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Eliot's Innovative Approach to Form and Theme in The Waste Land - The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot is considered an open text that could be regarded as a seminal piece of modern literature. By the term modernism, Graff (in Barth [1984] cited in Collins, 1992, 328) suggests that it can be understood to mean a movement that “began as a criticism of nineteenth-century bourgeois culture, a rejection of both its values and its most favored style, realism.” The period of modernity is defined by Best and Kellner (1991, 2) as “a historical periodizing term which refers to the epoch that follows the ‘Middle Ages’ or feudalism.” Their definition potentially covers an era that spans of hundreds of years which is out with the scope of the length of this essay....   [tags: The Waste Land]
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2333 words
(6.7 pages)
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T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land and the Modernist Movement - Sight. It is the simple, yet extremely intricate skill performed by humans everyday. The uniqueness of an eye can be described as different combinations of colors that draw people in for deep conversations and contact with one another. As light shines its beams onto an eye, different colors sparkle, making beautiful shades shine through. Brown, green, blue and hazel are merely a few of the colors that can make up one’s eye. Without eyes, human beings would not be able to visualize the wonderful aspects of nature....   [tags: The Waste Land Essays]
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2460 words
(7 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Journey Through The Waste Land -        T. S. Eliot drafted The Waste Land during a trip to Lausanne, Switzerland to consult a psychologist for what he described as mild case of nerves. He sent the manuscript to Ezra Pound for editing assistance. Between them the draft was extensively edited and published in 1922. As a modernist poet, Eliot struggled to remove the voice of the author from his work but the work is still a reflection of the author’s interpretation. He paints the picture as he sees it for the readers to view and interpret from their own perspective....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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1541 words
(4.4 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Superficiality in The Waste Land - Superficiality in The Waste Land   The Waste Land is concerned with the 'disillusionment of a generation'. The poem was written in the early 1920's, a time of abject poverty, heightening unemployment and much devastation unresolved from the end of WW1 in 1918. Despite this, or because of it, people made a conscientious effort to enjoy themselves. In doing so they lost their direction, their beliefs and their individuality. They were victims of the class system which maintained a system of privilege, snobbery and distrust....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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1656 words
(4.7 pages)
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T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land - T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land “Both the hysteric and the mystic transgress the linear syntax and logic governing the established symbolic order.” -Helen Bennett It is perhaps part of the unique genius of T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” that both critics and lay readers have repeatedly felt forced to look outside the published text of the poem for clues as to its meaning. The text’s fragmented, seemingly violated body seems to exhibit wounds through which its significance has slipped, creating a “difficulty caused by the author’s having left out something which the reader is used to finding; so that the reader, bewildered, gropes about for what is absent…a kind of ‘meaning’ which is not...   [tags: Eliot Waste Land Essays] 1895 words
(5.4 pages)
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Myth and Violence in The Waste Land -          As evidenced by his writings, T.S. Eliot has a profound appreciation for the use of myth as a point of departure for maintaining a cultural or historical perspective. In "The Waste Land," his employment of myth is not simply an allusive and metaphorical tactic, but rather an attempt at relating his own ideas and tropes to universals in order to establish some external order for the chaos he is presenting: "The element of myth in his art is not so much a creative method, a resumption of the role of mythic poet, as it is an intellectual strategy, a device for gaining perspective on himself and on his myth-forsaken time" (Ellmann, 621)....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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2653 words
(7.6 pages)
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The Waste Land and the Hero - The Wasteland, based on the texts I have read, is a varied and diverse environment of barrenness and death. In my life, and in society today, the Wasteland is not much different; the barrenness is one of mind and soul, and we have the same lack of knowledge about death now that these authors did when recording their thoughts on paper. A hero is needed in this harsh environment, to guide the multitude, or merely set the example for all others to follow. Though few characters meet the qualifications of a true hero, many come close in several aspects of their lives....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 3859 words
(11 pages)
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T.S Eliot's The Waste Land - T.S Eliot's The Waste Land In T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land you perceive many images from the writing style he uses. In lines 386 - 399 he writes: In this decayed hole among the mountains In the faint moonlight, the grass is singing Over the tumbled graves, about the chapel There is the empty chapel, only the wind's home. It has no windows, and the door swings, Dry bones can harm no one. Only a cock stood on the rooftree Co co rico co co rico In a flash of lightning....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 530 words
(1.5 pages)
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Elements of Interreligious Dialogue in The Waste Land - Elements of Interreligious Dialogue in The Waste Land “The House Of His Protection The Land Gave To Him That Sought Her Out And Unto Him That Delved Gave Return Of Her Fruits” -Engraved above the Western-most door of Joslyn Art Museum Beyond all doubt, T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” is one of the most excruciating works a reader may ever attempt. The reading is painful to the point of exhaustion for the poetry-lover as he scrutinizes the poem pericope by pericope. However, all this suffering (self-inflicted or otherwise) suggests that the author has likewise labored over the poem, emptying himself into his work--pericope by pericope....   [tags: Waste Land Eliot papers] 3037 words
(8.7 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Impact of Images on the Structure of The Waste Land - Impact of Images on the Structure of The Waste Land      Many of the images that give bounds to the structure of "The Waste Land" relate to the annual cycle of life with which ancient peoples closely bound up their own lives. Eliot himself points out the importance of the ancient cycle of life by acknowledging a "general indebtedness," as the anthologists' introduction to the poem points out, to Sir James Frazer's The Golden Bough and especially the volumes Adonis, Attis, Osiris. These two volumes deal with ancient beliefs about cycles in the life of vegetation and with ceremonies meant to insure fertility....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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961 words
(2.7 pages)
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Free Waste Land Essays: Underlying Myths in The Waste Land - Underlying Myths in The Waste Land The underlying myths that Eliot uses to provide a framework for "The Waste Land" are those of the Fisher King and the Grail Quest. Both of these myths come to Christian civilization through the ancient Gaelic tradition. Neither is found in the Bible, but both were important enough to Europeans that there was a need to incorporate them into the new European mythology, and so the stories became centered on the story of the death and resurrection of Jesus....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 582 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Power of T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land - The Power of T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land     T. S. Eliot, perhaps one of the most controversial poets of modern times, wrote what many critics consider the most controversial poem of all, The Waste Land.  The Waste Land was written using a fragmented style.  This is a style that is evident in all of Eliot's writings.  There are several reasons for his using this approach, from a feeling of being isolated, to a problem articulating thoughts (Bergonzi 18, Cuddy 13, Mack 1745, Martin 102)....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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1515 words
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Dryness and Spiritual Decay in The Waste Land - Dryness and Spiritual Decay in The Waste Land        T.S. Eliot peppers "The Waste Land," his apocalyptic poem, with images of modern aridity and inarticulacy that contrast with fertile allusions to previous times. Eliot's language details a brittle era, rife with wars physical and sexual, spiritually broken, culturally decaying, dry and dusty. His references to the Fisher King and mythical vegetation rituals imply that the 20th-century world is in need of a Quester to irrigate the land. "The Waste Land" refuses to provide a simple solution; the properties of the language serve to make for an ambiguous narrative and conclusion, one as confusing and fragmented as Eliot's era itself....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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2481 words
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Waste Land Essay: All is Not Well - All is Not Well in The Waste Land Eliot's "The Waste Land" doesn't make sense. No matter how many symbols and allusions are explained by critics or Eliot himself, no matter how many fertility gods and Eastern philosophies are dragged into it, the poem does not make sense. But then, it doesn't need to in order to be good or to have a purpose. All it needs is to have meaning, and something need not make sense to mean something. The meaning "The Waste Land" holds for me is of something wrong - something so twisted and "rotten," as to be intrinsically wrong....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 586 words
(1.7 pages)
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T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land and Morality - T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land and Morality T.S. Eliot and Yulisa Amadu Maddy both address the topics of fear of death and then correlative love of life, but from entirely different points of view. T.S. Eliot wrote during a time when people were questioning relativity, especially moral relativity and it's effect on life after death. Maddy wrote about young boys who were going through that time in a teenager's life when they realize that they will die someday. Thus, teenagers begin to acknowledge death while embarking on their search for love and the meaning of life....   [tags: Eliot Waste Land Morals Essays]
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1189 words
(3.4 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Love and Sex - Love and Sex in The Waste Land      Attitudes toward love and sex are one of the major themes of the poem. The introduction to "The Waste Land" in The Norton Anthology of English Literature states that "This is a poem about spiritual dryness," and much of this spiritual dryness relates to the nature of the modern sexual experience (although there are also other aspects of spiritual dryness the introduction also notes that major themes include a lack of a "regenerating belief" that gives "significance and value to people" and a type of death that "heralds no resurrection")....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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955 words
(2.7 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: A Single Protagonist - The Waste Land: A Single Protagonist The idea of a single and unifying protagonist in The Waste Land was briefly proposed by Stanley Sultan in Ulysses, The Waste Land, and Modernism form. I would like to pursue this topic in greater depth. Part I presents no obstacles to reading the poem in this light. On the contrary, the hypothesis of a single speaker and performer adds shadow, depth, drama, and direction to everything in the movement. It discovers a poem of far more seriousness, profundity, and complexity....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 1139 words
(3.3 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Eluding Understanding - The Waste Land: Eluding Understanding The Waste Land is, to begin with, a poem that includes an interpretation as part of the poem, and it is therefore a poem that makes a problem of its meaning precisely by virtue of its apparent (and apparently inadequate) effort to explain itself. We cannot understand the poem without knowing what it meant to its author, but we must also assume that what the poem meant to its author will not be its meaning. The notes to The Waste Land are, by the logic of Eliot's philosophical critique of interpretation, simply another riddle--and not a separate one to be solved....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 771 words
(2.2 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Spiritual Decay - Spiritual Decay in The Waste Land     In The Waste Land, T.S. Eliot develops his theme of sterility and decay in the post-World War I man by focusing on the aspect of "religious dearth or superficiality reflected in despintualized love" (Pinion). For Eliot, man's inability to find real love or to move beyond superficial sexual gratification is congruous to the spiritual decay of his soul.      In the first part of the poem, "The Burial of the Dead'~ Eliot's allusions to two love stories amidst a backdrop of "stony rubbish" and "broken images" illustrates his view of love as something that has lost its ability to blossom in the infertility of modem society (20,22)....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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535 words
(1.5 pages)
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Water and Religious Motifs in The Waste Land, by T.S. Eliot - The Waste Land: Water and Religious Motifs In his poem "The Waste Land," T.S. Eliot employs a water motif, which represents both death and rebirth. This ties in with the religious motif, as well as the individual themes of the sections and the theme of the poem as a whole, that modern man is in a wasteland, and must be reborn. In the first section, "Burial of the Dead," water (or the lack thereof) has a primarily negative meaning. It is first mentioned in lines four and nine, in reference to April, which the narrator calls "The cruellest month." Later, the narrator describes an arid scene, in which the "Dry stone [gives] no sound of water" (24)....   [tags: The Waste Land Essays]
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1524 words
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Free Waste Land Essays: The Lifeless Land - The Waste Land:  Lifeless Land       As The Waste Land begins, Eliot enters into the barren land, which the audience journeys across with the author through the course of the poem. "The roots that clutch" immediately evoke a feeling of desperation. Roots in the rocky soil Eliot describes are a base from which to grow; just as roots in plants gain nourishment from soil, these roots "clutch" infertile ground, desperately seeking something to gain from nothing. The question "what branches grow" suggests skepticism as to life's ability to survive in "stony rubbish," the waste that offers no forgiveness....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 507 words
(1.4 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Eliot's Use of Different Speakers - Eliot's Use of Different Speakers in The Waste Land     Different speakers in "The Waste Land" mirror the disjointedness of modern experience by presenting different viewpoints that the reader is forced to put together for himself. This is similar to the disassociation in modern life in that life has ceased to be a unified whole: various aspects of 20th-century life -- various academic disciplines, theory and practice, Church and State, and Eliot's "disassociation of sensibilities," or separation of heart and mind -- have become separated from each other, and a person who lives in this time period is forced to shore these fragments against his or her ruins, to borrow Eliot's phrase, to se...   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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688 words
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Waste Land Essay: Isolation from a Noble Past - The Waste Land:  Isolation from a Noble Past      Desire to return to a noble past is a central theme of T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.  The narrators of the poem consistently show dissatisfaction with the present, and describe, with yearning, the quality of the past; furthermore, Eliot portrays the contemporary world as irredeemably lost to the beauty of antiquity.  In The Waste Land, the theme of isolation from a noble past is represented by descriptions of the environment, sexual corruption, and self-mechanization....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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1989 words
(5.7 pages)
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Free Waste Land Essays: A New Understanding - The Waste Land: A New Understanding The Waste Land, Eliot's first long philosophical poem, can now be read simply as it was written, as a poem of radical doubt and negation, urging that every human desire be stilled except the desire for self-surrender, for restraint, and for peace. Compared with the longing expressed in later poems for the "eyes" and the "birth," the "coming" and "the Lady" (in "The Hollow Men," the Ariel poems, and "Ash-Wednesday"), the hope held out in The Waste Land is a negative one....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 1034 words
(3 pages)
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Free Waste Land Essays: The Current Relevance - The Current Relevance of The Waste Land Eliot’s poem, The Waste Land, is at least as relevant to life today as it was in 1922, when it was first published. All of the themes stated at the beginning of the Norton Anthology's introduction to the poem ("spiritual dryness," a lack of "regenerating belief" to give meaning to life, and death without resurrection) are with us to an even greater degree than they were at the time the poem was first published. (Introduction 2146) The attitudes toward sexuality that are implicitly condemned throughout the work have not changed in any way that Eliot would be likely to see as an improvement, either....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 436 words
(1.2 pages)
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Waste Land Essay: Truth through Complexity - The Waste Land: Truth through Complexity The basic method used in The Waste Land may be described as the application of the principle of complexity. T S Eliot uses a parallel structure on the surface to develop an ironic contrast, and then uses surface contrasts in a parallel form. To the reader, this gives the effect of chaotic experience ordered into a new whole, though the realistic surface of experience is faithfully retained. The fortune-telling of "The Burial of the Dead" will illustrate the general method very satisfactorily....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays] 850 words
(2.4 pages)
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T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land - The Most Influential Work in Modern Literature - T.S. Eliot’s "The Waste Land" - The Most Influential Work in Modern Literature T.S. Eliot’s "The Waste Land" is considered by many to be the most influential work in modern literature. First published in 1922, it captures the feelings and sentiments of modern culture after World War I. Line thirty of "The Waste Land," "I will show you fear in a handful of dust," is often viewed as a symbol of mankind’s fear of death and resulting love of life. Eliot’s masterpiece—with its revolutionary ideas—inspired writers of his era, and it continues to affect writers even today....   [tags: T.S. Eliot The Waste Land] 1254 words
(3.6 pages)
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Death without Rebirth in T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land - Death without Rebirth in T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land is filled with a variety of images and themes. Two outstanding themes are desolation and death without rebirth. Eliot employs many different images related to these two important themes. The most prominent image where desolation is concerned is a wasteland: a barren, rocky landscape lacking any life or water. The absence of water is mentioned over and over to suggest no life can ever exist in this desert, as water is a life-providing substance....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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563 words
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T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land – Can We Learn From the Past ? - T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land – Can We Learn From the Past . And he is not likely to know what is To be done unless he lives in what is not merely the present, but the present moment of the past, unless he is conscious, not of what is dead, but what is already living. --T.S. Eliot, "Tradition and the Individual Talent" When read for the first time, The Waste Land appears to be a concoction of sorts, a disjointed poem. Lines are written in different languages, narrators change, and the scenes seem disconnected, except for the repeated references to the desert and death....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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1758 words
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T.S. Eliot’s Powerful Use of Fragmentation in The Waste Land - T.S. Eliot’s Powerful Use of Fragmentation in The Waste Land T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land is an elaborate and mysterious montage of lines from other works, fleeting observations, conversations, scenery, and even languages. Though this approach seems to render the poem needlessly oblique, this style allows the poem to achieve multi-layered significance impossible in a more straightforward poetic style. Eliot’s use of fragmentation in The Waste Land operates on three levels: first, to parallel the broken society and relationships the poem portrays; second, to deconstruct the reader’s familiar context, creating an individualized sense of disconnection; and third, to challenge the reader to see...   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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2713 words
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An Annotation of T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Part 4, Death By Water - An Annotation of T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Part 4, Death By Water Each of us has our own personal wasteland. The wasteland may manifest itself in many things; school, loss of love, loneliness, work, fear or doubt. In any case, a wasteland is a part of us that is clearly missing something and causes a distinct lack of completeness and a sense of uncertainty about our future. T.S. Eliot manages to capture the essence of that dry and forsaken feeling in his five-part poem entitled, The Wasteland....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Papers]
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1834 words
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Cultural Decay in T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and Maddy’s NO Past, NO Present, NO Future - Cultural Decay in T.S. Eliot’s poem "The Waste Land" and Yulisa Amadu Maddy’s novel NO Past, NO Present, NO Future In both T.S. Eliot’s poem "The Waste Land" and Yulisa Amadu Maddy’s novel NO Past, NO Present, NO Future, the characters experience a downfall. It is human nature, though, to experience some sort of self-destruction. W.B. Yeats wrote the line "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold." Humanity tends to cling to that which is most destructive to itself, whether it is intended or not....   [tags: Waste Land Eliot Maddy Essays]
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1408 words
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Message of Hope in Eliot's The Waste Land, Gerontion, and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock - Message of Hope in Eliot's The Waste Land, Gerontion, and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock             Thomas Stearns Eliot was not a revolutionary, yet he revolutionized the way the Western world writes and reads poetry. Some of his works were as imagist and incomprehensible as could be most of it in free verse, yet his concentration was always on the meaning of his language, and the lessons he wished to teach with them. Eliot consorted with modernist literary iconoclast Ezra Pound but was obsessed with the traditional works of Shakespeare and Dante....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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2421 words
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The Waste Land - Faulkner presents sexual desire in The Sound and the Fury as a paradox of both entrapment and freedom. As he works his way through the nonlinear piece, information about sexuality of the characters, sexual symbols, and unfilled desire present themselves, each commenting on one another directly and indirectly. T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” serves as a helpful lens in understanding the requirements to escape the waste land of the ruined Compson family by providing a backdrop on which The Sound and the Fury can be projected....   [tags: Literary Analysis, T.S. Eliot] 2548 words
(7.3 pages)
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A Look at the Women of The Waste Land - T.S. Eliot’s poem, The Waste Land, shuffles through many characters, several of who are women. Each one of the characters has their own story and their own voice. They each contribute something unique to the overall meaning of the poem. The women in particular vary widely in age, stage of life, education level, and socioeconomic status. Their voices are unique and distinctive, and it is typically easy to tell them apart when they come up in the poem. However, despite their differences, Eliot remarked that the women are actually all a manifestation of a single woman....   [tags: Character Analysis, T.S. Eliot]
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1451 words
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The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot - The Waste Land, a 434-line modernist poem by T.S. Eliot revolves around a world of what seems to be chaotic and dead, and led by a single protagonist. Throughout The Waste Land, there are many uses of symbolism with tarot cards, astrology, and especially the game of chess: The game of chess is such a meaningful symbol throughout the story, that metaphors are used to describe the situation and emotions of the characters throughout the poem by describing them as chess pieces and in check-mate situations....   [tags: Poem Poetry T.S. Eliot Wasteland] 1512 words
(4.3 pages)
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Identifying with the Waste Land - T.S Eliot’s The Waste Land frustrates the reader with a complexity so dense that he or she feels lost. This frustration arises out of the poem’s fragmented structure of the characters, place, and time which gives the reader an insight into the civilization following World War I and the authors’ chaotic state of mind. He shows how modern life appears to be fragmented and disordered through the shifting images, points of view and alternating periods of time. T.S Eliot uses allusions to myths, history, and literature to lead us out of the confining present moment and ego to transcend into a self that is free and in harmony with others and nature....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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973 words
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Influences in the Waste Land by T.S. Eliot - The 1920’s are often referred to as the roaring twenties. It is customarily described as the golden age, boisterous and wild time period (Meredith 51). Contrary to this popular belief, authors, T.S Eliot, Ernest Hemmingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald described this time period differently. Eliot’s poem The Waste Land vividly describes the very state the world was found in after World War I. Eliot examines the way the land is left desolate, and the way the people act and live. Both the novels The Great Gatsby and The Sun Also Rises exemplify the ideas and concepts Eliot describes....   [tags: ennui, solisism, vlaues, conditions] 1488 words
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The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot - A wasteland [weyst-land] is defined as: land that is uncultivated or barren; an area that is devastated as by flood, storm, or war; something as a period of history, phase of existence, or locality that is spiritually, or intellectually barren; one of the most important poems of the twentieth century (Dictionary.com). The Waste Land, by T.S. Eliot, has puzzled its audience and been tossed aside by the general population since 1922, when the poem was published. To a reader not committed to delving into its metaphors, the story might appear to represent the broken faithlessness of a society physically and emotionally marred after the Great War....   [tags: poetry, metaphor, epigraph, Satyricon]
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2658 words
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Analysis of The Waste Land, by T.S. Eliot - ... (19-24) Eliot is comparing England’s post WWI culture to the cultures described in these sections of the Bible. Eliot is saying that the culture is lifeless, and falling to “darkness.” He is saying that people can’t prosper as long as the culture is this way in the lines, “What branches grow out of this stony rubbish?”(19-20). One of the reasons that the culture was stagnant is because the populace of England was in a kind of “shock” from the brutality of the First World War. Eliot portrays this in “The Burial of The Dead,” Unreal City, Under the brown fog of a winter dawn, A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many, I had not thought death had undone so many....   [tags: poem analysis]
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970 words
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Analysis of The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot - If René Descartes’ “Cogito Ergo Sum” embodies the essence of what it means to be a unified and rational Cartesian subject, then T.S. Eliot’s “heap of broken images” eagerly embraces its fragmented and alienated (post)modern counterpart. The message this phrase bears, resonates throughout the entire poem: from its title, “The Waste Land”, to its final mantra “Shantih shantih shantih”. All words, phrases and sentences (or just simply images) which make up this poem seem to, in Levi-Strauss’ words, “be a valeur symbolique zero [and the signifier] can take on any value required ”, meaning that the images Eliot uses do not have one fixed signification and consequently conjure up thought-prov...   [tags: descartes, modernist]
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1586 words
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The Sacred Wood and Began the Waste Land by T.S. Eliot - ... In 1927 – 31, he became a member of the Church of England and the British citizen. He made Ariel Poems during 1927 - 31. For Lancelot Andrews, 1928, Ash – Wednesday, 1930, Coriolan, 1931. Thoughts After Lambeth, 1931. Through the years 1923 and 1933, T. S. had his first visit to America since 1914. He delivered Charles Eliot Norton lectures at Harvard. They were published as the Use of Poetry and the use of criticism in 1933. He also delivered the Page Barbour lectures at the University of Virginia....   [tags: hard working writer, poem]
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637 words
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T.S Eliot's The Waste Land: Fire-Igniting Water - ... Perhaps the corpse in order to bloom will need water, for that water will extinguish the flames that keep the corpse dead and prevent it from sprouting. The symbol of water will often be mentioned and it will even simultaneously bring about a partial cause of suffering and a source of relief. Imagery of fire is revisited once again in the second section of the poem titled,“A Game of Chess,” in which Eliot remarks on the standing of what seems like an aristocratic woman. The flames are beginning to influence their surroundings....   [tags: modernist poems]
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1151 words
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Contrasting of Past with Present in Waste Land - Contrast of Past with Present in The Waste Land      Eliot contrasts the past with the present in several ways throughout his poem, The Waste Land. The simplest of these is the simple juxtaposition of one or more descriptions of the present immediately before or after one or more descriptions of the past. The most obvious of these is section two, in which two descriptions of the present (lines 111-139 and 140-172) immediately follow a description of the past (lines 77-110). In this case, the juxtaposition is used to hold the modern attitude toward sex and love next to an attitude from the past....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1089 words
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Comparing Waste Land with Other Myths - The Waste Land: Parallels with Other Myths The Waste Land summarizes the Grail legend, not precisely in the usual order, but retaining the principal incidents and adapting them to a modern setting. Eliot's indebtedness both to Sir James Frazer and to Jessie L. Weston's From Ritual to Romance (in which book he failed to cut pages 138-39 and 142-43 of his copy) is acknowledged in his notes. Jessie L. Weston's thesis is that the Grail legend was the surviving record of an initiation ritual....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 788 words
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Disintegration of Civiliation in Henry IV Part 2, The Handmaid's Tale and The Waste Land - The role of power is central to both 'The Handmaid's Tale' and Henry IV Part 2, the protagonist in each text have contrasting views, in the former Offred craves any power she is able to find whereas the latter sees Hal shirking his responsibilities. Atwood suggests throughout 'The Handmaid's Tale' that people would willingly tolerate subjugation as long as they feel they have some power, Offred recollects that her mother once told her it is "truly amazing, what people can get used to, as long as there are a few compensations." For Offred this compensation manifests in the form of Nick, despite her situation she becomes complacent, although this life bears great restrictions compared to befor...   [tags: responsibility, role model, compensation]
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A Comparison of The Waste Land and Pablo Picasso's Guernica - A Comparison of The Waste Land and Pablo Picasso's "Guernica" The similarities are striking. This is probably due, in no small part, to the inspiration for both works. Picasso and Eliot shared a common inspiration for their masterpieces the atrocities of war. Guernica was a response by Picasso to the German Luftwaffe's bombing of the Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War. During this 1937 attack hundreds of civilians were killed. T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land is similar to Guernica in this way....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 794 words
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Eliot's The Waste Land and Maddy's No Past, No Present, No Future - T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land" and Yulisa Amadu Maddy's "No Past, No Present, No Future" Time and circumstance change everything. When we are young, the world is fresh, exciting, and pure. As people age, we begin to realize how corrupt the world is. Our old center, one based on trust, breaks down. Everyone in the world is looking out for their personal well-being, not the well-being of others. With this knowledge, people’s perspectives change. Rather than trusting every thing, we question the meaning and motive behind it....   [tags: Wasteland Maddy Eliot Essays]
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T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land and Yulisa Maddy’s No Past No Present No Future - Death and Dying in T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land and Yulisa Maddy’s No Past No Present No Future I am immortal. Although I realize that I will die, I don’t believe it. The fear of death motivates me to ignore my mortality and, in motivating me to ignore, allows me to live a jaded, happy life. If death were a predominant thought, then appreciating life would seem difficult—unless of course I changed my name to Harold. Everyone confronts the idea of death sooner or later; different people just deal with death in different ways....   [tags: Eliot Wasteland Maddy Future Present Past Essays] 1224 words
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Free College Essays - Aesthetic Form of Cantos and The Waste Land - Cantos and The Waste Land:  Aesthetic Form in Modern Poetry    In the Cantos and The Waste Land, it is clear that a radical transformation was taking place in aesthetic structure; but this transformation has been touched on only peripherally by modern critics. R. P. Blackmur comes closest to the central problem while analyzing what he calls Pound's "anecdotal" method. The special form of the Cantos, Blackmur explains, "is that of the anecdote begun in one place, taken up in one or more other places, and finished, if at all, in still another....   [tags: free essay writer] 567 words
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The Second Coming a Poem by W.B. Yeats - 'Thing fall apart the centre cannot hold' is a line in W.B Yeats poem 'The Second Coming' because of its stunning, violent imagery and terrifying ritualistic language, "The Second Coming" is one of Yeats's most famous poems, its set in a world on the threshold of apocalypse must like the three texts. The texts 'Henry IV Part 2' by William Shakespeare, 'The Handmaid's Tale' by Margaret Atwood and the poem 'The Waste Land' by T.S Eliot deals with the topic of disintegration of and within civilisation....   [tags: The Waste Land' by T.S Eliot, sex, love]
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1871 words
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Comparing Life Without Meaning in Eliot’s The Waste Land and Welles’ Citizen Kane - Life Without Meaning in T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane It is the foundation of modern civilization that knowledge is better than ignorance, understanding more valuable than confusion, and wisdom more desirable than foolishness. Consequently, people feel that they should be able to understand the meaning of life and, in doing so, know that their lives are not in vain. They want life to be a coherent whole infused with meaning, so that they can know and understand what life is and where they fit in, thereby attaining wisdom....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
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A Handful of Optimism - A Handful of Optimism Despite race, religion, sex, or age the world can be divided into two different groups. Those who see the glass as being half full and those who see the glass as being half empty. In other words, being either that of an optimist or a pessimist. Though a simple question, often times people find it difficult to answer. Just when one thinks they have decided that they are one or the other, they come across a song, poem, or an experience that makes them reevaluate the mind frame from that which they have normally embraced....   [tags: Eliot Maddy Waste Land Essays]
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1283 words
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Hazardous Waste Affecting Our Community - Each year, five hundred thirty thousand tons of hazardous waste are disposed of in the United States alone. Most houses, with an average of four people, produce about twenty pounds of this waste (Solid). Hazardous waste is special because it is harmful and very dangerous. It is deemed hazardous if it contains one or more carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic compounds. This means that they are either cancer causing, capable of damaging our DNA, or can interfere with human fetal development. They are either flammable, may explode, may release toxic fumes, or may break down metal containers that would hold normal waste (Garbage)....   [tags: harmful waste, dangerous waste]
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1211 words
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The Challenges with Waste Diversion from Landfill in Scotland - The adverse degradation of the environment as a result of human activities such as the disposal of waste to the environment in an unsustainable manner. About 70% of waste (controlled waste) is land filled in Scotland .The need to develop more robust waste management techniques to ensure that waste disposal to the environment is carried in such a way that it does not endanger human health and the environment. Land fill contributes substantially to the rising greenhouse gas which cause global warming....   [tags: garbage, environment, waste management] 1795 words
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Reducing the Impact of Non-recycled Waste Products - ... There are massive implications with waste being neglected. When waste is sent to land fills some of it anaerobically rots and creates methane, which is 20 times more potent then carbon dioxide at trapping heat (Wastedfood.com, 2014). So what does all this mean. By sending waste to landfills, we are not doing out part in helping to prevent climate change. In today’s society, products are made to throw away. Products are not made to last as every day, there be newer, more improved items released and as capitalists, people want the latest product leading to old products being simply thrown away as waste....   [tags: waste for life, organization] 1585 words
(4.5 pages)
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Comparing Differing Approaches for Effective Solid Waste Management - In early history, all the waste generated by people, which composition was totally organic, was left on the ground where it was decomposed with time. Moreover, the population was small and everything was repaired and reused. As people began to produce items for their comfort and build houses, the population grew and cities burgeoned. According to National Waste & Recycling Association (2012), as population grew, waste production increased, and consequently emerging the necessity to develop waste disposal systems....   [tags: harzardous, non-hazardous, municipal waste]
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1948 words
(5.6 pages)
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Privatization of Solid Waste Management - Privatization of Solid Waste Management Among the major environmental policies that have triggered hot debates among stakeholders and the public in general is that of privatizing solid waste management in various cities in the United States. Private companies have been operating the business of waste collection and management for many years not only in the U.S but also in the U.K and other countries. The debate has been whether by privatizing municipal solid waste (MSW) management, cost reduction and improved service quality can be achieved....   [tags: Waste Management ] 1238 words
(3.5 pages)
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Oak Flats Waste Management - Introduction Oak Flats is a community in Australia that has a growing population in 2529. Due to an increasing population I started to wonder whether the waste in Oak Flats was in control and how much of this waste is recycled. My aim is to find out how much waste is produced form each household and how much is recycled in each household and depending on my results ways to reduce the amount of waste produced from each household. My investigations have led to their being a moderate amount of waste being produced in Oak Flats community although it’s low it could be lower and I will explain strategies in to how we can reduce the amount of waste and ways to show what can be recycled and what can...   [tags: Waste Management] 1681 words
(4.8 pages)
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Proper Waste Management in Trinidad and Tobago - Trinidadians do nothing but complain. We love having flies, roaches and mosquitoes in our homes. Rodents can almost be considered family. The average Trinbagonian will blame the government for everything instead of trying to fix ‘me’ first or trying to recycle. Why. ; because society creates its own common health problems by illegally dumping garbage, when various landfills are available for proper waste disposal. Time has evolved and so too has the standard of sanitary conditions globally....   [tags: Waste Management]
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2314 words
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The Human and Environmental Effects of E-Waste - CONTENTS 1. Introduction - Presentation of the issue 2. The Life cycle of an electronic device 3. Issues 4. The Impacts of Electronic Waste 5. Sources of E-Waste 6. Solutions 7. Conclusion 8. Questionnaire 9. Bibliography 9.1. Books 9.2. Articles 9.3. Online (World Wide Web) Sources 10. Appendix  INTRODUCTION The phenomenon of discarded electronic or electrical waste has generated worldwide attention and concern as it is a global problem that is getting bigger by the day. This concern is justified due to the effects of environmental pollution that e-waste causes....   [tags: E-Waste Pollution]
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3186 words
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Land Conversion in the Philippines - Land conversion has been present and rampant in the Philippines for the past few years especially in areas surrounding Metro Manila. To clarify the term land conversion, it is defined by the Department of Agrarian Reform as “the act of authorizing the change of the current use of a piece of land into some other use” (Nantes 130). In this context, it would be focus on the conversion of agricultural land into some other use. A brief history of land conversion around the region could be traced to the various developments in the city of Manila....   [tags: Changes in Land Use]
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2334 words
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Medical Waste: Why Incineration is a Waste of Resources - ... The main procedures being, steam sterilization which consists of the complete elimination of microorganisms from the debris so it will be permitted for disposal in the landfill's (Christina Louise Martini), and incineration which as mentioned by (Wendy Stynes), is the burning of infectious waste which reduces the volume and converts it into a non-burnable ash that can be disposed of in the land. While sterilization is used occasionally in the process of discarding Medical waste, in her article “Medical Waste Regulation in the United States: A Dire Need for Recognition and Reform” (Christina Louise Martini) agrees that Incineration however is the more popular selection as more than 80% of...   [tags: environmental field, disposal] 865 words
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Waste Water to Energy - Waste Water to Energy Introduction The waste produced from waste water treatment facilities can be used as an energy generation source instead of throwing it in landfills sites. According to the Energy Recovery Council, the US has about 87 Waste to Energy (WTE) plants capable of producing 2,700 MW of clean electricity; As a result they produce 17 billion Kwh of electricity per year which is enough to power 2 million American homes[2]. There are different technologies used to convert the waste to energy such as combustion, gasification, anaerobic digestion, pyrolysis of waste, and thermal depolymerization....   [tags: treatment facilities to energy generation source]
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Changes in the Land by William Cronon - The Europeans changed the land of the home of the Indians, which they renamed New England. In Changes in the Land, Cronon explains all the different aspects in how the Europeans changed the land. Changing by the culture and organization of the Indians lives, the land itself, including the region’s plants and animals. Cronon states, “The shift from Indian to European dominance in New England entailed important changes well known to historians in the ways these peoples organized their lives, but it also involved fundamental reorganizations less well known to historians in the region’s plant and animal communities,” (Cronon, xv)....   [tags: indians, europeans, england]
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The Polaroid SX-70 Land Camera - Technology and Innovation Management CASE STUDY OF A SIGNIFCANT INNOVATION : THE POLAROID SX-70 LAND CAMERA Introduction Today, the possibility of taking pictures and instantly sharing them with other people is a given. But that was not always the case. In the 1970’s, photography was a discipline reserved for professionals. Cameras cost a lot, and film negatives had to be sent to photo laboratories in order to be developed and printed. Enters the Polaroid SX-70. First introduced in 1972, the Polaroid SX-70 Land camera, first instant camera entirely designed for the average consumer, is one of the most revolutionary technology innovations of the 20th century....   [tags: Technology, Innovation, Management, Case Study]
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2357 words
(6.7 pages)
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Problem of E-Waste - 1. Problem definition 1.1. What is E-waste E-waste, or "Electronic waste", includes discarded computers, electronic equipments, entertainment consoles, mobile phones, televisions and many more. It comprises used electronics for reuse, resale, salvage, recycling, or disposal purposes. 1.2. Amount of E-waste Rapid changes in technology and falling prices have resulted in a fast-growing surplus of electronic waste around the globe. An estimate of 50 million tons of E-waste is produced each year (Sthiannopkao S, 2012)....   [tags: Impacts, Chemicals, Holographic Technology]
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1701 words
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How to Deal with Our Solid Waste - Executive Summary In the recent times it is quite evident that waste produced by households & Industries are of a major concern in dealing with it. So far, the State governments have completely relied on landfills to dump the waste. Considering the amount of growth in the economy and consumption pattern, the waste generated by the households and factories has gone up manifolds. The government’s dependency on the landfills has come to saturation due to excess waste generated than anticipated. Acquiring new landfills also has become difficult due to protest by the public....   [tags: hazards, landfiills, government] 2117 words
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1st Man on the Moon - Waste of Money? - Was the attempt to put the first man on the moon an ambitious accomplishment in science or a waste of government resources. In May of 1961, President John F. Kennedy stated a commitment to land an American on the moon by the end of the century (Gitlin). During the 1960’s, the Soviet Union and the United States started a massive space race. The Soviet Union had launched the orbit Sputnik on October 4, 1957 and later launched another, heavier, Sputnik 2 on November 3, 1957 with a dog named Laika inside....   [tags: astronauts, space, sputnik] 809 words
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Solid Waste Management of Mumbai, India - Introduction Mumbai the financial capital of India and capital of the Indian State of Maharashtra is one of the most developed cities in India. It is also the most populous city in India and the fourth most populous city in the world. The total metropolitan area population of approximately 20.5 million it includes cities of Navi Mumbai and Thane. It lies on the west coast and was named an Alpha world city. It is the richest city in India and has the highest GDP of any city in South, West or Central Asia....   [tags: population, metropolitan area] 1744 words
(5 pages)
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Mass Plastic Production and Plastic Waste - One individual creates four and a half pounds of waste each day compared to two and a half pounds per person from the 1960s. With this increased amount of waste, there are limited amounts of outlets for trash to be properly discarded. Most of this litter travels to oceans and endangers marine life and their habitats. The main types of debris that cause the most harm to oceanic organisms are plastics from varying sources such as landfills and human recreation, trap ropes used for fishing, and remnants from human recreation....   [tags: chemicals and marine pollution] 1944 words
(5.6 pages)
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E-waste Management - While technology has revolutionized the way people live, it has not come without a direct environmental cost. Toxic waste or electronic waste (e-waste), produced by obsolete electronic products, is growing at an alarming rate, and poses a severe environmental threat. In light of challenges underlined by this new kind of waste, sound management is imperative. Although, America and Asia are economically very different from each other, ironically they do not differ much when it comes to the `mismanagement' of e-waste: unsafe disposition practices, lax legislation, and inadequate recycling....   [tags: Environmental Toxic Electronic Waste Technology] 863 words
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Safe Disposal of Waste: Global Trends to Combat Dumping - Global trends to combat dumping To date, very important is the question of safe disposal of waste. Back in 1992 at the International Forum in Rio de Janeiro , this problem has been called one of the main problems of mankind. Increased interest in this issue is caused by an increase in the annual volume of waste produced in the world ( so far ), and the tangible results of their disposal in landfills or burning in the open. As a result of anaerobic (without air) decomposition of organic matter (about 25 % of waste in landfills ), and various kinds of plastic, an allocation of toxic substances - garbage gas consisting of methane (50% is considered to be the main cause of the greenhouse effect...   [tags: burning, processing in different ways] 822 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Nuclear Energy Controversy: Finding a Place for the Nuclear Waste - Nuclear waste has a reputation for making law makers and the public uneasy, thus it is difficult to find a site for nuclear waste disposal units. However, creating such sites is necessary to allow nuclear energy to the electricity production forefront in America. In the search for a waste disposal location, companies have been turning toward Native American reservations as the final resting places of the radioactive waste. Multiple tribes have quickly denied companies access to their land, but others have taken advantage of the potentially prosperous opportunity....   [tags: pollution, radiation, environmental issues]
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1865 words
(5.3 pages)
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Our E-Waste is Harming The Environment and Developing Countries - What is E-waste. E-waste is also known as electronic waste in which we no longer use our electronics. Did you know that “a massive eighty percent of the e-waste that is generated worldwide is not properly recycled” (Ford, Matt.). What happens with the electronics when we are done with them if they are not recycled properly. Most people just toss out their unwanted electronics, but do you know what happens if you just toss the products. Many end up half way across the world distributed all over third-world countries’ land....   [tags: electronics, pollutants, disposal]
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842 words
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The Municipal Solid Waste Dilemma - Everyone buys things and sooner or later, we will throw it away. Or suppose we eat at Mc Donald's. After we are finished, we throw away our trash and never see or think of it ever again. In our fast passed world that we live in today, there are many people living in it and produce a lot of garbage and waste. The United States alone produces over 200 million tons of Municipal Solid Waste every year. That is equates to about 4.5 pounds of waste per person, per day. According to data from the EPA, about 35% of that is paper, 30% include yard trimmings and food scraps....   [tags: Environmental] 1338 words
(3.8 pages)
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Urban Pollution and Waste Management - Urban Pollution and Waste Management Urban pollution and waste management is a major problem in both the first and third worlds. The increases of major air pollutants in the atmosphere are causing damage to our waters and land. The increase of garbage and waste in urban areas, such as cities, are beginning to look like huge landfills, acid rain is causing forests and buildings to deteriorate, and finally ozone, which is caused from primarily transportation, is slowly suffocating the populations it affects....   [tags: Papers] 1454 words
(4.2 pages)
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Social Justice Issues with the 2014 EWB Challenge in Nepal - ... Many NGOs have even helped to create a biogas plant among the squatter communities of Nepal (SWMRMC/UN-HABITAT 2008). A simple metal hook known as the “suiro” has been engineered and it is widely used in household of Bharatpur and Hetauda, this simple yet ingenious device is used to collect plastic waste materials over a period of about fifteen days and then it is sent to a recycling plant (WaterAid 2008). The invention of a new kind of waste collector created by the Hetauda municipality has been very effective in segregating and collecting medical wastes....   [tags: waste management]
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1661 words
(4.7 pages)
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Waste Management - Municipal waste is disposed of in three different ways. As of 2004 it is estimated that 71 percent is land filled, 16 percent incinerated, and 13 percent recycled. Other wastes that have to be disposed of are nuclear and hazardous wastes. The environmental effects of different waste management solutions will be discussed as well as ideal ways, in my opinion, to dispose of different forms of solid wastes. Landfills are the most commonly used form of disposing wastes today. It is also a form of disposal that causes many environmental impacts that are in need of addressing....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1053 words
(3 pages)
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Solutions to the Imminent Land Pollution Problems in Hong Kong - Nowadays, an average of 25,000 tonnes of solid waste were disposed of daily because of human activities of domestic households, commercial and manufacturing business and construction sites in the territory. This tells an imminent land pollution problem in Hong Kong. To deal with this problem, I discover three solutions. The three possible solutions will be increasing the number of recycling bins, landfill expansion and building more incinerators. The best remedy of the problem of land pollution will be building more incinerators....   [tags: recycling, bins, landfill, expansion, incinerators] 1017 words
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