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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Wordsworth Prefatory Sonnet"
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Freedom and Liberty in Wordsworth's Prefatory Sonnet - Freedom and Liberty in Wordsworth's Prefatory Sonnet       William Wordsworth's "Prefatory Sonnet", originally published in his book, Poems, In Two Volumes, deals with the concept of liberty as a personal goal and its relevance on the larger political spectrum. The poet likens Nuns and Hermits, who find solace in their confining spaces, to himself and the writing of sonnets. Building upon this framework, Wordsworth makes an important observation about personal liberty and its place in political freedom....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 1574 words
(4.5 pages)
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Wordsworth’s Sonnets and Technology - Wordsworth’s Sonnets and Technology In William Wordsworth’s sonnets "The World Is Too Much With Us" and "London 1802," he describes his society as being too dependent on technology. In Wordsworth’s time, the 1800’s, new phases of technology, such as electricity to run machines, were booming and people were relying more on them. With these new innovations, Wordsworth was convinced that people would stop appreciating nature while allowing technology to run their lives. In "London 1802," Wordsworth describes how people are becoming more dependent on technology and how they have left behind their ancestors' heritage: "England have forfeited their ancient English dower"(5)....   [tags: Wordsworth] 540 words
(1.5 pages)
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Nature Explored in the Poems of William Wordsworth - As time passes it is said that the human race becomes less aware of nature around them and more consumed with the things produced by man. The romantic poet William Wordsworth saw the cultural decline and as the literary critic Harold Bloom stated, “The fear of mortality haunts much of Wordsworth’s best poetry, especially in regard to the premature mortality of the imagination and the loss of creative joy.” This statement greatly reflects the views of Wordsworth, whose poetry conveys the warning of a man asking those enveloped in the world to step back and recognize the beauty and miracles of nature....   [tags: literary analysis, william wordsworth]
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(3.8 pages)
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A Critical Comparison of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130" and Elizabeth Barrett-Browning's "Sonnet 14" - Petrarchan sonnets are like all the other typical sonnets in the early sixteenth which consist of 14 verses in the poem and 10 syllables per line. In comparison, they all instigate the traditional theme of love where women were admired and sometimes worshipped in order to express deep love that emissaries her beauty. However, Petrarchan sonnet could not said be too congruent to sixteenth style of writing sonnets. Nevertheless, they share identical theme in the sonnets which is the traditional theme of love where Petrarchan sonnets uses clichés in order to describe his mistress as “lucid gold” and her smile as “angelic smile”....   [tags: Sonnet 130, sonnet 14] 1338 words
(3.8 pages)
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Loss of Innocence in Wordsworth's Nutting - A Loss of Innocence in Wordsworth's "Nutting" A romantic poet, William Wordsworth examines the relationship between the individual and nature. In the poem "Nutting," Wordsworth focuses on the role that innocence plays in this relationship as he describes a scene that leads to his own coming of age. Unlike many of his other poems, which reveal the ability to experience and access nature in an innocent state, "Nutting" depicts Wordsworth's inability as a young boy to fully appreciate nature, causing him to destroy it....   [tags: William Wordsworth, Poetry, Poem, Poets] 1897 words
(5.4 pages)
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Sonnet XX, by William Shakespeare - Sonnet XX, by William Shakespeare, is fraught with wordplay and ambiguity. Shakespeare misleads the audience with variety of puns and double entendres. Due to the large amount of criticism this poem produces, it is necessary to analyze this piece twice: once from the perspective of a female attraction, and once from the perspective of a male attraction. Only when both sides of this equilibrium are examined can true insight be achieved. It is my goal to present the same mystifying experiences as Shakespeare: the initial debate as to whether this fair youth is male or female, and the ultimate debate as to whether our narrator’s intense fondness for this youth is the result of platonic love o...   [tags: Sonnet XX Essays] 1482 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Power of the Sonnet - The Power of the Sonnet Sonnet 30 tells us that the speaker is a person who has long been stoic, whose tears have for a long time been unused to flow. In the situation sketched in the poem, he begins by deliberately and habitually making these tears flow again; he willingly--for the sake of an enlivened emotional selfhood--calls up the griefs of the past. In receding order, before the weeping "now", there was the "recent" dry-eyed stoicism; "before that," the frequent be-moanèd moan of repeated grief; "further back in the past," the original loss so often mourned; and "in the remote past", a time of achieved happiness, or at lea...   [tags: Sonnet essays] 842 words
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Holy Sonnet XVIII by John Donne - I will analyze John Donne’s Holy Sonnet XVIII. This sonnet is a variant of an Italian Sonnet with a volta occurring, unusually, at line 11 instead of the standard at line 9. The theme of this sonnet is the search for the true church of Christ among the various conflicting denominations of Christianity. Significant words, metaphysical conceit, metrics, sound patterns and tone come together to develop and clarify the theme. I will analyze the sonnet in three parts, beginning with the octave followed by the first two lines of the sestet and finally, the last four lines of the sestet....   [tags: christianity, italian sonnet, loneliness] 1131 words
(3.2 pages)
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet Sonnet 107 - Analysis of Sonnet 107 Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world dreaming on things to come Can yet the lease of my true love control, Suppos'd as forfeit to a condin'd doom. The mortal moon hath her eclipse endur'd, And the sad augurs mock their own presage; Incertainties now crown themselves assur's, nd peace proclaims olives of endless age. Now with the drops of this most balmy time My love looks fresh; and Death to me subscribes, Since spite of him I'll lime in this poor rhyme While he insults o'er dull and speechless tribes: And thou in this shalt find thy monument When tyrants' crests and tombs of brass are spent....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 526 words
(1.5 pages)
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Comparing Composed Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth and London by William Blake - Comparison between William Blake and William Wordsworth’s Views of London William Blake grew up in the slums of London and this is shown in his poem, he wrote his poem in the slums and back alleys of London as he never had very much money. He describes London as being “charter’d”, this gives us the impression that everything has rules and boundaries in London, and that there is no mystery to be discovered. Also chartered means on a map, almost as if it is owned, by the king perhaps. The line in which the word is on, “I wander through each charter’d street, near where the charter’d Thames does flow,” makes us feel as if every thing is owned and nothing is natural, like all the people in Lo...   [tags: William Wordsworth William Blake] 1468 words
(4.2 pages)
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Law of Nature - Wordsworth - Nature is freedom, it knows no boundaries. Bronislaw Malinowski wrote, "Freedom is a symbol which stands for a sublime and powerful ideal.” The state of nature is a term in political philosophy that describes a circumstance prior to the state and society's establishment. John Locke, whose work influenced the American Declaration of Independence, believes that the state of nature is the state where are individuals are completely equal, natural law regulates, and every human being has the executive power of the natural law....   [tags: William Wordsworth] 508 words
(1.5 pages)
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Comparing the Two Pictures of London, Illustrated by Wordsworth and Blake in Their Two Poems - Comparing the Two Pictures of London, Illustrated by Wordsworth and Blake in Their Two Poems The two poems depicting London by Wordsworth and Blake are in some ways similar and yet have many differences. Both observations of London are depicted through the poets' personal perspectives of London using individual experiences. We can tell that both poems are from the person's interpretations and experiences as they are said in the first person: 'Ne'er saw I…' in Wordswoths' poem and: 'I wonder through each chartered street…' in Blakes'....   [tags: Compare Contrast Wordsworth Blake] 1417 words
(4 pages)
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Sonnets and Poems of Wordsworth and Milton - Sonnets and Poems of Wordsworth and Milton Sonnets are poems that have fourteen lines that usually have a recognized rhyming scheme. A sonnet generally has two sections; with the first section normally having eight lines and the second section having six. The rhythm in each line of the sonnet can also apply with sonnet traditions and the syllables (which is counted in feet) can define which tradition it is - French, Italian or English. Sonnets were commonly written in the sixteenth to eighteenth century and often written to express emotions of happiness, sadness, and love or written for someone in particular by request....   [tags: Papers] 1178 words
(3.4 pages)
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Justifying Mutual Deceit in William Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 - Justifying Mutual Deceit in William Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 A common conception of William Shakespeare’s poetry entails complex language and hidden meanings. Shakespeare is famous for his ability to author a web of images that creates layers of interpretations and understandings. In Sonnet 138 however, Shakespeare is more direct in describing his relationship with his lover by avoiding imagery and metaphors, explaining to the reader that this seemingly unconventional relationship is indeed justified....   [tags: William Shakespeare Sonnet] 1862 words
(5.3 pages)
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An Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 - An Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 73      Sonnet 73 by William Shakespeare is widely read and studied. But what is Shakespeare  trying to say. Though it seems there will not be a simple answer, for a better understanding of Shakespeare's Sonnet 73, this essay offers an explication of the sonnet from The Norton Anthology of English Literature:                 That time of year thou mayst in me behold               When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang               Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,               Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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The Theme of Hopkins' Sonnet, The Windhover - The Theme of Hopkins' Sonnet, The Windhover "'The Windhover' is one of the most discussed, and it would seem least understood, poems of modern English literature." These opening words of a Hopkins' critic forewarn the reader of Hopkins' "The Windhover" that few critics agree on the meaning of this sonnet. Most critics do concur, however, that Hopkins' central theme is based on the paradoxical Christian principle of profit through sacrifice. Although most critics eventually focus on this pivotal concept, each one approaches the poem from a different analytical perspective....   [tags: Sonnet Essays] 3201 words
(9.1 pages)
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The Beauty of Sonnet 53 - The Beauty of Sonnet 53          Whether we realize it or not, we often give overlook the faults in the people who are dear to us. We focus on their good qualities and ignore the bad. This practice is not unique to our culture nor is it unique to our era. Shakespeare in his sonnet numbered 53, compares all beauty to his friend, and criticizes for trying to be as good as his friend. He does this by seemingly comparing his friend to things of beauty when in reality he is suggesting that his friend is the ideal and the beautiful things are merely copies or reflections of the friend....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Love in Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 - The Philosophy of Love in Sonnet 138                     Shakespeare was a superb philosopher, but in his sonnets, he was a philosopher of love.  Shakespeare sets forth the experiences of love and its torments fully within his sonnets.  The philosophy of love is that, love reconciles all.  Love is the evil and the good, the lies and the truth.  Love is all there is. It passion as well as deception and lies. "Sonnet 138", is a notable example of Shakespeare's philosophy of love.  Written as a dramatic monologue, this sonnet (also known as "song") is a lyric.  Like all sonnets, there are fourteen lines, with every four lines written as quatrains in a b a b format.  The last two lines are kn...   [tags: Sonnet essays] 712 words
(2 pages)
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Free Essays on Sonnet CXXX - Sonnet CXXX In our class we have been discussing sonnet cxxx. Many of my classmates believe that Shakespeare was saying that, although this girl is ugly, he still loves her. While others claim that he was not making any statements about her looks, but instead being realistic. It is my view that he was making a point of claiming that his girlfriend was a regular person and not a mythological goddess. Most people have heard on television or in movies, some guy tell his girlfriend that she has eyes as deep as the ocean or lips as soft as velvet....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 679 words
(1.9 pages)
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An Analysis of Sonnet 64 - An Analysis of Sonnet 64 The formal structure of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 64 is largely reinforced by the logical and syntactical structure; each of the three quatrains begins with the same extended conditional "When I have seen" clause and contains the completion of the thought expressed by the clause. However, the first quatrain also contains a second conditional "When" clause (lines 3-4), and the last two lines of the third quatrain introduce the "That" result clause for all the foregoing lines....   [tags: Sonnet 64] 1350 words
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Wordsworth and Vaughan - Wordsworth and Vaughan When reading T.S. Eliot’s critical comment, “It is to be observed that the language of these poets is as a rule simple and pure,” one might assume that he was referring to the Romantics (Eliot 2328). Specifically, we could apply this statement to poets the ilk of Wordsworth, who eschewed poetic affectations and “tricked out” language for sentiments that originated and flowed naturally (Wordsworth 270). Yet Eliot hadn’t focused his critical eye there, this time. Rather, he squinted a century back to a lesser-referenced literary group, the Metaphysical poets (Eliot 2328)....   [tags: Poetry Wordsworth Vaughan Essays] 2062 words
(5.9 pages)
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Metaphorically Speaking – Sonnet 73 - Metaphorically Speaking – Sonnet 73     Love is a blanket of bright and colorful flowers that covers a beautifully rolling meadow on a breezy summer day. Similar metaphorical images appear in many famous poems including Shakespeare's "Sonnet 73." The metaphor is the most basic device poets use to convey meanings beyond literal speech (Guth 473). Shakespeare's use of metaphors in this sonnet conveys his theme of the inescapable aging process. Shakespeare "establishes and extends a metaphor that illuminates the poem's central meaning" and compares the inevitability of old age to three different aspects of nature (Prather)....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 860 words
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Lust in Sonnet CXXIX (129) - Lust in Sonnet CXXIX (129) A Savage Action Full of Blame - The essences of pure lust and its’ dark side. That is, in a word, what Shakespeare in his Sonnet CXXIX1 describes. His language is full of anger, frustration and self-blaming. A real, emotional, affected language - no flourishes. Shakespeare doesn't write about eternal love, the beauties of a woman or spiritual relations - all themes which we might expect from a classical sonnets. No - he talks about lust and the feeling of being dominated and helpless....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Essay: Analysis of Sonnet 83 - Analysis of Sonnet 83 I never saw that you did painting did need, And therefore to your fair no painting set. I found, or thought I found, you did exceed The barren tender of a poet's debt. And therefore have I slept in your report, That you yourself, being extant, well might show How far a modern quill doth come too short Speaking of worth, what worth in you doth grow. This silence for my sin sis you impute, Which shall be muost my glory, being dumb, For I impair not being beauty being mute, When others would give life and bring a tomb....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 451 words
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Essay: Analysis of Sonnet 33 - Analysis of Sonnet 33 Full many a glorious morning I have seen Flatter the mountaintops with sovereign eye, Kissing with golden face the meadows green, Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy, Anon permit the basest clouds to ride With ugly rock on his celestial face And from the forlorn world his visage hide, Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace. Even so my sun one early morn did shine With all-triumphant splendor on my brow. But out, alack. he was but one hour mine, The region cloud hath masked him from me now Yet him for this my love no whit disdaineth, Suns of the world may stain when heaven's sun staineth....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 556 words
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Warnings in Shakespeare's Sonnet 95 - Warnings in Shakespeare's Sonnet 95        William Shakespeare is the master of subtle humor and sexual puns.  In his "Sonnet 95," a poem to a blond young man, both are seen while pointing out a couple of realities about sexual sin.  He speaks directly to a young man whose physical beauty compensates for his lack of sexual morality.     Shakespeare would like for this young man to realize that his handsomeness is the sole aspect of his person that prevents absolute disapproval of his behavior in other people, and he also wants him to be aware of the ultimate consequences of his actions.  Through a clever use of diction, imagery, and meter in a typical Shakespearia...   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Essay: Analysis of Sonnet 95 - Analysis of Sonnet 95 How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose, Doth spot the beauty of thy budding name. Oh, in what sweets dost thou thy sins enclose. That tongue that tells the story of thy days, Making lascivious comments on thy sport, Cannot dispraise but in a kind of praise. Naming thy name , blesses an ill report. Oh what a mansion have those vices got Which for thy habitation chose out thee, Where beauty's veil doth cover every blot And all things turns to fair that eyes can see....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 1294 words
(3.7 pages)
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An Analysis of William Wordsworth's Daffodils - Daffodils are happy flowers.  They are the first flower of spring and seeing them brings joy to many people.  William Wordsworth is considered a poet of nature and a topographic or landscape poet.  Wordsworth's "Daffodils" has a meaning and structure in which different techniques such as figurative language, imagery, and personification are used to successfully express his joy and feelings of glee in the vision of the daffodils dancing in the breeze. Wordsworth uses figurative language to describe himself in the poem.  Wordsworth begins the poem alone.  He is not only alone but happy to be alone he enjoys the tranquility of solitude.  Describing himself as a cloud, something that is consider...   [tags: Wordsworth Daffodils Essays] 491 words
(1.4 pages)
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William Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 - Keeping love alive is not easy. One knows that life eventually comes to an end, but does love. Time passes and days must end. It is in "Sonnet 18", by Shakespeare, that we see a challenge to the idea that love is finite. Shakespeare shows us how some love is eternal and will live on forever in comparison to a beautiful summer's day. Shakespeare has a way of keeping love alive in "Sonnet 18", and he uses a variety of techniques to demonstrate how love is more brilliant and everlasting than a summer's day....   [tags: Shakespeare Sonnet]
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William Wordsworth Reflecting On Past - William Wordsworth Reflecting On Past Envision five years from now. Driving through the streets, where you drove your old friends to places you remember listening to the radio, looking at the stores that once were your favorite hangouts, cruising through your common shortcuts. Clearly you will have remembered great memories and sad ones, and when you come back, both memories will come again at the places where they had happened....   [tags: Wordsworth Poem Poetry] 1785 words
(5.1 pages)
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Analysis of Sonnet 73 - [Line 1]* - 'that time of year' being late autumn or early winter. [Line 2]* - Compare the line to Macbeth (5.3.23) "my way of life/is fall'n into the sere, the yellow leaf". [Line 4]* - 'Bare ruin'd choirs' is a reference to the remains of a church or, more specifically, a chancel, stripped of its roof and exposed to the elements. The choirs formerly rang with the sounds of 'sweet birds'. Some argue that lines 3 and 4 should be read without pause -- the 'yellow leaves' shake against the 'cold/Bare ruin'd choirs' ....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 1683 words
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Comparing John Constable's Painting The Cornfield and William Wordsworth's Poem Tintern Abbey - Representations of Time: Wordsworth and Constable I do not know how without being culpably particular I can give my Reader a more exact notion of the style in which I wished these poems to be written, than by informing him that I have at all times endeavored to look steadily at my subject; consequently, I hope that there is in these Poems little falsehood of description, and my ideas are expressed in language fitted to their respective importance. Something I must have gained by this practice, as it is friendly to one property of all good poetry, namely, good sense; but it has necessarily cut me off from a large portion of phrases and figures of speech which from father to son have long...   [tags: Wordsworth Constable Art Poetry Painting]
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Wordsworth’s Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 - Wordsworth’s Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 The sonnet, “Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802,” shows Wordsworth’s appreciating the beauty of London and demonstrating it as “emotion recollected in tranquility.” It’s characteristic of his love for solitude that it is set in the early morning when there is no bustle and noise. Wordsworth is in awe of the scenic beauty of the morning sun radiating from London’s great architectural marvels. However, there are numerous religious connotations throughout this poem....   [tags: Wordsworth Composed Upon Westminster Bridge] 506 words
(1.4 pages)
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Life Struggling Against Death in Shakespeare's Sixtieth Sonnet (Sonnet 60) - Life Struggling Against Death in Shakespeare's Sixtieth Sonnet (Sonnet 60) Shakespeare's sixtieth sonnet is probably addressed to the same young, male friend to whom most or all of the earlier sonnets are said to be addressed. The sonnet does not specify this, however, so it could be to anyone or everyone. The theme is certainly universal; time steals human life away, but poetry is immortal. The poet uses diction and imagery to paint a picture of life struggling against death and losing.             The speaker of the sonnet tells the audience in the first quatrain that human life is fleeting....   [tags: Sonnet Essays] 971 words
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 65 - Analysis of Sonnet 65 Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea, But sad mortality o'ersways their power, How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea, Whose action is no stronger than a flower. Oh how shall summer's honey breath hold out Against the wrackful siege of battering days, When rocks impregnable are not so stout Nor gates of steel so strong but time decays. Oh fearful meditation. where, alack, Shall Time's best jewel from Time's chest lie hid. Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 521 words
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Use of Literary Techniques in Milton's Sonnet - Use of Literary Techniques in Milton's Sonnet At the prime of his life, Milton was struck with blindness. As a result of this tragedy, Milton created a sonnet about his blindness. He questioned the meaning of this tragedy, of the future, and God for his blindness within the sonnet. Within Milton's sonnet about his blindness: figurative language, personification, his intent and prosody are adopted to  convey his questions and heart felt acceptance of his blindness.             Milton uses figurative language to express his grievances and discontent....   [tags: Milton Sonnet] 721 words
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Egotism and Love in Shakespeare's Sonnet 42 - Egotism and Love in Shakespeare's Sonnet 42      William Shakespeare's sonnets deal with two very distinct individuals: the blond young man and the mysterious dark-haired woman. The young man is the focus of the earlier numbered sonnets while the latter ones deal primarily with the dark-haired woman. The character of the young man and a seductive mistress are brought together under passionate circumstances in Shakespeare's "Sonnet 42." The sexual prowess of the mistress entangles both Shakespeare and the young man in her web of flesh....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 154 - Analysis of Sonnet 154 The little Love-god lying once asleep Laid by his side his heart-inflaming brand, Whilst many nymphs that vow'd chaste life to keep Came tripping by; but in her maiden hand The fairest votary took up that fire Which many legions of true hearts had warm'd, And so the General of hot desire Was sleeping by a virgin hand disarm'd. This brand she quenched in a cool well by, Which from Love's fire took heat perpetual, Growing a bath and healthful remedy For men diseas'd....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 414 words
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Essay on the Artful Paradox of Sonnet 66 - In sonnet 66, Shakespeare creates a paradoxical difficulty for himself as a poet. As Helen Vendler points out, the censorship described in line 9 necessitates an absence of art from the poem (309-10), yet coevally Shakespeare must keep the reader interested. He straddles this problem by speeding the tempo, creating questions in the reader’s mind, and representing intense emotions-- all through apparently artless techniques. Most obtrusively, both sound technique and constant end-stoppage speed this poem’s tempo in an apparently craft less way....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 97 - Analysis of Sonnet 97 How like a winter hath my absence been From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year. What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!- What old December's bareness everywhere. And yet this time remov'd was summer's time,- The teeming autumn big with rich increase Bearing the wanton burthen of the prime, Like widow'd wombs after their lords' decease: Yet this abundant issue seem'd to me But hope of orphans, and unfather'd fruit; For summer and his pleasures wait on thee, And thou away the very birds are mute: Or if they sing, 'tis with so dull a cheer That leaves look pale, dreading the winter's near....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 388 words
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Essay on Millay's Relationships in Sonnet xxxi - Millay's Relationships in Sonnet xxxi        In his 1967 book, Edna St. Vincent Millay, James Gray writes that "the theme of all her [Millay's] poetry is the search for the integrity of the individual spirit" (Gray 6). While searching for the uniqueness of the individual spirit, Millay's poetry, especially "Sonnet xxxi", becomes interested in how the individual works when it is involoved in a relationship and must content with the power struggles which occur within that relationship. Power struggles occur on many levels, but Millay works in "Sonnet xxxi" with the decision of a partner to deny her individuality in order to provide harmony within the couple....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Shakespeare's Rebuttal to Possibilities in Sonnet 96 - Shakespeare's Rebuttal to Possibilities in Sonnet 96       Shakespeare's apostrophic "Sonnet 96," one of the sonnets written to the blond young man, is arranged similar to a rebuttal in an argument or debate." In the first three quatrains, he describes several possibilities, such as the youth's winning nature and potential for mischief, only to refute them in the couplet." He begins with concise one-line points in the first quatrain, moves to a comparison utilizing the entire quatrain in the second, and transitions to two-line arguments in the final quatrain, evoking the idea of a logical, organized argument." Along with reason, however, are the romantic tones of the couplet, whi...   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Free Essay: Metaphors in Sonnet 73 - Metaphors in Sonnet 73  "Sonnet 73" by William Shakespeare contains many metaphors to form a descriptive image. Shakespeare used conceits, which are "fanciful extended metaphors" (567), used in love poems of earlier centuries. Shakespeare used these beautifully in "Sonnet 73." A metaphor is a "brief, compressed comparison that talks about one thing as if it were another" (554). Shakespeare expresses three major metaphors in this sonnet. The first is about age, the second about death, and of course, love follows....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 486 words
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 55 - Analysis of Sonnet 55 Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme; But you shall shine more bright in these contents Than unswept stone besmear'd with sluttish time. When wasteful war shall statues overturn, And broils root out the work of masonry, Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn The living record of your memory. 'Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room Even in the eyes of all posterity That wear this world out to the ending doom....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 650 words
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 118 - Analysis of Sonnet 118 Like as, to make our appetites more keen, With eager compounds we our palate urge; As to prevent our maladies unseen We sicken to shun sickness when we purge: Even so, being full of your ne'er cloying sweetness, To bitter sauces did I frame my feeding; And, sick of welfare, found a kind of meetness To be diseas'd ere that there was true needing.j Thus policy in love, to anticipate The ills that were not, grew to faults assur'd, And brought to medicine a healthful state Which, rank of goodness, would by ill be cur'd: But thence I learn, and find the lesson true, Drugs poison him that so fell sick of you....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 479 words
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Eroticism and Mortality in Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 - Eroticism and Mortality in Shakespeare's Sonnet #73 William Shakespeare's sonnet cycle is famous with its rich metaphorical style.  The depth of each sonnet comes from its multilayered meanings and images, which are reinforced by its structure, sound, and rhythm.  Sonnet #73 provides an excellent example.  This sonnet shows the speaker's agony over human mortality and, moreover, his/her way of coping with it in an effective way.  The speaker, especially in terms of his cognizance of time, experiences dramatic changes in two ways: (1) from time measured by quantity to time as quality,  (2) from cyclical time to a linear one.  These changes, manifested by a set of images (autumn, twili...   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Essay on Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73 - Interpretation of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73 Sonnet 73 is a meditation on mortality, and yet it can be interpreted in a number of ways. The first such interpretation is that the author of the poem is speaking to someone else about his own death that will inevitably come in the future. This interpretation has the poem focused on the author, and his focus and concern over himself. This makes him seem very selfish, because we are all going to die sooner or later, and it does not do any good to dwell on or complain about it....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 796 words
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 5 - Analysis of Sonnet 5 Those hours that with gentle work did frame The lovely gaze where every eye doth dwell Will play the tyrants to the very same, And that unfair which fairly doth excel: For never-resting time leads summer on To hideous winter and confounds him there, Sap check'd with frost, and lusty leaves quite gone, Beauty o'ersnow'd and bareness everywhere: Then were not summer's distillation left A liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass, Beauty's effect with beauty were bereft, Nor ir nor no remembrance what it was....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 363 words
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Free Essay: Analysis of Sonnet 12 - Analysis of Sonnet 12 When I do count the clock that tells the time, And see the brave day sunk in hideous night: When I behold the violet past prime, And sable curls o'er-silver'd all with white; When lofty trees I see barren of leaves, Which erst from heat did canopy the herd, And summer's green all girded up in sheaves Borne on the bier with white and bristly beard: Then of thy beauty do I question make That thou among the wastes of time must go, since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake, And die as fast as they see others grow; And nothing 'gainst Time's scythe can make defence save breed to brave him when he takes thee hence....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 372 words
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Dissolution Versus Debauchery in Sonnet 96 - Dissolution Versus Debauchery in Sonnet 96       The sonnets of William Shakespeare chronicle the conflicts of love and lust between the blond young man and the dark-haired lady. In Sonnet 96, Shakespeare acts as an apologist on behalf of the blond young man as he concludes his discourse on the young man's character." Here the poet presents a picture of the young man as a misguided youth caught up in youthful indiscretion, rather than a rapacious beast prowling for prey. Shakespeare illustrates the inherent differences between dissolution and debauchery as he declares that upon first glance all is not as it appears; therefore, the young man's character must be examined in greater...   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Free Essay: Analysis of Sonnet 64 - Analysis of Sonnet 64 When I have seen by Time's fell hand defac'd The rich proud cost of outworn buried age; When sometime lofty towers I see down raz'd, And brass eternal slave to mortal rage; When I have seen the hungry ocean gain Advantage on the kingdom of the shore, And the firm soil win of the watery main, Increasing store with loss and loss with store: When I have seen such interchange of state, Or state itself confounded to decay, Ruin hath tought me thus to ruminate- That Time will come and take my love away....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 572 words
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 153 - Analysis of Sonnet 153 Cupid laid by his brand and fell asleep. A maid of Dian's this advantage found, And his love-kindling fire did quickly steep In a cold valley-fountain of that ground; Which borrow'd from this holy fire of Love A dateless lively heat, still to endure, And grew a seething bath which men yet prove Against strange maladies a sovereign cure. But at my mistress' eye Love's brand new fir'd, The boy for trial needs would touch my breast. I, sick withal, the help of bath desir'd, And thither hied, a sad distemper'd guest; But found no cure: the bath for my help lies Where Cupid got new fire-my mistress' eyes....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 437 words
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Free Essays On Shakespeare's Sonnet 14 - Analysis of Sonnet 14 Not from the stars do i my judgement pluck, And yet methinks I have astronomy- But not to tell of good or evil luck, Of plagues, of dearths, or season's quality: Nor can I fortune to Brief minutes tell, Pointing to each his thunder, rain, and wind, Or say with princes if it shall go well By oft predict that I in heaven find: But from thine eyes my knowledge I derive, And, constant stars, in them I read suck art As truth and beauty shall together thrive If from thy self to store thou wouldst convert: Or else of thee this I prognosticate:- Thy end is truth's and beauty's doom and date....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 384 words
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Youth: Life at Its Peak in "Sonnet 15" by William Shakespeare - As each day goes by the beauty of our vibrant youth decays and diminishes. In "Sonnet 15" Shakespeare refers to youth as life at its peak, however this precious point in our life is short-lived. Shakespeare speaks of youth as a single moment of perfection. He glorifies youth and alleges to immortalize it through his poetic words. He uses metaphors, imagery, and rhyme in a way to enhance the beauty and perfection of mans youth while in its prime. Through this he demonstrate the love and richness of youth despite the tole time takes on it....   [tags: Sonnet 15, Shakespeare, youth, ]
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The Sonnet Form and its Meaning: Shakespeares Sonnet 65 - The Sonnet Form and its Meaning: Shakespeare Sonnet 65            The sonnet, being one of the most traditional and recognized forms of poetry, has been used and altered in many time periods by writers to convey different messages to the audience. The strict constraints of the form have often been used to parallel the subject in the poem. Many times, the first three quatrains introduce the subject and build on one another, showing progression in the poem. The final couplet brings closure to the poem by bringing the main ideas together....   [tags: William Shakespeare Sonnet 65 Essays] 1853 words
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The Evasive Sonnet CXVI (116) -    In my survey of Shakespeare's Sonnets, I have found it difficult to sincerely regard any single sonnet as inferior.  However, many of the themes could be regarded as rather trite.  For example sonnet XCVII main idea is that with my love away I feel incomplete, sonnet XXIX says that only your love remembered makes life bearable, while sonnet XXXVIII makes the beloved the sole inspiration in the poet's life.   These themes recycled in love songs and Hallmark cards, hardly original now, would hardly have been any newer in Elizabethan England.   However the hackneyed themes of these sonnets is in a sense the source of their essence.  These emotions, oftentimes difficult to adequately articul...   [tags: Sonnet 116 Essays]
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Wordsworth's Ode: Intimations of Immortality - Wordsworth's Ode: Intimations of Immortality The fifth stanza of Wordsworth’s “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” is especially interesting to me because of the images it presents. It is at this point in the poem that Wordsworth resumes his writing after a two-year hiatus. In the fourth stanza, he poses the question, “Whither is fled the visionary gleam?” Stanza five is the beginning of his own answers to that question. Contrary to popular enlightenment ideas, Wordsworth suggests that rather than become more knowledgeable with age, man if fact is born with “vision splendid” and as he ages, that vision “dies away” and he left empty....   [tags: Wordsworth Ode immortality intimations Essays] 390 words
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Wordsworth, Social Reform Literature, and Politics of the 1790s - Wordsworth, Social Reform Literature, and Politics of the 1790s The historical mix of social fictions in England and France at the end of the 1780s greatly impacted the literature of the period. Tom Paine's The Rights of Man (1791) and Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1791) were the two most widely read works that spurred a decade long debate on how the nation of England was to be governed and by whom. As a young man during this period, William Wordsworth formed part of the circle of writers who fought for the Republican cause of democracy and its ideals....   [tags: William Wordsworth]
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Dorothy & William Wordsworth Analysis - ‘It is often suggested that the source for many of William Wordsworth’s poems lies in the pages of Dorothy Wordsworth’s journal. Quite frequently, Dorothy describes an incident in her journal, and William writes a poem about the same incident, often around two years later.’ It is a common observation that whilst Dorothy is a recorder – ‘her face was excessively brown’ – William is a transformer – ‘Her skin was of Egyptian brown’ . The intertextuality between The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals and ‘I wandered lonely as a Cloud’ allows both Dorothy and William to write about the same event, being equally as descriptive, but in very differing ways....   [tags: Comparative Analysis Poetry Dorothy Wordsworth] 1832 words
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Shakespeare's Sonnet 16 - Analysis of Sonnet 16 Sonnet 16 is a ravishing poem. It presents an argument that appears to be abstract or philosophical, not personal at all, not "interested" in the narrow sense. And impediment, which is generally required in a sonnet, is named by the poet only so that he may specifically disallow it. What shall we make of the contradiction. Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 685 words
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The Romantic Imagination in Wordsworth's Tintern Abbey - The Romantic Imagination, Wordsworth, and "Tintern Abbey" Historical Context The Enlightenment, an intellectual movement of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, immediately preceded the time in which the Romantics were writing. In Britain, the work of Locke and Newton, who were proponents of empiricism and mechanism respectively, were central to Enlightenment philosophy. Locke was the founder of empiricism, the belief that all knowledge is derived from sense-experience; Newton ushered in a mechanistic worldview when he formulated a mathematical description of the laws of mechanics and gravitation, which he applied to planetary and lunar motion....   [tags: William Wordsworth Poetry]
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Free College Essays - Shakespeare's Sonnet 76 - Sonnet #76 Sonnet #76 is in the section of Shakespeare's sonnets generally accepted as being written to the "fair young man." However, there is no clear indication within this sonnet to identify its recipient. The form is consistent iambic pentameter with an abab,cdcd,efef,gg rhyme scheme. The basic argument of this sonnet is the power of the sonnet itself as a lasting expression of love. In the first quatrain, the poet questions himself about his poetic style. He makes reference to it being "barren" (unproductive, dry, lacking richness or interest) of "new pride" which is an archaic expression for "ornament." He questions the lack of var...   [tags: Sonnet essays] 562 words
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An Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 - An Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 Shakespeare's Sonnet 116, denying Time's harvest of love, contains 46 iambic, 15 spondaic, 6 pyrrhic, and 3 trochaic feet. Like the varying magnitudes of stars that distinguish the sky's constellations, infused with myths describing all degrees and types of love, the spondaic, trochaic, and pyrrhic substitutions create a pattern of meaning that can be inferred by the discerning eye and mind. Shakespeare emphasizes his denial of the effects of Time on love by accenting "not" in lines 1, 2, 9, and 11, and "no" in lines 5 and 14....   [tags: Shakespeare Sonnet Essays 116 Papers]
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Sonnet Analysis - Fair Is My Love, by Edmund Spenser - This sonnet is an anti-love poem that ironically shows how the fairness of a lady is contingent upon nature's blessings and her external manifestations.  The Spenserian style brings unity to this sonnet, in that it's theme and rhyme is interwoven throughout, but the focus of her "fairness" is divided into an octave and a sestet.  The first eight lines praise her physical features (hair, cheeks, smile), while the last six lines praise her internal features (words, spirit, heart).  This sonnet intentionally hides the speaker's ridicule behind counterfeit love-language, using phrases like: "fair golden hairs" (line 1), and "rose in her red cheeks" (line 3), and "her eyes the fire of love does s...   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Essay on Metaphors for Death in Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 - Metaphors for Death in Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 73: That Time of Year Thou Mayest in Me Behold" is a sonnet that examines the fears and anxieties that surround growing old and dying -- a topic that resonates within us all. Shakespeare's use of metaphor to illustrate decay and passing are striking, and sets a somber tone throughout. He uses the season of Fall, the coming of night, and the burning out of a flame as metaphors for old age and death, and then uses the last two lines to suggest that we should love and cherish life while we can....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 557 words
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Edna St. Vincent Millay's Sonnet I, Being Born a Woman and Distressed - Edna St. Vincent Millay's Sonnet "I, Being Born a Woman and Distressed" Edna St. Vincent Millay’s sonnet, “I, Being Born a Woman and Distressed,” serves as an excellent example of a multi-faceted piece. From one angle, it is simply a Petrarchan sonnet, written with a slight variation on rhyme scheme – but that variation, taken deeper, reveals new layers of meaning. Added to Millay’s choice of meter and end-stop, along with a background of Millay’s person, this sonnet seems not so “simple” after all....   [tags: Edna Vincent Millay Sonnet Distressed Essays]
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Essay on the Gift of Life in Shakespeare's Sonnet 16 - The Precious Gift of Life Revealed in Sonnet 16 Throughout literature authors attempt to control the passage of time through their works. In William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 16" he addresses this subject through the use of literary devices. These devices indicate how the progress of seasons cannot be controlled by words alone. The passing of time is displayed through paradox and imagery, but it is overcome by the ceaseless life of progeny, unlike the feeble words of Shakespeare's sonnet....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 596 words
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Free College Essays - Shakespeare's Sonnet 147 - Sonnet 147 SONNET CXLVII My love is as a fever, longing still For that which longer nurseth the disease, Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Hath left me, and I desperate now approve Desire is death, which physic did except. Past cure I am, now reason is past care, And frantic-mad with evermore unrest; My thoughts and my discourse as madmen's are, At random from the truth vainly express'd; For I have sworn thee fair and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 781 words
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Essay on Sonnet 130 and Passionate Shepherd To His Love - Sonnet 130 and Passionate Shepherd To His Love In William Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 and Christopher Marlowe's The Passionate Shepherd To His Love, the themes of unconditional love, opulent treasures, and vivid imagery are all conveyed throughout the poems but through different point of views. The theme of unconditional love is expressed through the two poems. The poet proclaims his affection for her by telling his "love" that he will give her anything in the world if she would just be with him....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 807 words
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Free College Essays - Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 - Sonnet 130   Shakespeare was obviously a very deep, passionate and learned man; he was very open with how he felt and was able to express it in a way that was very exact and easy to comprehend.  In his sonnets, which, to me, are like a little diary, he talks a lot about his life involving his mistress as well as a male friend that he may or may not have been involved with.  In Sonnet 130 Shakespeare is talking of his mistress, her faults and his feelings about her an her faults.  the duration of the piece is spent pointing out the faults of this woman and how he thinks that any other man would be simply repulsed by this woman....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 355 words
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Free College Essays - Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 75 - Analysis of Sonnet 75 SONNET 75 So are you to my thoughts as food to life, Or as sweet-season'd showers are to the ground; And for the peace of you I hold such strife As 'twixt a miser and his wealth is found; Now proud as an enjoyer and anon Doubting the filching age will steal his treasure, Now counting best to be with you alone, Then better'd that the world may see my pleasure; Sometime all full with feasting on your sight And by and by clean starved for a look; Possessing or pursuing no delight, Save what is had or must from you be took....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 948 words
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Love in Shakespeare's Sonnet 128 and Gibran's The Prophet - Love in Shakespeare's Sonnet 128 and Gibran's The Prophet        William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 128" suggests a rather playful and sensual approach to love, while an excerpt on love and marriage from Kahlil Gibran's The Prophet has a didactic and intellectual tone. Shakespeare revels in lustful possession of his lover, but Gibran advises leaving space between partners in their relationship.   Well-endowed with imagery, Shakespeare's sonnet evokes the vision of a woman swaying back and forth playing a spinet, and the poet sitting back smiling and enjoying her movements, aroused by her music and charm....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Essay on the Power Hopkins' Sonnet, God's Grandeur - Essay on the Power Hopkins' Sonnet, God's Grandeur As "the world is charged with the grandeur of God," so Gerard Manley Hopkins' sonnet, "God's Grandeur," is charged with language, imagery, sounds and metric patterns that express that grandeur. Through its powerful use of the elements of poetry, the poem explores the power of God and the wonder of nature. "God's Grandeur" is a lyric poem. The tone of the poem is one, naturally, of grandeur, as well as power and wonder. Hopkins' choices of words add to the feeling of grandeur that is the subject of the poem through their powerful imagery, and they express wonder at the power and grandeur of God and the continuity of nature....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 767 words
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Physicality and Emotional Attachment in Shakespeare's Sonnet 46 - Physicality and Emotional Attachment in Shakespeare's Sonnet 46      In "Sonnet 46" of his works about the blond young man, William Shakespeare presents a unique view on the classic debate about physical lust versus emotional love. The poet struggles to decide if his feelings are based upon superficial desire and infatuation, represented by the "eye" (1), or true love independent of the physical world, symbolized by the "heart" (1). With a deft movement from violent imagery in the first two lines to the civilized language of law, Shakespeare dismisses the commonly accepted view of a battle between the eye and the heart.  The diction of warfare denotes two very separate alien side...   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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Women in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 - Women in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 Shakespeare is expressing, though not in the first person, that he knows women are not the perfect beauties they are portrayed to be and that we should love them anyway. He uses two types of descriptions, one of their physical beauty and the other of their characteristics to make fun of all those ‘romantic’ poets trying to ‘brown nose’ the girls they like. One of the physical attributes, in the first quatrain, that he mentions is his “mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun,” meaning she has no ‘twinkle’ in her eyes....   [tags: Sonnet 130 Shakespeare Women Essays] 459 words
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I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by Wordsworth - I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by Wordsworth Wordsworth takes readers on a reminiscent journey in "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" reflecting upon visions of nature. The figurative language and diction used elucidate the poet's response to nature. Wordsworth uses each stanza to share his experience in nature through the image of a dance that culminates in the poet's emotional response. Wordsworth opens with reference to himself through simile as a part of the natural landscape, "I wandered lonely as a cloud / That floats on high" (Wordsworth, Line 1)....   [tags: Poetry Wordsworth Lonely Cloud Essays]
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Homosexual Desire in Shakespeare's Sonnet 20 and Byron's To Thyrza - Homosexual Desire in Shakespeare's Sonnet 20 and Byron's To Thyrza   Crompton states in his epilogue "...diverse sexual lifestyles still arouse apprehension even when they threaten no direct harm to others. In this particular matter, our culture faces business unfinished by the Enlightenment" (381). Examining Byron and Shakespeare's poetry, opens a window to the prevailing sexual attitude of late eighteenth and early nineteenth century and defines more clearly the intent of these poets. A sexual metamorphosis involving the realization of homosexual desires and nonconventional erotic preferences occurs in both Lord Byron's "To Thyrza" and William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 20", but the poets,...   [tags: Sonnet essays] 2145 words
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Immortality Through Verse in Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 and Spenser’s Sonnet 75 - Immortality Through Verse in Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 and Spenser’s Sonnet 75       Desiring fame, celebrity, and importance, people for centuries have yearned for the ultimately unattainable goal of immortality. Poets, too, have expressed desires in verse that their lovers remain as they are for eternity, in efforts of praise. Though Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 and Spenser’s Sonnet 75 from Amoretti both offer lovers this immortality through verse, only Spenser pairs this immortality with respect and partnership, while Shakespeare promises the subject of the sonnet immortality by unusual compliments and the assurance that she will live on as long as the sonnet continues to be read....   [tags: Sonnet essays]
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William Wordsworth's Nutting - William Wordsworth's Nutting   If William Wordsworth rests on the throne as the King of the Romantic Period, Nutting is a shining exemple of why he should be put on a pedestal.  Flirting with the five senses, he seduces the reader into the beautiful backdrop of his lyrical ballad with an extravagant description of the natural setting.  Ignoring the conventional devices of figurative language, such as metaphor, Wordsworth manipulates natural language to evoke the images he desires to illustrate his memories.  Prosaic analysis of the lines, "[w]here fairy water-breaks do murmur on/For ever; and I saw the sparkling foam" (Wordsworth 33) reveals his talent for turning common language into p...   [tags: William Wordsworth Nutting Essays]
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The Death of Creative Power in Sonnet 73 - The Death of Creative Power in Sonnet 73 Most of the 127 sonnets Shakespeare wrote to one of his close male friends are united by the theme of the overwhelming, destructive power of time, and the counterbalancing power of love and poetry to create and preserve beauty. Sonnet 73 is no different, but it does present an intriguing twist on this theme. Most of these sonnets address the youth and beauty of his male friend, as well as poetry's power to immortalize them, but number 73 addresses the author's own mortality and the friend's love for him....   [tags: Shakespeare Sonnet 73] 1086 words
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