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Your search returned 356 essays for "Vonnegut":
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Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut - Kurt Vonnegut in Slaughterhouse-Five depicted that war is not going to be ever justified because innocent lives are always compromised. The text has three themes: the destructiveness of war, the illusion of free will and inevitable death. Destructiveness of War For the setting of the story, Dresden was juxtaposed Trafalmador. The former was hell on Earth and the latter, heaven. After Dresden was bombed and the soldiers emerge out of a slaughterhouse, Dresden was devastated. According to Vonnegut, it was clear that the intention was to kill everyone in Dresden....   [tags: literary analysis, kurt vonnegut]
:: 5 Works Cited
1304 words
(3.7 pages)
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Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut - In the novel Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, a fictional character named Bill Pilgrim is used to depict the various themes about life and war. Vonnegut went through some harsh times in Dresden, which ultimately led to him writing about the tragedies and emotional effects that come with war. By experiencing the war first handed, Vonnegut is able to make a connection and relate to the traumatic events that the soldiers go through. Through the use of Billy Pilgrim and the other characters, Vonnegut is able show the horrific affects the war can have on these men, not only during the war but after as well....   [tags: literary analysis, kurt vonnegut]
:: 3 Works Cited
1602 words
(4.6 pages)
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Blind Faith in Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut - In current society, critical thinking can be sparse. It is unusual that people question the traditions they have grown up with. Although this ignorance can be safe and simple, its outcome is ultimately problematic. In the satire Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut proves that undiscerning belief in anything will inevitably end in tragedy. Vonnegut demonstrates this using sensitive topics such as Science and Religion. In the present day, society depends on Science greatly; it supplies jobs, provides technology capable of saving lives, and furthers our society in many positive ways....   [tags: literary analysis, kurt vonnegut]
:: 1 Works Cited
1579 words
(4.5 pages)
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Repressive Society in Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut - The story “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut is120 years in the future, which allows us to more easily accept some of the bizarre events that happen in the story such as when the character Harrison Bergeron is dancing with a ballerina and there is no law of gravity and motion, so they can almost touch the studio ceiling which is thirty feet high. The author emphasizes in his work themes such as freedom, mind manipulation, the American dream, and media influence, also the opposition between strength and weakness and knowledge and ignorance....   [tags: Harrison Bergeron, Kurt Vonnegut] 762 words
(2.2 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut - The Man and His Work - Kurt Vonnegut – The Man and His Work One of the best, most valuable aspects of reading multiple works by the same author is getting to know the author as a person. People don't identify with Gregor Samsa; they identify with Kafka. Witness the love exhibited by the many fans of Hemingway, a love for both the texts and the drama of the man. It's like that for me with Kurt Vonnegut, but it strikes me that he pulls it off in an entirely different way. Kafka's work is a reaction to his mental anguish, which is kind of like Vonnegut, who has dealt with the bulk of his personal hardships throughout his career, but those hardships are not his sole motivation....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut]
:: 7 Works Cited
5175 words
(14.8 pages)
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Tick Tock.. or Tock Tick? in Vonnegut´s Slaughterhouse-Five - ... The illusion of chronological time appears as a recurring theme in Vonnegut’s novel Slaughterhouse-Five. Another instance where the obsession with time happens, when the novel says “..the Englishmen had known for 12 hours that the American guests were on their way…. their clothes were aromatic with the feast they had been preparing”(95). The Englishmen knew the Americans were coming, so they did everything they could to prepare. They had gone crazy trying to get their preparations completed in a timely, orderly conduct....   [tags: slaughterhouse-five, vonnegut]
:: 1 Works Cited
788 words
(2.3 pages)
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Human Fallibility Exposed in Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat's Cradle - Oscar Wilde, an acclaimed Irish Poet, novelist, dramatist and critic once aptly commented, “Men become old, but they never become good”. The philosophical aspect of this quote relies on the basis that human beings are inherently malevolent. Through his pessimistic perspective, Wilde clearly captures the ill-disposed mindset of mankind. Moreover, there are various deductive arguments that discredit the optimistic depiction of human nature. One of the prime examples can be found in Kurt Vonnegut’s literature....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle] 1029 words
(2.9 pages)
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War in Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut and Catch-22 by Joseph Heller - Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut and Catch-22 by Joseph Heller both have a striking resemblance in the themes of anti-war and of free will. Both don’t come into full force right in the beginning but eventually become more evident. Both novels focus on one character throughout the entire novel, and each protagonist is affected by all the events around them. It changes their perspective and how they view life as a whole. Both Billy in Slaughterhouse Five and Yossarian in Catch -22, dislike war and are known as anti-war heroes....   [tags: slaughterhouse-five, kurt vonnegut]
:: 2 Works Cited
1089 words
(3.1 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut as Social Critic - Kurt Vonnegut as Social Critic          Those who write on the human condition are often philosophers who write with convoluted language that few can understand. Kurt Vonnegut, however, focuses on the same questions, and provides his own personal answers with as much depth as that of the must educated philosopher. He avoids stilted language typical of philosophers, using shorter sentences, less complex vocabulary, humorous tangents, and outrageous stories to get his point across. With this style, Vonnegut presents the age-old question "How do we as humans live in this world?" in a manner appealing and understandable to the less educated mass....   [tags: Works of Kurt Vonnegut Jr.]
:: 14 Works Cited
2390 words
(6.8 pages)
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Use Of Satire in Kurt Vonnegut's Cats Cradle - Cat's Cradle: Religion and Satire What is religion. There is no one correct answer, however, one definition that seems to cover every aspect of most established religions is, "…the most comprehensive and intensive manner of valuing known to human beings" (Pecorino). In Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut takes this definition and creates his own religion in order to satirize all others. Bokononism, Vonnegut's contrived religion, is built on foma, or harmless untruths. Bokononists believe that good societies can only be built by keeping a high tension between good and evil at all times, and that there is no such thing as absolute evil (Schatt 64)....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut] 1440 words
(4.1 pages)
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Quest for Purpose in the Novels of Kurt Vonnegut - Quest for Purpose in the Novels of Kurt Vonnegut        Kurt Vonnegut's personal experiences force him to question the meaningless cruelties and conflicting paradigms in life.  As a second generation German-American and a witness of Dresden's bombing during World War II,  he observes firsthand the pointless destruction of which humans are capable (Dictionary 494).  He devotes his works to understanding the chaotic, cruel world he encounters.  According to  Peter Reed, Vonnegut's works feature a "...protagonist in quest of meaning in an absurd world" (500).  While struggling to understand the disordered universe around them, Vonnegut's protagonists attempt to become satisfied individuals b...   [tags: Works of Kurt Vonnegut Jr.]
:: 10 Works Cited
2311 words
(6.6 pages)
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Use of Coincidence in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Use of Coincidence in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Most modern novelists avoid the use of coincidence as a plot device, and such use of coincidence is looked on as trite and cheap. This was not always the case, as novelists of yore, Charles Dickens is a great example, have been known to throw in a suspicious coincidence at the very climax of the book that ties up the plot nicely but leaves modern readers feeling betrayed and deceived. Perhaps due to more literate, sophisticated readers, or just the maturation of the novel form, writers no longer have the luxury of plot coincidence....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 385 words
(1.1 pages)
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An Analysis of Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions - An Analysis of Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions Kilgore Trout is a struggling novelist that can only get his novels published in porn magazines. Dwayne Hoover is a fabulously well-to-do car salesman that is on the brink of insanity. They only meet once in their lives, but the entire novel, Breakfast of Champions (1973), is based on this one meeting. The meeting is brief, but that is all the author, Kurt Vonnegut, needs to express his message. In fact, it is quite crucial that the meeting starts and ends almost instantly....   [tags: Vonnegut Breakfast of Champions]
:: 1 Works Cited
974 words
(2.8 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Paradoxical Nature of Life Exposed in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Kurt Vonnegut's apocalyptic novel, Cat's Cradle, might well be called an intricate network of paradox and irony. It is with such irony and paradox that Vonnegut himself describes his work as "poisoning minds with humanity...to encourage them to make a better world" (The Vonnegut Statement 107). In Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut does not tie his co-mingled plots into easy to digest bites as the short chapter structure of his story implies....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 424 words
(1.2 pages)
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The Arrogance of The Lie by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. - The Arrogance of The Lie The Lie, written by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., is a story that stands as a mirror to reflect the ugly image of a condescending faction obsessed with grades and numbers, not actual learning. Even though it took place years ago, the sickening mind frames still exist in some of today’s people. They are namely the “elite group” or middle to upper class families. In the story, Doctor Remenzel is obsessed with Eli having a high standard of excellence, Eli getting special treatment because he is part of the higher group, and for those reasons, Eli is ashamed of himself, and terrified of telling his father and mother that he failed the entrance examinations....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Jr. The Lie] 990 words
(2.8 pages)
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Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle vs Our Assumptions Regarding War, Progress, and Religion If one of Vonnegut's purposes for writing is "to poison minds with humanity" (qtd. by Scholes, per Griffin), then the weapon of choice in Cat's Cradle, is satire. Cat's Cradle "poison[s] minds" only by revealing the toxins that are already present in the system. Vonnegut's brand of satire serves as a sort of syrup of ipecac on human folly, and if we are "to make a better world" as he would have it, we should understand how truly virulent human enterprise can be....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 384 words
(1.1 pages)
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Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Vonnegut deals a lot with fantasy in his book, Cat's Cradle. From the beginning, he talks about the religion that he follows: Bokonism. This is not a real religion, however he has rules, songs, scriptures, and opinions of a person that practices this fantasy religion. Within his description of this religion however is black humor as well. I think that by him making up this whole religion and an entire island of people who follow it, is in a way mocking today's religion and the way that people are dedicated to their beliefs....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 374 words
(1.1 pages)
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Choice and Direction in the Writings of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Choice and Direction in the Writings of Kurt Vonnegut Jr.         Satire in American literature has evolved in response to the development of the American mind, its increasing use of free will, and the context that surrounds this notion.  Satire is the biting wit that authors (labeled satirists) bring to their literature to expose and mock the follies of society.  Satirists can be divided, however, into two groups with very different purposes.   One type  mocks simply for the enjoyment of mocking.  These satirists are found almost everywhere in the world, on every street corner, household, and television sitcom.  It is the second type of satirist who is a strong force in the world of liter...   [tags: Works of Kurt Vonnegut Jr.]
:: 10 Works Cited
2862 words
(8.2 pages)
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Billy Pilgrim and the View of Time in "Slaughter House Five" by Kurt Vonnegut - The year is 1944, 1945, 1964, 1967, 1968, and 1976 as Billy Pilgrim becomes unstuck in time. For many of us we see time as a river. It drifts listlessly from the springs to the ocean. We cannot touch the same waters twice. In the Novel Slaughter House five by Kurt Vonnegut, Billy Pilgrim discovers the true abounding nature of time. And that time is not a river, but the entire ocean, every water molecule a moment in time existing all at once in the vast blue of eternity. In 1967 Billy Pilgrim was abducted by aliens called Tralfamadorians....   [tags: billy pilgrim, Slaughter House five, Kurt Vonnegut] 1163 words
(3.3 pages)
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Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle: Exposing the Folly of Humanity - Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle: Exposing the Folly of Humanity In an interview published in The Vonnegut Statement, Kurt Vonnegut states that one of his reasons for writing is "to poison minds with humanity. . . to encourage them to make a better world"(107). He uses poison, not in the context of a harmful substance, but as an idea that threatens welfare or happiness. In Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut strives to disturb the complacency of his readers by satirizing humanity and its institutions, such as religion, science, and war, to name a few....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 471 words
(1.3 pages)
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Satire, and Black Humor in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire, and Black Humor in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut was written in 1963. "It is a satirical commentary on modern man and his madness" (back cover). It is a book that counters almost every aspect of our society. As well as satire, Vonnegut also includes apocalyptic elements in this novel. Satire, "the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice or folly" (Webster 1193), is very prevalent in Cat's Cradle. Vonnegut hits on many aspects of human life with this satire....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 698 words
(2 pages)
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Satire, Surrealism and Dark Humor in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire, Surrealism and Dark Humor in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle "And there on the shaft in letters six inches high, so help me God, was the word: Mother" (48) "'If that's mother,' said the driver, 'what in hell could they have raised over father?'" As the reader soon finds out, 40 cm of marble, as directed by Felix Hoenikker's will, that says "FATHER" (49). Vonnegut stops you short and plucks at your hand like a little boy who has just shaved the cat and can't wait to show you what he's done: you can't, as a responsible adult, laugh at the absurdity of the bald and shivering feline because you know that you should be astonished, offended, annoyed, anything but burst out laughing, which yo...   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 555 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Cruel Joke of Life Exposed in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - The Cruel "joke" of Life Exposed in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle is set up like a series of comic strips, with satirical commentary found in the last "panel". What, then, could we conclude is the accumulative punchline for the entire novel. What does Vonnegut give us for his "last laugh". If we attempt to answer this question, we must first try solving the answers to "what is the joke?" and "who is the joker?" It seems Vonnegut's characters are the victims to the cruel "joke" of life....   [tags: Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 368 words
(1.1 pages)
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Satire and Fantasy in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire and Fantasy in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle For this essay, I decided to pick two terms that describe Cat's Cradle. I felt that satire and fantasy were two terms that suited the novel quite well. The book qualifies as a satire because it makes a mockery of things that were of concern in the sixties. For example, the Cuban missile crisis was a big issue in the early sixties. Religion was taken much more seriously, and the family unit was more tightly wound. In the novel, the threat comes not from a large warhead, but from a small crystal of Ice-nine....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle] 792 words
(2.3 pages)
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Use of Satire in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Use of Satire in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle Kurt Vonnegut said in The Vonnegut Statement (1973), in an interview with Robert Scholes, that one of his reasons for writing is "to poison minds with humanity…to encourage them to make a better world" (107). This idea works quite well in Vonnegut's book, Cat's Cradle. It is a satirical story of a man's quest to write a book about the day the world ended (refering to the day the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima), which he never finishes. What we get is a raw look at humans trying desperately to find a sense of purpose in their lives through different means such as religion, science, etc....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 496 words
(1.4 pages)
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Satire and Surrealism in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Satire and Surrealism in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle In 1963, Kurt Vonnegut published his second novel Cat's Cradle. It is a distressing yet satirical critique of our society and the surrealistic end that is its destiny. Through his use of irony and sarcasm he attacks and exposes society's flaws while questioning its intelligence. Nothing is safe from his satiric pen. He attacks science and religion with equal intensity. He creates a novel that has left, "an indelible mark on an entire generation of readers" (back cover)....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Cat's Cradle Essays] 468 words
(1.3 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five and Breakfast of Champions - Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five and Breakfast of Champions Who would have ever thought the way a radioactive particle decays would relate to whether or not we have bad attitudes towards life. Who would have ever suspected that the structure of space-time would be so closely linked to whether or not we would marry rich wives. And who indeed would have ever expected that the properties of light might affect whether or not we go on homicidal rampages. Perhaps Kurt Vonnegut did. Could it be possible that a writer known more for his pictures of assholes than his knowledge of advanced physics actually centered some of the deepest concepts in his works on the philosophical implications of gen...   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Breakfast Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
3300 words
(9.4 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s Cat's Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s Cat's Cradle In the early sixties, Kurt Vonnegut Jr. released his candidly fantastical novel, Cat's Cradle. Within the text an entire religious sect, called Bokononism is born; a religion built on lies, absurdity, and irony. The narrator of Cat's Cradle is Jonah, a freelance writer who characterizes Bokononism as being, "free form as an amoeba" (Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle, 3). It is boundless and unpredictable as the unconscious itself. Bokonon lives on the impoverished island of San Lorenzo where he spends his days scribing poetic calypsos in the books of Bokonon....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Vonnegut Essays Papers]
:: 5 Works Cited
3327 words
(9.5 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five - Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five Great artists have the ability to step back from society and see the absurd circus that their world has become. Such satirists use their creative work to reveal the comic elements of an absurd world and incite a change in society; examples include Stanley Kubrick’s film, Dr. Strangelove, and Joseph Heller’s novel, Catch-22. Both works rose above their more serious counterparts to capture the critical voice of a generation dissatisfied with a nation of warmongers....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five Essays]
:: 17 Works Cited
3845 words
(11 pages)
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Mirrors Don’t Lie in Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.'s The Lie - Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.'s The Lie - Mirrors Don’t Lie In The Lie by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Eli Remenzel is a thirteen-year-old boy on his way to The Whitehill Preparatory School with his parents. Little do they know that Eli is keeping a big secret from them: he didn’t get accepted to the school. As the story unfolds Eli finally cracks under the pressure of the lie as the headmaster informs his parents that he wasn’t accepted at Whitehill. What happens next is a disaster. As I was reading the story I noticed a lot of qualities in the different characters that are traits I see in myself....   [tags: Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. The Lie] 1026 words
(2.9 pages)
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True Happiness in The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut and Hans Weingartner's The Eduakators - True Happiness in The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut and Hans Weingartner's The Eduakators A large parcel of the population has as their ultimate goal in life achieving well-being. Unfortunately many try to achieve it through the wrong means. For instance, in The Sirens of Titan, by Kurt Vonnegut, Malachi Constant thinks he is truly happy, but what he really does is fulfill his hedonism, satisfy his shallow needs, without truly searching for a higher form of well-being. Not only does a life focused on hedonic satisfaction not achieve true happiness, it also leads, along with the urge to accumulate, egocentrism, and greed, to an unethical life....   [tags: Vonnegut Weingartner Eduakators Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
2270 words
(6.5 pages)
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Writing Techniques in Art Spiegelman's Maus and Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five - Writing Techniques in Art Spiegelman's Maus and Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five BAM. ZONK. POW. ZAP. What images do these words bring to mind. For many people, they illicit scenes of Batman and his sidekick Robin, fighting their way through a legion of bad guys while arriving only seconds after their arch-villain has escaped. From these short, succinct, nonsense words, images of battles are painted over a much larger canvas; the delicate balance and constant struggle between good and evil is illustrated in black and white terms....   [tags: Spiegelman maus Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Essays] 1986 words
(5.7 pages)
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Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut - ... The article Diagnosing Billy Pilgrim: A Psychiatric Approach to Kurt Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse Five” is a good example, “But not many words about Dresden come to mind then,..And not many words come now either…”(Gulani, 2). Gulani’s point relates to Vonnegut’s, she knows not many words come to mind when trying to write about a war. Just how Vonnegut feels, it’s too hard to write a book about something that is suppose to be left in the past. Kurt Vonnegut says this book was a failure because it was written by a pillar of salt (Vonnegut, 22)....   [tags: novel review, story analysis] 521 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Life and Writings of Kurt Vonnegut - Kurt Vonnegut is celebrated as one of the most successful novelist in the Post-Second World War period in the America. His literary works have had varied impacts on American culture, including the use of the word “karass” amongst college students, the naming of the pop groups “Ice Nine Kills” and “The Billy Pilgrims”, and the frequent use of the term “So it goes” as written in Vonnegut’s obituary on the New York Times (Farrell, p.ix). This article examines the impacts of Vonnegut’s on his literary work....   [tags: Biography ]
:: 9 Works Cited
2232 words
(6.4 pages)
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Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut - ... Also, he uses Biblical situations which impresses Glover; introducing the concept of Christianity and kindness into the minds of people. The critic points out the fact that Vonnegut does not take all matters seriously and is very humorous with his writings. Other critics tend to see Vonnegut as not being highly acclaimed or not accepting to the academic canon. Lastly, Glover points out the fact that Vonnegut uses time travel to help create imagery into foreshadowing and creativeness. Vonnegut is an effective writer and makes an impression on numerous literary fanatics....   [tags: hansel and gretels, massacre in europe]
:: 7 Works Cited
815 words
(2.3 pages)
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Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut - A man begins to cry. Not because of sorrow or joy, but because he’s terrified. The man who once enjoyed viewing the firework show that symbolized the freedom of his nation now cowers, because of the hardships he endured to maintain the freedom of his nation. Like many war veterans, the man suffers from PTSD. Billy Pilgrim, a WWII veteran, also suffers from PTSD. While Kurt Vonnegut wrote his novel Slaughterhouse-five before PTSD became an official diagnosis, the protagonist of his story, Billy Pilgrim, displays the disease’s symptoms....   [tags: post war hysteria, billy pilgrim, ptsd ]
:: 5 Works Cited
879 words
(2.5 pages)
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Harrison Bergeron, by Kurt Vonnegut - Harrison Bergeron is a story written by Kurt Vonnegut. Vonnegut’s story is a warning to the world about the quest of equality, which is spreading all round in many nations with America on the lead. The story shows the reader how the equality issue can have negative impacts on people’s individuality, and the society. The story revolves around the protagonist, Harrison Bergeron who is an archetypical symbol that represents defiance, and individuality. He is used to represent the people who will stand up, and protest against cruel laws imposed by the state on equality, and encourage others to protest with him....   [tags: Harrison Bergeron Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1574 words
(4.5 pages)
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Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut - ... The doctors agreed: He was going crazy”... “They didn’t think it had anything to do with the war” (Vonnegut, 100) Everyone but the doctors believed that he was a fine patient. Billy lives through horrible conditions during the war for example when people started dying on the box car and many soldiers in the war often had hallucinations, diagnosed with many problems because of all the traumatic images seen during that time, and must have lost any type of motivation for life and this was the position Billy was in....   [tags: book review and story analysis] 736 words
(2.1 pages)
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Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut - Slaughterhouse-five strives to remember the tragedy of the bombing of Dresden. Kurt Vonnegut constructs his novel around a main character who becomes “unstuck in time” (23). Billy Pilgrim’s life is told out of order, which gives him a different perspective than the rest of the world. Billy lives through his memories, and revisits events in his life at random times and without warning. Vonnegut introduces Billy Pilgrim to the Tralfamadorian way of thinking about memory and time so that he can cope with being unstuck in time....   [tags: remembering the bombing of Dresden, book review] 1576 words
(4.5 pages)
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Slaughterhouse by Kurt Vonnegut - ... Vonnegut pointed out that most people have the wrong views on war. Wanting to show his audience that the war was unorthodox, he said that the soldiers are just being put in pointless danger. Kurt said to an interviewer, “War is nonsensical. People are being sent on fool’s errands.” (PBS NOW Transcript). This quote plainly shows Vonnegut’s disagreement with war. Kurt Vonnegut says multiple times that he believes war is a silly thing. He thought war was not something to be happy about, and definitely not something to take such pride in....   [tags: unhappy, art, war prisoner] 806 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut - Over the course of Kurt Vonnegut’s career, an unorthodox handling of time became one of many signature features in his fictional works (Allen 37). Despite The Sirens of Titan (1959) being only his second novel, this trademark is still prevalent. When delving into science fiction, it is often helpful to incorporate ideas from other works within the genre. This concept is exemplified by the “megatext,” an aspect of science fiction that involves the application of a reader’s own knowledge of the genre to a new encounter (Evans xiii)....   [tags: unorthodox handling of time] 1155 words
(3.3 pages)
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Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut - ... Billy visits infancy during early adulthood at a prisoner of war camp hospital and seemingly within the same moment from his hospital bed in Dresden Billy exists in a future moment on Tralformadore as a middle aged man. Initially this jumbled structure that often lacks clear transition confuses and frustrates the reader, but after completion the novel depicts Billy’s life as deep and beautiful. Once all the segments of the novel have been read the story is no less complete than if it had been told in chronological order....   [tags: story and character analysis] 966 words
(2.8 pages)
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Slaughter Five by Kurt Vonnegut - ... They tell Billy “ All time is time. It does not change. It does not lend itself to warnings or explanations. It simply is. Take it moment by moment, that we all are, as I’ve said before, bugs in amber.” (Pg. 86) And when Billy suggests that from that, it sounds like the Tralfamadorian doesn’t believe in free will, he simply replies “I’ve visited thirtyone inhabited planets in the universe, and I have studied reports on one hundred or more. Only on Earth is there any talk of free will.” Billy’s subconscious basically tells him that no matter what he or anyone could have done, the world would be exactly the same, and that nothing he or anyone can do, will change the outcome of the world....   [tags: story and character analysis] 599 words
(1.7 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut - A man of many (yet respectable) words, Kurt Vonnegut was always ready to express his intricately woven philosophies in his literature and art. After facing many personal trials including his mother’s suicide and his prisoner of war status, Vonnegut had a wealth of material to write about. Self described as a Freethinker and Humanist, Vonnegut wrote an impressive catalog of science fiction philosophy novels. Although at worst he was described as simply a “comic book philosopher,” the majority of the scholarly world sees him dark moral comedy king and as an expert social satirist and humanist....   [tags: Biogrophy]
:: 8 Works Cited
1629 words
(4.7 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut's Tragic Path to Success - ... According to the collages rules, a piece of writing could be substituted for his essay. Twenty years later, Vonnegut displayed his writing "Cat's Cradle", and he got his degree in 1971. Vonnegut's first short story, "Report on the Barnhouse Effect," was published in 1950. Vonnegut has expressed some annoyance with his short stories, saying that he wrote most of them for money while working on his novels, which were more important to him than the short stories. Thou some of his stories are accomplished works, and most of his readers obtain their first contact with Vonnegut through these stories, which combine to form Vonnegut's calling card humor, fantasy, and commentary....   [tags: children, death, writing] 1137 words
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Unequality in Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut - Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle once said, “The worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal.” Kurt Vonnegut portrays Aristotle’s philosophy brilliantly in his short story “Harrison Bergeron.” The story depicts the American government in the future mandating physical handicaps in an attempt to make everyone equal. Vonnegut describes a world where no one is allowed to excel in the areas of intelligence, athletics, or beauty. Yet, the inequalities among the people shine even brighter....   [tags: aristotle, society, god]
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860 words
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Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five - Kurt Vonnegut’s anti-war science fiction novel entitled, Slaughter House Five otherwise known as “The Children’s Crusade” or “A Duty Dance with Death,” is a classic example of Vonnegut’s eccentric and moving writing capabilities.Originally published in 1969, Slaughterhouse-Five pays tribute to Vonnegut’s experiences in World War Two, as an advanced scout in the 106th infantry division, a prisoner of war and witness to the firebombing of Dresden on February 13th, 1945 in which 135,000 people were killed, making it the greatest man-caused massacre of all times.This novel illustrates the cruelties and violence of war along with the potential for compassion in human nature and all that it encomp...   [tags: Classic Literature] 560 words
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Equality of Life in Kurt Vonnegut's Works - Equality of life Will Rogers once said “We will never have true civilization until we have learned to recognize the rights of others.” This quote is what we should strive for in reality but in Kurt Vonnegut’s “Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow”, “Harrison Bergeron”, and “All the King’s Horses” this is the exactly the opposite of what occurs in his stories. In “Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow”, the earth is overcrowded, people live forever, the same politicians have been in office forever and no one recognizes each other’s rights....   [tags: humanity, satire, society]
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1066 words
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Kurt Vonnegut's "Slaughterhouse-Five" - I. Author- Kurt Vonnegut’s background had an endless influence upon his writing. In his early years, Vonnegut was a private in the 106th infantry division in World War II. He and five scouts were caught behind enemy lines, and then captured. They were held POWs and were beaten on various occasions. In 1945, they witnessed the fire-bombing of Dresden, Germany. Kept during this time in a slaughterhouse, this is part of the inspiration for Slaughterhouse-five. After being released from the Slaughterhouse, Vonnegut called Dresden “utter destruction” and “carnage unfathomable”....   [tags: Literature Review]
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1327 words
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Great American Authors: Kurt Vonnegut - ... had to be pulled from his private preschool. After moving his father gave up and Edith began an addiction to alcohol. (Allen) Kurt Jr. attended Shortridge High school in Indianapolis. At short ridge Kurt wrote for the student newspaper called, The echo. After high school he attended many well-known and prestigious colleges. He first attended Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He was there from 1940 to 1942. While he was at Cornell he was the managing editor for, The sun. The sun was the campus newspaper....   [tags: Slaughterouse 5]
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903 words
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Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut Jr - ... (29) As stated above, the time travel aspect of this novel is simply a metaphor of how Billy Pilgrim is struggling with letting go of his past and the above quote demonstrates this completely. Vonnegut writes that Billy walks through one door in 1955 and comes out another one in 1941 and that he visits random moments of his life. Billy visiting random little moments of his life could just be a sign that, because the war affected him so strongly, that he is having trouble letting go. The next quote where Vonnegut addresses the after effects of war is, “Billy is spastic in time, has no control over where he is going next and the trips aren’t necessarily fun” (29)....   [tags: violence of war, fire-bombing, germany] 1401 words
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Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut Jr - ... Once back from the war Billy begins to suffer from PTSD. He his haunted by his experiences in Dresden, and regularly checks himself into mental hospitals. While Billy is in the mental hospital he begins to ponder his ability to travel through time. Although he has no control over his sporadic time travels, he is most often taken to the past or the future of his life. However, the most frequent place that Billy visits is his past life in Dresden. Once Billy arrives back home from his stay at the mental hospital he settles down with Valencia, has a son and daughter, and becomes a very successful optometrist....   [tags: billy pilgrim, effects of war] 910 words
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Communism and Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron - The structure of communism and its main concepts heavily relate to “Harrison Bergeron”. Communisms main idea is to keep the corporations from having too much power; as well as making everything equal. Communisms structure differs from “Harrison Bergeron”, but they both share a lot of characteristics. In “Harrison Bergeron” the government is given way to much power and forces everyone to become equal. Communism also differs greatly from our U.S. government and acts in many different ways....   [tags: Harrison Bergeron Essays]
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966 words
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Goethe & Vonnegut - Powerful Emotion (3) Anyone who reads The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe instantly feels the emotional intensity portrayed by Werther, the protagonist. His speculations about life are indeed unique, especially in modern times when life often goes by quickly without notice. Perhaps that is one of the reasons why his immense emotion strikes a chord with readers as coming from someone crazy or dangerous. Werther’s mental state seems incredibly alive at some times while seemingly lifeless at others....   [tags: essays research papers] 1397 words
(4 pages)
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Vonnegut's Simple Style in Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Vonnegut's Simple Style in Cat's Cradle The simple style with which Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. writes his novels belies the complexity hidden behind his sentences. Vonnegut's novels, as a result, are amazingly easy and, to many, enjoyable to read, yet they contain messages that go to the very root of humanity, messages that are not hidden underneath flowery prose. The success of Cat's Cradle, like all of his novels, relies on this simplicity to reveal its messages about religion, death, and apocalypse to the reader....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays] 1227 words
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The Life Of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - The Life of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Kurt Vonnegut Jr. is a famous American author "known for works blending satire, black comedy, and science fiction" (Kurt Vonnegut). Although Kurt Vonnegut is most widely known as a science fiction writer, what if his readers knew that he didn't consider himself that at all. He once said he "learned from the reviewer" that he was a science fiction writer. Regardless of what Kurt Vonnegut considers himself, he is one of the most sought-after science fiction writers in history....   [tags: Biography] 1819 words
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Dresden and the Destruction of Vonnegut's Dream - Dresden and the Destruction of Vonnegut's Dream The little dream Vonnegut took with him to war was not founded on the rubble of insanity, absurdity, and irrationality that he experienced in WWII. His dream was founded on order, stability, and justice. It was founded on what Dresden symbolized. And when Dresden evaporated so too did Vonnegut's dream. (Klinkowitz 223) Vonnegut's views on death, war, technology and human nature were all affected by his experience in Dresden and these themes become evident in his novels....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five Essays] 1880 words
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Coping Mechanisms in Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five - People react differently to tragedies: some mourn, some speak up, and some avoid the sorrow. In Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut suggests the danger and inhumanity of turning away from the discomfort by introducing Billy Pilgrim as someone who is badly affected by the aftermath of the Dresden bombing, and the Tralfamadorians as the aliens who provide an easy solution to Billy. It is simpler to avoid something as tragic as death, but Vonnegut stresses the importance of confronting it. Vonnegut, like many artists, expresses his ideas through his creations....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five]
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1664 words
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Hume's Ideas Present In Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron - ... Here Hume implies that for the characters within Vonnegut's stories they rarely ever receive the homecoming that is expected of a monomythic hero (Hume,209). In simpler terms the character's return is not a happy one, but depressing even though they went through the entire journey to acquire more wisdom and knowledge of themselves. Take into consideration Vonnegut's literary work in "Harrison Bergeron" as affirmation for Hume's claim. The story conveys a society where everyone is equal in the sense that if anyone were to show signs of superiority they would ultimately be subject to an inhibitor....   [tags: monomyth, hero]
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450 words
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Religious Allusions in Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut’s fictional novel “Cat’s Cradle”, indirectly explores issues that parallels into topics such as religion, scientific/technological advancements, political power and much more. Vonnegut’s novel is narrated by a character named Jonah (John). He, Jonah, sets out to write an anthropological book based off of what key people were doing on the day that the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Throughout Vonnegut’s novel it can clearly represents how a writer can become a very destructive person to society....   [tags: literature, destructive writing, fiction]
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1439 words
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The Mind of Kurt Vonnegut - The Mind of Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut is one of the preeminent writers of the later half of the twentieth century. His works are all windows into his mind, a literary psychoanalysis. He examines himself as a cog in the corporate machine in "Deer in the Works"; as a writer through the eyes of Kilgore Trout in several works; and most importantly, as a prisoner of war in Slaughterhouse-Five. Vonnegut created short stories and novels that dealt with events in his life. One of the most obvious self examinations is in "Deer in the Works"....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays] 957 words
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Analysis of Slaughterhouse-Five, a Novel Written by Kurt Vonnegut - ... He soon married and had three children, and worked at General Electric and wrote and published short stories to support his family. In 1952, his very first novel, “Player Piano” was published. Over the next 17 years, Vonnegut published 5 more novels, including Slaughterhouse-Five in 1969. This was the book that launched his fame, and a film adaptation of the book soon followed in 1969, which was successful and only increased his popularity further. He went on to write 9 more novels before his death in 2007....   [tags: Germany, Bombing, World War II] 1184 words
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Kurt Vonnegut and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - ... In Billy’s case, the bombing of Dresden could account for the tragic accident that caused the anxiety. Vonnegut is using this allusion, as he was present and survived in the bombing of Dresden as well. As mentioned before, Pilgrim “time travels”. His mind randomly goes to places he has been and will go, even if he hasn’t yet. He has seen when, how, and why he will die. This is also another factor in the PTSD. He sees the bad things that happened to him over and over again, as well as the horrible things that will happen to him in the near future....   [tags: Slaughter-house Five] 804 words
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Fate in Kurt Vonnegut’s Novel, Slaughterhouse-Five - “Fate is a misconception, it's only a cover-up for the fact you don't have control over your own life.” –Anonymous. In Kurt Vonnegut’s novel, Slaughterhouse-five, an optometrist named Billy Pilgrim becomes unstuck in time uncontrollably and constantly travels between his past, present, and future. Since Pilgrim is unable to control his time warps, he is forced to re-live agonizing moments such as watching his wartime friend Edgar Derby executed for stealing or going through the Dresden bombing repeatedly....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 534 words
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Billy Pilgrim's Struggle with PTSD in Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five - In order to illustrate the devastating affects of war, Kurt Vonnegut afflicted Billy Pilgrim with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which caused him to become “unstuck in time” in the novel. Billy Pilgrim illustrates many symptoms of PTSD throughout the story. Vonnegut uses these Slaughterhouse Five negative examples to illustrate the horrible and devastating examples of war. The examples from the book are parallel to real life experiences of war veterans, including Vonnegut’s, and culminate in a very effective anti-war novel....   [tags: Slaughterhouse Five]
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1779 words
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The Satire of Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - The Satire of Cat's Cradle       Cat's Cradle is, "Vonnegut's most highly praised novel. Filled with humor and unforgettable characters, this apocalyptic story tells of Earth's ultimate end, and presents a vision of the future that is both darkly fantastic and funny, as Vonnegut weaves a satirical commentary on modern man and his madness" (Barnes and Noble n.pag).  In Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut uses satire as a vehicle for threatened self-destruction when he designs the government of San Lorenzo.  In addition, the Bokonists practice of Boko-maru, and if the world is going to end in total self destruction and ruin, then people will die, no matter how good people are and what religion peop...   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
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1004 words
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The Masterpiece of Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - The Masterpiece  of Cat's Cradle      Kurt Vonnegut,  critically acclaimed author  of several best-selling novels, uses  self-expression and psychological manipulation to  stress to the reader  his beliefs and ideas dispersed within  the context of Cat's  Cradle. From reading this  novel, one  might attribute  perplexity pondering over the plot  and general story  line of the  book. Cat's Cradle entangles  itself  in  many  interesting  changes of events; strange outlandish ideas and psychological "black holes" can be found with just the flip of a page....   [tags: Cat's Cradle Essays]
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2161 words
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A Critical Analysis of Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut - ... “New historicists remind us that it is treacherous to reconstruct the past as it really was—rather than as we have been conditioned by our own place and time to believe that it was “. (Critical approaches) Kurt Vonnegut is an author whom is well known for introducing aspects of his own life into his story through his fictional characters. Vonnegut’s drafting into the army during the Second World War alludes greatly to the character, Howard W. Campbell own fictional life. This life experience gave Kurt a unique insight to the actual events that took place during the war, and it also allowed him to express his own opinions personally through the actions and dialogue of the ch...   [tags: world war II, nazi] 1093 words
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Mental Health in Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut - ... She was heavenly azure. One hour later she was dead” (Vonnegut 234). But it really matters in the book because Billy Pilgrim indeed insane he talks about a place that no one else knows about, and how he sees everything in the future. He think the that he has a sort of communication with the Tralfamadorians, in reality he really does not, this a proof that Billy suffers from insanity, Billy also thinks to himself that he can travel through time, this which includes going from his war days, to being on Tralfamadore, to him also being back on earth....   [tags: Trauma, PSTD]
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727 words
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The Doctrines of Kurt Vonnegut - The Doctrines of Kurt Vonnegut The writing of Kurt Vonnegut exhibits perception without restriction and imagination without limitation. It surpasses mountains of ignorance and rivers of innocence to extend emotions for society to sympathize with reality. He incorporates his knowledge and view-points into a variety of literary genres for everyone to learn of his inquiries and philosophies. To draw readers into his sphere of influence, Kurt Vonnegut administers an inflection on the present to state other tenses (Schatt 148)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays] 1418 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Idealism of Kurt Vonnegut - The Idealism of Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut was greatly influenced by his involvement in World War II. His entanglement with the Dresden bombing had an unequivocal effect upon his mentality, and the horrid experience propelled the liberal anti-war assertions that dominate many of his novels. Throughout his life, his idealistic nature has perceptibly undulated, and five representative novels illustrate the forceful progression and gradual declivity of his liberal views. The first thirty years of his life outwardly coincided with the average American man....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays] 2000 words
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Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut - Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut “The story is a satire, a parody of an ideological society divorced from common sense reality” (Townsend). As Townsend stated Kurt Vonnegut makes a satire about society in his fictional short story Harrison Bergeron, which in their society there has been attempt of conformity through the handicaps of the people, the similarity to an authoritarian government, and the technology, whereas the people will eventually overcome. The Kind if government authority seen both mimics and satirizes the way Americans came to see the enemy (the Soviet Union) during the Cold War, which was near its height of distrust and fear in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s....   [tags: Harrison Bergeron Essays]
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569 words
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Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut - "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut In "Harrison Bergeron" Kurt Vonnegut depicts a society in which everyone is mentally, physically, and socially equal. Throughout the history of our country, Americans have sought racial, gender, and socio-economic equality. On paper such a society seems ideal. Through the story one might infer that Vonnegut views the concept of total equality as ludicrous. Equality can be interpreted many ways. One point of view is the American belief that everybody should be treated equally and another view is the one represented in the story that everybody is equal....   [tags: Harrison Bergeron Essays] 520 words
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A Sardonic Novel, Kurt Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse Five - ... Billy cannot understand this, which, ultimately, leads to his acceptance of the Tralfamadorian view that nothing has any meaning at all. In the beginning of chapter four, Vonnegut creates a depiction of the war going backwards to display the random nature of time as defined by the Tralfamadorians. In this scene, Billy is watching a movie on American bombers and the gallant pilots in World War II. Billy becomes stuck in time, as he watches the movie forward and backward. This passage in the novel reiterates the Tralfamadorian view of time and how time exists as a continuum; therefore the direction in which it travels doesn’t really matter....   [tags: tralfamadorians, war, death]
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725 words
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Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut and The Lottery by Shirley Jackson - An Uncomfortable Death There are many short stories in literature that share a common theme presented in different ways. A theme that always keeps readers’ attention is that of death because it is something that no one wants to face in real life, but something that can be easily faced when reading. “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut and “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson both exemplify how two authors use a common theme of death to stand as a metaphor for dystopian societies. Kurt Vonnegut wrote novels and short stories with a darker tone....   [tags: dystopian societies, an uncomfortable death] 1065 words
(3 pages)
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Biography of Kurt Vonnegut - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. was born to third-generation German American parents in the city of Indianapolis, year 1922, November 11th. While at Shortridge High School in Indianapolis, Vonnegut was heavily involved with the school’s daily newspaper, the first and only daily high school newspaper in our nation. During his time at Cornell University, Vonnegut became the school paper’s senior editor. World War II then began, and so Vonnegut joined our nation’s armed forces. Mother’s Day came in 1944, and during this time while Vonnegut was home on leave, his mother committed suicide....   [tags: essays research papers] 2394 words
(6.8 pages)
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Kurt Vonnegut’s beliefs on the nature of humans - The message of the true nature of human beings could be many things, but there is one thing that stands out to me. This would be that humans do everything in their best interest. Even if you think that they don’t in the story of Harrison and Bergeron I will prove to you that they in return do. I am going to tell you a few individual characters that have really shown that through this short story. First will be Harrison I will give you specific examples of how he has been the light at the end of the tunnel in this story, but also how he has done things in his own interest too....   [tags: Personal Best Interest, Laws of the Handicaps]
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1483 words
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Kurt Vonnegut’s Novel Cat’s Cradle - In the fraudulent words of the prophet Bokonon, “God made mud. God got lonesome. So God said to some of the mud, ‘Sit up!’” (Vonnegut 220). Thus, the creation of man. Unfortunately for all the mud, some of the mud decided that the only thing missing in life was a way to end it. Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Cat’s Cradle takes a satirical look at the shortsightedness and hubris in man’s approach to new technology. In the novel, one of the designers of the bomb that fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Dr. Felix Hoenikker, invents a way for military commanders to solidify muddy battlefields into a hard surface, perfect for crossings by tanks and soldiers....   [tags: Literary Themes]
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1575 words
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Major Themes of Slaughter House by Kurt Vonnegut - ... And this explained why most soldiers were teenagers at the end of the war, like what a British officer said in the novel: “We had forgotten that wars were fought by babies” (50). In the novel, there were several characters that showed the darkness of humanity. Perhaps, Paul Lazzaro was the most obvious one. In the novel, he used an extremely inhumane way to torture and killed a dog that tried to bite him because he thought that revenge was “the sweetest thing in life” (65). And unfortunately, Billy was one of his “victims” too, he died from the murder of this person in 1976....   [tags: war, attitude, philosophy]
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629 words
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Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut - 1. Define 'satire' and provide one example of personal or social satire that yoou have encountered. You may use any source for your example:TV, media, news editorials, movies, comedy, etc. Satire can be defined as any work in which a human vice or folly is attacked with irony or sarcasm. An example of satire can be found in the song "When the President Talks to God" by Bright Eyes. In this song, the lyrics lay out hypothetical conversations between the President and God, which mocks current President George W....   [tags: Harrison Bergeron Essays] 485 words
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