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Your search returned over 400 essays for "To Build a Fire"
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - “To Build a Fire” written by Jack London can truly be considered as a work of art. With themes anyone can relate to, such as survival and man versus nature, it is a great short story for anyone looking for something to read. Everyone knows a dog is a man’s best friend, but what happens when it is man versus dog. When survival of the fittest kicks in, the fittest truly shows. In “To Build a Fire”, Jack London expresses various elements of literature to really get the reader involved in the story....   [tags: To Build a Fire ]
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1805 words
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To Build a Fire, by Jack London - No one plans on or even wants to lose their life due to an unfortunate mishap. Isn’t it better to check twice and thoroughly plan ahead as opposed to finding oneself in an unfortunate situation. No wonder mothers ask so many questions; they leave no scope for misunderstanding. Jack London’s “To Build A Fire,” both 1902 and 1908 versions, cause distress in readers’ minds and make them wonder how a simple topic of surviving in the cold can turn out so horrific. A handful of alterations were made to the original version of the story; some add a completely new meaning, while others only provide slight nuances....   [tags: To Build a Fire, Jack London]
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887 words
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Man vs. Environment in To Build a Fire by Jack London - One can express many different types of themes in Jack London’s, “To Build a Fire”. Though I feel strongly that London’s theme in the story is about that the environment shapes who we are because it shows that the man is not strong enough to live up to his environment. Allowing the environment to kill the man indicates that he is weak both mentally and biologically, while on the other hand the dog is stronger by surviving the same harsh environment. Instinct superior to reason is another theme that is highly portrayal able in London’s story....   [tags: To Build a Fire, Jack London]
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943 words
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Can You Survive Nature? "To Build a Fire" - To Build a Fire is a remarkable account of one man’s finish line. In it this story holds quite a few rather important morals. There is as well a very important theme. The theme most referred to is that of the power of nature. The force that it can display on earth is immense and cannot be duplicated or overpowered by humans. However one man decided he would be the one prove this axiom wrong. One man became totally confident that he can and will withstand the awesome mighty strength of nature. Stubbornness is a horrible character flaw of the man in the story....   [tags: To Build a Fire, nature, ] 418 words
(1.2 pages)
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Foreshadowing in To Build a Fire - Foreshadowing in To Build a Fire In the story "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, foreshadowing is often used. In this story foreshadowing is an effective way to build up a climax. The foreshadowing is both shown by the environment and things the characters say. An example of environmental foreshadowing was when it said, "Fifty degrees below zero stood for a bite of frost that hurt and that must be guarded against.... "Another example was when the man's "fire was blotted out." These examples show that the cold will be the man's doom, but foreshadow only by telling the necessary details....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 489 words
(1.4 pages)
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Jack London's To Build a Fire - Jack London's To Build a Fire Nature is always pushing man to his limits. When man heeds the warning signs that nature has to offer and those warnings of other men, he is most likely to conquer nature. When he ignores these warnings, nature is sure to defeat man. To build a fire is a prime example of this scenario. In the short story, “To Build a Fire” by Jack London, an inexperienced traveler in the Yukon travels alone with his dog, even though it is ill advised to do so. The man is strong and smart but nature humbled him during his quest to reach his friends....   [tags: London Jack Build Fire Essays]
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989 words
(2.8 pages)
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A Critique of Jack London's To Build a Fire - A Critique of Jack London's To Build a Fire Karen Rhodes analyzed to build a fire in a cultural context. He believed "London's works were written so that he could survive in a world he increasingly came to see as "red in tooth and claw""(1). It is obviously the story of a man fighting the stresses of Nature. According to Rhodes, to build a fire was drawn from the year London spent in Canada's Yukon Territory. London depicted arctic and very cold conditions throughout the story. Rhodes believed to build a fire represented London's Naturalistic Flavor....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 513 words
(1.5 pages)
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An Analysis of Jack London's To Build A Fire - An Analysis of Jack London's To Build A Fire Charles E. May, Author of the article "To Build A Fire': Physical Fiction and Metaphysical Critics" was giving his psychological criticism on the Jack London short story. May was elaborating on the naturalistic behavior of man versus nature when it comes to survival. May's article suggests that the protagonist in the story did not only have a psychological discovery but a "simple physical discovery that self is body only"(23). In the story, "To Build A Fire", the protagonist has to accept that he was not invincible, but a human with a weakness....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 456 words
(1.3 pages)
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An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire - An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire In his article "To Build a Fire" a Physical Fiction and Metaphysical Critics Charles E. May comments and disagrees with a statement that "To Build a Fire" is "a masterpiece of a short fiction"(20). Literary critics claimed that London used many metaphors in this work such as "sun-fire-life" or "cold-darkness-depression-death"(20), but May argues that this story should be read and interpreted literally and does not contain deep, dual or metaphorical meaning....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 542 words
(1.5 pages)
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An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire - An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire In her cultural criticism of Jack London's "To Build a Fire", Jill Widdicombe explores the question of whether the story's protagonist might have perished from the extreme cold of the Klondike winter even if with a traveling companion. She describes the brutality of the winter weather and, alluding to the man's confidence in his ability to survive the weather, describes it as "behavior most of us can understand" - especially if we are accustomed to warmer surroundings....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 474 words
(1.4 pages)
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Criticism of Jack London's To Build a Fire - Criticism of Jack London's To Build a Fire In her critique of "To Build a Fire" Jill Widdecombe assesses the personality and motivation of the unnamed man in the story. Widdecombe suggests a story of mystery, intrigue, and rationalization. I see it as a story about inner conflict and submit the mans inner conflict parallels Widdecombe's analogy of imagination versus rationalization. The conflict in the story is two-fold; the man struggles between his will and reasoning and second with the man's desires and abilities....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 472 words
(1.3 pages)
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Use of Devices in London's To Build A Fire - Use of Devices in London's To Build A Fire Jack London uses the devices of plot, setting, and characterization in this short story "To Build A Fire" to convey his message that humans need to be social. London sets an average, middle-aged logger in a deserted Yukon trail during a wintry season. The temperature is seventy-five degrees below zero and the logger and his husky are traveling towards Henderson Creek, about ten miles away, where the logger's companions are located. London places the man in this Yukon environment to symbolize that in this cold, cruel world, we need to learn how to benefit from each other....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 439 words
(1.3 pages)
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Alienation of the Main Character in To Build A Fire - Alienation of the Main Character in To Build A Fire In most novels and short stories, the emphasis lays on the main character. The author gives details on his personality, his skills, or his appearance one by one until we, as readers, get the final picture of what the protagonist looks like. However, this is not always the case; sometimes it seems in the writer's favor to limit the descriptions of the main character to a minimum, in order to allow him to put the emphasis on the theme. In the short story "To Build A Fire" by Jack London, the main character slowly evolves in a wild environment as a distanced, alienated man, lost in a fatal fight against nature....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays]
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1506 words
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No Accidents in Jack London's To Build a Fire - As the title implies, Jack London's 1908 short story contains within its narrative a literal set of sequential directions on how "To Build a Fire." London extends this sequential conceit to his fatidic vision of the universe. Unlike the dog in the story, who can rely on its pure-bred arctic instinct as it navigates through the dangerous tundra, the anonymous man possesses a duller, myopic instinct which is unable foresee the consequentiality of the environment. This instinctual flaw in mankind (relative to that of a husky) is a given, but the man fails to compensate by integrating intellectuality into his journey....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays]
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2560 words
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - To Build a Fire by Jack London The short story "To build a Fire" by Jack London, tells about the relationship between man and nature. The story takes place in the Yukon during one of the long night. The main character who is unnamed travels with a dog along a small trail to a mining camp. The man leaves against the advice of a local and after a short time realizes that he should have waited. The temperature is extremely cold because the mans spit freezes before it hits the ground. The main obstacle of his journey is the many covered springs that mean death to whoever falls into them....   [tags: Jack London Build Fire Essays Papers] 972 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jack London's To Build a Fire - Jack London's To Build a Fire In his short story entitled "To Build a Fire," Jack London portrays a bitter conflict between man and nature. The nature in this story is the harsh environment of the Yukon Trail. London chose to use nature as the antagonist, almost as a force working against the main character in his struggle for survival. London accomplished this personification of nature by giving the environment many human characteristics, by creating numerous things going wrong that really should not have happened, and by foreshadowing the protagonist's fate all throughout the story....   [tags: Papers London Jack Build Fire Essays]
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1091 words
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Jack London's To Build A Fire - There are many authors in this world today. Some are known for classical writings of poetry, or hundreds and hundreds of books written by them. This author though was one who portrayed himself through dozens of short stories. His name is Jack London. Jack London is a writer who shows the conflict between Nature versus Man in his writings and supports this theme through his work, “To Build a Fire.” Jack was born on January 12, 1876 and died on November 22, 1916. He is best known for his nature novels depicting how nature can sometimes be so powerful that it overcomes man....   [tags: Writer Author Jack London Build Fire] 1022 words
(2.9 pages)
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Naturalism in Jack London's To Build a Fire - Naturalism in Jack London's "To Build a Fire" This essay has problems with format When Jack London wrote "To Build a Fire" he embraced the idea of naturalism because it mirrored the events of daily life. Naturalism showed how humans had to be wary at every corner because at anytime death could be there, waiting for them to make a mistake and forfeit their lives. He used naturalism, the most realistic literary movement, to show how violent and uncaring nature really is and how no matter what you do nature will always be there....   [tags: Jack London To Build a Fire Essays]
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1273 words
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Free Essays - A lack of Respect in To Build a Fire - A lack of Respect “To Build a Fire” by Jack London is a short story about a man traveling along the Yukon River in the bitter winter weather. While warned against traveling alone in the frigid cold, he ventures out to meet his companions at a remote camp many miles away, with only his dog. Overcome by nature’s power, he eventually perishes along the way, leaving his four-legged partner to complete the journey alone. The story displays how the forces of nature can surprisingly overwhelm even the most confident of men....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 789 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Existential Theme of London’s To Build A Fire - The Existential Theme of London’s “To Build A Fire"           Jack London’s short story, “To Build a Fire,” is the tragic tale of a man who decides to travel alone through the hostile environment of the Yukon in sub-freeing temperatures and falls victim to the unrelenting and unforgiving power of nature. During his journey, the man gets his feet wet as he falls through the ice into the water of a hot spring (London 122). Because of the severity of the cold, some “one hundred and seven degrees below [the] freezing point,” the man’s life depends upon his ability to promptly light a fire to keep his feet from freezing (122-23)....   [tags: Build Fire Essays]
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1310 words
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Overconfidence and Arrogance in To Build a Fire by Jack London - Overconfidence and Arrogance in To Build a Fire by Jack London Overconfidence and arrogance led to the death of the man in Jack London's "To Build a Fire." This overconfidence in his own abilities led to him making poor decisions and scorning the advice of those who know what they are talking about. Instead, he laughs at the old man after he tells him "a man should travel with a partner" (1769) and goes out into the frigid weather anyway. He knew that it was 75 degrees below zero and that his body was numb but he didn't care because he thought he could handle it....   [tags: Build Fire Jack London Arrogance Essays]
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The Importance of Setting in Jack London's To Build A Fire - The Importance of Setting in Jack London's To Build A Fire       In "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, the setting plays a significant role throughout the entire short story.  Jack London uses certain techniques to establish the atmosphere of the story.  By introducing his readers to the setting, prepares them for a tone that is depressed and  frightening.    Isolated by an environment of frigid weather and doom, the author shows us how the main character of the story is completely unaware of his surroundings.  The only world the man is truly accustomed to, is his own.  Never being exposed to such a harsh climate, draws us to the conclusion that the environment is the...   [tags: London Build Fire Essays Jack London Poem]
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1451 words
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“To Build a Fire” - “To Build a Fire” is a short story written by Jack London. It is viewed as a masterpiece of naturalist fiction. “To Build a Fire” features a miner who is traveling to the Yukon Territory with a dog as his companion. The miner is the protagonist and the dog companion is called the foil. The dog plays off of the traits of the protagonist. “The central motif of “To Build a Fire” concerns the struggle of man versus nature.” (Short Story Criticism) The most argued point in the short story is the reason of the protagonist death....   [tags: Literature Review]
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832 words
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To Build a Fire - I would not be as crazy as this guy trotting around in the frigid weather. No way that is not for me. This man he goes unnamed in this passage goes walking by the Yukon River around in there searching for this camp or whatever and he comes upon this dog and he saves the dog and they both almost die and then the story ends. I think it is strange how in this story we only meet one person and a dog and the author keeps the details about these characters very open. Also the setting in this story does not have many details at all....   [tags: short story] 657 words
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Significance of the Dog in To Build a Fire - Significance of the Dog in To Build a Fire With regard to Jack London's, "To Build a Fire", I will attempt to analyze the significance of the dog, however in doing so I will need to discuss not only the dog, but the man and nature as well, because they all impact one another with equal significance. It is my opinion that throughout most of the story the dog is to represent a living creatures innate instincts (although I was lead to question this at the end), the man represents desire and sheer will (although he also shows many signs of repressed instinct), and nature represents the force which triggers instinctual behavior (perhaps a temporary barrier if obeyed...   [tags: Build] 1513 words
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The Yellow Wallpaper and To Build A Fire - ... The settings in each of the stories are very different in how they are described, but are very important to the outcome of the story. Although the settings in these two stories are very different, how the setting determines the plot is very similar. The setting in The Yellow Wallpaper is the reason that the woman goes crazy, and eventually dies. The start of her downfall is initially caused by her sickness, but is continued because she has to stay in the room. If her husband would have let her gone out of her room to get help, then quite possibly she wouldn't have gone crazy and died....   [tags: development of the story and plot] 930 words
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - “To Build a Fire” written by Jack London in 1908, is a story of a man, who, left unnamed, sets out to traverse a dangerous trail in the Yukon territory near the end of nineteenth century. Accompanied only by a dog, t¬¬he man travels across the trail, risking his life with every step on the snow-laden path full of frozen ice-water traps. He falls into a trap and wets his feet, incurring the possibility of frostbite. The man manages to build a fire, but it is shortly extinguished by snow that falls from a tree....   [tags: yukon, gold rush]
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - What would you do if the only thing separating you from death was starting a fire. Most people would obviously start a fire because they do not want to die. This is exactly the same situation that a man falls into in To Build A Fire. In this story a man is setting across the Yukon in order to get to a camp where his friends are at. This is a trip that he has made many times and he can even predict what time he will arrive in that camp. He is traveling with a dog as his companion. As he goes along the trail that he has picked out he notes many things about his surroundings and the temperature is a constant figure in his mind because if it drops too rapidly that would mean death for him....   [tags: short story review and analysis] 995 words
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The Build a Fire by Jack London - The short story “To Build a Fire” written by Jack London tells the tale of one mans journey to find his fellow hikers campsite in dangerously cold temperatures. The man’s journey ends when Mother Nature gets the best of him and he perishes in the cold. While it may seem as though the main conflict, man against nature, is what killed the man, the man’s internal conflict, his pride and masculinity versus his humility is what actually kills him. Nature, in reality, just finished the blow while the man’s internal conflict is what really weakened him to that point of death....   [tags: nature, conflict, cold]
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1195 words
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To Build A Fire: Naturalism - “To Build A Fire” is a clear example of naturalism and follows many of its conventions. Some of the characteristics of naturalism are being conditioned or controlled by the environment, having the world understood only through objective science, conflicts which bring out the instincts of man, pessimism, and presenting a viewpoint which is detached from the reader. One characteristic of Naturalism in literature is that the characters in a story are described as being conditioned or controlled by the environment in which they are in; in essence man versus nature....   [tags: Jack London] 1098 words
(3.1 pages)
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Nature in Jack London´s To Build a Fire - People always tell you to listen to your gut. However, all goes wrong for the poor character in Jack London’s (1876-1916) To Build a Fire when he wants to trust his gut. In the story, a mountain man explains to him how dangerous it is to venture out alone in incredibly freezing circumstances. Being the confident man that he is, he did not listen to the advice. It soon turns into a story of a man’s lonely road to try to survive. He finds a silent companion that cannot seem to help him. He then falls into a soft spot and gets wet to the knees....   [tags: gut, trust, advice, survive, fire, cold] 669 words
(1.9 pages)
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to build a fire - To Build a Fire To Build a Fire A Paper Jack London?s short story, ?To Build a Fire?, incorporates the struggle for a man and his dog to survive the forces of nature. The story also demonstrates how man is a creature of intellect and dog is a creature of instinct. Ignoring advice about traveling alone in the brutal Alaskan winter, the man begins his journey with his dog. Never realizing the ramifications of exposure to such brutal weather when temperatures are fifty degrees below freezing, he pushes forward, thinking he can beat nature and reach the camp before dark....   [tags: Papers] 391 words
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To Build A Fire - 'To Build a Fire'; In Jack London's, 'To Build a Fire';, it is obvious to see that as the story progresses, the man becomes more bestial. However at the same time the dog seems to gain the human quality of good sense. This quality of good sense, which the dog acquires, allows it to away from the same fate of the man. There are many examples of how this is portrayed as the story makes headway. The first example of how the man becomes more bestial occurs after his first fire fails. After his fire fails, his hands are too cold to allow him to pick up matches....   [tags: essays research papers] 583 words
(1.7 pages)
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To Build A Fire - Sometimes everyone feels like giving up, and the only thing a person can rely on is his will to survive. Giving up is admitting defeat, in every circumstance. In the story by Jack London, To Build a Fire, the main character learns a hard lesson of reality, when he meets his fate. The result came about because of many factors, mainly the man’s lack of psychological perserverance on the journey, as well as the harsh temperature and surroundings. If there was any hope for the man to survive these conditions, it would rely wholey on his persistance and motivation....   [tags: essays research papers] 576 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Build A Fire - “To Build A Fire”, by Jack London was a story about a man who’s job is to ship logs in the springtime. The author uses the 8 aspects of fiction to reflect his point of view that it takes brains to survive. The characters in the story are used to keep the story going and help the author come across to his audience. The plot is the storyline in which the story it self takes place. The setting is the environment in which the story takes place. The suspense is when the author keeps information back from the reader so he/she will continue reading to find out what will happen....   [tags: essays research papers] 903 words
(2.6 pages)
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to build a fire - In the short story, “To Build a Fire” by Jack London shows how man vs. nature and how inexperienced traveler in the Yukon tries to travel alone with his dog, even though it’s advised not to. Yet he is stubborn and thinks he is right, and sets off for Henderson Creek to meet his friends. He faces many different conflicts of man verses man, and man verses nature. The traveler is advised not to make this trip with the lack of his inexperience in the Yukon due to the weather, the incoming storm, and its advisories....   [tags: essays research papers] 906 words
(2.6 pages)
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To Build a Fire - Author Jack London wrote "To Build a Fire," the heart-wrenching story of a man's struggle to overcome the power of nature in the most extreme temperatures. Throughout his journey along the trail in the Yukon, he underestimates nature and overestimates himself. Almost immediately his fate is revealed when London writes, "But all this---the mysterious, far-reaching hair-line trail, the absence of sun from the sky, the tremendous cold, and the strangeness and weirdness of it all---made no impression on the man" (977)....   [tags: American Literature] 840 words
(2.4 pages)
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to build a fire - Interpretation “To Build a Fire” In the story "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, a man is travelling through the klondike in Alaska to find his friends, "the boys". Because the man is only quick and alert to the things of life and not the significance, he finds himself in some very bad circumstances. The man experiences several instances of bad luck such as getting wet up to his knees, the spruce tree dumping snow on his fire, and matches falling through his numb fingers and going out in the snow....   [tags: essays research papers] 1096 words
(3.1 pages)
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Conflicts of "To Build a Fire" by Jack London - Literature focuses on many aspects to form a coherent and captivating story, mainly those aspects retaining to characters and conflict. Within any story, a conflict arises for a character to overcome which drives the whole story. Conflict, the struggle against many forces of multiple varieties, creates the obstacle or issue a character must face to advance past the problem. In "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, conflict plays a major role in the story. The conflicts of man fighting against nature and man against himself present the struggles the unidentified man from "To Build a Fire" faces and attempts to overcome....   [tags: struggle, nature, resolve]
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To Build A Fire, Written, by Jack London - ... Roberta is desperate for Clyde to marry her, eventually threatening to expose their relationship. He then takes Roberta out on a row boat in upstate New York.When Roberta moves toward him, he strikes her in the Ropp #2 face causing the boat to flip. Roberta is unable to swim and Clyde, unable to save her, swims to shore. In the midst of his trial, Clyde incriminates himself with a confusing and contradictory testimony. Clyde is then sentenced to death. Theodore Dreiser depicts naturalism in An American Tragedy in many ways....   [tags: naturalism, social conditions] 1683 words
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The Theme of To Build a Fire - The struggle between man and nature is a common theme in a lot of literary pieces. Some exaggerate the role of either nature or man; however, this tale exposes weaknesses of both sides and provides an interesting twist. Through the use of both flat and round characters, involved in a specific life changing event, will lead to a role reversal that proves nature will truly win out over nurture in some situations. Mr. London involves the reader and prepares the plot through specific uses of Character, Point of view and demonstrates his view on which will be the victor....   [tags: Man and Nature, Literary Analysis, Jack London]
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1018 words
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Jack London: To Build A Fire - Introduction Jack London had already established himself as a popular writer when his story "To Build a Fire" appeared in the Century Magazine in 1908. This tale of an unnamed man's disastrous trek across the Yukon Territory near Alaska was well received at the time by readers and literary critics alike. While other works by London have since been faulted as overly sensational or hastily written, "To Build a Fire" is still regarded by many as an American classic. London based the story on his own travels across the harsh, frozen terrain of Alaska and Canada in 1897-98 during the Klondike gold rush; he is also said to have relied on information from a book by Jeremiah Lynch entitled Three Ye...   [tags: Jack London] 880 words
(2.5 pages)
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Epiphany in to Build a Fire - An Analysis of the Man’s Epiphany in "To Build a Fire" The short story "To Build a Fire," written by Jack London, is a tragic tale of an overconfident, inexperienced man traveling through the brutal, sub-freezing conditions of the Yukon with only the companionship of a dog. The man, un-named in this story, arrogantly decides to break from the main trail to take a less traveled route against the advice of the seasoned old-timer of Sulfur Creek, who warns of traveling alone in such severe conditions....   [tags: Jack London] 955 words
(2.7 pages)
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To Build A Fire Character Stud - In "To Build a Fire," Jack London expresses his perspective of the multitude of greenhorns who flocked to the yukon in a rush for gold. It is evident that he believed that these newcomers were too inexperienced and blinded by gold fever to survive the trip. Like many of them, "the Man" is driven by his own foolish ego to act irrationally and to not follow wise advice. Though his consience continually nags at him, his ego-driven way of thought keeps pushing him blindly forward....   [tags: essays research papers] 958 words
(2.7 pages)
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Two Versions of To Build a Fire by Jack London - ... First of all, the title is well-chosen, for it gives the readers an overview of the story and supports the plot effectively. Detailed descriptions of how to set up a fire and the man’s continuous attempts to do so reflect that the story evolves around the phrase “to build a fire”. Throughout his journey, if the man succeeds in making a fire, it brings warmth, hope, and life; on the other hand, if he fails, it means coldness and death. The seemingly ordinary flame is vital and powerful, because “it meant life, and it must not perish”....   [tags: travel, hypothermia, death]
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734 words
(2.1 pages)
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Jack London’s Use of Repetition in “To Build a Fire” - Jack London’s To Build a Fire follows an unnamed protagonist, who’s only referred to as “the man”, as he travels the Yukon Trail during a severe snow storm. Along with his husky wolf-dog, he determined to meet friends at an old junction by six o’clock. The man, who was warned not travel in the Klondike alone, presses forward through the terrain’s harsh weather. He later falls through the snow in what looked to be a secure spot. With his feet and fingers soaked, he starts a fire and begins drying himself....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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1230 words
(3.5 pages)
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Analysis of Jack London´s To Build a Fire - Jack London was a prominent Bay Area author and he, himself, had a heuristic experience with the Alaskan wilderness, much like the main character in his short story “To Build a Fire”. The aforesaid main character, simply referred to as “the man” endured the harshness of Nature in the Yukon, firsthand, and is accurately told due to London’s past experience with similar settings. The man and his companion, the dog, were unnamed and this, therein, implies that they are symbols representing the aggregation of humanity and instinctual, animalistic thought....   [tags: humanity, thought, natural, mindset] 562 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Role of Setting in To Build a Fire by Jack London - In “To Build a Fire” by Jack London, the setting plays a significant role throughout the entire story. The chosen setting by London creates a specific and idealistic mood for his depressing story. It forces, as well as prepares, it’s audience to what the story holds. The amount of constant detail the story holds allows the reader to anticipate the ending that is inevitable to happen. Jack London creates a setting that is hostile and “cold”. The story is set in the wilderness of the frozen Yukon, during the harsh winter months, when “there was no sun nor hint of sun” in the sky....   [tags: isolated, mood, stubbornness] 577 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Build a Fire a Short Story by Jack London - ... The protagonist failed to see the danger that was ahead of him, and disregarded all the numbness he felt in his body, and continued with the journey. The man was so ignorant because, in a man who is not self-centred, and thinks logically is to halt his journey, and go back to where he came from for the fear of his life. However, this did not happen with our protagonist. In the short story To Build a Fire, the protagonist lacks the understanding of reality. He was short sighted because, he sees danger ahead of him, but assumes that there is nothing wrong....   [tags: individual´s choice, judgement]
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880 words
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The Cost of Pride in Jack London’s To Build a Fire - ... 129). He eventually makes a fire to thaw out his “ice muzzle” to eat but leaves the warmth of the fire soon afterward, and he continues to chew tobacco, once again, turning his eye muzzle. His hand and toes began to go numb, and only his reaction is to strike his hand against his body, in order to regain feeling in his extremities. He is reckless and takes for granted the only form of mobility he has, his body (pg.130) In the perilous journey, he demonstrates signs of careless planning. He was not able to make compatible intelligent choices, equal to the opposing factors against him....   [tags: overconfident, reality, careless] 591 words
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To Build a Fire by Jack London and Into The Wild, by Jon Krakauer - Imagine you were someone who could do whatever thing for his own personal gain. How could the feeling of taking over a certain part of the world be like. Wouldn’t it be nice to realize that you have the supremacy to do everything. All of this is generally considered a fantasy of mankind. There is no man or women that can do all. There was one fellow, who had this feeling, of conquering a certain space from which not many people attempt to do. This man, Chris McCandless, had been filled with hubris in his mind to conquer the outside part of society, the wild....   [tags: Into the Wild Essays] 1012 words
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Into the Wild, by John Karkauer and Jack London's To Build a Fire - John Karkauer novel, Into the Wild displays a true life story about a young man by the name of Christopher McCandless, who creates a new life for himself by leaving civilization to live in the wilderness. The story displays how Christopher develops and matures throughout the story by prevailing harsh predicaments and learning valuable lessons on the way. Christopher’s character evolves by comprehending several new lessons and such as finding true pleasure, disregarding other people’s judgments, as well as realizing that material things are just material things and nothing else....   [tags: Into the Wild Essays] 565 words
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The Setting of To Build a Fire by Jack London - The Setting of To Build a Fire by Jack London No matter what type of story you are reading, setting always plays a key element in producing the desired effect. Jack London's short story To Build A Fire provides an excellent example of this. In this story, a man hikes across a snow and ice covered plane towards the encampment where he is supposed to meet up with more travelers like himself. The setting of this story is one of the northernmost most areas of the earth, the Yukon. The man must hike across this area for approximately thirty-six miles before he reaches the camp at which he is expected....   [tags: Papers] 468 words
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Comparing the Two Versions of To Build a Fire - Comparing the Two Versions of To Build a Fire "I am absolutely confident that beyond the motif itself, there is no similarity of treatment whatever" (544). Jack London, writing in December 1908, was responding to an inquiry from the Richard W. Gilder, editor of Century Magazine. Gilder, having just published "To Build a Fire" in his magazine, was worried when he came across another version published 6 years earlier. London's explanation was that the first story was for boys and the new one was for men; the only similarity being the motif itself....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 1093 words
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Survival 101: Instinct or Knowledge? - At first glance, Jack London’s, “To Build a Fire” seems like a generic story about the sufferings and unfortunate mishaps that a man and his dog encounter on their trip through the Yukon Wilderness. However, upon closer inspection, it becomes apparent that this story not only tells the story of a man’s journey through the Yukon Wilderness with his dog, but it also compares instinct with knowledge and how each can affect survival ability in the wilderness. The protagonist, an unnamed man, has great scientific knowledge but does not know how to use his knowledge, especially in crucial times....   [tags: Jack London, To Build a Fire]
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The Flame of Life - A single word inserted or removed can change the feeling of a story in an instant; creating tingles that trickle along the length of your spine or even a compulsive movement to put down the piece and never pick it up again. In many cases an author will write and rewrite their tales until they are perfect. Jack London was very much one of these authors, sending his first version of “To Build a Fire” to a magazine before rewriting it into the masterpiece of which many are more familiar with today....   [tags: To Build a Fire, Jack London]
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Survival in the Wild: Jack London's To Build a Fire and Arthur Gordon's Sea Devil - Anxiety, suspense, hesitation, and death; these all revolve around survival, which lets humans go over their limits and see what they’re really capable of. Survival is a mix of physical, mental, and emotional challenges. Though there are many stories that challenges man over his abilities, there are two stories that show survival that question our dominance as human beings. “To Build a Fire” by Jack London and “Sea Devil” by Arthur Gordon are both about characters that have caught themselves in a battle between man and nature....   [tags: Survival, Man vs Nature, Analysis]
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The Main Theme Presented Within Jack London's Text To Build a Fire - “It was a clear day, and yet there seemed an intangible pall over the face of things, a subtle gloom that made the day dark, and that was due to the absence of sun.” (Fire, 597) There was a time before humans experienced consciousness on this earth, and there will, without a doubt, be a time after. Even after humanity has long passed, the world will not cease its spinning. Some individuals like to look around and think that nature responds to the existence of humanity, however, upon further investigation you constantly see small structures being enveloped by foliage....   [tags: literary analysis] 998 words
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Conflicts of Man Versus Nature in Jack London's To Build a Fire - ... You know well that it is now nine o’clock, yet you see no sign of light rising from the eastern horizon. Just think of that. How fearful it must have been. London also applies a phenomenon that usually occurs in the northern territories to represent the danger and build up the suspense, the running spring hidden under soft layers of snow. It would become deadly for a man to step on it and get soaked. “…it stepped on the white, unbroken surface. Suddenly it broke through…” It shows that the solid snow cover is a trap, it seems very rigid and unbroken....   [tags: setting, foreshadowing, cold] 1022 words
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Stephen Crane's The Open Boat and Jack London's To Build A Fire - Stephen Crane's The Open Boat and Jack London's To Build A Fire Stephen Crane’s short story, “The Open Boat” speaks directly to Jack London’s own story, “To Build A Fire” in their applications of naturalism and views on humanity. Both writers are pessimistic in their views of humanity and are acutely aware of the natural world. The representations of their characters show humans who believe that they are strong and can ably survive, but these characters many times overestimate themselves which can lead to an understanding of their own mortality as they face down death....   [tags: Literacy Analysis ]
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Life Requires Imagination - ... This man in the story has his own his of pride for himself. He needs to stay by the fire and keep warm, but rather than resting and staying warm, he keeps on moving trying harder and harder to make it to the mining camp. London never mentions whether or not the man has a time limit to get to the mining camp, therefore the reader assumes he does not. But, rather than waiting and keeping warm, the man simply keeps on moving when his body does need the rest. Also, he not only needs to keep warm, he separates himself from the boys....   [tags: To Build a Fire by Jack London]
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Comparing Destruction in Steinbeck's Flight and London's To Build a Fire - Journey to Destruction in Steinbeck's Flight and London's To Build a Fire Not many people have to face death in the cold wasteland of the Arctic or rugged mountains of California, but Pepe and "the man" do. Although the ironic destruction of Pepe and the man were caused by relentless forces of nature, their attitudes and reasons for going on their journeys differed. The setting in both stories consisted of extreme climate and conditions. In Flight the climate was desert hot during the day and chilling cold at night....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 693 words
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Choices and Responsibility in London's To Build a Fire and Crane's The Open Boat - Choices and Responsibility in London's To Build a Fire and Crane's The Open Boat Naturalism portrays humans' control over their actions and fate as limited and determined by the natural world, including their very humanity. The freedom described by Jean-Paul Sartre results in all individuals having the ability to make present choices independently. Despite the fatalism illustrated in naturalism, the characters in London's 'To Build a Fire' and Crane's 'The Open Boat' are ultimately responsible for their choices and consequences of their choices....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
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How to Build a Personal Computer -   Contents Introduction 4 Health and Safety 5 Equipment and Tools 7 Components 8 Essential Components 8 Optional Components 10 Installation 11 Components 11 Case and PSU 11 Motherboard, CPU, Heatsink and Fan, and RAM 11 WARNING 11 Motherboard and CPU assembly 12 WARNING 12 Hearsink and Fan 13 RAM 14 Motherboard Installation 14 Graphics Card 15 HDD 15 DVD 16 Connections 17 Connections 18 Installing Essential Peripherals 21 Monitor 21 Keyboard 21 Mouse 21 Broadband Cable 21 Power Cable 21 Troubleshooting / Beep Codes 22 AWARD BIOS 22 AMI BIOS 22 Bios 23 Installing an Operating System 24 Install Windows XP with Service Pack 3 24 Customising Windows XP Installation 29 Installing Drivers 36 Inst...   [tags: Build a Computer from Scratch]
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The Increased Threat of Unattended Fire in Wood Stoves and Fireplaces inside Homes - {Recognizing that wood stoves and fireplaces are a common heat source in homes, the Fire Prevention Bureau is concerned of the increased threat of an unintended fire as outdoor temperatures drop.|Understanding that fireplaces and wood stoves are prevalent sources of heat in homes, the Fire Prevention Bureau has expressed concerns that there will be increased risk of fire if it gets colder outside.|The Fire Prevention Bureau realizes that wood stoves and fireplaces are common sources of heat in homes and therefore, pose a fire hazard if the temperature outside drops.} {While there are several ways that a stove or fireplace may cause a fire, past experience demonstrates that fires resulting fr...   [tags: fire prevention bureau] 1434 words
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A Fire Not Built - A Fire Not Built “To Build a Fire”, a short story written by Jack London, is viewed as a masterpiece of naturalist fiction. “To Build a Fire” features a miner and his wolf-dog companion who are traveling in the Yukon Territory to meet fellow miners. The miner is the protagonist and the wolf-dog companion is the foil because the wolf-dog plays off of the traits of the protagonist. The central theme of “To Build a Fire” concerns the struggle of man versus nature. “To Build a Fire” tells of a man traveling in the extreme cold through the Yukon Territory....   [tags: Literature Review]
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The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 - The Great Chicago Fire was a major milestone in the city’s history. The fire started on October 8th, 1871 and did not end until October 10th, 1871. People never saw this fire coming which might have made it even worse. The only reason it spread so far was because everything was made out of wood, the ground was parched and the wind was blowing that night; the reason it stopped was because it had started raining. Although the fire destroyed most of the city, it was a positive turning point in history....   [tags: milestone in Illinois history] 1739 words
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The Great Fire of London - Throughout recorded history, fires have been known to cause great loss of life, property, and knowledge. The Great Fire of London was easily one of the worst fires mankind has ever seen causing large scale destruction and terror. Samuel Pepys described the fire as “A most malicious bloody flame, as one entire arch of fire of above a mile long… the churches, houses and all on fire and flaming at once, and a horrid noise the flames made.” (Britain Express 1). Although it started as a small fire in a baker’s shop and the official death toll was low, nevertheless the Great Fire of London heavily impacted England’s social, political, and economic history because the outcome allowed for changes in...   [tags: History, Disaster] 1817 words
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Courage Under Fire - Courage Under Fire      In 1991, millions of people tuned in to CNN to observe a real life and death drama played out in the cities and deserts of Iraq. For the United States, the war was more or less a display of power and a preservation of economic interest. Nobody was to ever hear of the mishaps and foul-ups of the war. In many eyes the war was seen as a chance to boost American spirit and make the government look empowered. Director Edward Zwick and writer Patrick Shane Duncan snatched onto this notion and expounded on it in their movie Courage Under Fire....   [tags: Film Movie courage Under Fire Essays] 1942 words
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Process Essay: How to Build a Campfire - Campfires are a great way to stay warm in cold weather and a lot of fun to have when out on campouts and other social events outside. Campfires, although fun, have a serious process and must be treated as something serious. When planning to build a campfire, there are several things to consider such as preparation, safety, building the fire, keeping the fire going, and putting the fire out properly. If certain things are not followed while building a fire, someone could get hurt or property could be damaged....   [tags: Earth Science] 468 words
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The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 -      The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 was one of the largest disasters in American history. Practically overnight the great city of Chicago was destroyed. Before the fire there was a large drought causing everything to be dry and flammable, then a fire broke out in the O’Leary’s barn and spread throughout the city. Many attempts were made to put out the fire but there were too many errors and problems in the beginning. After the fire many people were left homeless and had to help build their city again (Murphy, 39) Before the fire broke out on Sunday night, October 8, 1871 there had been a large drought causing everything to be dry and extremely flammable....   [tags: American History essays research papers] 1472 words
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Analysis of Jack London's "To Build a Fire" - In Jack London's "To Build a Fire" we see a classic story of man against nature. In this story, however, nature wins. One reason that this is such a compelling and engrossing story is the vivid descriptions of the environment the nameless main character endures. Plot and characterization are brief, and the theme is simple. Yet this story is still a very popular story, and it has a mysterious quality that makes it great. Jack London starts early in the story to set a foreboding feeling: "Day had broken cold and gray, exceedingly cold and gray, when the man turned aside from the main Yukon trail and climbed the high earth-bank, where a dim and little traveled trail led eastward through the fa...   [tags: World Literature] 595 words
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Great Chicago Fire - Great Chicago Fire I have no passion or desire to write about a thunderous destruction of a city or the death of hundreds of people. Yes, I have no connection to this topic, besides my home being 30 minutes from downtown Chicago, but that does not mean that this fire does not pertain to me or anyone who lives in a completely different state for that matter. So, just because I have never experienced a disaster of this magnitude does not mean that my lips should stay shut regarding the topic of the Great Chicago Fire....   [tags: American History] 1803 words
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The role of fire ecology in plant succession - Succession is defined as a directional change in community composition and structure over time (Gurevitch et al, 2002). Succession is either primary or secondary. In primary succession plants grow and colonize earth for the first time. In secondary succession plants inhabit and colonize earth that was once inhabited by plants life. A wildfire is one example of secondary succession. When a disturbance in the environment occurs, such as a wildfire, either part or all of the community is destroyed....   [tags: essays research papers] 776 words
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Comunity Risk Reduction Programs and Procedures - Introduction As emergency providers we are viewed as a trusted and valuable source of information particularly when it comes to protecting the public. Through the years the America Fire Service has recognized the need to build and maintain effective emergency response capabilities. The new norm for the fire service has many common similarities with financial restraints that affect staffing levels, response times, equipment needs, growing pressures from political groups, and various demographic considerations, yet the expectations to provide a high quality service are still present....   [tags: local fire department responsibilities]
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Volunteer Fire Fighter Dies While Lost in Residential Structure Fire - ... The NIOSH investigators report did conclude some of the factors could have been avoided. With this case the NIOSH report was able put together a pretty lengthy list of what could have been different. NIOSH found the following (2009) Ensure that fire fighters receive essential training consistent with national consensus standards on structural firefighting before being allowed to operate at a fire incident, develop, implement, and enforce written standard operating procedures (SOPs) for fireground operations, ensure that fire fighters are trained to follow the two-in/two-out rule and maintain crew integrity at all times, ensure that adequate numbers of apparatus and fire fighters are o...   [tags: issues that lead to this fatality] 641 words
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Lessons of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire of 1911 - The sheer physical nature of fire is to consume all fuel that lay in its path. That is exactly what happened in the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire of 1911. The building itself was reported to be fire proof, but what about its contents. The amount of unused cotton and other fabric scraps that were piled up were ample amounts of fuel just waiting to be consumed by a spark. The business owners kept what little exits and escape routes the building had locked for fear of a thieving employee. The employees mostly took the elevators up and down the building, limiting their knowledge of possible escape routes....   [tags: research paper] 596 words
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Prescribed Fire to Manage for Quail Habitat - Introduction One of the most important species of quail is the Northern bobwhite quail (Colinus virgianus), which populations is currently in decline. The quail population is characterized with “boom or bust” population swings but short term variation does not represent long term trends. The long term trend indicates that the quail population has been declining since the 1950’s. (Stevens, 2013) The amount, quality and availability of food and nesting areas affect population levels. (Yarrow, 2009) The use of fire is an important and effective tool that can be utilized for the management and preservation of quail in the United States....   [tags: land management tool]
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Fire in Hean Rhy´s Wide Sargasso Sea - ... Antoinette formed a relation to it due to its association to trauma. Subconsciously Antoinette was not able to cope with her past traumatic experience. This is expressed at the end of the novel due to the burning of Rochester's house in England. Thus suporting the Rhys’ theme that unless people who suffer trauma eventually learn to cope with it, it will build psychologically and will eventually be released harmfully. Self evaluation Name:__________________________________ Wide Sargasso Sea Essay—Draft 1 Self-Evaluation...   [tags: traits, trauma, psychologically, harmfully] 2024 words
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The Imagery of Smoke, Fire, and Burning in The Columbus School for Girls by Liza Wieland - The Imagery of Smoke, Fire, and Burning in The Columbus School for Girls by Liza Wieland The story "The Columbus School for Girls," by Liza Wieland contains the imagery of smoke, fire, and burning as a means of expressing the many aspects of love and passion. The ultimate symbol of love in the story is an all-consuming fire, yet smoke and burning act as manifestations of the different stages of love. The "narrators" in the story experience many of these facets by witnessing it in the life of Emily Jerman, and ultimately come to a realization and transformation of their own....   [tags: The Columbus School for Girls] 523 words
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