oresteia. This thread, with its complexity of contemporary and universal implications lends itself quite well to – in fact, almost necessitates – deeply interested study. While a brief summary of the Oresteia will inevitably disregard some if not much of the trilogy’s essence and intent, on the positive side it will establish a platform of characters, events, and motives with which this paper is primarily concerned....   [tags: Oresteia Essays]
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2434 words
(7 pages)
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The Oresteia by Aeschylus: Guilty or Innocent - When a person is accused of a crime they are either found innocent or guilty. This is the basic idea of justice and it is what many feel needs to happen if someone has done something controversial. In the play The Oresteia by Aeschylus, the story of Clytemnestra guilt or innocents is questioned. She does many things that people are not too happy with and those controversial actions throughout the story, mainly in the first part Agamemnon get her into the trouble. As we explore the case that builds against her innocents by exploring the killings of Agamemnon and Cassandra and the boastful expression about the killings....   [tags: Oresteia Aeschylus] 1104 words
(3.2 pages)
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Justice for All - Justice for All The word “justice,” is a difficult word to define. Looking thru a number of definitions one can find the word “just” included to explain the word justice. Just means to be fair and ultimately we can say that justice has the characteristic to be fair or right. Keeping this definition in mind while reading Agamemnon and The Libation Bearers one can see that the characters within both plays took justice into their own hands and believed that they were doing the “right” thing. Based on the ancient law of the Furies, they state that blood should be compensated for with blood and an unending cycle of calamity....   [tags: Literature Review] 962 words
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Reproduction of the Oikos in Aeschylus’ Oresteia - Aeschylus’ Oresteia is the chronicles of a cursed family that includes a circle of betrayal, adultery, and murder, among other things. The Greek word oikos can be used to describe the Greek family structure. In Homer’s Odyssey, two polar opposites of oikoi are given. First, the son of Odysseus’ son Telemachus meets Nestor, who symbolizes a near-perfect oikos . The family is involved in a large sacrificial feast upon the arrival of Telemachus . He also utilizes xenia, the Greek word for manners or the ideal guest-host relationship, to perfection....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia ]
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The Dilemmas of the Oresteia: Like Father, Like Son? - Aeschylus' The Oresteia features two characters burdened by seemingly hopeless decisions. First is Agamemnon, king of Argos, whose army was thwarted by the goddess, Artemis. Agamemnon was faced with the decision to call off the army's sail to Troy, and thus admit defeat and embarrassment, or to sacrifice his daughter, Iphigenia, to satisfy Artemis whom had stopped the winds to delay Agamemnon's fleet. Second is Orestes, son of Agamemnon, who was given the choice by Apollo to avenge his father's murder, thus committing matricide, or face a series of torturous consequences....   [tags: World Literature] 796 words
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Why Was Honour an Important Theme in Homer’s Iliad? - For the Homeric hero, honour was a code to live by, won on the battlefield, achieved through oratory discourse and attained via athletic ability. However, to understand why honour was an important theme in Homer’s Iliad, we need to look at how the heroes of the epic poem, such as Agamemnon and Achilles lived by this code, observing their behaviour and how they treated others throughout the story. With this in mind, we can establish the ideal conduct that warrants honour and the reality of what living by such a code meant to everyone involved....   [tags: Greek Literature]
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The Arbitrary and Contradicting Nature of Mythological Justice - The workings of justice and what falls under it have been debated for a very long time, ever since men started to interact with one another. Some say justice is based on what is fair, lawful, or moral, but that only depends on what someone sees as fair, lawful, or moral. During the time of Aeschylus, justice was all three of them as well as none of them. Justice in itself was contradictory, and was subject to follow the whims of both man and god. This is seen especially in Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, and The Furies, where from story to story someone’s views on justice were different than that of the person before them....   [tags: Justice, Laws, Lawful, Moral, Punishment]
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Summary of The Illidad by Homer - The Iliad is a poem told by Homer that describes the horror of men and gods alike battling toward the destruction of both sides as it moves to the tragic conclusion of the Trojan War. Robert Fagles using his poetic and scholar skills to perfectly translates the Iliad using Bernard Knox’s introduction and notes. In his translation he sticks to maintain the drive music of Homer’s poetry, and evokes the impact of the Iliad’s repeated phrases. Fagles' translations emphasizes on English idioms and phrasings, but tries to stay as faithful to the original text as possible....   [tags: Epic, Mythology]
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The Iliad of Homer - The Iliad Important Characters: Agamemnon king of Mycenae; brother of Menelaos Hektor Prince of Troy; son of Priam and Hekuba Achilles greatest warrior of the Achaian army Aias song of Telamon; he has brute strength and courage Menelaos husband of Helen; brother of Agamemnon Paris a prince of Troy; also son of Priam and Hekuba Priam King of Troy; very old man Helen wife of Menelaos; most beautiful woman In the world Diomedes one of the best Achaian warriors Hekuba wife of Priam Aeneas son of Aphrodite; Trojan Aphrodite Daughter of Zeus; goddess of love; mother of Aeneas; patron of Paris; on the Trojans' side Athena daughter of Zeus; goddess of wisdom; on the Achaian side Ares son of Zeus;...   [tags: essays research papers] 1542 words
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"The Iliad" and the Pursuit of Honor and Glory - The Iliad, which is an epic poem written about the Trojan War, was the first thing written in the European tradition. Astonishingly, its quality and appeal have yet to be surpassed. This is a result of Homer's use of idealistic themes, many of which show up in many modern novels. One of the most dominant themes present in The Iliad is the pursuit of honor and glory. Even though the Achaeans and Trojans are in a violent battle with one another, both display a similar attitude: the acquisition of glory is more important than life itself....   [tags: World Literature] 953 words
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The Imagery of Bloodshed in The Oresteia - The Imagery of Bloodshed in The Oresteia   In the prologue of Agamemnon, the first play of Aeschylus' trilogy, The Oresteia, the watchman implores the gods for "a blessed end to all our pain." (20). He is asking for deliverance from the retributive system of justice, where the only certainty is that bloodshed breeds more bloodshed. The old men of the chorus in their opening chant, "Hymn to Zeus," declare that suffering must be experienced before man can be released from this ceaseless irredeemable bloodshed and thus be, "free from all the pain." (1) They declare that it is a law laid down by Zeus "that we must suffer, suffer into truth./ We cannot sleep, and drop by drop a...   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]
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Assumptions About Proper Behavior - ... The Achaeans honored Achilles as if he were a god, by refusing the gifts his honor was diminishing.6 They were attempting to make him see reason, he was behaving in ways that were not proper for a warrior. If a warrior was insulted gifts were to be used to appease them. Agamemnon offered Achilles gifts,7 but to Achilles they were nothing which was contrary to proper behavior.8 Phoenix tells him he would not ask Achilles to forget his anger if Agamemnon had not offered gifts, but because he does Achilles should not scorn his friends; he is explaining what is considered to be proper during such circumstances.9 Agamemnon fulfilled his duty by offering Achilles the gifts, in return he was t...   [tags: The Iliad, Trojan War, literary analysis, epic]
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Persuasion in the Iliad - Persuasion in the Iliad Throughout history is an endless list of great war leaders who have conquered great masses of land. So, it must take a great speaker to convince thousands of men to leave the comforts of their homes to risk their lives in war. In Homer's, The Iliad, two great nobleman Agamemnon and Odysseus are in the position to push exhausted soldiers back on to the battlefield. Each use different approaches to excite the men, however, it is Odysseus, not King Agamemnon, who succeeds....   [tags: Papers] 643 words
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Odysseus's Appearance in The Odyssey and the Iliad - ... Odysseus knew that Achilles would never agree to this stipulation if he told him about it during the toast. Achilles, however, can see right through this omission and states that he is going to pack his ships and leave tomorrow. The way that Odysseus handles situations such as these provide a crucial insight into his character. Ajax points out to Achilles that his heart has been replaced with “flint and malice, because of one girl” (Homer, Iliad 9.658-59). Ajax does not understand that “seven of the finest women to be found” cannot forgive Agamemnon’s actions (Homer, Iliad 9.661)....   [tags: ancient Greek heroes, Greek tragedies] 1405 words
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The Orestia:Aeschylus, Religion and Women - Aeschylus was, by all accounts, a notable participant in Athens’s major dramatic competitions. Regarded as the father of tragedy, Aeschylus used poetry to address ethical dilemmas that were often present during his time. In the Oresteia, Aeschylus’ religious tendencies seem to, at times, cloud his view. In the context of the play, events created by human hubris set off a chain reaction of such epic proportions that only the gods can help mend; he seems to forgive and forget the gods involvement in the events that lead to the curse....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Comparing Women's Revenge in The Oresteia and Medea - Comparing Women's Revenge in The Oresteia and Medea Clytaemnestra and Medea are two women who are seeking justice for a wrong committed by their husbands. Clytaemnestra?s husband, Agamemnon, did not wrong here directly but rather indirectly. Agamemnon sacrificed their daughter Iphigeneia, in order to calm the Thracian winds. For Clytaemnestra this brought much hatred towards Agamemnon. Here Agamemnon had betrayed Clytaemnestra and their daughters trust, and for that she sought revenge. Medea's husband, Jason, had dishonored her with his unfaithfulness....   [tags: Oresteia Medea Revenge Essays]
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Justice and Social Order in The Oresteia - Justice and Social Order in The Oresteia   Democracy, emerging in the city-state of Athens, allowed unprecedented power to her citizens. Among these new powers was the ability to legislate. Yet, legislation was not without its problems. First the citizens must agree upon what is just and unjust, and then enforce the law by bringing the unjust to reconcile their guilt with the public through trial, and finally dispense the appropriate penalty. This evolution was not without concern. The Greeks were attempting to establish a governmental system which would span the middle ground between anarchy and despotism....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]
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The Powerful Clytemnestra in Aeschylus' Oresteia - The Powerful Clytemnestra in Aeschylus' Oresteia What Price Glory. was the title of a Maxwell Anderson play about World War I. Although the Oresteia deals with the period following a much different war, the same question can be asked of it. In the trilogy Aeschylus presents the reader with a stunning example of ancient Greek society, in which warrior ideals were firmly held, and glory in battle was considered the supreme good. The question of moral justification in the trilogy brings in many complex issues, but all of them revolve around the construction of Greek society and the role of different individuals in this system....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]
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Incest in Greek Mythology - Incest in Greek Mythology        Incest in Greek mythology was a common occurrence. Part of the reason is that the gods themselves set the example, and since everything that happened in society was the result of the passion of the gods, this, of course, gave the characters in the Greek plays the opportunity to also lust after their children and relatives. While the story of Oedipus the King is the delineating play on the subject, Greek mythology is full of incestuous relationships.   The gods who inspired the love and hate relationships among families include Hermes, who used his magical use of language to lure the feelings of his brother Apollo away from jealousy to love....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
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Homer's Iliad Study Questions - ... Polydamas interprets it as being significant and feels that is a sign that their charge will fail, but Hector does not want to retreat. 58) Sarpedon is able to make the first breach on the ramparts, and Hector is able to finish them off by destroying one of the gates with a boulder. 59) The fact that Poseidon begins to interfere with the battle subverts Zeus' confidence in the Trojans. 60) Little Ajax grotesquely bowled a head at Hector's feet. 61) Zeus was of two minds concerning the Greeks and the Trojans in the sense that he wanted the Trojans to win, but he did not want the entire Argive force to be destroyed....   [tags: ancient Greek epic poems] 1766 words
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The Contributions of Homer's Book XXIV - Greek literature, in particular, Homer’s Odyssey, remains a masterpiece because of its structure. Additionally, an abundance of wisdom pours forth from its pages. Aristophanes and Aristarchus, two Greek critics, claimed that Homer’s Odyssey ended with the lines, “Rejoicing in each other, they returned to their bed, the old familiar place they loved so well” (XXIII: 337-338). While, at first glance, Book XXIV appears unnecessary, entirely omitting it leaves Homer’s work unfinished. Book XXIV features a wonderful study of the human condition....   [tags: Greek, Odyssey] 498 words
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Who was the Real Hero in Homer's The Iliad? - ... Even with these great abilities, it is hard for many readers to perceive him as a hero because of the way he acts. Homer takes this brief time period out of this whole ten-year war just to demonstrate how Achilles cannot control himself when he goes into a rage. In todays world Achilles would not last long as a soldier in any army because he would be court marshaled for insubordination. Achilles yells at King Agamemnon, "What a worthless, burnt-out coward I'd be called if I would submit to you and all your orders," (Pg....   [tags: achilles, war, battle]
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The Main Theme in the Ilyad: Anger - ... The wrath of Achilles is provoked by Achilles' sense of honor as a result of discord, which leads to the warrior's alienation from the Greeks and eventually from human society. In the Iliad, the origin of Achillies' anger is a direct result of the action that he perceives as an attack on his personal honor. Agamemnon takes Briseis from Achilles. In response, Achilles renounced from the war, making a bif quarrel both personaly and generally in the war. Achilles cannot reconcile with his desire not to fight honorably with his peopl, because of that he becomes more and more petulant and angry at Agamemnon....   [tags: decisions, wrath, action, society] 675 words
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Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis - Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis There are obviously many obligations at hand in Iphigenia at Aulis. The one however that widely catches my attention is Iphigenia’s ending decision to accept her fate. Iphigenia’s fate of death is a sacrifice that her father Agamemnon has to uphold to his brother Menelaus. Agamemnon like any father would not willingly offer his child as a sacrifice, however he does so because of his “commander-in-chief” position and the oath he took on behalf of Menelaus. There are similarities and differences to Agamemnon and Iphigenia’s fate....   [tags: essays research papers] 483 words
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Fighting Injustice in Ancient Greece - The use of violence as the answer to injustice is addressed in both the Odyssey and the Agamemnon. Violent revenge as a form of punishment was commonplace in Greek culture, but its effectiveness varies between these works. Odysseus' violent retribution against the suitors in his house proved to be successful in ending the injustice that was created by the suitors. On the other hand, the violence used by Clytaemnestra against Agamemnon and Cassandra in retaliation for Agamemnon's killing of their daughter just caused more violence, as Orestes avenged Agamemnon's death by killing Clytaemnestra and Aegisthus....   [tags: European Literature] 1146 words
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Male Dominance In Greek Mythology - As one begins to enter the Greek world of Mythology it cannot be helped but to notice the significant impact these works have had on this day and age. Seeing as how they have such profound impact on our everyday lives, it’s necessary to research and analyze this noteworthy topic. A constant recurring theme worth discussion as seen throughout Greek Mythology is that of men and their dominative status. Some examples of such men include: Hercules – renown for his 12 Great Labors, the cunning Odysseus in his return voyage home, and the ever-courageous Orestes....   [tags: Greek Mythology] 1248 words
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Essay on The Importance of Nestor in Homer's Iliad - The Importance of Nestor in Homer's Iliad       The role of the character Nestor in Homer's Iliad is one often overlooked. Nestor is not only an Achaian counselor, respected and listened to due to his age, but he also “serves as a link between the peace of home the Achaians are leaving and the barbarism of war to which they are succumbing”(Richardson 24). Nestor incites action, instills values and motivates the characters to keep a balance between this peace and barbarism.   Nestor first appears in book one during an argument between Achilles and Agamemnon over Briseis, a war prize belonging to Achilles....   [tags: Iliad essays]
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Achilles Respect for Authority in The Iliad - Achilles Respect for Authority in The Iliad Respect for authority plays an important role in The Iliad. Achilles is a major character in it whose views on authority change throughout the book. In Book One, he seems to have no respect for King Agamemnon. Achilles questions his judgment as well as rebelling against his authority. This is shown best when Achilles says, "What a worthless, burnt-out coward I'd be called if I would submit to you and all your orders." (Pg. 87 line 43-45)....   [tags: Iliad essays] 906 words
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Tug of War - Tug of War If the two women of Agamemnon, Clytaemnestra and Cassandra, were put to the test of Tug of War, would there be a winner or would neither win. A game of Tug of war meaning, a pull from each side of the rope until one side with out a doubt crosses a drawn line. There are similarities between the two ladies as well as several differences. The actions of the ladies and confrontations lead the town to have confused thought of each woman. Both women are strong characters having strong pulls on the rope but each shows their weaknesses and tends to lose grip....   [tags: Papers] 702 words
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Vengeance in Oresteia - Vengeance in Oresteia From the beginning of time vengeance or retribution has been part of the human condition. This is especially true in Aeschylus's trilogy the Oresteia. One of the underlying themes in these works is Oculo pro oculo or an eye for an eye. According to the plays introduction by Richmond Lattimore, the history behind this blood feud of vengeance begins with Atreus and Thyestes. Atreus tricks his brother Thyestes into partaking of his own children (another possible Hannibal sequel)....   [tags: Papers] 957 words
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The Illiad by Homer - Women have held many different roles in society throughout human history. Since the beginning of time men have always been viewed as superior. In Homer’s Iliad, a perfect example of the suppressive role of women is shown. Women are treated as property and are used for the mere purpose of reproduction within the household. Paralyzed by their unfortunate circumstances, they were taken and given as if they were material belongings. In Homer's Iliad, women are seen and introduce as rewards to the male heroines and usually the greatest fighters....   [tags: women's role, human history, creek]
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Fighting With Integrity - In the 4 books we read, Freedom’s Children, The Pearl, Schooled, and The Iliad, the main protagonists all fight with integrity. In Freedom’s Children, the black kids fight with integrity by protesting to gain freedom. In The Pearl, Kino fights with integrity by fighting for freedom in the form of protest. In Schooled, Cap fights with integrity y being non- violent by protesting. People fight with integrity by protesting for what they believe i. Claudette Colvin fought with integrity by doing what she thinks is right....   [tags: Literary Analysis ] 916 words
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The Nature of Honour in Virgil and Homer - In the epics of both Homer and Virgil, the meaning and politics of honour play a significant role in the decisions and actions of the characters. Honour involves arbitrary set of rules, so just what is is and why did people need to maintain these rules at all. In these poems, honour is linked to a hero’s possessions, identity, and deed. All three are important, but one’s deeds seem to matter the most and without performing great deeds, honour cannot be had the other two ways. Honour is often represented by possessions, and, in a way, the possessions are honour itself....   [tags: Literary Elements]
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Proving Ones Honor in The Iliad by Homer - ... 126). During the war, Hector was faithful to the fight, but Achilles withdrew from the war due to an argument with Agamemnon. Agamemnon had angered one of Apollo's priests and in accordance with the wishes of his priest Apollo started reigning havoc and death upon the Greeks. Agamemnon took a beautiful hostage named Briseis away from Achilles which had been given to him as his prize of honor. Agamemnon did this because he was forced to return his own prize of honor, Chryseis, back to her father in order to please Apollo (Rosenberg, 1999, p....   [tags: hero, glory, warrior]
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The Impact of Classical Literature on Machiavellianism - Much of what we know today of Greek culture was passed on through history via The Iliad by Homer. The Greeks, one of the earliest recorded civilizations that our species is aware of, had a large influence on the Roman Empire and by extension most of the civilizations of our known history. Through history and different cultures, there are various stories of heroes and heroism, and it seems that the definition of heroism has changed frequently since classical antiquity. “Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus’s son Achilles, murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses.”(The Iliad I.1-2) So opens The Iliad, a story of the Trojan War and the flawed hero, Achilles....   [tags: Greek Literature ] 1457 words
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The Trojan War and its Heroic Heroes - ... Menelaus established that he won the duel and demanded Helen back; they would not return her, so the efforts toward a truce failed. While Paris and Helen were at the Palace, war raged on with Hector in the midst of the battle. Then Hector returned to the palace and told Paris to either fight or return Helen instead of hiding because they were being slaughtered. Further into the war, the Trojans began to advance and started winning, during that time Hector decided to visit his family. Hector’s wife told him not to engage in the war because he might not return....   [tags: The Iliad by Homer, epic poems] 594 words
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Free Essays - Achilles' Moral Dilemma in Homer's Iliad - Achilles' Moral Dilemma in Homer's Iliad The question "was Achilles' anger justified" brings up issues that seem to have little or no relevance to the war. In time of war I would expect the leaders to prioritize the groups interest for the sake of unity and cooperation rather than being entrenched in achieving their own personal goals. But my expectations are those of a modern day literature student, I'm inclined to think that the Greeks who first read this epic valued different things than myself....   [tags: Iliad essays] 532 words
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Achilles As Hero - Achilles As Hero Despite the grand scope of Homer’s epics--which present warfare, heroism, adventure and divinity as forces that shape human destiny—The Iliad may be seen as an account of the circumstances that irrevocably alter the life of one man: Achilles, greatest of warriors. Through the course of the poem, Achilles goes through many ordeals, which changes his character immensely.      One example of such a character change is when he is quarreling with Agamemnon. Achilles and Agamemnon have an extreme amount of tension building between the both of them....   [tags: essays research papers] 478 words
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