Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned 52 essays for "Wyrd":

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
Wyrd - Wyrd “Fate often saves an undoomed man when his courage is good.”-- Beowulf According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the Anglo-Saxon word “wyrd” means “the principal, power, or agency by which events are predetermined; fate, destiny.” The Anglo-Saxon understanding of fate is not all too different from our modern understanding and applies to both Christian and pagan beliefs. Fate is a force that controls a man’s life regardless of his actions. Fate is usually seen as three women, sometimes blind, who weave the thread of a man’s life and cut it when it is his time to die....   [tags: Anglo Saxon Dictionary Power Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
483 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Heathen and Christian Elements in the Wanderer - Heathen and Christian Elements in the Wanderer       The modern word 'weird' bears only a superficial resemblance to its etymological descendent, wyrd.  What now stands for 'strange' and 'queer' only has an archaic connection to its classical meaning of 'Fate'.  During the process of evolution, however, the word went through many phases, especially during the formation of the English language by the Anglo-Saxons.         Wyrd appears fairly often in Old English poetry and prose, indicating a certain importance in Germanic society.  By following the changes the word undergoes, it is also possible to follow some of the changes that the culture undergoes as well.  A fine example...   [tags: Wanderer]
:: 5 Works Cited
1754 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Anglo Saxon Literature - Anglo Saxon Literature W Y R D The word wyrd generally means fate in Anglo Saxon literature. It is one of the recurrent themes in many old English works. For example, wyrd is seen as the force that determines the result of events in Beowulf. In another story, “The Wanderer,” wyrd is mentioned several times. In the first few lines, the speaker states that “fully-fixed is his fate” (Norton 100). This shows that wyrd is unchangeable. Then, he goes on to say “Words of a weary heart may not withstand fate” (Norton 100)....   [tags: History Beowulf ] 2029 words
(5.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Supernatural Motives in Shakespeare's Macbeth - ... After Macbeth left and headed back, he started to think hard about how much he wanted that crown. Macbeth was suppose to be King Duncans friend, not his killer. His job was to protect the king, but his thoughts the witches put in his head about the power he could have overcame his duties. He contemplated in his head and even wrote Lady Macbeth a letter telling her about what hes been thinking. After Lady Macbeth received his letter and read it she was like yeah right there is no way Macbeth is man enough to do this himself....   [tags: witches, demons, killed] 692 words
(2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Reconciling Ingrained Traditions with Newly Emerging Christianity - Before the eighth century, England was a pagan society, the English originated from a society marred in idolatry and polytheism. The intermingling of Christian and pagan elements in Beowulf are consistent with the attitudes toward religion that are found in Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People. Beowulf is written on medieval Scandinavia which was a highly pagan society, however the narrator is telling this story within the timeframe of medieval Anglo-Saxon Britain which was highly Christianized....   [tags: paganism, beowulf, christianity]
:: 2 Works Cited
1144 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay Comparing the Concept of God in Beowulf and Other Anglo-Saxon Poems - The Concept of God in Beowulf and Other Anglo-Saxon Poems            Is the concept of God mentioned only in Beowulf or is it a common element in all Anglo-Saxon poetry. Is the concept of God described the same way as in Beowulf.   Beowulf presents a mixture of Christian and pagan elements Hrothgar is demonstrably a monotheist, bu this people were offering sacrifice to pagan gods when Grendel caused them to despair. Let’s try to clarify the concept of God in this poem. In the early lines of this classic we see what is meant by GOD and by GOODNESS, as embodied or exemplified by the king, in this case by King Scyld Scefing:   he grew under heaven,              prospered in honors...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1814 words
(5.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Beowulf - Pagan or Christian Epic? - Beowulf Pagan or Christian Epic Beowulf: Pagan or Christian Epic. Although the story of Beowulf is filled with references to religion and faith, many discrepancies occur throughout the story that suggest that Beowulf is not a Christian epic. The character of Beowulf frequently speaks to God and obviously believes in His existence. However, pagan practices are mentioned in several places. Beowulf often refers to another being rather than the Christian God. Pagan practices of cremation and blood-drinking are included in the epic....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 1060 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Anglo Saxon Beliefs and Concepts - The Anglo-Saxon hero must possess many traits before becoming an actual hero. One must be ruthless, superhuman, and cunning, understand the need for sacrifice, have pride, and be courageous. The goal of many Anglo-Saxon heroes' is to change their fate and the actions that they take can sometimes be unethical and immoral; however, they always seem to succeed in their goal. Both Beowulf and Buliwyf (The 13th Warrior) had all the characteristics of being Anglo-Saxon heroes. Beowulf is one of the most known Anglo-Saxon hero's of the past and present....   [tags: Personal Essays] 1386 words
(4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Comedic Relief within Macbeth - The comedic relief the porter gives illustrates three different facets of Macbeth in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. The Porter opens the door of comedic relief by also opening the door to the three men who knock on Macbeth’s door. “ ‘Knock. Knock. Who's there?’ In the Harrowing of Hell scenes of English mystery plays, the answer to that question was no joke. The Harrowing marks the climax of the battle between God and Satan for the fate of humanity.” (Schreyer) In fact the Harrowing reveals the beginning of Macbeth’s struggle between good and evil....   [tags: Shakespeare]
:: 7 Works Cited
1908 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Role of Women in Macbeth by William Shakespeare - ... Banquo imagines that they could be telling a truth, yet behind it is a negative result that could exceed it. The witches make few appearances, so the subject of evil corresponding with women is continued all around the play with the part of Lady Macbeth. As the plot unfolds, Lady Macbeth turns into Macbeth's "instrument of darkness" on the grounds that she is his main ‘push’ behind the death of Duncan and the plan to cover it up. She utilizes her own particular sort of control to get Macbeth to commit evil much the same as the control used by the witches with their prediction that sounds alluring, however underneath the "deepest consequence" is stowed away....   [tags: evil, weird sisters, power of man] 1033 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Reconciling Ingrained Traditions with Newly Emerging Christianity - Before the eighth century, England was a pagan society, the English originated from a society marred in idolatry and polytheism. The intermingling of Christian and pagan elements in Beowulf are consistent with the attitudes toward religion that are found in Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People. Beowulf was written in the Middle Ages (500-1000) on Scandinavia, which was a highly pagan society, however the narrator is telling this story within the timeframe of medieval Anglo-Saxon Britain, which was undergoing Christianization....   [tags: beowulf, christianization, pagan society]
:: 2 Works Cited
1189 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Christian And Pagan Ideals In Beowulf - Before the invention of the printing press or written history, oral history, especially in early Germanic culture, became the foremost means of transcribing values, and past events. Written down in approximately 1,000 A.D. by an unknown author, Beowulf, originally a pagan fable, became a Christian allegory upon its transcription by Christian monks. However, as scholars have debated over the religious context in Beowulf, the attempts by the monks to turn the epic poem into a Christian parable ended merged, including both original and Christian aspects....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 1328 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
How War was Portrayed in Beowulf - How War was Portrayed in Beowulf The anonymous author of Beowulf can easily be construed as either arguing for or against war in its basic form. However, on a deeper level, the author is giving a profound and perhaps comforting view of war during this time period. The author we know has a great respect for wyrd or fate. We know that the outcome of any engagement of war is already pre-ordained by the Almighty so how could one argue for or against war when the general consensus was that there was really nothing to be done about it....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 679 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Religious Context of Beowulf - There has long been controversy and speculation over the religious context of the poem Beowulf. Many believe that Beowulf was written to be strictly a Pagan tale, yet some insist that there is a subtle but definite theme of Christianity that outlines the poem. Although it is tough to decipher the actual intensions of religious outlook in Beowulf, (not having discovered the true author) it is safe to conclude that both Pagan and Christian components are established within the text. Beowulf was originally thought of as a Pagan tale which happened to be scribed by a Christian monk....   [tags: Epic Poems, Grendel, Anglo-Saxon] 625 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Point Of View In Grendel And Beowulf - Contrasting points of view in Grendel and Beowulf significantly alter the reader’s perception of religion, good and evil, and the character Grendel. John Gardner’s book, Grendel, is written in first person. The book translated by Burton Raffel, Beowulf, is written in third person. Good and evil is one of the main conflicts in the poem Beowulf. How is Grendel affected by the concepts of good and evil. Grendel is an alienated individual who just wants to be a part of something. His desire to fit in causes him to do evil things....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 1236 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Prelude to Beowulf´s Last Fight - Prelude to Beowulf´s Last Fight The Old English epic Beowulf depicts Anglo-Saxon warrior culture where fate (wyrd) governs the actions of the hero. Beowulf, now over seventy years old and king of the Geats, has earned his respect and glory on the battlefields as a great warrior. The honorable old king has ruled for fifty years, and according to the author, "he was a wise king, an old guardian of the land" (Norton, 55), when the dragon attacks Beowulf's Hall, assaulting Geats at night. The dragon - "the worm" - as he is referred to sometimes by the poet, while guarding the treasure in the depth of his cave, is awakened by a slave who steals the cup from his hoard....   [tags: English Epics Literature Anglo Saxon Essays] 867 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Analysis Of Grendel And Beowulf - Point of View in Grendel and Beowulf Contrasting points of view in Grendel and Beowulf significantly alter the reader’s perception of religion, good and evil, and the character Grendel. John Gardner’s book, Grendel, is written in first person. The book translated by Burton Raffel, Beowulf, is written in third person. Good and evil is one of the main conflicts in the poem Beowulf. How is Grendel affected by the concepts of good and evil. Grendel is an alienated individual who just wants to be a part of something....   [tags: essays research papers] 1243 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Christianity and the Beowulf Poet - Christianity and the Beowulf Poet In my initial study of Beowulf it seemed to me that the Christian references in it were overlaid onto the essentially pagan tale that makes up the bulk of the poem. So I innocently decided to investigate this incongruity as the topic of this paper. And so I found myself smack-dab in the middle of an argument that has evidently raged for the last one hundred years or so. I found sources that ran the gamut from the position that Beowulf was a quintessentially Germanic pagan work that had been corrupted by some revisionist monastic scribe (Mooreman 1967), to the assertion that the author intentionally created a Christian allegory along the lines of Book...   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1177 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Beowulf: A Pagan Epic Hero? - Throughout literature there have been countless parallels and references to the story of Christ as written in the Bible. Even in such unexpected places as in seemingly pagan poems of ancient Danes and Geats- an epic with dragons and monsters- one still finds similar biblical allusions. In just such an unexpected place, the epic Beowulf, it's title hero and his circumstance, become an allegory for the story of Christ. In this sense, Beowulf can be seen as a Christian story of salvation. The similarities between Beowulf and the story of Christ are striking....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 1641 words
(4.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Shakespeare's Portrayal of Women and Sovereign Issues in Macbeth - “Almost without exception, people feel constrained to play roles in accordance with what they believe to be the expectations of others” (Asp). During odd or unnatural events, these stereotypical expectations can be overshadowed and conquered by the intense desire for power or wealth. In William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Shakespeare alters the physical attributes associated with specific genders in order to illustrate the progression of a character’s actions and thoughts. Throughout history, stereotypical profiles of what a man or woman should be have determined how they are perceived by others....   [tags: william shakespeare, macbeth, duncan]
:: 8 Works Cited
1497 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Three Witches in Shakespeare´s Macbeth - 'Fair is foul and foul fair' (1.1.?) This quote spoken by the three witches in the beginning of the story set the theme of the play. There are no rules, no moral guidelines. Macbeth, written by William Shakespeare, is a play in which the good turn evil. This archetypal transformation from the young, idealistic, promising character to a dark, evil one is apparent in hundreds of plays, novels, and stories throughout history. In this story, the events which begin Macbeth's downfall aren't actions, but words....   [tags: mystriousness, prophetic, manipulative] 972 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Heroism in Beowulf and Frankenstein - With fear comes courage, with experience comes bravery, and with pain comes strength. One may assume that these traits are the exact characteristics a hero. However, heroism can come in many different forms. Victor Frankenstein, from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Beowulf exemplify many different traits of heroism. The perfect image of a true hero is Beowulf. His courage and confidence seems to come naturally. He is the ideal man; he puts others before himself and has amazing physical and mental strength....   [tags: Epic Poems, Grendel, Anglo-Saxon]
:: 2 Works Cited
949 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Macbeth: Predestination or Free Will? - When reading William Shakespeare’s play, Macbeth, it seems that Macbeth was predestined to do the terrible deeds that he did. However, there is also a valid argument that Macbeth exercised his free will and chose to do those things on his own. This discussion leads into many different topics, but it relates most to spirituality. The concept of free will and how it relates to Macbeth and our present lives yields a relevant and interesting topic for further discussion. The first argument for Macbeth being predestined arises in the first Act when the witches called themselves the “weird” sisters: “The weird sisters hand in hand” (I.iii....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
:: 3 Works Cited
1031 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
When Worlds Collide - When Worlds Collide The world of Beowulf and that of modern America have some interesting similarities. The Anglo- Saxon belief in "wyrd," or fate, is alive and well in the 21st century. Like the Anglo- Saxons, our culture regards the crime of killing one’s own kin or family to be the most heinous of all. Americans love entertainment just as much as the Anglo- Saxons of Beowulf’s time did. Of course, with our modern technology like movies, television, and the Internet, we are allowed to experience many more methods of enjoyment than medieval people were able to enjoy....   [tags: Culture Anglo Saxon Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
758 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Epic of Beowulf - Beowulf is an epic poem that explores many themes and motifs within the Anglo-Saxon society. The Author, who remains anonymous, composed the epic around 1000 A.D. The literature focuses mainly on a Scandinavian warrior named Beowulf, who comes to the aid of Herot, a small town ran by King Hrothgar. Beowulf arises to rid the town of evil forces, such as the demon monster Grendel, and his savage mother who seeks revenge for the death of her son. As he ages, Beowulf presumes his title as king of Geatland, still eager to protect his loyal followers from danger....   [tags: Epic Poems, Grendel, Anglo-Saxon]
:: 4 Works Cited
1546 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Macbeth's Complex Character - In the comprehensive history of philosophy, Sophie’s World, by Jostein Gaarder, beliefs of three well known Greek philosophers, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, are discussed. According to the book, Plato’s philosophy consisted of the idea that all beings were formed from a universal “cookie cutter” which resembles its perfect form derived from a higher state of being. Aristotle, Plato’s most famous pupil, did not accept his teacher’s philosophy. Instead, Aristotle claimed that each being stands alone in this world....   [tags: Shakespearean Literature]
:: 2 Works Cited
1098 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Epic of Beowulf - Beowulf, the national epic of England, was passed down from generation to generation tells the legend of a mighty hero. This folk epic portrays the ideas of 16th century Anglo-Saxon culture until the early 8th century when a monk transcribed it into written form. Housed in the British Museum, the manuscript is considered to be a historical document as well as a great piece of literature. This tale narrates a story about a man who saves two nations from terrible beings which embody evil. Beowulf contains many themes such as the fantasy of supernatural creatures and the role of woman....   [tags: Epic Poems, Grendel, Anglo-Saxon] 1332 words
(3.8 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
William Shakespeare's Macbeth - The seventeenth century saw a complete change in the course of British history, specifically in the world of politics and foreign affairs. Early modern England underwent an adjustment of sorts, an adjustment known as the Union of the Crowns, which concerns the merging of the English and Scottish monarchies under one ruler, James VI of Scotland and I of England. This decisive, unifying event in the progression of the British dynastic line of monarchs created the current amalgamation of territories known today as the United Kingdom....   [tags: story and character analysis] 2193 words
(6.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Epic of Beowulf - Beowulf’s Christian Tone Beowulf is an epic about a larger than life hero, who becomes leader of his people. The overall tone of Beowulf is predominantly Christian, "owing to a vision of evil in the world, a belief in the power of Fate to rule human destiny, and resignation to the certainty of death." Parallelism between fate and providence, constant battling between good and evil, and the virtues of consideration of others, moderation, and unselfishness all support this overall Christian tone....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 527 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Order and Superstition in the Tragedies of William Shakespeare - Order and Superstition in the Tragedies of Shakespeare     The concept of order was an extremely important one to William Shakespeare, and to Elizabethans in general. We in the existentialist atomic age have little trouble conceiving of an individual man or woman as the only beacon of light in a world gone irrevocably and irredeemably mad, but this would be inconceivable to Shakespeare and his audience. Shakespeare staunchly followed the common Elizabethan conception of the universe as deliberately and benevolently patterned and planned; when, for some reason, something happened to temporarily force things out of kilter, individual people might suffer, but the universe would soon right it...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1602 words
(4.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Oedipus Rex – The Conflict, Climax and Resolution - Oedipus Rex – The Conflict, Climax and Resolution                Sophocles’ tragic drama, Oedipus Rex, presents to the reader a full range of conflicts and their resolution after a climax.   Thomas Van Nortwick in The Meaning of a Masculine Life describes Oedipus’ tragic flaw:   As ruler, he is a father to Thebes and its citizens, and like a father he will take care of his “children.” We see already the supreme self-confidence and ease of command in Oedipus, who can address not only other people’s children as his own, but also be a father to men older than he is....   [tags: Oedipus the King Oedipus Rex]
:: 5 Works Cited
2515 words
(7.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
The Conflict, Climax and Resolution in Oedipus Rex - The Conflict, Climax and Resolution in Oedipus Rex             Sophocles’ tragic drama, Oedipus Rex, presents a main conflict and lesser conflicts and their resolution after a climax.   In Oedipus Tyrannus: Tragic Heroism and the Limits of Knowledge, Charles Segal had the protagonist fares well in the first series of tests, but does poorly in the second series:   The first three tests are, respectively, Oedipus’ meetings with Creon, Teiresias, and then Creon again. In each case he is pursuing the killer as someone whom he assumes is other than himself....   [tags: Oedipus the King Oedipus Rex]
:: 6 Works Cited
2736 words
(7.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Role of Women in the Epic of Beowulf - Role of Women in Beowulf As an epic tale of heroes and monsters, Beowulf gives its readers much excitement and adventure, but Beowulf's importance is more than just literary. It offers many insights into the beliefs and customs of seventh-century Anglo-Saxon culture. Among these insights is the Anglo-Saxon view of women and their role in society. Good Anglo-Saxon women are peaceful and unassertive, greeting guests and serving drinks to the warriors and other men in the meadhall. Wealhtheow, the queen of the Danes, represents a typical subservient Anglo-Saxon woman....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf womenbeo anglo saxon]
:: 1 Works Cited
1575 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Immortal Life vs. Immortal Name: Gilgamesh and Beowulf - Immortal Life vs. Immortal Name: Gilgamesh and Beowulf Death. Fate. Immortality. Destiny. All are subjects that we tend to avoid. While most of us hope for life after death, we tend not to dwell on this subject because we are uncomfortable with the unknown. On those rare occasions when we allow ourselves to think about the fact that our days are numbered, we wonder if death can be cheated and immortality gained. Some have suggested that being remembered is just as enduring as living forever. Thoughts of destiny and the here after are not new....   [tags: English Literature Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1447 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Fair Is Foul And Foul Is Fair - In the tragedy, Macbeth by William Shakespeare, the paradoxical theme of “Fair is foul, and foul is fair” functions throughout the play. The line is a prophecy which one thing seems like another. It implies especially to the characters that they are not as they seem to be. The Three Witches are the ones who introduce the paradox that runs throughout the play. The theme affects these characters because although they speak of the future, they do not seem to affect the course of it. They are the agents of fate because they only speak of the truth of what will happen....   [tags: essays research papers] 770 words
(2.2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Macbeth - The Importance Of The Witches - The witches in Macbeth are very important in the plot and develop certain aspects of the play. They make greater the theatrical experience with images of darkness, thunder and lightning that make Macbeth the tragedy it is. Their actions also add to the play, dancing round the cauldron and chanting ‘Double, double…’. Their appearance as ‘dark hags’ adds mystery to the play. The witches also add a sense of evil and of the supernatural. Their chanting, ‘Double, double, toil and trouble: Fire burn and cauldron bubble’ is rhythmic and has an almost hypnotic quality to it....   [tags: essays research papers] 1056 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Magin during the Pre-Neolithic and Neolithic Culture - I will be looking at magic in prehistoric Europe and the part it played in pre-Neolithic/Neolithic cultures. From this, I hope to reach an understanding of the part magic played in this time and how it progressed into later cultures. As there is no literary evidence for this time frame we must rely on the archaeological finds, in particular various phallic imagery, statuettes, cave art and monuments. These elements all point in one way or another towards an involvement with the religious beliefs of the time....   [tags: Prehistoric Europe] 7979 words
(22.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Oedipus Rex - Conflict, Climax, Resolution - Oedipus Rex - Conflict, Climax, Resolution              Sophocles’ tragic drama, Oedipus Rex, sees the conflict develop and reach a climax, and this is followed by a catastrophe and resolution of the conflict.   E. T. Owen in “Drama in Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus” describes the climax of the drama:   The central scenes contain the heart of the drama, that for which the rest exists – the drama of the revelation. The poet’s task here is to make its effect adequate to the expectation. He manages to spin it out to nearly 500 lines, and, instead of thinning, increases the excitement by spreading it out; it becomes a threefold revelation rising to a climax (36)....   [tags: Oedipus the King Oedipus Rex]
:: 7 Works Cited
2876 words
(8.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
A Comparison Of Augustus And Beowulf - Beowulf’s Kingship For the most part, Beowulf’s characteristics describe those of a triumphant warrior who played a major role in defending the lives of his fellow citizens, while leading a thriving country. Although Beowulf soon became king, he died for his people, and was remembered as a victorious fighter. Beowulf is at least in part a study of kingship because it discusses the qualities that produce a good king, the disadvantages during his rule and how he overcame them, and the problems that arose upon his death....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 672 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Macbeth's Downfall in William Shakespeare's Play - Macbeth's Downfall in William Shakespeare's Play 'Macbeth' by William Shakespeare is a play set in 1040 about a Scottish general named Macbeth. It explores the transformation and effect of his ambition upon his life. Although it is set in 1040, it is written in the 1606 under the reign of James 1st. James' very recent accession to the English throne would have been of great contemporary importance and a play which focuses on Kingship would have roused interest too. The first characters we are introduced to in the opening of the play are the witches....   [tags: Papers] 2115 words
(6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Supernatural in Shakespeare's Macbeth - The Supernatural in Macbeth Displays of supernatural activities were used throughout Macbeth, and evidence of this was brought out in the appearances of the three Witches. In Shakespeare's day, special effects were not used in his plays. Therefore, the dramatic performances and the suspenseful scenes were the fundamental qualities to making a great play. Shakespeare used the element of the unknown to evoke fear in the minds of his audience. By allowing the Witches to see into the future, it made Macbeth more suspenseful....   [tags: GCSE English Literature Coursework] 740 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Themes in Oedipus Rex - The Themes in Oedipus Rex          Sophocles’ tragedy, Oedipus Rex, contains one main theme, which this essay will consider. The theme is the general doctrine or belief implicit in the drama, which the author seeks to make persuasive to the reader (Abrams 170).   In “Sophocles’ Moral Themes” Robert D. Murray Jr. cites a critic who is strictly moralist in the interpretation of the theme of Oedipus Rex:   Let C. M. Bowra speak for the moralists:   The central idea of a Sophoclean tragedy is that through suffering a man learns to be modest before the gods....   [tags: Oedipus the King Oedipus Rex]
:: 7 Works Cited
2786 words
(8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Guilt of Lady Macbeth - The Guilt of Lady Macbeth      Shakespeare's "Macbeth" holds many hidden themes within its already exuberant plot.  The first of these surrounds the murder of Duncan and the role that both Lady Macbeth and Macbeth himself played.  However, the true guilt of the murder can fall on either character.  Although Macbeth physically committed the crime, it was Lady Macbeth that pushed him to his limits of rational thought and essentially made fun of him to lower his esteem.  With Macbeth's defenses down, it was an easy task for Lady Macbeth to influence Duncan's murder and make up an excuse as to why she could not do it herself.  The guilt of Duncan's murder can be placed firmly on the...   [tags: Macbeth essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1002 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
An Analysis Of British Literature - An Analysis of British Literature Death is inevitable and what happens after death will always be a mystery to the living. For this reason, the afterlife has always been a topic which artists have chosen to explore in their works. Throughout the chronology of British literature, artists have used society's views as a basis to examine the afterlife, and look at it in new ways. The afterlife has been a theme in British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period of Beowulf to the twentieth century writings of Dylan Thomas....   [tags: essays research papers] 2715 words
(7.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Beowulf: A Study of Kingship - For the most part, Beowulf’s characteristics describe those of a triumphant warrior who played a major role in defending the lives of his fellow citizens, while leading a thriving country. Although Beowulf soon became king, he died for his people, and was remembered as a victorious fighter. Beowulf is at least in part a study of kingship because it discusses the qualities that produce a good king, the disadvantages during his rule and how he overcame them, and the problems that arose upon his death....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf] 423 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Beowulf the Anglo Saxon Hero - The epic poem Beowulf describes the most heroic man of the Anglo-Saxon times. The hero, Beowulf, is a seemingly invincible person with all the extraordinary traits required of an Anglo Saxon hero. He is able to use his super-human physical strength and courage to put his people before himself. He encounters many monsters and horrible beasts, but he never fears the threat of death. His leadership skills are outstanding and he is even able to boast about all his achievements. Beowulf is the ultimate epic hero who risks his life countless times for glory which to him meant eternal life....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 499 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Periods Of English Literature - Question: Show how the voices of writers through many centuries of literature have depicted a variety of mentalities and lifestyles. . Centuries could pass, and not many changes could be easily perceived by the common man, as those changes came gradually. Yet those changes can be readily discerned when looking at England as a whole, not looking at parts of history individually. The alterations of life, when looked at from a certain literary viewpoint, can be explained when one looks at the different periods in English literature, seeing the depictions of a certain era through writings that unintentionally convey great varieties in the mentality and lifestyles of the people who lived during...   [tags: essays research papers] 1484 words
(4.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Christian Sybolism in Beowulf - Christian Sybolism in Beowulf Within the poem Beowulf, the poet utilizes the Christian religion to symbolize the elements of good and evil and Heaven and Hell. Beowulf is the oldest known English epic poem. The manuscripts date back to about 1000 A.D., when two scribes wrote it down for posterity. The poem was handed down from the Anglo-Saxon period, and through the retelling of the poem, it changed a little each time. The poem creates an oral depiction of an epic hero who strived to fight against the forces of evil....   [tags: Christianity epic Poem Beowulf Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
1609 words
(4.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Fate in Beowulf - Fate in Beowulf A Twist of Fate for the Great Hero Beowulf Fate seems to be an ongoing theme in the works of Boethius and Beowulf. Whether it is a belief of Christian providence or pagan fatalism, the writers of these works are strongly moved by the concept of fate and how it affects the twists and turns of a person’s life. Fate is most often seen as the course of events in a person’s life that leads them to inevitable death at some time or another. Throughout the poem Beowulf, the characters are haunted by fate and acknowledge its strong presence in everything that they do....   [tags: Beowulf Fate Essays] 1477 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Epic of Beowulf - Beowulf The Anglo-Saxon Culture as Illustrated in Beowulf Beowulf is an epic poem, which takes place in ancient Denmark and Geatland and describes the adventures of Beowulf, a Geat hero. Through their heroes, epic poems usually describe the traditions and beliefs of a certain culture. An Anglo-Saxon author wrote Beowulf about the Danes and Geats. The Anglo-Saxon’s had similar beliefs to that of the Dane and Geat’s, so the poem gives us some idea of what the Anglo-Saxon culture was like. Throughout Beowulf, it is illustrated that women were thought to be virtually valueless; that Anglo-Saxons believed in paganism, and that there was great emphasis on valuables and weaponry....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1018 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Boewulf - Boewulf The section entitled "Further Celebration at Heorot" opens after Boewulf has slain Grendel's mother. This becomes acceptable adult behavior when you realize that Grendel and his mother are both monsters from the same evil metal. Beowulf has returned to King Hrothgar's beautiful Heorot Hall to celebrate his victory over evil Grendel. Beowulf's boasts illuminate his heroic deeds. His crowing declares the mead hall now safe for all the thanes to drink in once again. Hrothgar, the honorable king of the Danes, is grateful for the monster's slaughter that Beowulf has done but is also reflective....   [tags: Boewulf Essays] 713 words
(2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Beowulf - The epic poem, Beowulf, depicts the most heroic man of the Anglo-Saxon times. The hero, Beowulf, was an outstanding warrior with all the extraordinary values required by a hero. He was able to use his super-human physical strength and courage to put his people before himself. He encountered terrifying monsters and the most ferocious of beasts, but he never feared the threat of death. His leadership skills were excellent and he was able to boast about all his achievements. Beowulf was the ultimate epic hero who risked his life countless times for immortal glory and for the good of others....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf Essays] 995 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]


Your search returned 52 essays for "Wyrd":