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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway"
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Memory in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Memory in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Clarissa Dalloway and Peter Walsh are defined by their memories. Virginia Woolf creates their characters through the memories they share, and indeed fabricates their very identities from these mutual experiences. Mrs. Dalloway creates a unique tapestry of time and memory, interweaving past and present, memory and dream. The past is the key to the future, and indeed for these two characters the past creates the future, shaping them into the people they are on the June day described by Woolf....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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1972 words
(5.6 pages)
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The Importance of Time in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - The Importance of Time in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway We live in a consumer society consuming time. We use time to function smoothly but also to channel the direction of our lives. As a college student, I am constantly aware of time. I have a time frame for finishing my college career, as well as constant deadlines to meet. Daily, I divide my hours between my job, my studies, and my friends. In the midst of following external time, I strive for a balance with my internal time. My personal sense of time allows me to live in the present moment....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway Virginia Woolf Essays]
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1614 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Intersection of External Time and Internal Time in Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf - In Mrs Dalloway, the modernist writer Virginia Woolf undermines the usual conventions of prior prose fiction by adopting an innovative approach to time. She contrasts the objective external time and subjective internal time that structure the plot of the one-day novel. In fact, the story takes place on a single day in June and, by the use of two important techniques, namely the stream of consciousness mode of narration and the interior monologue, the reader is constantly flowing from the present to the past or the future....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway, Virginia Woolf]
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2726 words
(7.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway It is apparent throughout the Virgina Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway that the character development and complexity of the female characters of the story are concentrated on far more than their male counterparts. It is my feelings that the magnitude of this character development comes about because of the observations and feelings of the main character Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway] 1125 words
(3.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway “Imagination is the one weapon in the war against reality.” -Jules de Gaultier Set just after one of England’s worst tragedies, Virginia Woolf’s 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway is a vivid picture of the effects of World War I on London’s high society, often in glaring contrast to the effects of shell shock suffered by war veteran Septimus Smith. For members of high society, the War’s impact is largely indirect, mainly affecting their conversations at posh social functions....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway Essays WWI]
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1866 words
(5.3 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway In Jacob's Room, the novel preceding Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf works with many of the same themes she later expands upon in Mrs. Dalloway. To Mrs. Dalloway, she added the theme of insanity. As Woolf stated, "I adumbrate here a study of insanity and suicide; the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side." However, even the theme that would lead Woolf to create a double for Clarissa Dalloway can be viewed as a progression of other similar ideas cultivated in Jacob's Room....   [tags: Novel Analysis Dalloway Woolf] 737 words
(2.1 pages)
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An Analysis of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - An Analysis of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Somewhere within the narrative of Mrs. Dalloway, there seems to lie what could be understood as a restatement - or, perhaps, a working out of - the essentially simple, key theme or motif found in Woolf's famous feminist essay A Room of One's Own. Mrs. Dalloway does in fact possess "a room of her own - " and enjoys an income (or the use of an income) that is at least "five hundred a year - " (Room: 164). But most importantly, Clarissa Dalloway also deals with ways of working out female economic necessity, personal space, and the manifestation of an "artistic" self-conception....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway]
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3340 words
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Social Oppression in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - The physical and social setting in "Mrs. Dalloway" sets the mood for the novel's principal theme: the theme of social oppression. Social oppression was shown in two ways: the oppression of women as English society returned to its traditional norms and customs after the war, and the oppression of the hard realities of life, "concealing" these realities with the elegance of English society....   [tags: Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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1475 words
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Female Relationships in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Female Relationships in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway     Clarissa Dalloway, the central character in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, is a complex figure whose relations with other women reveal as much about her personality as do her own musings. By focusing at length on several characters, all of whom are in some way connected to Clarissa, Woolf expertly portrays the ways females interact: sometimes drawing upon one another for things which they cannot get from men; other times, turning on each other out of jealousy and insecurity....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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1447 words
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The Effects of Society in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Society is a constant changing idea, whether that change be from region to region or a period of time. People move through it without thinking what they really are doing. Often they do not realize how much pressure society places on one’s being. It is the basis of how a person forms their opinions, beliefs, and morals. The structure of behavior rests in the society one is raised in. People’s acceptance of one another and a desire to conform create a world where people are struggling to fit in. Virginia Woolf sees this....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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3069 words
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Analysis of Mrs. Dalloway by – Virginia Woolf - Analysis of Mrs. Dalloway by – Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway, published in 1925, is a romantic drama with deep psychological approaching in to the world of urban English society in the summer of 1923, five years after the end of World War I. The book begins in the morning with the arrangements for a party Clarissa Dalloway will give and it ends late in the evening when the guests are all leaving. There are many flashbacks to tell us the past of each character, but it does not leave the range of those few hours....   [tags: Play Woolf MRS Dalloway] 1456 words
(4.2 pages)
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Mystical Motifs in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway - Mystical Motifs in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway The scholarship surrounding Woolf’s mysticism by and large focuses on a psychoanalytical approach. While this paper will somewhat attempt to move away from a psychoanalytical methodology, it is valuable to examine the existing scholarship and the departures from this approach. Within this theoretical structure, the critical discussion further breaks down into two separate, though not incompatible, groups: those who see Woolf’s use of mysticism as a feminist statement and those who see Woolf as a mystic....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway]
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1367 words
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Perception is Reality in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Although the entire novel tells of only one day, Virginia Woolf covers a lifetime in her enlightening novel of the mystery of the human personality. The delicate Clarissa Dalloway, a disciplined English lady, provides the perfect contrast to Septimus Warren Smith, an insane ex-soldier living in chaos. Even though the two never meet, these two correspond in that they strive to maintain possession of themselves, of their souls. On this Wednesday in June of 1923, as Clarissa prepares for her party that night, events during the day trigger memories and recollections of her past, and Woolf offers these bits to the reader, who must then form the psychological and emotional make-up of Mrs....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays] 1985 words
(5.7 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - A Modern Tragedy - Mrs. Dalloway - A Modern Tragedy           The narrative of Mrs. Dalloway may be viewed by some as random congealing of various character experience. Although it appears to be a fragmented assortment of images and thought, there is a psychological coherence to the deeply layered novel. Part of this coherence can be found in Mrs. Dalloway's psychological tone which is tragic in nature. In her forward to Mrs. Dalloway, Maureen Howard informs us that Woolf was reading both Sophocles and Euripides for her essays in The Common Reader while writing Mrs....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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3726 words
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Diagnosing Septimus Smith in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Diagnosing Septimus Smith in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf’s novel, Mrs. Dalloway, features a severely mentally ill man named Septimus Smith. Throughout the novel the reader glimpses moments of Septimus’s dementia and how his poor frazzled wife, Rezia, deals with him. Septimus, who has returned from the war and met Rezia in Italy on his discharge, has a seriously skewed version of reality. He has been through traumatic events during the war, including the death of his commanding officer and friend, Evans....   [tags: Woolf Dalloway Literature Analysis] 1424 words
(4.1 pages)
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Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf - The psychological effect the city environment has on both, the characters and authors, can be seen in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway and T.S.Elliot’s the wasteland. The lack of unity of Elliot’s text has lead critics to feel the writing is far too fragmented: My nerves are bad to-night. Yes, bad. Stay with me. Speak to me. Why do you never speak. Speak. What are you thinking of. What thinking. What. I never know what you are thinking. Think. (TWL: 110) However, as Gareth Reeves suggests in the book T.S.Elliot: The wasteland ‘unprecedented conditions of chaos and disintegration demand unprecedented methods of poetic fragmentation’ (16)....   [tags: ts eliot, city environment, the wasteland]
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1487 words
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a Metaphor in Mrs. Dalloway, By Virginia Woolf - When WWI was over, many people questioned the brutality that carried on over the four years that the war was happening. The Europeans trust in authority and in their country began to collapse, and Modernism was a way they could respond to the damage of those beliefs. It was obvious that the old world was gone and a new one had started to arise. In this new world, while other aspects of Europe were advancing, improvement in the psychiatric treatment of mental conditions, for example shell-shock, fell short....   [tags: Virginia Woolf]
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2442 words
(7 pages)
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Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway - Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway revolves around several of the issues that preoccupied the Bloomsbury writers and thinkers as a group. Issues of androgyny, class, madness, and mythology run throughout the novel. While that is hardly an exhaustive list, these notions seem to form the core of the structure of the novel. Woolf herself, when envisioning the project, sought to produce “a study of insanity and suicide, the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side.” This issue of madness, in particular, gives the novel its form as we follow the twinned lives of Septimus Warren Smith and Clarissa Dalloway....   [tags: Woolf] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
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Cultural Disenchantment in a Postwar Climate Illustrated in Virginia Woolf’s Novel Mrs. Dalloway - One of the principal themes in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway is the English people’s collective loss of confidence in the state of the British Empire after the First World War. Set in London in the June of 1923, the novel opens at the close of a global war that lasted only four years but cost the United Kingdom more than 100,000 lives and permanently shifted the political boundaries and social world order of its people. Each of the novel’s many characters represent a different aspect of the English citizens’ disenchantment with established, presupposed cultural values and worldview brought about by the unexpected lack of glory in victory or dignity in the dead and wounded multitudes....   [tags: Mrs. Dalloway, argumentative, persuasive]
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2194 words
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World War I Veterans and Shell Shock in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf’s novel, Mrs. Dalloway, addresses life during the interwar years and more specifically the impact of shell shock on World War I veterans. Septimus Warren Smith, a survivor of the war, suffers daily through the trauma he endured in the war. Woolf highlights societies lack of understanding when it comes to the condition plaguing so many soldier after the war through characters like Dr. Holmes and Sir William Bradshaw. This along with propaganda glorifying the war and instilling the notion of manliness and strength in those that fought led to great misconceptions on the societies ignorance on soldiers suffering from shell shock....   [tags: Social Class Divide, Mental Illness]
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976 words
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Overview and Literary Techniques: Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf - INTRODUCTION :- The story of Mrs. Dalloway was written by Virginia Woolf in 1925, and closely relates to her own life. Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 into an upper-class family. At the age of 13, Woolf’s mother died, which was the beginning of her bouts with mental illness. Two short years later, Woolf’s older sister and primary care giver Stella also died. After her death Virginia Woolf began suffering from more severe depression and manic episodes that would stay with her intermittently for the rest of her life....   [tags: homosexuality, feminist, ]
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1488 words
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Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights - Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights share similarities in many aspects, perhaps most plainly seen in the plots: just as Clarissa marries Richard rather than Peter Walsh in order to secure a comfortable life for herself, Catherine chooses Edgar Linton over Heathcliff in an attempt to wrest both herself and Heathcliff from the squalid lifestyle of Wuthering Heights. However, these two novels also overlap in thematic elements in that both are concerned with the opposing forces of civilization or order and chaos or madness....   [tags: Compare contrast Woolf Bronte Essays] 1672 words
(4.8 pages)
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The War is Over: Post World War I in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - War is an important theme in Mrs. Dalloway (1925), a post World War I text. While on the one hand there is the focus on Mrs. Dalloway’s domestic life and her ‘party consciousness’, on the other there are ideas of masculinity and “patriotic zeal that stupefy marching boys into a stiff yet staring corpse and perniciously public-spirited doctors” , and the sense of war reverberates in the entire text. Woolf’s treatment of the Great War is different from the normative way in which the War is talked about in the post world war I texts....   [tags: British Literature] 1672 words
(4.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot - Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot are representative works of two separate movements in literature: Modernism and Post-Modernism. Defining both movements in their entirety, or arguing whether either work is truly representative of the classifications of Modernism and Post-Modernism, is not the purpose of this paper; rather, the purpose is to carefully evaluate how both works, in the context of both works being representative of their respective traditions, employ the use of symbolism and allusion....   [tags: Modernism, Post-Modernism]
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2439 words
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Processing Emotions in Mrs. Dalloway and Demonology - Processing Emotions in Mrs. Dalloway and Demonology Hold them in or let them out; typically these are the only two options one has in dealing with their everyday emotions. Over time, making this decision has differed greatly. The transition between holding in your emotions and letting them out can be seen between two writers from two different eras. In Virginia Woolf’s Mrs.Dalloway, she portrays people in upper class England during the first half of the 20th century and how they process their emotions....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Rick Moody Social Classes Essays] 1468 words
(4.2 pages)
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Representation of War in Sassoon’s They, Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, and the film Hedd Wynn - Representation of War in Sassoon’s They, Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, and the film Hedd Wynn “They”, by Siegfried Sassoon, “Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf, and the film Hedd Wynn directed by Paul Turner, were works written about World War I. These works were the author’s point of view about the war. The authors described how the war effected people during and after the war was over. The poem “They”, by Siegfried Sassoon was a poem written during World War I. The poem basically states that no man comes out of the war the same....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway]
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1466 words
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Mrs. Dalloway - I. Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf, was published on May 14, 1925 in London, England. The novel follows Clarissa Dalloway and a variety of other characters throughout the span of one day in their lives in 1923 London. Woolf utilizes a narrative method of writing. With the novel’s structure, the narrator possesses the ability to move inside of a character’s mind and compose her thoughts and emotions immediately as events occur throughout the day. The novel’s main character, Clarissa, is a middle-aged woman who belongs to the upper-middle class in society and is well-married to a Member of Parliament—Richard Dalloway....   [tags: Character Analysis, Clarissa Dalloway, Wolf] 2654 words
(7.6 pages)
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The Light in A Sketch of the Past and Mrs. Dalloway - The Light in A Sketch of the Past and Mrs. Dalloway      Virginia Woolf's method to writing fiction was always to "dig out beautiful caves1" behind, within, and around her characters - to tunnel through their consciousness in order to tell their story as artfully as one tells his or her own.  It is her "tunneling" process that makes her style so distinctive: her sentences layered with multiple meanings, her paragraphs rich with stream-of-consciousness internal monologue, and her dialogue sparse.  Clearly, she had few qualms about taking the modern novel's all-too-common, linear form of storytelling and turning it upside down in order to dig through to its core - its very essence - and fi...   [tags: Sketch Dalloway]
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1602 words
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Mrs. Dalloway By Virginia Wool - In Virginia Woolf’s book, Mrs. Dalloway, Clarissa Dalloway and Septimus Warren Smith grow up under the same social institutions although social classes are drawn upon wealth; it can be conceived that two people may have very similar opinions of the society that created them. The English society which Woolf presents individuals that are uncannily similar. Clarissa and Septimus share the quality of expressing through actions, not words. Through these basic beliefs and idiosyncrasies, both characters mimic each other through their actions and thoughts, even though they never meet....   [tags: essays research papers] 783 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Theme of Mental Health Illustrated in Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Cunningham's The Hours - ‘Mrs. Dalloway’, by Virginia Woolf is a derivative text of ‘The Hours’, written by Michael Cunningham. The novels both share an important theme of mental health. The circumstances of mental health are commonly sympathetic, and empathetic. The characters Septimus and Clarissa in ‘Mrs. Dalloway’ and Richard, Laura Brown, and Virginia Woolf in ‘The Hours’ show the strongest symbols for this theme. Most of the problems and treatments these characters face are in direct result of the age they live in....   [tags: Literary Comparison, Literary Analysis] 453 words
(1.3 pages)
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Modernist Movement in Ford's Good Soldier and Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Ford Madox Ford and Virginia Woolf were major contributors to the modernist movement. They, as well as others (such as James Joyce), were trying something new, by breaking down the boundaries of traditional writing. Ford's Good Soldier and Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway are two particular examples of the genre. These novels were not well-received in their own time. As time went on, however, the attitudes of the literary world changed and were able to finally see these works for what they really are – exemplary pieces of fiction, certainly worth merit....   [tags: Ford Woolf Dalloway Soldier Modern Essays]
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A Room of Ones Own by Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf, a founder of Modernism, is one of the most important woman writers. Her essays and novels provide an insight into her life experiences and those of women of the 20th century. Her most famous works include Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), Orlando: A Biography (1928), The Waves (1931), and A Room of One's Own (1929) (Roseman 11). A Room of One's Own is an based on Woolf's lectures at a women's college at Cambridge University in 1928. Woolf bases her thoughts on "the question of women and fiction"....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Essays]
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Mrs. Dolloway by Virignia Woolf - ... Based on text study, Septimus has been diagnosed with schizophrenia, which is a mental illness closely linked with hallucinations and gradual dissociation with ones emotions, thoughts, and behaviors (Class Notes – AP Psychology). While on active duty, Septimus suffered through several traumatic events. After dispatch, Septimus met Lucrezia in Italy, married her, and came to England, where he had constant hallucinations. The prominent hallucination in the novel was that of his close friend and commanding officer, Evans, who died in battle....   [tags: veterans, hallucinations, war]
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605 words
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Virginia Woolf and Contemporary Feminism - Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941), a prominent English writer and feminist, was considered one of the twentieth-century’s most remarkable modernist novelists. The well-known works of Virginia Woolf are often closely related to the development of feminist reproach. With that being said, she was a rather distinguished writer in relation to the modernist movement as well. Virginia Woolf certainly restructured the novel, experimenting with her flow of thoughts and imageries. Although, not always appearing to be the work of clear organization or even solid structure for that matter....   [tags: english writer, modernism, biography]
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The Challenge of Free Indirect Speech in Mrs. Dalloway - Mrs. Dalloway’s Free Indirect Discourse Modernist writers emergence in the twentieth century brought many changes to literature. They rejected the Romantic focus on nature and being and instead were inspired by the impersonal and capitalistic feelings brought on from machinery and World War I. Soldiers who were sent to war saw death and pain in completely new ways. These experiences, which only worsened with World War II in the 1940s, prevented many soldiers from mentally coming home. Enlisted writers and those back home who saw the shell-shock effects of war used that horror within their writing....   [tags: modernist writer, woolf]
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1183 words
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Society, Class, and Conflict the Social Criticism of Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf offers interesting analysis of social pressure and social class in Mrs. Dalloway and The Years. Understanding Woolf’s message about society demands a certain amount of sensitivity and decoding on behalf of her reader. Her social criticism in both texts can be easily overlooked because she keeps it subtle and implicit, hidden in the patterns and courses of her characters’ trains of thoughts. Yet upon such close reading, the essential importance of conflict between the individual and society in Woolf’s work becomes clear....   [tags: Literature]
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Individual and Society in Virginia Woolf's Novel "mrs Dalloway" - According to Viktors Ivbulis (1995: 23 - 29) in Modernist fiction a special attention is paid to an individual who degrades because of the pressure from the society and is therefore shown as a small part of the society being unable to do miracles. Moreover, the 20th century's fight for the power makes the rights of an individual be dependent on the rights of the society. This individual is not a personality anymore that was established in the 19th century literature. It is a simple person, who is depressed by the highly technological world and the demands of the society and is therefore lonesome and isolated....   [tags: European Literature] 1047 words
(3 pages)
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Comparing Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Edward Thomas’ And As the Team’s Head Brass, and the film Hedd Wyn - Comparing Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Edward Thomas’ And As the Team’s Head Brass, and the film Hedd Wyn The wars of the Twentieth century have had a marked impact on the views and actions of societies all across the world. The impacts of World War I can be viewed vividly through the literature of the time period. In this period, each author had his or her own way of illustrating the effects of the war on their public. Three works dealing in particular with this representation are: “As the Team’s Head Brass” a poem by Edward Thomas, “Mrs....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
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1483 words
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf was born Adeline Virginia Stephen, in 1882. She suffered immensely as a child from a series of emotional shocks (these are included in the biography of Virginia Woolf). However, she overcame these incredible personal damages and became a major British novelist, essayist and critic. Woolf also belonged to an elite group that included Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot. Woolf pioneered in incorporating feminism in her writings. “Virginia Woolf’s journalistic and polemical writings show that she made a significant contribution to the development of feminist thought” (Dalsimer)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf In recent times there has been a renewed interest in Virginia Woolf and her work, from the Broadway play, “Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” to the Academy award nominated film “The Hours” starring Nicole Kidman. This recent exposure, along with the fact that I have ancestors from England , has sparked my interest in this twentieth century British novelist. During the early part of the twentieth century, artists and writers saw the world in a new way. Famed British novelist Virginia Woolf was very sensitive to this change, for she felt that human relationships such as ones between a husband and wife of master and servant were shifting, due to all of the political, religious, a...   [tags: Novelists Authors Writers Essays]
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Feminism and Insanity in Virginia Woolf's Work - Feminism and Insanity in Virginia Woolf's Work The critical discussion revolving around the presence of mystical elements in Virginia Woolf's work is sparse. Yet it seems to revolve rather neatly around two poles. The first being a preoccupation with the notion of madness and insanity in Woolf's work and the second focuses on the political ramifications of mystical encounters. More specifically, Woolf's mysticism reflects on her feminist ideals and notions. Even though she ultimately associates Woolf's brand of mysticism with the 19th century Theosophists, she continually refers to the specific encounters in Woolf's work as "natural mysticism" (Kane 329)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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The Character of Clarissa Dalloway Created by Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf creates interesting contrast within the character of Clarissa Dalloway using stream of consciousness narration in her novel Mrs. Dalloway. Clarissa’s inner thoughts reveal a contrast between her lack of attraction to her husband due to her lesbian feelings and her fear of loosing him as a social stepping stone. These contrasts and many others can be seen throughout the novel using the literary device of stream of consciousness narration. Clarissa’s character reveals to us early in the book her lack of attraction to her husband....   [tags: essays research papers] 463 words
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The Social/Economic Upper-Class in England in Mrs. Dalloway, Sense and Sensibility, and The Picture of Dorian Gray - The social/economic upper-class in England in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray are depicted through the characters’ lifestyles, wealth, and behaviors. Woolf, Austen, and Wilde give insightful portrayals of the characters by emphasizing their social roles in the England society. Their portrayals of the characters suggest that they are critical of the upper-class’ factitious lifestyles. Members of England’s social/economic upper-class in Woolf’s, Austen’s, and Wilde’s literary works are distinguished by their lifestyles....   [tags: Comparative, Austen, Wilde]
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Biography of Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf was born on January 25th, 1882 to Leslie Stephan, editor of the Cornhill magazine and the Dictionary of National Biography (Kennedy 340). Her mother name was Julia who was a famous beauty, also got sketched by pre Raphaelite artist (Woolf 173). This was during a period of a vastly fast paced growing United States, where the railroad industry was booming and industrialism was at full spin. Her mother, Julia died in 1895 when Woolf was thirteen (Woolf 173). Although Woolf was growing up in a literary and artistic household but she was kept away from a better education which her brothers were allowed to attend....   [tags: freedom of women, wartime]
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1874 words
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Viriginia Woolf - Viriginia Woolf (this essay has problems with the format) One of the greatest female authors of all time, Virginia Woolf, produced a body of writing respected worldwide. Driven by uncontrollable circumstances and internal conflict, her life was cut short by suicide. Her role in feminism, along with the personal relationships in her life, influenced her literary works. Virginia's relationships throughout her life contributed, not only to her literature, but the quality of her life as well. Perhaps the greatest influence in Virginia's life is her mother, Julia Stephen....   [tags: Author Viriginia Woolf feminism relationships]
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1952 words
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Psychiatric Evaluation and Diagnosis of Virginia Woolf - I have chosen to write about Virginia Woolf, a British novelist who wrote A Room of One’s Own, To the Lighthouse and Orlando, to name a few of her pieces of work. Virginia Woolf was my first introduction to feminist type books. I chose Woolf because she is a fantastic writer and one of my favorites as well. Her unique style of writing, which came to be known as stream-of-consciousness, was influenced by the symptoms she experienced through her bipolar disorder. Many people have heard the word "bipolar," but do not realize its full implications....   [tags: Bipolar Disorder]
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773 words
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Mrs. Dalloway - Mrs. Dalloway (1998) presents a day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, an upper-class English woman. Clarissa Dalloway is the wife of Richard Dalloway, a Conservative Member of Parliament. The story takes place in London on a day in June 1923, a day when Clarissa is giving a dinner party. She walks to the florist shop to buy flowers for the party. Admittedly, it's no easy task to make a silly woman's foolish choices an engrossing cinematic experience. For that reason alone the people who tried to make a film of Virginia Woolf's novel, "Mrs....   [tags: essays research papers] 722 words
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The Life of Virginia Woolf - The Life of Virginia Woolf Driven by uncontrollable circumctances and internal conflict, her life was cut short by suicide. One of the greatest female authors of all times, Virginia woolf, produced a body of writtings respected world wide. Her role in feminsim, along with the personal relationships in her life, influanced her literary. Virginias relationships throughout her life contributed not only to her literature, but the quality of her life as well. Perhaps the greatest influence in Virginia's life is her mother, Julia Stephen....   [tags: Papers] 1528 words
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Clarissa Dalloway and Septimus Warren Smith - Clarissa Dalloway and Septimus Warren Smith Clarissa Dalloway and Septimus Warren Smith are two of the character is in the book Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. Clarissa Dalloway and Septimus Warren Smith are unhappy with their lives. Although, Clarissa and Septimus are both unhappy the basis for their unhappiness stems from different reasons and/or events that have happened in their lives. But the both fear the can not feel as others feel. Clarissa Dalloway, a middle aged upper class woman, is unhappy because of choices she has made in her life she also fears that she can not feel things as others do....   [tags: essays research papers] 1004 words
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Virginia Woolf's Use of Moments of Being - Virginia Woolf's Use of Moments of Being      Virginia Woolf is recognized as one of the great innovators of modern fiction. Her experiments with point of view and her use of stream of consciousness have influenced many writers that followed her. But one particularly interesting technique that does not seem to receive much attention is her use of "moments of being."   She first mentions moments of being in her essay, "A Sketch of the Past," which was to be the beginning of her memoirs....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Commerce, Politics and the City in A Room of One's Own and Mrs. Dalloway - Commerce, Politics and the City in A Room of One's Own and Mrs. Dalloway        "...At this moment, as so often happens in London, there was a complete lull and suspension of traffic. Nothing came down the street; nobody passed. A single leaf detached itself from the plane tree at the end of the street, and in that pause and suspension fell. Somehow it was like a signal falling, a signal pointing to a force in things which one had overlooked ... Now it was bringing from one side of the street to the other diagonally a girl in patent leather boots and then a young man in a maroon overcoat; it was also bringing a taxi-cab; and it brought all three together at a...   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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Adaptations of Virginia Wolfe - In approaching a topic such as adaptations, one has to first understand what exactly adaptation means and how it is applied to such works to get the product the "adapter" is trying to create and for what reasons they are "adapting" for. The American Heritage Dictionary defines Adaptation as the following: "1(a). The act for process of adapting. 1(b). The state of being adapted. 2. A composition recast into a new form: "The play is an adaptation of a short novel." 3. An alteration or adjustment by which a species or individual improves its condition in relationship to its environment....   [tags: Comparative Literature] 2348 words
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Cunningham's The Hours: The Mind of Virginia Wolf - While writing a fiction novel, I would think that the writer would have to dig deep into their mind and into their heart in order for them to convey realistic emotions through their characters. This process could almost be related to hypnosis where the writer relies on his or her inner thoughts and feelings to effectively add depth to their novel's fictitious characters. In the novel Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf used a technique called stream-of-consciousness in which she attempted to write the novel in the same patterns as her brain's thought process....   [tags: Cunningham Hours Essays]
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Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Jacob Flanders, Many Things to Many Readers - Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Jacob Flanders, Many Things to Many Readers Listless is the air in an empty room, just swelling the curtain; the flowers in the jar shift. One fibre in the wicker arm- chair creaks, though no one sits there. - Jacob's Room The year 1922 marks the beginning of High Modernism with the publications of T. S. Eliot's The Wasteland, James Joyce's Ulysses, and Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room. Woolf's novel, only her third, is not generally afforded the iconic worship and critical praise so often attached to those works of her most famous male contemporaries....   [tags: Jacob's Room Essays]
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An Abstract View of Death in Mrs.Dalloway and The Hours - An Abstract View of Death in Mrs.Dalloway and The Hours Works Cited Missing In Mrs. Dalloway and The Hours contradictory and almost altered views of death are presented. Virginia Woolf and Michael Cunningham portray death as escape for some, but an entrapment for others. It is no longer treated as a subject to worry about or fear, which society now views it as. A line from Shakespeare's Cymbeline, "Fear no more the heat o' the sun / Nor the furious winter rages," sums up what the authors of Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Michael Cunningham] 1675 words
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War in the Works of Virginia Woolf, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen - War in the Works of Virginia Woolf, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen     War has the ability to destroy not only countries and society, but families and individuals as well.  Adverse effects are often the outcome of a war.  It is not looked at in a positive way and often causes conflict.  Through the works of Virginia Woolf, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, and the 1992 Welsh film Hedd Wyn the effects of war are made apparent.  All of them express their representations of war differently; however, the works have many similarities as well....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 1512 words
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Narrative Theory in Virgina Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Beginning, Plot, Sequence, Closure: Teaching To the Lighthouse Narrative theory is extremely useful in teaching modernist fiction; its revival in the beginning of the twentieth century may be a direct response to the practices of modernist fiction. One of the most important components of narrative theory is what I call narrative dynamics, or the related issues of presentation of the story from the choice of beginning point, through the arrangement of linear and nonlinear sequences of events, to the function of the ending....   [tags: To the Lighthouse Essays]
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Characterization in To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolfe - Characterization in To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolfe Virginia Woolfe was truly talented author, who wrote in the 1920's. She was considered a gifted woman and a pioneer for feminist authors yet she was plagued by mental illness from her youth until her suicide. She suffered from manic depression that was said to have been aggravated by her troubled youth. She experienced many traumas, including the death of her mother at age 13 and sexual abuse by her stepbrother at the age of 12. However Woolf was able to find temporary escape from her illness by using the characters in her novels to express her unusual and often disturbing thoughts and feelings about herself and the world around he...   [tags: Papers] 1343 words
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The Life and Work of Virginia Woolf - From the early death of her mother at age 13 to the sexual abuse from her own half brothers led to the many mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects Virginia’s life filled with depression even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, ]
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The Death of the Moth, by Virginia Woolf - The battle against death, while can be portrayed as magnificent, is ultimately pathetic and insignificant. Like a boulder tipping precariously off a cliff, one can exhibit the ardent desire to survive, yet against the fragility and impermanence of life, this desire is a pitiful effort in the face of impending failure. The hopelessness of such a situation is depicted in “The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf, in which the moth incessantly endeavors to overcome the irresolvable dilemma of breaking through the barriers that contain it and visit the outside world....   [tags: The Death of the Moth, Virginia Woolf] 725 words
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The Duchess And The Jeweler by Virginia Woolf - The Duchess and the Jeweler is the story of the world's greatest jeweler who had promised his mother to become the richest jeweler in the world in his childhood but now that his dream has materialized he does not feel satisfied. So trying to achieve satisfaction, knowingly he buys fake pearls from a Duchess in exchange for passing a whole weekend with her daughter whom he is in love with. The purpose of this essay is to show how Virginia Woolf has successfully presented the inner mind of the characters, their struggle and their communication through the least amount of verbal communication among them....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Duchess Jeweler] 1572 words
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To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf When speaking of modernism in the work Virginia Woolf, scholars too readily use her innovations in style and technique as the starting point for critical analysis, focusing largely on the ways in which her prose represents a departure from the conventional novel in both style and content. To simply discuss the extent of her unique style, however, is to overlook the role of tradition in her creation of a new literary identity. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's invention reveals itself instead as a reinvention, a recasting of the conventional through the use of the traditional....   [tags: Lighthouse Virginia Woolf Essays]
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Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents - Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents Why would I start with Julia Duckworth Stephen to get to Virginia Woolf. One answer is Virginia’s often quoted statement that "we think back through our mothers if we are women" (Woolf, A Room of One’s Own). Feminism is rooted not just in a response to patriarchy but also in the history of females and their treatment of each other. Part of feminism is a reevaluation of the value of motherhood. But what does Virginia’s mother have to do with Virginia’s writing....   [tags: Virginia Woolf]
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Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women and Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women - It is as if a window finally cracks open revealing the sun’s rays brightening with the truth that men and women experience different challenges. Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women has to face the music when applied to Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women. In Tannen’s essay the claim that “[t]here is no unmarked women” has trouble withstanding but manages to hold up Woolf’s position of the battle women fought against the traditional norm to the freedom they can possess. First and foremost, Tannen claims that all women are “unmarked” and that leaves the essay with room for doubt....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, Deborah Tannen]
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Evolution of the Modern Woman in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Evolution of the Modern Woman in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse examines the role of women or more specifically, the evolution of the modern woman. The two main female characters in the novel, Mrs Ramsay and Lily Briscoe, both represent different views on life and follow different paths on their search for meaning. Lily Briscoe transcends the traditional female gender roles embodied by Mrs Ramsay; by coming into her own as an independent and modern woman, she symbolises the advent of modernism and rejection of traditional Victorian values....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays Virginia Woolf ]
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Expectations in the Movie The Hours - Expectations in the Movie The Hours We expect those endowed with a gift - be it artistic, intellectual or circumstantial - to cultivate that gift and use it as a vehicle for excellence in life. In the movie The Hours Virginia Woolf, the 20th Century British author; Laura Brown, a doted-upon 1951 Los Angeles housewife; and Clarissa Vaughan, a 2001 New York editor; struggle with their gifts and the expectations they, and others, have for themselves. All three women are obsessed with finding the right balance between living, freedom, happiness and love....   [tags: Movies Film Woolf Brown Vaughan Essays]
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A Room of Ones Own by Virginia Woolf - A Room of Ones Own by Virginia Woolf      In 1928, Virginia Woolf was asked to speak on the topic of “women and fiction”. The result, based upon two essays she delivered at Newnham and Girton that year, was A Room of One’s Own, which is an extended essay on women as both writers of fiction and as characters in fiction. While Woolf suggests that, “when a subject is highly controversial-and any question about sex is that-one cannot hope to tell the truth,” (Woolf 4) her essay is, in fact, a thought out and insightful reflection on the topic....   [tags: Room Ones Own Virginia Woolf Essays]
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The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - ‘The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf      Death is a difficult subject for anyone to speak of, although it is a part of everyday life. In Virginia Woolf’s “The Death of the Moth”, she writes about a moth flying about a windowpane, its world constrained by the boundaries of the wood holding the glass. The moth flew, first from one side, to the other, and then back as the rest of life continued ignorant of its movements. At first indifferent, Woolf was eventually moved to pity the moth. This story shows that life is as strange and familiar as death to us all....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Death Moth Essays]
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The Personal Events which Led Virginia Woolf to the a Great Novelist - From the early death of her mother at age thirteen to the sexual abuse from her own half- brothers, many personal events contributed to the numerous mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people, you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects that Virginia’s life was filled with depression, even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, biography, Kew Gardens] 1769 words
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Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita - Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita It has been said the novel Orlando is the longest love-letter ever written; a celebration of the bond between women. The relationship between Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West is well documented and known to have been intimate. That Virginia was passionate and giddy about her relationship with Vita is also known and displayed in Orlando. But Orlando also offers a rare intimate glimpse into the mind of Virginia Woolf. An unselfconscious work, it reveals her mind, talent at play....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]
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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf For this book talk, I read an Edward Albee's play, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf." I saw the movie version of this book, which I found excellent, so it inspired me to read the book. The book begins when George, who is an associate professor of a New England college, and Martha, who is the daughter of the college professor comes home after a faculty party. Although it is well after midnight and they are heavily drunk, Martha invites another couple, Nick who is a new and young professor in the college, and his wife Honey....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf Essays] 665 words
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Gender Roles in Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Though usually viewed as a violent play about turbulent marriages, Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. should be regarded as an early feminist text. Bonnie Finkelstein writes that the 1962 play portrays and analyzes the damaging effects of traditional, stereotypical gender roles, particularly for women; the play serves to point out how unrealistic, useless and extraordinarily damning they ultimately are. Finkelstein notes that the 1963 publication of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique unofficially began a re-evaluation of gender roles in the United States (Finkelstein 55)....   [tags: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?]
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Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando - Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando In her novel Orlando, Virginia Woolf tells the story of a man who one night mysteriously becomes a woman. By shrouding Orlando's actual gender change in a mysterious religious rite, we readers are pressured to not question the actual mechanics of the change but rather to focus on its consequences. In doing this, we are invited to answer one of the fundamental questions of our lives, a question that we so often ignore because it seems so very basic - what is a man....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]
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The Importance of Birds in Virginia Woolf's The Waves - The Importance of Birds in Virginia Woolf's The Waves      To emphasize her viewpoint in The Waves, Woolf employs a distinctive style.  She interlocks the dramatic monologues of six characters at successive stages in their lives to tell her story; and prefaces each of the sections with a descriptive passage of sun and waves through a single day.  In these passages descriptions of the sun, the sea, the plants, and the birds make implicit comparisons with the characters' speeches.  The actions of the birds in the descriptive passages most strikingly parallel the developing consciousness of the characters, exemplified by Susan....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Waves Essays Papers]
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Analysis of Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children and Virginia Woolfe’s Mrs. Dalloway - Transitions of place, time, and character are key to the storytelling in Salman Rushdie's “Midnight's Children” and Virginia Woolfe’s “Mrs. Dalloway”. Rushdie explores the History, Nationalism and Hybridism of the nation of India after they became independent of Great Britain. Woolfe comments heavily on English society more through her description of her characters, and the weaving of time and place is an effective way to telling the stories of her characters as we follow them through a single day....   [tags: literary analysis, literary criticism] 1603 words
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The Set of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - The Set of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.         For a play as drastically depressing and oppressive as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, the set needs to augment the mood as much as possible. Albee’s play calls for several props, and all of these have to be provided, but more than that, the set needs to look as real as possible, to show that these people are not vastly different from the rest of us. And because in that fact the true horror of the play resides the set is all-important. Luckily, the performance featured a realistic, intricate, close set....   [tags: Whos Afraid Virginia Woolf] 875 words
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Reality versus Illusion in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Reality versus Illusion in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf.        In his play, The American Dream, Edward Albee unveils a tortured family that is symbolic of the reality beneath the illusion of the American dream.  In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Albee takes a more traditional approach than the theater of the absurd, and his language is more natural, but he returns to this theme with a vengeance.  For in all of drama there are few plays about domestic relationships that are as caustic, violent and as poisoned with the milk of human bitterness, cynicism and pessimism as is Woolf.  The story regards George and Martha, a married couple (he a history professor and she the University Presiden...   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf]
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Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   "I am preoccupied with history" George observes in Act I (p. 50) of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. But his relationship with his wife, Martha, seems to lean almost towards anthropology. Pagan social and religious elements in Albee's work seem to clarify and enhance the basic themes of the play.             Pagan trappings adorn the whole structure of the play: the prevalence of alcohol, the "goddamn Saturday night orgies" (p....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf] 1119 words
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New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf is a disturbing and powerful work. Ironically, it is disturbing and powerful for many of the same reasons. As the audience watches George and Martha tear savagely at each other with the knives of hurled words, sharpened on pain and aimed to draw blood, the way in which these two relentlessly go at each other is awful to see, yet strangely familiar. Like wounded animals, they strike out at those closest to them, and reminds one of scenes witnessed as a child between screaming parents from a cracked door when one is supposed to be in bed....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf] 1723 words
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Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Missing works cited In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf ponders the plight of women throughout history. Woolf 'reads the lives of women and concludes that if a woman were to have written she would have had to overcome enormous circumstances' (Woolf xi). Woolf's initial thesis is that 'a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction' (Woolf 4). Throughout the book, however, she develops other important conditions for artistic creation....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Room One's Own Essays]
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