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Your search returned 200 essays for "To Kill A Mocking Bird paradox":
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Atticus once said You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them - Examine characters and relationships in to kill a mockingbird, in order to illustrate this maxim. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD Atticus once said "You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them" Examine characters and relationships in to kill a mockingbird, in order to illustrate this maxim. I think Atticus is trying to say that you never really know a man until you step in his shoes and do what he does....   [tags: English Literature] 1382 words
(3.9 pages)
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To Kill A Mocking Bird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mocking Bird by Harper Lee "There's four kinds of folks in the world. There's the ordinary kind like us and the neighbors, there's the kind like the Cunninghams out in the woods, the kind like the Ewells down at the damp and the Negroes". Jemchapter 23 What do we learn about the Maycomb society in "To Kill A Mocking Bird". 'To Kill a Mockingbird' is set out in Maycomb, a town Harper Lee has narrated the story from Scout's standpoint. However she incessantly replaces her approach in order to give a more adult opinion about the events and experiences that happen in the book....   [tags: Papers] 2232 words
(6.4 pages)
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Racism in Amistad, To Kill a Mocking Bird, and Telephone Conversation - The texts To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee, Amistad directed by Steven Spielberg and Telephone Conversation by Wole Soyinka explore the issue of racism. These three texts focus on prejudice, discrimination, bias, behaviour and attitude revolving around the issue of discrimination because of the coulour of ones skin and the cultural and social attitudes past on from one generation to another. Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel set in the southern states of the USA in the 1930’s, a time that is “Post Abolitionist”, however a time where the culture and social structure is still entrenched with racist attitudes and laws....   [tags: essays research papers] 1792 words
(5.1 pages)
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To Kill A Mocking Bird - ... It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what (Lee 147). Lee chose Mrs. Dubose, to show the concept of courage. By doing so, Lee suggests that there is always something good in everybody, no matter how unappealing that person appears to be. Atticus also demonstrated, courage when he undertook the task of defending Tom Robinson. Atticus knew he would not win the case and like Mrs....   [tags: Black Like Me, John Howard Griffin] 1621 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Instances of Injustice and Justice in To Kill A Mocking Bird and Silas Marner - The Instances of Injustice and Justice in To Kill A Mocking Bird and Silas Marner In this essay I am going to compare and contrast the instances of injustice and justice in "To Kill A Mockingbird" and "Silas Marner". "To Kill A Mockingbird" is set in Maycomb, in the southern state of Alabama during the years, 1933-35, the time of the Great Economic Depression. Racial prejudice was particularly strong in the Southern States due to the earlier abolishment of slavery, slavery played an important part in the regions' economy....   [tags: Papers] 2227 words
(6.4 pages)
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Childhood Presented in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison - Childhood Presented in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Childhood should be a time of great learning, curiosity, joy, playfulness and guiltlessness. The reality is that it can be a time of extreme vulnerability and dependency. The innocence and fragility of a child is easily manipulated and abused if not nurtured and developed. Family relationships are crucial in the flourishing of young minds, but other childhood associations are important too. These include school life, friends, play and peer-group....   [tags: English Literature Childhood Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited :: 2 Sources Cited
3582 words
(10.2 pages)
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The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird - The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird     The theme of prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird is much more than just a case of black and white. The entire novel is about prejudice in its' many forms, the most prominent case of prejudice is the hate between the blacks and whites. The whole town of Maycomb is based on stereotypes of it's inhabitants, that are passed down from generation to generation. Rumors run rampid and very little truth is usually in them.       "So Jem received most of his information from Miss Stephanie Crawford,      a neighbor scold, she said she knew the whole thing....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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1377 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird "To Kill a Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee was published in 1960 and was adapted into a play by Christopher Sergal and published in 1980. It tells the story of a court case when a black man gets accused of raping a white woman. The black man, Tom Robinson is defended by the a lawyer called Atticus Finch. Atticus is one of the few people in Maycome who have a bit of money an can read and write very well. The inevitable outcome of the case was that the Black man was sentenced to death....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 2334 words
(6.7 pages)
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The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird ‘To Kill a Mocking Bird’ teaches us about the deceit and prejudice amongst the residents of Maycomb County, all of whom have very contrasting and conflicting views. We are told the story through the eyes of little girl, Scout, and the day-to-day prejudices she faces amongst society. Her father, Atticus, is a white man defending a Negro, even though the town frowns upon such a thing. He is trying to bring order to the socially segregating views, both within the court and out....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee Prejudice Essays] 2555 words
(7.3 pages)
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Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings - Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Maya shields herself against the confusion of St. Louis by reading fairy-tales and telling herself that she does not intend on staying there anyway. Vivian works in a gambling parlor at night....   [tags: Angelou Caged Bird Book Summary Review Analysis] 1676 words
(4.8 pages)
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Bird Flu Crisis In Hong Kong - Bird Flu Crisis in Hong Kong Introduction Do you know how many chickens do we consume every day. Three thousand, five thousand or more. We demand almost more than ten thousand chickens daily. What a big figure. We can see that chickens are very important to Chinese society. Chickens are always devoted to God and served in dinners to celebrate traditional festivals. Without chickens, it will cause inconvenience to Hong Kong people, especially during Lunar New Year. Unfortunately, Hong Kong people has just encountered this situation....   [tags: Bird Flu China Chinese Essays] 2826 words
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Symbolism and Allegory in To Kill a Mockingbird - Symbolism and Allegory in To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee uses symbolism extensively throughout To Kill a Mockingbird,, and much of it refers to the problems of racism in the South during the early twentieth century. Harper Lee's effective use of racial symbolism and allegory can be seen by studying various examples from the book, namely the actions of the children, of the racist whites, and of Atticus Finch. One of the more effective allegories in the novel is the building of a snowman by Jem and Scout....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
:: 2 Works Cited :: 1 Works Consulted
3737 words
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The Different Types of Prejudice Depicted in Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The theme of prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird broadens to a further extent than just the situation of racial discrepancy between the blacks and the whites. Although, the racial discrimination mainly towards the blacks is the most prominent occurrence of injustice at Harper Lee’s time- the early Twentieth century, the whole novel includes several, other forms of prejudice that portray the unfavourable effects that was endured by innocent people. These blameless individuals were referred to mockingbirds, since it was a sin to kill one as said by Atticus, “Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” So, therefore mockingbirds are a representation of the main events that occurred during Harper Lee’s life such as having African Americans taking away their life due to the colour of their skin....   [tags: to kill a mockingbird] 2201 words
(6.3 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a highly regarded work of American fiction. The story of the novel teaches us many lessons that should last any reader for a lifetime. The messages that Harper Lee relays to the reader are exemplified throughout the book using various methods. One of the most important and significant methods was the use of symbols such as the mockingbird image. Another important method was showing the view through a growing child's (Scout Finch) mind, eyes, ears, and mouth....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 1401 words
(4 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird The United States has been dealing with the issue of racism ever since Columbus landed on Plymouth Rock. The Indians were the first to endure harsh racism in this country. Pilgrims moving west ran them off their land wiping out many tribes and destroying many resources in their path. However, when many think of racism today, the issue of blacks and whites is the first to come to mind. African Americans have come a long way in today’s society as compared to the society their ancestors had to overcome....   [tags: Racism Race Kill Mockingbird Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited :: 2 Sources Cited
1388 words
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The Reality of To Kill A Mockingbird - The Reality of To Kill A Mockingbird The novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, takes place during a racially intense time in history. Harper Lee’s novel was intended to bring a harsh sense of reality to the real world, and demonstrate how it really was during this time in history. This novel is set in Maycomb, Alabama, somewhere during the time period of 1925-1935. Times were hard for the citizens of Maycomb during this period, because of the depression. There are many fictional events in this novel related to non-fictional racial events in history....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays]
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1437 words
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Summary of To Kill a Mockingbird - Summary of To Kill a Mockingbird Mayella testifies next, a reasonably clean nineteen-year- old girl who is obviously terrified. She says that she called Tom Robinson inside the fence that evening and offered him a nickel to break up a dresser for her, and that once he got inside the house he grabbed her and took advantage of her. In Atticus' cross-examination, Mayella reveals that she has seven siblings to care for, a drunken father, and no friends. Then Atticus examines her testimony and asks why she didn't put up a better fight, why her screams didn't bring the other children running, and--most importantly--how Tom Robinson managed the crime with a useless left hand, torn apart by a cotton gin when he was a boy....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee Essays] 4095 words
(11.7 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird In the early twentieth century, the United States was undergoing a dramatic social change. Slavery had been abolished decades before, but the southern states were still attempting to restrict social interaction among people of different races. In particular, blacks were subject to special Jim Crow laws which restricted their rights and attempted to keep the race inferior to whites. Even beyond these laws, however, blacks were feeling the pressure of prejudice....   [tags: Racism Race Kill Mockingbird Essays]
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1363 words
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Prejudice Runs Deep in To Kill A Mockingbird - Prejudice Runs Deep in To Kill A Mockingbird   To Kill A Mockingbird takes place in small town Maycomb, Alabama, a depression era town where people move slowly and twenty-four hours seems longer.  The narrator of the story is a six-year-old girl named Jean Louise Finch, a tomboy who hates wearing dresses and goes by the nickname "Scout."  Scout's being a tomboy is of no little significance because while we are treated to a sweet and affectionate portrayal of Maycomb at the novel's opening, we will find it is a town where racial prejudice, hostility and ignorance run deep below the surface.  Not only are the majority of the townspeople prejudiced against blacks, maintaining a feeling of superiority to the whole of their race, but there are also well-defined social roles based on gender.  To Kill A Mockingbird reflects many themes, but three of the most significant ones are courage, prejudice, and education.  Through characterization and behavior the author demonstrates the connection of these themes as crucial for manifesting real humanity within individuals.  Education and courage produce a higher level of humanity in human behavior, particularly because they allow individuals to walk in the skins of other people before judging them.  Education and courage allow for a neutralization of prejudice because they lend a broader understanding to the individual concerning others.  Atticus, the father of Scout and Jem (Jeremy Finch), often teaches the lessons of education and courage to his children.  Atticus' brand of courage and education is different than that of most people's in the town.  Atticus' brand of courage disdains the use of guns, as we see when he refuses to use one to protect Tom Robinson (a black man accused of raping a white woman).  Atticus is determined his children understand real courage and bravery, and he uses every chance he gets to further their education.  He reads to them and discusses issues with them as if they were adults who could understand from the time they are infants.  However, Atticus knows he lives in a community and era when so many people lack education and remain intolerant to others that an innocent black man can be murdered on merely the testimony of a white man whose own character is untrustworthy.  We see this best dramatized when Atticus gives his closing arguments while defending Tom "The witnesses for the state...have presented themselves to you gentlemen...in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted, confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the...evil assumption...that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral beings, that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption one associates with minds of their caliber" (Lee, 1960, 207)....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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1665 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Use of Symbolism - Use of Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird "I'd rather you shoot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you'll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want , if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." This is what Atticus Finch tells his children after they are given air-rifles for Christmas. Uniquely, the title of the classic novel by Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird, was taken from this passage. At first glance, one may wonder why Harper Lee decided to name her book after what seems to be a rather insignificant excerpt....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1709 words
(4.9 pages)
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Meno's Paradox - Meno's Paradox It is thought that Meno's paradox is of critical importance both within Plato's thought and within the whole history of ideas. It's major importance is that for the first time on record, the possibility of achieving knowledge from the mind's own resources rather than from experience is articulated, demonstrated and seen as raising important philosophical questions. Meno's paradox states: `Why on what lines will you look, Socrates, for a thing of whose nature you know nothing at all....   [tags: Philosophy] 2022 words
(5.8 pages)
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The Paradox Of Community - The Paradox of Community “One can see that insiders are caught in the paradox of community: The same cultural vocabulary that undermines community is simultaneously that community's idiom of self-affirmation” (Greenhouse, et al. 175). In Law and Community, David M. Engel explores how ordinary people in a small, rural, Illinois town perceive the law, courts, litigants, and community. By analyzing the legal practices and relations in Sander County, it is evident that law and the courts play a central role in the processes of making and unmaking communities....   [tags: essays research papers] 1884 words
(5.4 pages)
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The Solow Paradox - <a href="http://www.geocities.com/vaksam/">Sam Vaknin's Psychology, Philosophy, Economics and Foreign Affairs Web Sites The PRODUCTIVE HARDWARE The world is debating the Solow Paradox. Named after the Nobel laureate in economics, it was stated by him thus: "You can see the computer age everywhere these days, except in the productivity statistics". The venerable economic magazine, "The Economist" in its issue dated July 24th, quotes the no less venerable Professor Robert Gordon ("one of America's leading authorities on productivity") - p.20: "...the productivity performance of the manufacturing sector of the United States economy since 1995 has been abysmal rather than admirable....   [tags: essays research papers] 2163 words
(6.2 pages)
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The Plasmodium Paradox - Malaria rather paradoxically seems to invest few resources in gametocyte (the reproductive and transmissible stage) production. Mathematical modeling is used to explore how this reproductive restraint can be evolutionarily adaptive. Where in-host strain competition appears to be the key driving force. Malaria cases a vast amount of mortality and morbidity, claiming in the order of one million lives every year mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. As such it is perhaps one of the most deadly of infectious diseases plaguing populations today....   [tags: Research Analysis ]
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1677 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird In the novel by Harper Lee named, To Kill a Mockingbird, there is one main tragic event that occurs. The feelings and expressions dealt with in the novel are seen through the eyes of the main character, named Scout. In the novel Tom Robinson is a black male accused of rape in Maycomb County. During the same time period as the novel there were many historical events that were almost identical in setting and conclusion. There were many things that happened leading up to the court case that foreshadowed Tom Robinson’s inability to be found innocent of the charges....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Racism Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited :: 1 Sources Cited
1376 words
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A Closer Look at Boo Radley's Eccentric Character in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Set in the 1940’s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird features a man named Arthur Radley, though the people of Maycomb know him as Boo. He is described as a malevolent phantom, hence his nickname, that eats cats and is over seven feet tall. Boo is known as the town recluse and madman. Nevertheless, there may be some reason for his eccentric behavior. As said by William Shakespeare, “Though this be madness, yet there is method in’t.” Boo Radley is the character in To Kill a Mockingbird that best portrays the idea of madness....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird] 1205 words
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Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was written by Harper Lee in 1960. Nelle Harper Lee was born on April 28, 1926 in Monroeville, Alabama, a city of about 7,000 people. She studied law at the University of Alabama and one year at Oxford University. After giving up working as a clerk for an airline she moved into a cold-water apartment in New York to concentrate on writing. She first handed this book to a publisher in 1957 but it was rejected so she took two further years to rework it before it was published as ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ in 1960....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 6279 words
(17.9 pages)
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Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee “To better understand a person you have to climb up inside their skin and walk around in it.” The quote previously stated by Atticus in the book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is an unveiling of the upcoming forms of prejudice. The setting for the novel is a fictitious town called Maycomb. This town is situated in Alabama. The racial prejudice shown in the novel has a lot to do with the town being situated in the southern United States. The backwardness and narrow-mindedness of the community fueled racism in Maycomb....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird Harper Lee Essays] 2869 words
(8.2 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Southern Tradition Exposed - Southerners are known to be proud of their traditional beliefs. To Kill A Mockingbird allows its readers to question and consider those beliefs. Maycomb represents a typical old southern town. Not many people move into Maycomb and not many people who live there journey beyond its boundaries. As a result, the opinions held by many of the citizens of Maycomb are left to grow and foster in the same families for many generations. The circumstances in Maycomb are less than ideal for generating change and more prone to sustaining traditionally accepted codes....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1939 words
(5.5 pages)
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Ethical Dilemmas in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Ethical Dilemmas in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird Black and white, right and wrong; do decisions that simple and clear even exist. Does a decision ever mean gaining everything without giving anything up. Many characters in To Kill A Mockingbird are forced to make difficult, heart wrenching decisions that have no clear right answer. Harper Lee presents many of these important decisions in To Kill A Mockingbird as ethical dilemmas, or situations that require a choice between two difficult alternatives....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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1983 words
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Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Prejudice is the preconceived opinion of a person or thing. There are three main types of prejudice: racial prejudice, social prejudice and religious prejudice. These three are the types of prejudice most dominant in ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’. The setting for the novel is a fictitious town called Maycomb. This town is situated in Alabama, south USA. The racial prejudice shown in the novel has a lot to do with the town being situated in the southern United States....   [tags: To Kill a Mockinbird Harper Lee Prejudice Essays] 3902 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird and the Scottsboro Case - Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird and the Scottsboro Case On March 25 1931 a group of nine boys were charged with raping two girls aboard a train traveling from Paint Rock Alabama across the state’s border. The trial of these boys had become collectively known as the Scottsboro case. Several years later Harper Lee wrote her famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird. In this story a young male Tom Robinson is charged with raping a white female. It is by understanding the parallel between Tom Robinson’s case in To Kill a Mockingbird and the Scottsboro case that can be understood that a fair trial was unlikely and that because of Tom Robinson’s race he was presumed guilty before his trial....   [tags: Racism Rape Kill Mockingbird Essays]
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The Verdict of Tom Robinson in Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - The Verdict of Tom Robinson in Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird A closer look at the ways of the South during the time period 1925 through 1935 reveals the accurate representation of society in Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird. Many of the fictional events occurring in the novel are closely related to actual historical events that took place in the South during the time period in which the book is set. Most importantly, the trial of Tom Robinson illustrates how life was for a black man in a world dominated by white men....   [tags: Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays Papers]
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2079 words
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A Gentleman of the South: Atticus Finch in "To Kill A Mockingbird" - True role models are those who possess the qualities that we would want to have in the near future and those who interest us in a way that make us want to be a better person. They teach us more about ourselves and encourage us to make better choices. A role model is not just someone who is successful, but someone who has had similar experiences that we have had. In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee demonstrates that Atticus Finch is a true role model. Over the course of the novel, Atticus stands up for his beliefs, respects everyone despite who they are and behaves as a true father....   [tags: To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee, heroes, ]
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Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House - Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House differentiates itself from the four other novels that make up the 'Manawaka series' that has helped establish her as an icon of Canadian literature. It does not present a single story; instead, it is a compilation of eight well-crafted short stories (written between the years 1962 and 1970) that intertwine and combine into a single narrative, working as a whole without losing the essential independence of the parts....   [tags: Laurence A Bird in the House Essays]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird, both as a novel and as a film, shows how time can change the way society views the importance of certain issues, such as racism. Because it was written during the civil rights movement, many people protested against it for conveying issues of prejudice between the north and the south. However, after time, the novel gradually became accepted. It is now a world-renowned classic, and it has won the Pulitzer Prize, as well as having made its way to the big screen....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays]
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The Crucial Role of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Crucial Role of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird       In To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee, themes and central ideas of the novel are emphasized by subtle symbols. Symbols shown throughout the novel not only represent concrete objects but also ideas, feelings, beliefs, and attitudes of the characters. Some symbols even represent more than one thing. Lee's recurring use of symbols contribute to the underlying themes and ideas of the novel. Lee's unusual title is a symbol itself and it keeps the reader in anticipation while waiting for a mockingbird to enter the story....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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2059 words
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Quest for Self-Determination in I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and Lakota Woman - Quest for Self-Determination in I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and Lakota Woman       During their growing up years, children struggle to find their personal place in society. It is difficult for children to find their place when they are given numerous advantages, but when a child is oppressed by their parents or grandparents, males in their life, and the dominant culture, the road to achieving self-identity is fraught with enormous obstacles to overcome. Maya Angelou's I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and Mary Crow Dog's Lakota Woman depict the two women's "triumph over formidable social obstacles and [their] struggle to achieve a sense of identity and self-acceptance" (Draper 1)....   [tags: Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Essays]
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Racial Prejudice and Oppression in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Racial Prejudice and Oppression in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird 'Democracy,' she said. 'Does anybody have a definition?' ... 'Equal rights for all, special privileges for none' (Lee 248). To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee's only novel, is a fictional story of racial oppression, set in Maycomb, A.L. in 1925 to 1935, loosely based on the events of the Scottsboro trials. Unlike the story however, the racial discrimination and oppression in the novel very accurately portrays what it was like in the 1920's and 1930's in the south....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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2110 words
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Mythology and Archetypes in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Mythology and Archetypes in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird       Of all the various approaches to criticism, the Mythological/Archetypal achieves the greatest impact over the entire literary scope, because the themes and patterns unearthed apply universally to all works, yielding results that can be applied to a great many texts. This is because the very nature of the Mythological/Archetypal approach is the exploration of the canon for widespread and pervading symbols, plots, and characters....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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2531 words
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