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Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Missing works cited In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf ponders the plight of women throughout history. Woolf 'reads the lives of women and concludes that if a woman were to have written she would have had to overcome enormous circumstances' (Woolf xi). Woolf's initial thesis is that 'a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction' (Woolf 4). Throughout the book, however, she develops other important conditions for artistic creation....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Room One's Own Essays]
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The Outsider in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - The Outsider in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own In A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf writes: "I had no wish to enter had I the right, and this time the verger might have stopped me, demanding perhaps my baptismal certificate, or a letter if introduction from the dean"(8). This particular line jumps out at me for several reasons. First off, I find it rather humorous. I was rather surprised by this remark as well. I did not think that I would be reading anything that would make me laugh even the slightest bit....   [tags: Virginia Woolf A Room of One's Own]
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Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own - Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own Though published seventy years ago, Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own holds no less appeal today than it did then. Modern women writers look to Woolf as a prophet of inspiration. In November of 1929, Woolf wrote to her friend G. Lowes Dickinson that she penned the book because she "wanted to encourage the young women–they seem to get frightfully depressed" (xiv). The irony here, of course, is that Woolf herself eventually grew so depressed and discouraged that she killed herself....   [tags: Virginia Woolf A Room of One’s Own]
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The Scope of Woolf’s Feminism in A Room of One’s Own - The Scope of Woolf’s Feminism in A Room of One’s Own Missing Works Cited A highly contested statement on women and fiction, Virginia Woolf’s extended essay A Room of One’s Own has been repeatedly reviewed, critiqued, and analyzed since its publication in 1929. Arnold Bennett, an early twentieth-century novelist, and David Daiches, a literary critic who wrote an analysis entitled Virginia Woolf in 1942 (Murphy 247), were among those to attempt to extricate the themes and implications of Woolf’s complex essay....   [tags: Woolf A Room of One’s Own] 1665 words
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Women's Position in Society in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Women's Position in Society in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own The passage at the end of the Third Chapter in A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf deals with two major themes of this essay. The first being the ways in which women were kept down and made inferior to men, and the second being how this affected women’s writing. Woolf asserts that women were made inferior as a direct result of men’s perceived superiority. This assertment provides a new way of thinking about women’s lower position in society and the subsequent low opinion men held of women and their capabilties as writers....   [tags: Virginia Woolf room One's Own Essays] 1381 words
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Analysis of Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own - Analysis of Virginia Woolf’s "A Room of One’s Own" Throughout history, female artists have not been strangers to harsh criticism regarding their artistic works. Some female artists are fortunate to even receive such criticism; many have not achieved success in sharing their works with the world. In Virgina Woolf’s third chapter of her essay “A Room of One’s Own,” Woolf addresses the plight of the woman writer, specifically during the Elizabethan time period of England. Woolf helps the reader appreciate her view on how stifling and difficult this time period was for women and how what little creativity emerged would have been distorted in some way....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Room One's Own Essays]
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Woolf's Vision in A Room of One's Own - Woolf's Vision in A Room of One's Own       Many years have lapsed sinee Virginia Woolf spoke at Newnham and Girton colleges on the subject of women and fiction.  Her remarkable words are preserved for future generations of women in A Room of One's Own.  This essay is the "first manifesto of the modern feminist movement" (Samuelson), and has been called "a notable preamble to a kind of feminine Declaration of Independence" (Muller 34).  Woolf writes that her modest goal for this ground-breaking essay is to "encourage the young women--they seem to get fearfully depressed" (qtd....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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A Room Of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf - ... These situations prompted Woolf to make a conclusion on why a woman needs a private space of her own. The grass at Oxbridge and the fortress-like library depict the barriers between the two genders in the fictional world. However, in the modern reality, the World Wide Web is open for everyone’s usage. Such innovations as blogs and social networks endow the access for women to engage in the literary field without the adversities past counterparts have experienced. Unlike Virginia Woolf’s original idea of “a room of one’s own with a lock”, the World Wide Web provides an open atmosphere in which everyone can participate without considering the social norms....   [tags: A Room Of One’s Own] 835 words
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Virginia Woolf's Narrative Technique in A Room of One's Own - Virginia Woolf's Narrative Technique in A Room of One's Own   "Like most uneducated Englishwomen, I like reading." Can these words really belong to Virginia Woolf, an "uneducated Englishwoman" who knew half a dozen languages, who authored a shelf's length of novels and essays, who possessed one of the most rarified literary minds of the twentieth century. Tucked into the back pages of A Room of One's Own, this comment shimmers with Woolf's typically wry and understated sense of humor. She jests, but she means something very serious at the same time: as a reader, she worries about the state of the writer, and particularly the state of the female writer....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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Poetry in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Poetry in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own According to Laurence Perrine, author of Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense, "poetry is as universal as language and almost as ancient"; however, "people have always been more successful at appreciating poetry than at defining it" (517). Perrine initially defines poetry as "a kind of language that says more and says it more intensely than does ordinary language" (517). After defining literature as writing concerned with experience which allows us to imaginatively participate in it (518-19), Perrine adds, "poetry takes all life as its province" (522); no sharp distinction between poetry and other forms of imaginative literature exists (523); and "poetry ....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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Virginia Woolf's A Room of One’s Own - Virginia Woolf's A Room of One’s Own In Virginia Woolf’s feminist essay “A Room of One’s Own,” Woolf argues that “a woman must have money and a room of her own” (16) if she is to write fiction of any merit. The point as she develops it is a perceptive one, and far more layered and various in its implications than it might at first seem. But I wonder if perhaps Woolf did not really tap the full power of her thesis. She recognized the necessity of the writer’s financial independence to the birth of great writing, but she failed to discover the true relationship to great writing of another freedom; for just as economic freedom allows one to inhabit a physical space---a room of one’s own---so does mental freedom allow one to inhabit one’s own mind and body “incandescent and unimpeded.” Woolf seems to believe that the development and expression of creative genius hinges upon the mental freedom of the writer(50), and that the development of mental freedom hinges upon the economic freedom of the writer (34, 47)....   [tags: Literature Room of One's Own Papers] 2616 words
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Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf, in her treatise A Room of One's Own, identified a gendered division of labor. For her, men work in the market place and make the money while the women, the upper class women at least, attend to the social pleasantries and household management. While she lamented this state of affairs, she did not present, as Gilman did, a model for existence that would allow men and women to operate on the same level....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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The Contempt and Bitterness of Virginia Woolf Exposed in A Room of One's Own - The Contempt and Bitterness of Virginia Woolf Exposed in A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf refuses the role society prescribes her. She stands up against glass ceilings, separate spheres, and double standards-cultural institutions that create and uphold a weaker sex. In her writing, specifically "A Room of One's Own," she manifests her contempt and bitterness by advocating "it is necessary [for women] to have five hundred [pounds] a year and a lock on the door if you are to write fiction or poetry" (769)....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own Proves Students Need Schools of Their Own - Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own Proves Students Need Schools of Their Own According to the Children’s Defense Fund, in 1989 an average of 1,375 children dropped out of school every day. As a future educator, my reaction to this figure is one of horror and disbelief. Once I get past the shock of such a figure and the obligatory rhetorical questions: How could we let this happen?, I become an investigator. I begin to look for patterns in the profiles of students who have failed. I consider the curriculum these students ingest and how it is fed to them....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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Education and Virginia’s Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own - Education and Virginia’s Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own “Only the gold and silver flowed now, not from the coffers of the king, but from the purses of men who had made, say a fortune from industry, and returned, in their wills, a bounteous share of it to endow more chairs, more lectureships, more fellowships in the university where they had learnt their craft” (754). This is a quote from Virginia’s Woolf’s essay, “A Room of One’s Own”. Here she is making a point about universities and the funding that they received from men that had gone to school there....   [tags: Room Ones Own]
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Muted Women in Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own and Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Aurora Leigh - Muted Women in Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own and Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Aurora Leigh In the predominantly male worlds of Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own and Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “Aurora Leigh (Book I)”, the women’s voices are muted. Female characters are confined to the domestic spheres of their homes, and they are excluded from the elite literary world. They are expected to function as foils to the male figures in their lives. These women are “trained” to remain silent and passive not only by the males around them, but also by their parents, their relatives, and their peers....   [tags: Room Ones Own]
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Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own: Women and Fiction - Many female writers see themselves as advocates for other creative females to help find their voice as a woman. Although this may be true, writer Virginia Woolf made her life mission to help women find their voice as a writer, no gender attached. She believed women had the creativity and power to write, not better than men, but as equals. Yet throughout history, women have been neglected in a sense, and Woolf attempted to find them. In her essay, A Room of One’s Own, she focuses on what is meant by connecting the terms, women and fiction....   [tags: Biography] 1151 words
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Alice Walker's In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens and Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Alice Walker's In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens and Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own It is interesting to contrast the points of view of Alice Walker and Virgina Woolf on the same subject. These writers display how versatile the English language can be. Alice Walker was born in 1944 as a farm girl in Georgia. Virginia Woolf was born in London in1882. They have both come to be highly recognized writers of their time, and they both have rather large portfolios of work. The scenes they might have grown up seeing and living through may have greatly influenced their views of subjects which they both seem to write about....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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A room of one's own - ... But I doubt whether that was true of Charlotte Bronte..."(2189). It is a wonderful quality of Jane Austen that she is able to rise above the prejudice that has been inflicted upon her and all women for that matter, but is that ability the only path to meaningful writing. Does Woolf really mean to say that the writing of Jane Austen is better than Charlotte Bronte merely because this female perspective is somehow obscured, subtler than in Bronte's works. Rosenman illuminates this quandary when she relates, "How do we judge the works of the women writers Woolf discusses, almost all of whom express anger at their plight....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Virginia Woolf] 1898 words
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Breaking Convention in A Room of One's Own - Breaking Convention in A Room of One's Own New discoveries and exciting breakthroughs are all made at the expense of contradicting old rules and ideas. In order for Earth to be round, it could no longer be flat. Revolutions in literature, science, and countries are always filled with conflicts and contradictions to traditional conventions. In this sense, Virgina Woolf's essay A Room of One's Own can be called a revolution. Woolf breaks nearly all the rules of essay writing in her argumentative essay....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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The Contrast of Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker - The Contrast of Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker After reading the four essays assigned to this sequence, it becomes interesting to contrast two author's points of view on the same subject. Reading one professional writer's rewriting of a portion of another professional writer's essay brings out many of each of their characteristics and views. Also, the difference in writing styles could be drastic, or slight. Nevertheless, the writers display how versatile the English language can be. Alice Walker was born in 1944 as a farm girl in Georgia....   [tags: Writers Morals A Room of One's Own Essays] 1345 words
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Commerce, Politics and the City in A Room of One's Own and Mrs. Dalloway - Commerce, Politics and the City in A Room of One's Own and Mrs. Dalloway        "...At this moment, as so often happens in London, there was a complete lull and suspension of traffic. Nothing came down the street; nobody passed. A single leaf detached itself from the plane tree at the end of the street, and in that pause and suspension fell. Somehow it was like a signal falling, a signal pointing to a force in things which one had overlooked ... Now it was bringing from one side of the street to the other diagonally a girl in patent leather boots and then a young man in a maroon overcoat; it was also bringing a taxi-cab; and it brought all three together at a point directly beneath my window; where the taxi stopped; and the girl and the young man stopped; and they got into the taxi; and the cab glided off as if it were swept on by the current elsewhere." (A Room of One's Own 100)   "Virginia Woolf" - the version of her that narrates the "events" of A Room of One's Own - observes the above urban scene from her window....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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A Room of Ones Own by Virginia Woolf - A Room of Ones Own by Virginia Woolf      In 1928, Virginia Woolf was asked to speak on the topic of “women and fiction”. The result, based upon two essays she delivered at Newnham and Girton that year, was A Room of One’s Own, which is an extended essay on women as both writers of fiction and as characters in fiction. While Woolf suggests that, “when a subject is highly controversial-and any question about sex is that-one cannot hope to tell the truth,” (Woolf 4) her essay is, in fact, a thought out and insightful reflection on the topic....   [tags: Room Ones Own Virginia Woolf Essays]
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Virginia Woolf's Style And Subject In A Room Of Her Own - Virginia Woolf’s Style and Subject in a Room of Her Own Times have changed since universities admitted only male students. Women have gained the right to educate themselves, and the division of the sexes in business has decreased dramatically. When Virginia Woolf wrote her essay A Room of One’s Own, however, there was a great lack of female presence in literature, in writing specifically. In the essay, Woolf critiques this fact by taking the reader on a journey through a day in the life at a fictional university to prove that although women are capable of critical thought and want to write great works of literature, they are unable to for lack of means....   [tags: Virginia Woolf] 1863 words
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A Room of One's Own - ... After the narrator is not permitted to enter the Oxbridge Library, she amuses the thought of going to the campus chapel before stating, “I had no wish to enter had I the right, and this time the verger might have stopped me, demanding perhaps my baptismal certificate or a letter of introduction from the dean” (Woolf 8). Through her moderate overstatement of the possible repercussions from entering the chapel, the incidence becomes a playful mockery rather than a cynical attack. Her derisive manner and slighting ridicule of these rules targeted at women, though suggesting an underlying personal protest, also illustrate a degree of charm from the narrator’s efforts to create comicality in an otherwise disagreeable situation....   [tags: LIterary Analysis ] 2164 words
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A Room of Ones Own - A Room of Ones Own Virginia Woolf, a founder of Modernism, is one of the most important woman writers. Her essays and novels give an example into her own life experiences and of women of the 20th century. Her most famous works include Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), Orlando: A Biography (1928), The Waves (1931), and A Room of One's Own (1929) (Roseman 11). A Room of One's Own is an essay, based on Woolf's lectures at a women's college at Cambridge University in 1928. Woolf bases her thoughts on "the question of women and fiction"....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Literature Women Fiction Essays]
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A Room of Ones Own - A Room of Ones Own Hundreds of years ago, an unconscious culture diseased the female population. Similar to Shakespeare's sister, women were conditioned to conform to a feminine ideology. This concept of femininity spread through out the country essentially defining the nature of a woman and robbing them of their innate sense of self. While women may have dreamed about the day when their creative spirit could be unleashed, those dreams were quickly interrupted by the powerful grasp of male dominance....   [tags: Classics, Feminism, Woman's Right, Virginia Woolf] 323 words
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Woolf's Advice for the Woman Artist - Woolf's Advice for the Woman Artist Women who want to escape the label "woman writer" (as opposed to writer--the masculine norm) have had to write like one of the boys, de-sexing themselves. Super-feminine lady writers, if they stick to their nice nook, will be both praised and despised for doing what comes naturally. But the woman writer who refuses these categories blows the scheme sky-high and incurs the wrath of the gods. (Michele Roberts in The Independent, 1997) Perhaps more than any other late-twentieth century British woman writer, Jeanette Winterson has taken to heart Woolf's advice in A Room of One's Own that "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction" (4), but Winterson has also, as Michele Roberts points out, "incur[red] the wrath" of the cultural gods as a result....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Writer Essays]
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Comparing Wuthering Heights and A Room of One's Own - Wuthering Heights and A Room of One's Own                 From the time that Emily Bronte penned Wuthering Heights in 1847 to the time that Virginia Woolf wrote A Room of One's Own in 1929, the 80 plus year period brought tremendous change to literature and for women authors.   In the early Victorian era when women writers were not accepted as legitimate, Emily Bronte found it necessary to pen her novel under the name "Mr. Ellis Bell" according to a newspaper review from 1848 (WH  301).   According to The Longman Anthology of British Literature, "Women had few opportunities for higher education or satisfying employment" (1794) and the "ideal Victorian woman was supposed to be domestic and pure, selflessly motivated by the desire to serve others..."  (1794).  The Bronte sisters partook of many of the typical duties of the Victorian age such as taking on governess duties and teaching jobs (Bradbury p....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Comparing The Buried Life and A Room Of One's Own - Comparing The Buried Life and A Room Of One's Own       Victorian writers did ask difficult and unsettling questions, and the modern writers continued on with the quest to display these unsettling thoughts and feelings in their works even more so. You can see this continuing easy from "The Buried Life," to the ideas of "A Room Of One's Own."   In "The Buried Life," Arnold questions why men in society bury their emotions and innermost thoughts from one another like they are the only one's with these qualities, even though every man has them: "I knew the mass of men concealed their thoughts, for fear that if they revealed they would by other men be met with blank indifference, or with blame reproved; I knew they lived and moved tricked in disguises, alien to the rest of men, and alien to themselves--and yet the same heart beats in every human breast" (p.2021)....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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A Room of One’s Own and Modern Fiction - A Room of One’s Own and Modern Fiction One of the first things to notice about A Room of One’s Own is that it is not a typical lecture. It rambles and flows back and forth, in and out. It is more narrative than logic. It breaks many of the conventions of a formal address. Why does Virginia Woolf choose to do this. Why choose this style, this method. One reason is to turn predominantly masculine, or traditional, thinking on its head in order to undermine its authority. There is another reason for her approach, however—one that rises from her most basic ideas about what literature and writing should be and do....   [tags: Lectures Literature Papers]
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Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents - Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents Why would I start with Julia Duckworth Stephen to get to Virginia Woolf. One answer is Virginia’s often quoted statement that "we think back through our mothers if we are women" (Woolf, A Room of One’s Own). Feminism is rooted not just in a response to patriarchy but also in the history of females and their treatment of each other. Part of feminism is a reevaluation of the value of motherhood. But what does Virginia’s mother have to do with Virginia’s writing....   [tags: Virginia Woolf]
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Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Jacob Flanders, Many Things to Many Readers - Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Jacob Flanders, Many Things to Many Readers Listless is the air in an empty room, just swelling the curtain; the flowers in the jar shift. One fibre in the wicker arm- chair creaks, though no one sits there. - Jacob's Room The year 1922 marks the beginning of High Modernism with the publications of T. S. Eliot's The Wasteland, James Joyce's Ulysses, and Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room. Woolf's novel, only her third, is not generally afforded the iconic worship and critical praise so often attached to those works of her most famous male contemporaries....   [tags: Jacobs Room]
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf was born in London, as the daughter of Julia Jackson Duckworth, a member of the Duckworth publishing family, and Sir Leslie Stephen, a literary critic, a friend of Meredith, Henry James, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot, and the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography. Leslie Stephen's first wife had been the daughter of the novelist William Makepeace Thackeray. His daughter Laura from the first marriage was institutionalized because of mental retardation....   [tags: Author Writer Biography Woolf] 1700 words
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A Women's Quest in The Odyssey, A Room Of One's Own, and Northanger Abbey - A Women's Quest in The Odyssey, A Room Of One's Own, and Northanger Abbey      A quest is a tale that celebrates how one can cleverly and resolutely rise superior to all opposition.  Yet as fresh prospectives on history now suggest,  in this search for freedom and order,  the masculine craving for adventure, demanded restrictions upon women,  forcing her into deeper confinement, even within her limited province.  Thus the rights of a man are separated by the expectancies of a woman.   Each subsequent story deals with a search for truth that is hidden by the facades of social convention.   This search is often hampered by the conventions that are part of the outside and inside domain.  For a female's quest is best displayed in the sphere of domestic life, which drastically diminishes her diversity of action, compared to men who are expected to live public, successful lives....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Rebecca West's The Return of the Soldier and Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Rebecca West's The Return of the Soldier and Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room Rebecca West and Virginia Woolf give great significance to the families of their respective main characters in The Return of the Soldier and Jacob’s Room because it gives the reader a greater insight to the formation of and reasoning for both Chris and Jacob’s nature. Each of these characters have multiple families to deal with: Chris has Kitty and Jenny on the one hand, and Margaret on the other, while Jacob deals with his mother and brother as well as his connections to society and academia....   [tags: Woolf West Soldier Jacob's Compare Essays] 2723 words
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf spends much of her time straddling the issues in ?A Room of One?s Own.. She carefully manipulates the reader by burying her points in flowery language and assumes the identity of another person so she does not have to take responsibility for what she says. She is very careful not to come off as too forceful or angry because she knows that her ideas will be disregarded if she does. Woolf is terrified of having her words labeled as ?feminist. and of attracting the stigma that the label is surrounded by....   [tags: Papers] 1272 words
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Reality versus Illusion in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Reality versus Illusion in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf.        In his play, The American Dream, Edward Albee unveils a tortured family that is symbolic of the reality beneath the illusion of the American dream.  In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Albee takes a more traditional approach than the theater of the absurd, and his language is more natural, but he returns to this theme with a vengeance.  For in all of drama there are few plays about domestic relationships that are as caustic, violent and as poisoned with the milk of human bitterness, cynicism and pessimism as is Woolf.  The story regards George and Martha, a married couple (he a history professor and she the University President's daughter).  Verbally and emotionally George and Martha are as skilled at cutting each other without going for the final kill as much as a professional torturer trained to prolong his victim's agony.  Into this volley of abuse come Nick and Honey, a young couple who also share a vision of the "American dream," but Albee portrays Nick as the victor in his battles with George because George is of the old school and Nick has already been indoctrinated into the new American culture of capitalism for its own sake.    The theme of the play, other than touching on the disillusionment of the American dream for the younger generation, and a robotic-like acceptance of the evolved "capitalized" version by the older generation, is that each of the characters in the play, like each of us in real life, are destined to struggle through our own personal hell, a struggle that we face alone "It becomes clear that each character is engaged in an isolated struggle through a personal hell" (Murphy 1113).  The plot centers around George and Martha's psychological manipulation of each other, both of them as manipulating as they are manipulated.  Yet, they know their antics are not only dramatic, they understand that they are even using their guests for theatrical reasons (much as Albee used the audience for his own theatrical purposes).  We see this when George intentionally pays no attention to Martha as she tries all the harder to win his interest:   George: No, no now...you go right ahead...you entertain your guests....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf]
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Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights - Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights share similarities in many aspects, perhaps most plainly seen in the plots: just as Clarissa marries Richard rather than Peter Walsh in order to secure a comfortable life for herself, Catherine chooses Edgar Linton over Heathcliff in an attempt to wrest both herself and Heathcliff from the squalid lifestyle of Wuthering Heights. However, these two novels also overlap in thematic elements in that both are concerned with the opposing forces of civilization or order and chaos or madness....   [tags: Compare contrast Woolf Bronte Essays] 1672 words
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An Analysis of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - An Analysis of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Somewhere within the narrative of Mrs. Dalloway, there seems to lie what could be understood as a restatement - or, perhaps, a working out of - the essentially simple, key theme or motif found in Woolf's famous feminist essay A Room of One's Own. Mrs. Dalloway does in fact possess "a room of her own - " and enjoys an income (or the use of an income) that is at least "five hundred a year - " (Room: 164). But most importantly, Clarissa Dalloway also deals with ways of working out female economic necessity, personal space, and the manifestation of an "artistic" self-conception....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway]
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf was a very powerful and imaginative writer. In a "Room of Ones Own" she takes her motivational views about women and fiction and weaves them into a story. Her story is set in a imaginary place where here audience can feel comfortable and open their minds to what she is saying. In this imaginary setting with imaginary people Woolf can live out and see the problems women faced in writing. Woolf also goes farther by breaking many of the rules of writing in her essay....   [tags: essays research papers] 1166 words
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Virginia Woolf - An Author’s Brush Virginia Woolf is not unlike any other truly good artist: her writing is vague, her expression can be inhibited, and much of her work is up to interpretation from the spectator. Jacob’s Room is one of her novels that can be hard to digest, but this is where the beauty of the story can be found. It is not written in the blatant style of the authors before her chose and even writers today mimic, but rather Jacob’s Room appears more like a written painting than a book. It is as if Woolf appeared tired and bored of the black and white style of writing that dominated her culture and chose to use a paintbrush to write her story....   [tags: essays papers] 1249 words
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Virginia Woolf as Feminist and a Psychoanalyst - Virginia Woolf as Feminist and a Psychoanalyst When first introduced to the feminist and psychoanalytical approaches to literary criticism, it seems obvious that the two methods are opposed to each other; at the very least, one method -the psychoanalytic - would appear antagonistic to feminism. After all, there is much in Freud's earlier theories that a feminist would find appalling. It also seems to be a conflict that the feminists are winning: as feminist criticism gains in popularity, the psychoanalytic approach has apparently fallen into disfavour within the academic community....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Virgina Woolf and Feminism - Virginia Woolf is often categorized as being an aesthetic writer. Most of her works played largely on the concept of suggestion. They addressed many social issues especially those regarding feminine problems. Woolf was acutely aware of her identity as a woman and she used many of writings as outlets for her frustrations. According to her doctrine, the subjugation of women is a central fact of history, a key to most of our social and psychological disorders (Marder 3). The two works I will focus on is A Room of One's Own and "A Society" from Monday or Tuesday....   [tags: World Literature] 1749 words
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Reader Response to Woolf’s To The Lighthouse - Reader Response to Woolf’s To The Lighthouse      There is a saying that the worth of a man’s life is best measured by the degree to which he has if he has touched the lives of others and not by the quantity of worldly possessions that he has acquired.  It is important to keep this in mind when considering Virginia Woolf’s novel, To The Lighthouse.  Throughout the novel, it seems as though the characters, mainly Mr. And Mrs. Ramsay, are trying to find worth in their lives.  As a first time reader of the novel, it immediately seemed clear to me that the eight children that Mr....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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Male and Female Relations in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Male and Female Relations in To The Lighthouse           To The Lighthouse exemplifies the condition of women when Woolf was writing and to some extent yet today. It offers a solution to remedy the condition of both men and women. To say the novel is a cry for a change in attitude towards women is not quite correct. It shows the plight of both men and women and how patriarchy is detrimental to both genders. Mrs. Ramsey. Both suffer from the unequal division of gender power in Woolf's society....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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Confrontation of Gender Roles in the Works of Mill, Tennyson, and Woolf - Confrontation of Gender Roles in the Works of Mill, Tennyson, and Woolf Although women in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries faced oppression and unequal treatment, some people strove to change common perspectives on the feminine sex. John Stuart Mill, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and Virginia Woolf were able to reach out to the world, through their literature, and help change the views that society held towards women and their roles within its structure. During the Victorian era, women were bound to domestic roles and were very seldom allowed to seek other positions....   [tags: European Literature] 1976 words
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What is one to do? - For the great majority of people “what is one to do?” is a rhetorical question or a submissive utterance which appears in the outstanding short story The Yellow Wallpaper written by the American author Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Doubtless, with this question the writer seeks to withdraw the generally accepted role of women in the past century by simply guiding the readers to take a dare to answer “what is one to do ?”. It can be argued that the 19th century was a different period and women were used to be submissive, although, one cannot deny that there is always an answer to this question echoing through the paper....   [tags: Literary Analysis ] 1367 words
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Going Round Our Selves - Going Round Our Selves To tell the truth about oneself, to discover oneself near at hand, is not easy. -Virginia Woolf, "Montaigne" It was the end of August. I was eight years old and my mom, dad, brother, uncle, and I had gathered on the front porch of our lakeside cottage in Indiana. All day a thunderstorm raged outside. The rain swept across the lake in sheets from the north, flooding the boathouse and drenching the sheets and towels my mother and I had hung on the clothesline the night before....   [tags: Personal Narrative Woolf Essays]
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The Life and Work of Virginia Woolf - From the early death of her mother at age 13 to the sexual abuse from her own half brothers led to the many mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects Virginia’s life filled with depression even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, ]
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Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway - Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway revolves around several of the issues that preoccupied the Bloomsbury writers and thinkers as a group. Issues of androgyny, class, madness, and mythology run throughout the novel. While that is hardly an exhaustive list, these notions seem to form the core of the structure of the novel. Woolf herself, when envisioning the project, sought to produce “a study of insanity and suicide, the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side.” This issue of madness, in particular, gives the novel its form as we follow the twinned lives of Septimus Warren Smith and Clarissa Dalloway....   [tags: Woolf] 624 words
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The Duchess And The Jeweler by Virginia Woolf - The Duchess and the Jeweler is the story of the world's greatest jeweler who had promised his mother to become the richest jeweler in the world in his childhood but now that his dream has materialized he does not feel satisfied. So trying to achieve satisfaction, knowingly he buys fake pearls from a Duchess in exchange for passing a whole weekend with her daughter whom he is in love with. The purpose of this essay is to show how Virginia Woolf has successfully presented the inner mind of the characters, their struggle and their communication through the least amount of verbal communication among them....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Duchess Jeweler] 1572 words
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Viriginia Woolf - Viriginia Woolf (this essay has problems with the format) One of the greatest female authors of all time, Virginia Woolf, produced a body of writing respected worldwide. Driven by uncontrollable circumstances and internal conflict, her life was cut short by suicide. Her role in feminism, along with the personal relationships in her life, influenced her literary works. Virginia's relationships throughout her life contributed, not only to her literature, but the quality of her life as well. Perhaps the greatest influence in Virginia's life is her mother, Julia Stephen....   [tags: Author Viriginia Woolf feminism relationships]
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway In Jacob's Room, the novel preceding Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf works with many of the same themes she later expands upon in Mrs. Dalloway. To Mrs. Dalloway, she added the theme of insanity. As Woolf stated, "I adumbrate here a study of insanity and suicide; the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side." However, even the theme that would lead Woolf to create a double for Clarissa Dalloway can be viewed as a progression of other similar ideas cultivated in Jacob's Room....   [tags: Novel Analysis Dalloway Woolf] 737 words
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To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf When speaking of modernism in the work Virginia Woolf, scholars too readily use her innovations in style and technique as the starting point for critical analysis, focusing largely on the ways in which her prose represents a departure from the conventional novel in both style and content. To simply discuss the extent of her unique style, however, is to overlook the role of tradition in her creation of a new literary identity. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's invention reveals itself instead as a reinvention, a recasting of the conventional through the use of the traditional....   [tags: Lighthouse Virginia Woolf Essays]
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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf For this book talk, I read an Edward Albee's play, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf." I saw the movie version of this book, which I found excellent, so it inspired me to read the book. The book begins when George, who is an associate professor of a New England college, and Martha, who is the daughter of the college professor comes home after a faculty party. Although it is well after midnight and they are heavily drunk, Martha invites another couple, Nick who is a new and young professor in the college, and his wife Honey....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf Essays] 665 words
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway “Imagination is the one weapon in the war against reality.” -Jules de Gaultier Set just after one of England’s worst tragedies, Virginia Woolf’s 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway is a vivid picture of the effects of World War I on London’s high society, often in glaring contrast to the effects of shell shock suffered by war veteran Septimus Smith. For members of high society, the War’s impact is largely indirect, mainly affecting their conversations at posh social functions....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway Essays WWI]
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Analysis of Mrs. Dalloway by – Virginia Woolf - Analysis of Mrs. Dalloway by – Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway, published in 1925, is a romantic drama with deep psychological approaching in to the world of urban English society in the summer of 1923, five years after the end of World War I. The book begins in the morning with the arrangements for a party Clarissa Dalloway will give and it ends late in the evening when the guests are all leaving. There are many flashbacks to tell us the past of each character, but it does not leave the range of those few hours....   [tags: Play Woolf MRS Dalloway] 1456 words
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Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando - Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando In her novel Orlando, Virginia Woolf tells the story of a man who one night mysteriously becomes a woman. By shrouding Orlando's actual gender change in a mysterious religious rite, we readers are pressured to not question the actual mechanics of the change but rather to focus on its consequences. In doing this, we are invited to answer one of the fundamental questions of our lives, a question that we so often ignore because it seems so very basic - what is a man....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]
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Analysis of Baldwin's Giovanni's Room - Analysis of Baldwin's Giovanni's Room Baldwin portrays a different form of oppression in his novel entitled, Giovanni's Room. Sexual oppression is exemplified through individual homosexual white men who are unable to find happiness or contentment in themselves or in everyday relationships. In Baldwin's 'Everybody's Protest Novel' he writes, 'but our humanity is our burden, our life; we need not battle for it; we need only to do what is infinitely more difficult-that is, accept it.' Giovanni's Room is about each individual's need to accept their own humanity and societies need to embrace the universal theme of suffering amongst humanity....   [tags: Giovanni's Room Baldwin Oppression Essays]
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Virginia Woolf’s Between the Acts - Virginia Woolf’s Between the acts Virginia Woolf uses many images in the Between the Acts. Like the other novels I read in the class, the images in the Between the Acts cannot be separated with the story development, and the images themselves construct the story in the book by dismantling the conventional expectation for the novel. However, Woolf uses common and conventional words and images with an experimental way in this novel. This novel constructs the images and the representation with their conventional words and actions of the characters....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Between the Acts Essays]
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The Personal Events which Led Virginia Woolf to the a Great Novelist - From the early death of her mother at age thirteen to the sexual abuse from her own half- brothers, many personal events contributed to the numerous mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people, you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects that Virginia’s life was filled with depression, even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, biography, Kew Gardens] 1769 words
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Perception is Reality in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Perception is Reality in Mrs. Dalloway  Although the entire novel tells of only one day, Virginia Woolf covers a lifetime in her enlightening novel of the mystery of the human personality. The delicate Clarissa Dalloway, a disciplined English lady, provides the perfect contrast to Septimus Warren Smith, an insane ex-soldier living in chaos. Even though the two never meet, these two correspond in that they strive to maintain possession of themselves, of their souls. On this Wednesday in June of 1923, as Clarissa prepares for her party that night, events during the day trigger memories and recollections of her past, and Woolf offers these bits to the reader, who must then form the psychological and emotional make-up of Mrs....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays] 1985 words
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The Effects of Society in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - The Effects of Society in Mrs. Dalloway Society is a constant changing idea, whether that change be from region to region or a period of time. People move through it without thinking what they really are doing. Often they do not realize how much pressure society places on one’s being. It is the basis of how a person forms their opinions, beliefs, and morals. The structure of behavior rests in the society one is raised in. People’s acceptance of one another and a desire to conform create a world where people are struggling to fit in....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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Female Relationships in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Female Relationships in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway     Clarissa Dalloway, the central character in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, is a complex figure whose relations with other women reveal as much about her personality as do her own musings. By focusing at length on several characters, all of whom are in some way connected to Clarissa, Woolf expertly portrays the ways females interact: sometimes drawing upon one another for things which they cannot get from men; other times, turning on each other out of jealousy and insecurity....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita - Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita It has been said the novel Orlando is the longest love-letter ever written; a celebration of the bond between women. The relationship between Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West is well documented and known to have been intimate. That Virginia was passionate and giddy about her relationship with Vita is also known and displayed in Orlando. But Orlando also offers a rare intimate glimpse into the mind of Virginia Woolf. An unselfconscious work, it reveals her mind, talent at play....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]
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New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf is a disturbing and powerful work. Ironically, it is disturbing and powerful for many of the same reasons. As the audience watches George and Martha tear savagely at each other with the knives of hurled words, sharpened on pain and aimed to draw blood, the way in which these two relentlessly go at each other is awful to see, yet strangely familiar. Like wounded animals, they strike out at those closest to them, and reminds one of scenes witnessed as a child between screaming parents from a cracked door when one is supposed to be in bed....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf] 1723 words
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Evolution of the Modern Woman in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Evolution of the Modern Woman in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse examines the role of women or more specifically, the evolution of the modern woman. The two main female characters in the novel, Mrs Ramsay and Lily Briscoe, both represent different views on life and follow different paths on their search for meaning. Lily Briscoe transcends the traditional female gender roles embodied by Mrs Ramsay; by coming into her own as an independent and modern woman, she symbolises the advent of modernism and rejection of traditional Victorian values....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays Virginia Woolf ]
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The Importance of Time in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - The Importance of Time in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway We live in a consumer society consuming time. We use time to function smoothly but also to channel the direction of our lives. As a college student, I am constantly aware of time. I have a time frame for finishing my college career, as well as constant deadlines to meet. Daily, I divide my hours between my job, my studies, and my friends. In the midst of following external time, I strive for a balance with my internal time. My personal sense of time allows me to live in the present moment....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway Virginia Woolf Essays]
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Social Oppression in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Social Oppression in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway The physical and social setting in "Mrs. Dalloway" sets the mood for the novel's principal theme: the theme of social oppression. Social oppression was shown in two ways: the oppression of women as English society returned to its traditional norms and customs after the war, and the oppression of the hard realities of life, "concealing" these realities with the elegance of English society....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway Virginia Woolf] 1482 words
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A Sense of Character and Society in Forster's Room With a View - A Sense of Character and Society in Forster's Room With a View Forster wastes no time in setting the scene and setting the class boundaries of his characters. We know even from the first statement that Miss Bartlett is towards the upper classes and is potentially a very highly strung woman, which is later proven to be true. "The Signora had no business to do it" is so telling because we can imagine the word "Signora" being spat out in disgust and the forcefulness of the "no" truly imprints Charlottes histeria as major trait of her disposition....   [tags: Forster Room View] 1181 words
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Use of Religion to Offer a Critique of Society in Forster's “A Room with a View" and Hartley's "The Go-Between" - “Life is nothing until it is lived; but it is yours to make sense of, and the value of it is nothing else but the sense that you choose”, Jean-Paul Sartre, 1946. In these books, religion is used as a tool to express this feeling; even though A Room with a View was written before Existentialism and Humanism, Sartre’s idea is very clear in Forster’s work. The authors examine ways of living; impassively, as is thrust upon one by a society with such concrete values, or actively, through a rejection of the innate morals of this society....   [tags: A room with a view, the go between]
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Outcry Against Conformity in Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Outcry Against Conformity in Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf. Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf. may be viewed as a criticism of American society in the 1960s. Edward Albee saw 'the responsibility of the writer...to be a sort of demonic social critic': thus the play became a reaction against the illusionary plays of its time. Two lines from the play are directly lifted from the works which Albee is mocking: 'Flores para los muertos' is from A Streetcar named Desire and Martha's speech - 'Awww, tis the refuge we take...' - is from a play by Eugene O'Neill....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf Essays] 1646 words
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Searching For Meaning in Virginia Woolf's Between the Acts - Searching For Meaning in Virginia Woolf's Between the Acts I wanted to examine the states at the limits of language; The moments where language breaks up...I wanted to examine the language which manifests these states of instability because in ordinary communication--which is organized, civilized--we repress these states of incandescence. Creativity as well as suffering comprises these moments of instability, where language, or the signs of language, or subjectivity itself are put into "process"....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Between the Acts Essays]
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway It is apparent throughout the Virgina Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway that the character development and complexity of the female characters of the story are concentrated on far more than their male counterparts. It is my feelings that the magnitude of this character development comes about because of the observations and feelings of the main character Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway] 1125 words
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Symbolism and Allusion in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot - Symbolism and Allusion in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot are representative works of two separate movements in literature: Modernism and Post-Modernism. Defining both movements in their entirety, or arguing whether either work is truly representative of the classifications of Modernism and Post-Modernism, is not the purpose of this paper; rather, the purpose is to carefully evaluate how both works, in the context of both works being representative of their respective traditions, employ the use of symbolism and allusion....   [tags: Woolf Beckett Godot Woolf Symbolism Essays]
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The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells - The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells Both stories are Gothic mystery stories and were written around the late eighteenth century to the early nineteenth century. These sorts of stories usually have a setting of a dark, abandoned and scary place. The Red Room is about a young man who visits a castle and feels he must spend a night in a mysterious room that is suspected to be haunted. The Cone is about a woman having an affair with a man called Raut. The story is based around the husband who is called Horrocks seeing Raut with his wife....   [tags: The Red Room The Cone H.G. Wells Essays] 1150 words
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The Intersection of External Time and Internal Time in Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf - In Mrs Dalloway, the modernist writer Virginia Woolf undermines the usual conventions of prior prose fiction by adopting an innovative approach to time. She contrasts the objective external time and subjective internal time that structure the plot of the one-day novel. In fact, the story takes place on a single day in June and, by the use of two important techniques, namely the stream of consciousness mode of narration and the interior monologue, the reader is constantly flowing from the present to the past or the future....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway, Virginia Woolf]
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Imposing Our Own Ideological Frameworks onto Virginia Woolf and Her Writing - Imposing Our Own Ideological Frameworks onto Virginia Woolf and Her Writing Whenever we try to imagine the feelings or motives of a writer, we impose our own thoughts and ideas, our own biases, onto that person and their work. Perhaps in order to justify our choices or legitimate the philosophies that we hold dear, we interpret texts so that they fall into place in our own ideological frameworks. Literature, because it engages with the most important and passionate questions in life, evokes responses in readers that emanate not only from the mind but also from the subconscious and from the deepest places in the heart....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - ‘The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf      Death is a difficult subject for anyone to speak of, although it is a part of everyday life. In Virginia Woolf’s “The Death of the Moth”, she writes about a moth flying about a windowpane, its world constrained by the boundaries of the wood holding the glass. The moth flew, first from one side, to the other, and then back as the rest of life continued ignorant of its movements. At first indifferent, Woolf was eventually moved to pity the moth. This story shows that life is as strange and familiar as death to us all....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Death Moth Essays]
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