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Your search returned over 400 essays for "The Elephant Man"
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The Elephant Man - The Elephant Man John Merrick, a man so pathetic and helpless because of the curse of his extremely disfigured body he carries around with him. Lots of people are born with some deformity or another, but none such as the case of John Merrick, in other words, ‘The Elephant Man’ who was given this name because he was so deformed he resembled an extremely ugly elephant. The movie shows how John Merrick is marginalized not only by the general public, but also the poorest of people to such an extent that his life was a misery....   [tags: Elephant Man Essays] 1393 words
(4 pages)
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Bernard Pomerance and the Elephant Man - Bernard Pomerance and the Elephant Man Bernard Pomerance was born in 1940 in Brooklyn, New York. He attended college at the University of Chicago, where he received a degree in English. In the 1970's Pomerance moved to London, England to become a novelist. He was unsuccessful and then decided to try his hand as a dramatist. He quickly got involved with several left-wing fringe groups, which where at the time thriving in England. Then, along with director Ronald Rees, he founded the Foco Nove Theater group....   [tags: Elephant Man Essays]
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2217 words
(6.3 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant and The Man Who Would Be King - Moral Authority and the Ultimate Fate of Imperialism The 1800’s staged the universal dissemination and climax of British imperialism, thereby destructing and reconstructing the world into a new order. It is ordinary to depict the British as overindulgent consumerists, and the natives as magnanimous servers of the Empire, though history suggests that imperialism was not a mere black and white affair. It is certain that imperialism unjustly exhausted global resources and is therefore deserving of its condemnation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]
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2534 words
(7.2 pages)
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The Elephant Man - For everyone life is already hard enough. All anyone wants is to be accepted and to feel cared about but when you are unfortunately born with deformities life is a hundred times harder. According to his play The Elephant man Bernard Pomerance believes that society will shun those with deformities until they take the time to actually get to know them. John was a man shunned by society because he simply didn’t look like everyone else. He was born with a serious case of Elephantitis and was said to look like a monster....   [tags: Literature Analysis] 608 words
(1.7 pages)
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Social Rejection in the Film The Elephant Man - The Elephant Man is a moving film, based on the true story of Joseph Merrick, a man born with a prevalent deformity and dying from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this film, John Merrick is initially portrayed as an imbecile and is consequently placed in a circus freak show, where he is ridiculed as a result of his deformity and is abused by his manager. However, his life takes a turn for the better when he becomes acquainted with Dr. Treves and is introduced to a new lifestyle, dissimilar to what he had endured throughout his life....   [tags: prevalent, deformity, death, church, bag] 832 words
(2.4 pages)
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Elephant Man - Ashley Montagu tells John Merrick’s unusual story in the book that studies human dignity, The Elephant Man. The Elephant Man, an intriguing book that captures the heart of the spirit, is the story of a simple, yet unfortunate, man. It causes one to think about life’s precious gifts and how often they are taken for granted. As the sad and unique story of John Merrick, “the elephant man,'; unfolds, all are taught a lesson about strength and courage. When Sir Frederick Treeves first discovered John Merrick in 1884, he could only be described as, “a huddled mass of loneliness';(14)....   [tags: essays research papers] 810 words
(2.3 pages)
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Elephant Man - Elephant Man The Elephant Man, written by Bernard Pomerance, is a play about identity. It is a play about a man who is deformed, but constantly trying to live life as an ordinary person. The play begins with John Merrick, also known as the Elephant Man, performing in a carnival freak show in order to make a minute amount of money for living expenses. In Scene VI, Even on the Niger and Ceylon, Not This, Treves brings in Miss Sandwich to become Merricks nurse. He explains to her that he has been let down so far by the other nurses he has introduced to Merrick....   [tags: essays papers] 440 words
(1.3 pages)
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A Comparison of Dorian Gray and The Elephant Man - Dorian Gray compared to The Elephant Man At the beginning of The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde, Basil paints a portrait of Dorian Gray. Throughout the novel, Dorian is viewed and is treated by the world as art. As art, Dorian is constantly changed by the influences of his different artists. The most influential and main artist of Dorian is Lord Henry. Lord Henry corrupts Dorian into a vain, selfish, arrogant, hedonistic, and cruel man. A similar artist to art relation exists between Mr....   [tags: essays papers] 1033 words
(3 pages)
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Comparing Evil in The Elephant Man, Romeo and Juliet, and Let the Circle Be Unbroken - Comparing the Evil Exposed in Christine Sparks' The Elephant Man, William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, and Mildred Taylor's Let the Circle Be Unbroken       "Evil is the underlying element in the life of a living creature." This quotation, by Ray V. Sjorvek, expresses the idea that all living creatures contain a certain degree of evil inside themselves. In literature, protagonists usually express their sinister sides through words or actions when trying to prove the point that one's hidden emotions cannot be concealed....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 980 words
(2.8 pages)
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Central Characters as Outsiders in Society in E.T. The Extra Terrestrial and the Elephant Man - Central Characters as Outsiders in Society in E.T. The Extra Terrestrial and the Elephant Man Both films there are many similarities and differences between the directive strategies of Directors David Lynch and Steven Spielberg although it should be remembered that there is a theory that all stories derive from six basic plots. The directors have chosen characters that compare with the general feeling of the period for the two similar plots....   [tags: Papers] 2138 words
(6.1 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant by Geroge Orwell - In his early twenties, George Orwell (1946) began a line of work he would later term “an unsuitable profession”: officer of the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, which began his transformation into a writer of primarily political topics. His essay “Shooting an Elephant” describes his feelings of frustration in attempting to perform his duty – shooting a mad elephant discovered to have broken its chain, destroyed property, and killed a man – while avoiding the ridicule of the local population. (Orwell, 1936) The elephant can be seen to represent a number of individuals and groups in the story, held by various chains in their different circumstances....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]
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947 words
(2.7 pages)
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True Power in "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell - The quest for power is one which has been etched into the minds of men throughout history. However, it can be said that true power is not a result of one’s actions but comes from the following one’s own beliefs without being influenced by others. This principle sets up the story for Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell. The protagonist, Orwell himself, is a sub divisional police officer in Burma, a British colony. Orwell must try to find and use his inner power when he is faced with the decision of whether or not to kill an elephant which has ravaged the Burman’s homes....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant] 1473 words
(4.2 pages)
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Pride and Power in George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" and "A Hanging" - Every writer has that one special quirk that keeps readers coming back for more. Whether it is the humor or the characters, most authors carry their quirks from story to story. In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell describes his experience of shooting an elephant. In “A Hanging,” he describes the emotions that run through him as he watches the hanging of a prisoner. Both essays have similar key ideas that identify Orwell as a writer. The results of pride and power contribute to the themes that connect his essays and identify Orwell as a descriptive writer....   [tags: shooting an elephant, a hanging] 986 words
(2.8 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell Few supervisors experience lack of respect and denunciation from workers because of their positions in a company. Supervisors take actions to preserve the image of authority before subordinates and from being ridiculed by their workers, even if the supervisors object these types of actions. The essay "Shooting an Elephant" relates to this situation. The author of this essay is George Orwell. The author talks about his work and personal experience that emphasizes the impact of imperialism at the sociological and psychological stage....   [tags: Orwell Elephant Shooting Analysis]
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1529 words
(4.4 pages)
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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" In 'Shooting an Elephant,' George Orwell finds himself in a difficult situation involving an elephant. The fate of the elephant lies in his hands. Only he can make the final decision. In the end, due to Orwell's decision, the elephant lay dying in a pool of blood. Orwell wins the sympathy of readers by expressing the pressure he feels as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, struggling with his morals, and showing a sense of compassion for the dying animal. Readers sympathize with Orwell because they can relate to his emotions in the moments before the shooting....   [tags: George Orwell Shooting Elephant]
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792 words
(2.3 pages)
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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism - George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism   The glorious days of the imperial giants have passed, marking the death of the infamous and grandiose era of imperialism. George Orwell's essay, Shooting an Elephant, deals with the evils of imperialism. The unjust shooting of an elephant in Orwell's story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and its executioner. The British officer, the executioner, acts as a symbol of the imperial country, while the elephant symbolizes the victim of imperialism....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays Orwell ]
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837 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Elephant as a Symbol for Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant” - In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell retold an occasion where he was struggling to come to a final decision of whether to shoot the elephant or not. With his final decision, the elephant finally lay dying in front of thousands of people. He said that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he also explained that he had to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” in front of the crowd (14). At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case....   [tags: Symbolism, British, Orwell] 1173 words
(3.4 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant - The art of telling a story relies on the language used. Whether a writer is good at using the language appropriately is vital for an interesting and impressive story. So how can the uses of appropriate language affect the whole narration of a story. George Orwell, one of the most famous English authors, was born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, India, in 1903. His father was a colonial official for the British and his mother’s family also had colonial ties. In 1922, Orwell worked as a British imperial policeman in Burma for five years but he finally returned to England again because he recognized the injustices of the British imperial rule in Burma and could not suffer the guilt of oppressing...   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell] 1589 words
(4.5 pages)
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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - A Moral Dilemma - A Moral Dilemma in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant Unanticipated choices one is forced to make can have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author recounts an event from his life when he was about twenty years old during which he had to choose the lesser of two evils. Many years later, the episode seems to still haunt him. The story takes place at some time during the five unhappy years Orwell spends as a British police officer in Burma. He detests his situation in life, and when he is faced with a moral dilemma, a valuable work animal has to die to save his pride....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays] 990 words
(2.8 pages)
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Power of the Oppressed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - Power of the Oppressed Exposed in Shooting an Elephant     In Burma, the Indian Imperial Police consisted of British officers who, in theory, supported the extension of power and dominion of a nation, which is the basis of imperialism. George Orwell decided to follow family tradition when he went to Burma to work for the Indian Imperial Police, yet "when he realized how much against their will the Burmese were ruled by the British, he felt increasingly ashamed of his role as an alien police officer" (Britannica)....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]
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1977 words
(5.6 pages)
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Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's “Shooting an Elephant” The phrase “the power of the press” is used often, but what exactly is the power of the press. Since the beginning of news reporting, it’s been known that what actually gets into the news reports is monitored and carefully picked by higher authorities. What isn’t widely known, however, is that the media can use specific wording and phrases that, on the surface, look like normal news coverage, but are actually a technique of the media to control the images people see and the words they hear and read....   [tags: George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant]
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1588 words
(4.5 pages)
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Shooting An Elephant - Shooting an Elephant In life we as humans often make decisions that we would not have made on our own if we would not have been influenced by someone else. As humans others' opinions mean a great deal to us, and in "Shooting an Elephant", Orwell shows how true this idea is by the tone of the story. "Shooting an Elephant" is the story of a British policeman in Moulmein, a city in Burma, that is torn between shooting or not shooting an elephant that has gone ramped. The native people did not like him much, but when the elephant went on its rampage they were quick to call on him....   [tags: George Orwell Literature Analysis Shooting Elephan] 942 words
(2.7 pages)
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Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell "Shooting an Elephant" is perhaps one of the most anthologized essays in the English language. It is a splendid essay and a terrific model for a theme of narration. The point of the story happens very much in our normal life, in fact everyday. People do crazy and sometimes illegal moves to get a certain group or person to finally give them respect. George Orwell describes an internal conflict between his personal morals and his duty to his country to the white man's reputation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant George Orwell Essays]
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848 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In the essay ?Shooting an Elephant. by George Orwell, the author uses metaphors to represent his feelings on imperialism, the internal conflict between his personal morals, and his duty to his country. Orwell demonstrates his perspectives and feelings about imperialism.and its effects on his duty to the white man?s reputation. He seemingly blends his opinions and subjects into one, making the style of this essay generally very simple but also keeps it strong enough to merit numerous interpretations....   [tags: Shooting Elephant George Orwell Essays Papers] 878 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Finale of Evil in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell faces a dilemma: whether or not to kill the elephant. With his final decision, the elephant finally lays dead in front of thousands of people. He explains that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he has to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” (14) in front of the crowd. At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case. He effectively uses this incident to demonstrate the “real nature of imperialism” (3), where the elephant represents the British Empire....   [tags: Imperialism, Analytical Essay] 1234 words
(3.5 pages)
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Analysis of The Elephant Vanishes by Harucki Murakami - ... In the 20th century, Japan experienced an American enculturation. In the story, the main character works as a salesman of kitchen equipment presumably for an American corporation; that is why, he must use the word “kitchen” instead of the Japanese word. (Goossen 409). This implies the process of Americanization and at the same time the break with the Japanese traditional culture. This is very difficult to understand because it is a traumatic process in which the Japanese society had to renounce the deeply rooted traditions and substitute them for others....   [tags: japanese, literature, tradition, society] 1525 words
(4.4 pages)
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Shooting An Elephant - The story that my evaluation will be based on is Shooting an Elephant written in 1936. The author George Orwell was born in 1903 in India to a British officer raised in England. He attended Eton College, which introduced him to England’s middle and upper classes. He was denied a scholarship, which led him to become a police officer for the Indian Imperial in 1922. He served in Burma until resigning in 1927 due to the lack of respect for the justice of British Imperialism in Burma and India. He was now determined to become a writer, so at the brink of poverty he began to pay close attention to social outcasts and laborers....   [tags: essays research papers] 1377 words
(3.9 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant - “Shooting an Elephant” I was not comfortable with many aspects of this story. The prejudice throughout the book was unimaginable, I find I am uncomfortable with any kind of bigotry. Reading of the Burmese people and their disrespect toward someone who was there to “protect and serve”, was difficult. I suppose I am naïve, I try to hold on to the belief that people of God are inherently good. I know there are bad apples in all walks of life, bad people are everywhere so holding on to this optimism is harder each day....   [tags: essays research papers] 474 words
(1.4 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant - A police officer in the British Raj, the supposedly 'unbreakable'; ruling force, was afraid. With his gun aimed at a elephant's head, he was faced with the decision to pull the trigger. That officer was George Orwell, and he writes about his experience in his short story, 'Shooting an Elephant';. To save face, he shrugged it off as his desire to 'avoid looking the fool'; (George Orwell, 283). In truth, the atmosphere of fear and pressure overwhelmed him. His inner struggle over the guilt of being involved in the subjugation of a people added to this strain, and he made a decision he would later regret enough to write this story....   [tags: essays research papers] 422 words
(1.2 pages)
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Hills like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway - Symbolism in Hemingway’s Story ‘Hills like White Elephants’ ‘Hills Like White Elephants’ is a short story authored by Ernest Hemingway about an American and a girl named Jig. In the story, the two are sitting in a train station waiting for the train to Madrid. While they wait, they have an intense ongoing debate on whether or not to abort Jig. At the end of the story, the train is about to arrive and the man carries luggage on the tracks as they prepare to leave. The end of the story does not clearly define the outcome of its decision....   [tags: symbolism, white elephant]
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1361 words
(3.9 pages)
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George Orwell's Essay Showing Regret for Shooting an Elephant - ... In reality he is uncertain of his responsibility. This sense of duty is interpreted by Orwell as taking away some of his freedom. He can no longer act the way he wants and is controlled by expectations. This message can be translated to the double edge nature of tyranny. The British have lost a part of their freedom from public perception of their tyranny. Orwell feels it is his responsibility to kill an elephant even though he does not want to kill the elephant. At this point he is going through the motions of a police officer and not convinced about the need to kill the elephant....   [tags: burmese, tyranny, british empire]
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891 words
(2.5 pages)
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Analytical Summary Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - ... On his way, he hears that the elephant that was causing trouble was actually a tamed elephant that went mad due to ‘must.’ He also learns that it had already wreaked massive havoc among the Burmese villages. Upon his arrival, he is perplexed at the conflicting testimonies of the natives, making him think that this incident is just a hoax. At that very moment, he sees a corpse of man that the elephant had trampled upon. Realizing the severity of the situation, he sends an orderly to get an elephant rifle and heads towards a paddy field where the elephant rests, followed by a large crowd of people....   [tags: imperialism, wishes, essay, officer] 1059 words
(3 pages)
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George Orwells Shooting an Elephant - George Orwells Shooting an Elephant In George Orwell's essay "Shooting An Elephant," he writes about racial prejudice. Orwell is a British officer in Burma. The author is, "for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British"(842). Orwell feels caught in the middle of this cultural struggle. He sympathizes with the oppressed people of India, but is treated poorly, since he is viewed as one of the oppressors. He comes to terms with the role he plays in this vicious cycle of oppression , as an imperial servant, and the influence it has on him to shoot an elephant....   [tags: essays papers] 483 words
(1.4 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In his essay Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell explains how the controlling authorities in a hostile country are not controlling the country's population but are in fact a mere tool of the populous. Orwell's experience with the elephant provided the insight for his essay, and gives a clear example of the control the natives have over the authorities. The authorities in Lower Burma were there to police the state that their government controlled, but were only accomplished in being controlled by the people of the state....   [tags: Papers] 582 words
(1.7 pages)
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Literary Analysis of “Shooting an Elephant,” by George Orwell - ... Part five is the last paragraph, he tells us about why that he had to kill the elephant. At the beginning, Orwell claims that he is fully against the Imperialism and he describes it as “devil”. O well’s point is to use the image of the elephant as a metaphor to demonstrate the destructive and unethical power of the Imperialism. We can see the destruction of imperialism when Orwell depicts “An elephant was ravaging the bazaar” ()and “It had already destroyed somebody’s bamboo huts, kill a cow and raided some fruit-stalls and devoured the stock;” ()....   [tags: metaphor, imperialism, imagery]
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1146 words
(3.3 pages)
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Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone - Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone Free will can be defined as: “The right, given to humans by God, to make their own decisions.” A mans free will cannot be destroyed by any power other than God. Humans can always exercise their free will when making decisions. However, when their decisions come in conflict with the laws set by a higher power, they might face consequences based on how they choose to use their free will. The more restrictions imposed upon someone’s free will the more restricted their ability to make decisions become....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 839 words
(2.4 pages)
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Critical Analysis of Hemmingway’s The White Elephant - “Hills Like White Elephants” the short story written by Ernest Hemingway, presents the difference between man and woman’s attitude toward a relationship when it becomes responsible. The conflict arises where the girl wants to keep the baby when the man asks her to have an abortion. The man tells the girl that he loves her through whole story, but does not want anyone or anything to get involved in their relationship. The man is irresponsible, improvisational, and manipulative; overall he is immature and showing childish attitude but the girl tries to become responsible and mature....   [tags: Relationship, Abortion]
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858 words
(2.5 pages)
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An Exploration of British Injustice in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - ... This phrase shows not only how the people oppressed by the Imperialism suffer, but the tyrant itself by giving up his freedom. Through the way Orwell arrange this paragraph the audience can now truly understand Orwell’s argument about how Imperialism has negative effects on those in the power, and how ironically it is for Orwell to gain power and dominance over others, just to lose freedom and dominance over yourself. Through the essay, with the use of particular emotional words and sentences, the audience can perceive Orwell’s feelings and emotions, by the memorable amount of pathos over his essay....   [tags: imperialism, control, pressure] 1616 words
(4.6 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant - In the essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer in Lower Burma, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. Since “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to the British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma, Orwell is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese (12). This allows him to hate his job and the British Empire. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell] 1354 words
(3.9 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant - In his essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. He hates his job as a police officer in Moulmein because an “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma. Therefore, Orwell, a white man is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese which allows him to hate his job and British Empire, the root of everything. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Analysis, George Orwell] 1357 words
(3.9 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - ‘Shooting an Elephant’ is a short story written by George Orwell in 1936. The story is about a young British man who serves as a police officer in Burma, which is part of British India in the 1920s. This policeman is torn between his hate for the British occupation and the abuse he gets from the natives on a daily basis. Politically, he is on the Burmese side because he despises the oppressive British rule in Burma. Even though he is against the occupation, he has to act superior over the natives in order to maintain British power over the land....   [tags: short story, British oppression in Burma]
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593 words
(1.7 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, Brief Description of Words and Symbols - ... As well as in paragraph seven when he speaks about the “white man turns into a tyrant, he destroys his own freedom.” Being ruled over, that everything he does now is not because he wants to but because it is expected of him. 4. The Coolie man who was killed is Orwell’s reassurance to kill this elephant. His own reasoning as to why everything he is about to do is okay. That whatever he does at the end the Burman people will not laugh at him or be angry with him. The remark at the end of the essay shows his thankfulness for no knowing the real reason why he killed the elephant....   [tags: irony, epiphany, coolie] 860 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Effects of Groupthink - Everyday a war is being waged, not in foreign countries- but in small neighborhoods and capital cities all over the world. A timeless battle to retain individual thought and action in an increasingly conformist society. The concept of a unanimous group-thinking society can be witnessed throughout history in the form of political controversies to pop culture and trends, to subtle influences in everyday life. The short narrative “Shooting an Elephant” written by George Orwell is a perfect example of group-thinking that implicates that to be accepted into these societal groups, one must do what is right by them, and not by the individual....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell]
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2220 words
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Colonialism and Imperialism Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness - Destructive Colonization Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness       As a man is captured, his first instinct is to try and break free from his shackles and chains. Primal urges such as this often accompany humans when they are forced, as in capture, to rely on their most basic instincts to survive. In this manner, natives in Africa acted upon instinct when the Europeans arrived to take their land and freedom. The short story Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell and the novel Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad revolve around the time when colonialism had a foothold in many parts of the world....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1358 words
(3.9 pages)
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Shooting an Elephant bye George Orwell - ... He explains this feeling in his thought, “In the end the sneering yellow faces of young men that met me everywhere, the insults hooted after me when I was at a safe distance, got badly on my nerves” (Orwell 1). Orwell adds in this extra explanation to overemphasize the feelings of resentment he cannot bear, since most people can usually shrug off insults very easily. Kenneth Keskinen, a literary criticism author, interprets that Orwell cannot bear the natives’ contemptuous attitude and the resentment reflects Orwell’s attitude on imperialism....   [tags: short story analysis] 1027 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Elephant vanishes - In “The Elephant Vanishes Stories” by Haruki Murakami, he uses a mixture of fantasy and reality to engage the reader into the main idea of object or people disappearing. Most of his stories may seen as if they came from life but he adds mystery to each one of them when something is missing or vanishes and the circumstances around it becomes unreal. In “The Wind-Up Bird and Tuesday’s Women” Murakami starts off by surrounding the plot around a man who quits his job for no apparent reason at all, who irons his shirts in a particular manner, and avoid the sexual urges of a woman....   [tags: essays research papers] 419 words
(1.2 pages)
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Courga in Colin McDougall´s The Firing Squad and George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant - A characters courage is not measured by how an action will be accepted by others, but by how their actions stay true to themselves even in the face of a pressured surrounding. Colin McDougall’s The Firing Squad a story about a young soldiers attempt at redemption and George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant an essay about Orwell’s days in a British colony where he was called to handle the situation with an aggressive elephant are two pieces of literature that demonstrate the effects of courage. Courage takes many forms and in these two great pieces of literature it can be measured by looking at the characters and how they use courage and lack of courage as a driving factor in different ways thro...   [tags: Soldiers, War, Fear]
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1007 words
(2.9 pages)
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Perspective of the Elephant - ... Therefore, it may look like I did a large amount of bad things, but there were good reasons for each of them. I do not understand the purpose of the terrible panic breaking out amongst the people. Oh right, there is one more thing. When they eventually captured me and brought me back to my pen, I became very agitated and picked up the first man I saw. I never meant to hurt him; I only wanted to give him a little scare. However, I accidentally dropped him and the people made a much bigger deal out of nothing....   [tags: short story, shooting] 854 words
(2.4 pages)
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British Imperialism Exposed in Shooting an Elephant, by George Orwell - George Orwell was, without a doubt, one of the most influential authors of his time. His strong opposition to totalitarianism and imperialism made him one of the most recognizable names in literature during the 1900’s. Orwell spent 5 years as an imperial policeman in Burma, witnessing firsthand the effects of imperialism on the people of Burma (BBC). The insight he gained during those years made clear to him the injustices of colonization and fueled his opposition to totalitarianism....   [tags: British Imperialism Essays]
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Shades of a White Man - ... “[A white man] wears a mask, and his face grows to fit it.” (Orwell, par. 7). This anti-imperialist mask would degrade the white man from a master to a slave, from a colonizer to a colonized slave, who is to be controlled by the natives to appease them. After all, white men had to convert, temporarily, to slaves in order to accomplish their goal as colonizers; do their job. Orwell converted to a slave, by putting on the mask, to appease the natives, just like all the white men do. He was like a puppet controlled by the natives – the puppeteers – who forced him to shoot the elephant....   [tags: imperialist, morals, ethic, culture, freedom] 1192 words
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George Orwell's Shooting and Elephant and William Carlos Williams's The Use of Force - George Orwell’s short story “Shooting and elephant” and William Carlos Williams “The use of force” both share the same theme which is violence. While these stories are very much different they share many similarities. They both commit an act of violence and those acts have different effects on the main characters of the stories. “The use of force” by William Carlos Williams is about a doctor who makes a home visit and wants to diagnose this child because he thinks she has Diphtheria. The doctor must examine her throat but it is not an easy task because it becomes a conflict between the doctor and the child....   [tags: theme of violence analysis] 809 words
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Synapsis of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe - ... My own father has killed me. I feel so betrayed as if my heart has been ripped out of my chest. I felt so loved by my family, but know they have killed me. I shall be alone forever. Hills Like White Elephant (the lady) The bar I worked at was located at the side of a train station that shades us from the sun. We sat in the valley of the Ebro. Today there was a strange couple that sat outside of the bar. They were an American man and a young girl. They looked like they were waiting for the train....   [tags: american dream, success, elephant]
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The Story of the Puppet - ... Ack.” Puppet watched, masking his disgust, as a wad of yellowish-brown phlegm flew from Drachen to the ground and he thought, Well, the ground’s tainted here forever now... The ringmaster continued, interrupting the little man’s thought, “Anyway, who knows, coverin’ up that ugly mug ah yours might do ya some good,” he laughed heartily at that for a moment. Then barked gruffly, “Well, what the hell ya just standin’ there lookin’ stupider than usual fer. Get yer ass over to the makeup tent, tell Gerdy I sent ya....   [tags: short story, elephant, puppets] 1690 words
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The Eagle and the Elephant: a Simple Comparison - Human history has always been full of ups and downs. Successes and failures, treaties and war. And just as human history, a human life can get lost in they're own challenges and experiences. Often oblivious to the plight of others, most just live out their lives. Taking what they have for granted, they live inside their glass shell, unable to imagine a world without. Take the United States of America for instance. With a GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of $47,400, the United States of America is the 10th wealthiest nation in regards to GDP ....   [tags: Government ]
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The Themes of Wilderness and the White Man in William Faulkner's The Bear - The Themes of Wilderness and the White Man in William Faulkner's The Bear    William Faulkner's The Bear is bilateral in subject and plot. The first half of the story looks at the wilderness and the virtues man can learn from it. The second half applies these virtues to civilization, exposing the white man's corruption and misuse of the land. A careful look at the interaction of these two halves reveals a single unifying theme: man must learn virtue from nature. Faulkner believed humility, pride, courage, and liberty would be almost impossible for man to learn without the wilderness to teach him....   [tags: Faulkner Bear Essays]
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Hills Like White Elephants: My Interpretation of the Play - This short story is about a couple arguing about abortion. The girl, Jig, does not want to, but the American man says that it is the only thing between them. The girl wants to continue on with her life of exploring the world with the addition of the baby, but the man says that it would take the world away from them. The man has experience in this, but the woman seems not to. She is reluctant, and does not want to talk about it any more after a point. There are many elements in the story, such as disconnection, manipulation, dominance, innocence, and irresponsibility....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants, ] 1335 words
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Analysis of The Tree Where Man Was Boen by Perter Matthiessen - In The Tree Where Man Was Born, Peter Matthiessen shares his East African explorations and findings from the 1960’s with poetic flavor and grandeur imagery. Matthiessen gives a uniquely diverse account of the wilderness, wildlife, and traditional peoples of various East African regions. Through these accounts and informative stores of what life is like there from socio-ecological perspective as well as personal travel narrative, one understand the depth to his musings. Despite his accounts as a majority of subjectivity and reader-impressionism from a different era, his insight is still creditable and helpful to the changes of life....   [tags: exploration, wilderness, wildlife, tradition] 891 words
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Hills Like White Elephants, by Ernest Hemingway - Communication is the key to building a strong foundation of trust between a man and woman. In Ernest Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” we learn about the communication breakdown, between a woman named Jig and her companion who is an American man. They must make a decision that will affect both of their lives, and potentially end their relationship. The setting of the story represents Jig and her relationship with her American companion. “The hills across the valley of the Ebro were long and white....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays]
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The Depictions of Imperialism in Shooting an Elephany by George Orwell - ... When a man is killed by the outraged elephant and the Burmese people follow the police officer on his way to the elephant he realizes that the Burmese expect him to shoot the elephant. He knows it would not be right to kill the animal because of its worth and because it has started to calm down and would be the tame, harmless animal it is used to be. But under the pressure of the crowd the police man does not see leaving the elephant alive as an option because it would make him look weak and he might get laughed at if he gets attacked by the animal....   [tags: police, autobiography, experience]
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The Man Behind Hubble: Bob Williams - The Man Behind Hubble: Bob Williams Four weeks after space-walking shuttle Endeavour astronauts repaired the Hubble Space Telescope in December 1993, an ecstatic Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski waved a Hubble picture of the core of the spiral galaxy M100 at her naysaying colleagues. Today, Mikulski could host a Capitol Hill star party: The orbiting telescope has generated more than 100,000 photos of celestial objects, including a cemetery of dying stars, elephant trunks of dust and hydrogen gas twisting in the Eagle Nebula, jovian storms and aurorae, the rocky rings of Saturn and the colossal supernova smoke rings blown from an exploded star, to list a few....   [tags: Shuttle Astronomy Space Essays] 3667 words
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The Role of Myth in R.K. Narayan's The Man-Eater of Malgudi - The Role of Myth in R.K. Narayan's The Man-Eater of Malgudi In R.K. Narayan's book The Man-Eater of Malgudi, there exists a deep mythical structure. The story of the peaceful printer Nataraj who must overcome the demon-like Vasu is structured very much like a myth. As myths and spirituality are implicit in Hindu society, the world of Malgudi is full of mythical elements. To complement these mythical elements, comparisons and references are made to various Hindu myths throughout the book, which act as signposts to the significance of what is going on in the story itself....   [tags: Papers] 1608 words
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Questions on Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway - Questions on Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway Reading: Hills Like White Elephants/Ernest Hemingway 1. What are they talking about. (Evidence…) The man and the girl are talking about getting an abortion. Evidence: the "white elephants" ~ White elephants are sacred in some countries, but usually a white elephant is not considered to be something good…the idea is that it would be really nice to own a white elephant, but once you get one it becomes clear that it has no real value and costs a lot to maintain…also, rulers of India often sent white elephants to those who they hated b/c then the person would be financially destroyed trying to maintain such a pri...   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 672 words
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The Issue of Capital Punishment as in the film Dead Man Walking - The Issue of Capital Punishment as in the film Dead Man Walking In this essay I am going to analyse and explain how the issue of Capital Punishment is portrayed in the film "Dead Man Walking", a true story acted out. Before I proceed with this essay, I think it necessary to give some background information on Capital Punishment. Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime. Prisoners are kept in an isolated part of the prison, often-called Death Row, until the execution date....   [tags: Papers] 945 words
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Hills Like White Elephants, a Theme Analysis - Ernest Hemmingway uses time, place, and symbolism in "Hills like White Elephants" to intensify the central dilemma in a story about a man and a woman deciding on whether to go through with an abortion. Although a literal reading of the title may not seem to have any relation to the story, the title is rich in implications. Critics suggest that "Hills" refers to the shape of a woman's stomach when pregnant, and Webster's 21st Century Dictionary defines white elephant as: "[An] awkward, useless possession." The term is also defined in Webster's as an item that is worthless to some but priceless to others....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 1242 words
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An Analysis Of Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants - In Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” I found many layers of symbolism, and a fascinating psychological underplay afoot between his two characters. It begins with the girl’s comment about a line of white hills seen in the distance, which she compares to white elephants. The man responds with the comment “I’ve never seen one.” The symbolism of a white elephant is widely known as something very large or apparent that no one wishes to acknowledge or speak of in American society. It is an interesting opening to a very strained conversation concerning an apparent pregnancy, and the man’s wish to terminate it....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 927 words
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Critical Analysis on Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants - The thing that makes, Hills Like White Elephants, by Ernest Hemingway such a powerful story is the subtlety with which it is told. Hemingway is commenting on subject matter which for the time would have been considered taboo, but does so without actually spelling it out for the reader. As the characters sit together drinking beer and talking, it becomes immediately apparent that there is something weighty between them and as the conversation continues, the reader can feel pressure building between the two of them....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 559 words
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The Effect of Respect on Morality Depicted in The Guest and Shooting an Elephant - The prevailing theme in The Guest and Shooting an Elephant is the effect of respect on morality. In the former, the main character Daru exhibits a great deal of respect and hospitality to the Arab, especially considering the circumstances. In the latter, the Burmans exhibit no respect to the police officer in the event of the elephant display, or in his day to day life. These opposite scenarios have a distinct effect on the morality of the main characters. Respect has a distinct effect on morality which differs depending on if respect is being strived for or shown....   [tags: The Guest and Shooting an Elephant] 508 words
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African Elephants and Human-Elephant Interactions: Implications for Conservations by P.C. Lee and M.D. Graham - ... The ivory trade is devastating towards elephants and is only growing in time despite authoritative efforts. According to Elephant Daily an elephant is killed every fifteen minutes, and in the last 4 years poachers have killed up to a third of the population. By 1989 the population had fallen again to 600,000 and that is when action began to take place. The first large effort to shed light on the situation was Richard Leakey. Leakey was responsible for convincing the president of Kenya to burn the countries stockpile of ivory a very large statement to be made which jumpstarted the efforts to save the elephants....   [tags: the ivory trade, elephant population] 881 words
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Symbolism in Hills Like White Elephants, by Ernest Hemingway - In a well-written short story, different literary elements and terms are incorporated into the story by the author. Ernest Hemingway frequently uses various literary elements in his writing to entice the reader and enhance each piece that he writes. In Hills Like White Elephants, Hemingway uses symbols to teach the reader certain things that one may encounter during daily life. Symbolism may be defined as relating to, using, or proceeding by means of symbols (Princeton). The use of symbols in Hills Like White Elephants is utterly important to the plot line and to the fundamental meaning of the story....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays]
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Hills Like White Elephants, by Ernest Hemingway - In “Hills like White Elephants”, the setting of the story is symbolic to the main character’s dilemma. The author, Ernest Hemingway gives just enough information by using symbols in the story so the reader can draw a deeper meaning to what is being detailed. As the main theme of the story, he relies on symbolism to convey the idea of an abortion. The description of the two different landscapes of the railroad tracks represents Jig’s difficult decision of whether she should keep her baby or continue a ruthless lifestyle with the American....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 1189 words
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Hills Like White Elephants, by Ernest Hemingway - Hills Like White Elephants “The hills across the valley of the Ebro were long and white. On this side there was no shade and no trees and the station was between two lines of rails in the sun. […] The American and the girl with him sat at a table in the shade, outside the building. It was very hot and the express from Barcelona would come in forty minutes. It stopped at this junction for two minutes and went to Madrid” (290 paragraph 1). Ernest Hemingway crafts a well written dialogue in this story about a man and a girl....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 940 words
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Modernism: Hills Like White Elephants, by Ernest Hemingway - The art, literature, and poetry of the early 20th century called for a disruption of social values. Modernism became the vague term to describe the shift. The characteristics of the term Modernism, all seek to free the restricted human spirit. It had no trust in the moral conventions and codes of the past. One of the examples of modernism, that breaks the conventions and traditions of literature prior to Modernism, is Ernest Hemingway’s short story “Hills Like White Elephants”. The short story uses plot, symbolism, setting, dialogue, and a new style of writing to allow human spirit to experiment with meaning and interpretation....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays]
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Hemingway’s Hills Like White Elephants - “My aim is to put down on paper what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way” (E. Hemingway, Brainy Quote). It is evident that this is why Ernest Hemingway writes the literary pieces he writes. Hemingway proves this by writing his short story, Hills Like White Elephants. Hemingway also quoted, “I never had to choose a subject - my subject rather chose me” (E. Hemingway, QuotesPedia). This also relates to Hemingway composing Hills Like White Elephants along with many of his other works....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays]
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Hills Like White Elephants - ... The man views pregnancy just the opposite. When the woman is talking about white elephants, the man says he has never seen one and responds, “I might have. Just because you say I wouldn’t have doesn’t prove anything.” This shows the defensive nature of the man and that he is unable to differentiate between what is beautiful and what is not. It also shows a tensional conversation between the two. He is making it harder for her to talk and she worries about how she says things to him. It also implies that since the woman is pregnant, the man doesn’t want to take burden of the baby....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway short story analysis] 897 words
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Society's Influence on People Depicted in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant and Lucy Grealy's Mirrors - Throughout the ages, people have at times been influenced by society to do things they would not normally do. There are people who have been influenced to do things they did not desire to do at the behest of others, simply to be accepted by their peers. The choices that are made in life affect you either way even if they were made by you or someone else. Each choice made has a consequence which will affect the individual and in return the decision will produce a particular outcome. Influence is a hard thing to calculate into someone’s life and seeing how it changes lives for better or for worst is very difficult....   [tags: shooting an elephant, mirrors] 972 words
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Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell - Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell George Orwell's essay 'Shooting an Elephant' gives remarkable insight into the human psyche. The essay presents a powerful theme of inner conflict. Orwell feels strong inner conflict between what he believes as a human being, and what he believes and should do as an imperial police officer. The author is amazingly effective in illustrating this conflict by providing specific examples of contradictory feelings, by providing an anecdote that exemplified his feelings about his situation, and by using vivid imagery to describe his circumstances....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant George Orwell Essays] 894 words
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Moral Issues and Decisions in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - Moral Issues and Decisions in Shooting an Elephant    Throughout "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell, he addresses his  internal battle with the issues of morality and immorality. He writes of several situations that show his immoral doings. When George Orwell signed up for a five-year position as a British officer in Burma he was unaware of the moral struggle that he was going to face. Likewise, he has an internal clash between his moral conscious and his immoral actions. Therefore, Orwell becomes a puppet to the will of the Burmese by abandoning his thoughts of moral righteousness....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]
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Analysis of Hills Like White Elephants - Analysis of Hills Like White Elephants “Hills Like White Elephants”, by Ernest Hemingway, is a short story published in 1927 that takes place in a train station in Spain with a man and a woman discussing an operation. Most of the story is simply dialogue between the two characters, the American and Jig. This couple is at a critical point in their lives when they must decide whether or not to have an abortion. Certain themes arise from this story such as choices and consequences, doubt and ambiguity, and how men and women relate....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays]
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The Role of the Man in Hills Like White Elephants - The Role of the Man in Hills Like White Elephants It is the early afternoon of a Tuesday, and it is raining. Surrounded by the calming non-inspiration of bare off-white walls, I sit and listen to the railing of my peers as they attempt to deconstruct the brilliance of a deceased writer. It is a usual Tuesday this semester. Seated in my accustomed place in the front row, just left of center, my eyes close to the high-keyed soprano and alto ranting of all the outspoken students, who are today, sadly, entirely female....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 1386 words
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Analysis of Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway - Analysis of Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway "Hills Like White Elephants," is a short story,. It is a story about a man and a woman waiting at a train station talking about an issue that they never name. I believe this issue is abortion. In this paper I will prove that the girl in the story, who's name is Jig, finally decides to go ahead and have the baby even though the man, who does not have a name, wants her to have an abortion. It is the end of the story that makes me think this....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays] 1059 words
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