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Your search returned over 400 essays for "ST. AUGUSTINE, CONFESSIONS"
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Analysis of St. Augustine’s Confessions - St. Augustine’s Confessions St. Augustine is a man with a rational mind. As a philosopher, scholar, and teacher of rhetoric, he is trained in and practices the art of logical thought and coherent reasoning. The pursuits of his life guide him to seek concrete answers to specific questions. Religion, the practice of which relies primarily on faith—occasionally blind faith—presents itself as unable to be penetrated by any sort of scientific study or inquiry. Yet, like a true scientist and philosopher, one of the first questions St....   [tags: St. Augustine Confessions Philosophy Essays]
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1939 words
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Teaching The Confessions of St. Augustine - Teaching The Confessions of St. Augustine ABSTRACT: Augustine's passionate and immensely personal account of his conversion has enthralled readers for centuries. Unfortunately, the passion and personal nature of the writing can stand as a barrier to comprehension, especially when the text is taught at the undergraduate level. Add to this the fact that the work has the character of one long and substained prayer to God, contains many passages that are tediously introspective, and refers to a time and place that are foreign to today's undergraduates, the task of helping students to understand and appreciate the work is daunting, to say the least....   [tags: The Confessions of St. Augustine]
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3949 words
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Western Christianity: Augustine Confessions - ... He claims that in order to sense God, he must reflect into his soul. Augustine says that this is not something practiced among inanimate objects or “beasts” but yet they owe God for their existence. Augustine does not associate God with the “life of the body,” referencing his physical senses, but rather says that he considers there being another power that gives him the ability to live in his body and use his body while his soul is a product of God. He claims that it must be another power and that it cannot simply be his mind which gives him the ability to use his body because even animals have a “mind,” but cannot sense higher powers such as God....   [tags: philosophy, god, skills] 763 words
(2.2 pages)
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Augustine’s Journey to the Truth in The Confessions of St. Augustine - In the Confessions by Saint Augustine, this great philosopher experiences many problems and emotions related to sin and evil. As a boy, he often felt darkness, blindness, and confusion while attempting to find rest in God. Augustine started out in childhood with a restless heart because he had to live in two different worlds. These worlds consisted of his mother’s Christian faith, and the world of everything else. These two worlds confused and disturbed Augustine as a child. Augustine’s father was pagan and his mother was Christian, and they both wanted him to be very successful in the world....   [tags: philosophy, religion, The Confessions of St. Augus]
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Augustine's Confessions Paper - When one reads the word "confessions," one would not necessarily associate it with the word "narrative." Confessions seem to be more of something stated directly without any story-like element. They are also a more personal thing- one does not simply put them in a story form unless purposely intending to do so, because usually it is something that expresses guilt for something personal or is between the author and their conscience (or perhaps to themselves). However, there can always be an exception, like Augustine's Confessions....   [tags: Literacy Analysis ]
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1346 words
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The Movie American Beauty and Augustine Confessions - A stereotype of life is that when people are teenagers they go through a phase where they test the waters with their parents and start to rebel a bit. The teenager thinks he/she is all-knowing, which would be impressive since philosophers grasp for wisdom all of their lives, and think what their parents tell them is not relevant. The story in movies usually ends with the teenager having a revelation or growing up and realizing his parent’s were right and gains respect and love for them. In a sense he comes back home, which reflects the story of the Prodigal’s Son (Luke 15) in the Bible....   [tags: stereotypes, teenagers]
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1193 words
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Exploring St. Augustine of Hippo's Augustine Confessions - ... The fourth book has the story of his years among the Manichaeans, his attraction to astrology and the introduction to other philosophy books. The fifth book centers on his encounter with Faustus. Augustine realizes that Faustus couldn’t answer his questions, and therefore the Manichaeans doctrine left him unsatisfied. After his meeting with Faustus, Augustine flees to Rome where he meets Ambrose and later decides to become a Christian catechumen. The sixth book focuses on St. Augustine discovery of truth from Catholic doctrine....   [tags: autobiographical work] 836 words
(2.4 pages)
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Origin of Evil in The Confessions by Augustine - ... 330). This would mean that God had created evil things, which is in direct conflict with Gods good nature and evil is caused by the divine. Augustine ultimately rejected the Manichean ideals for Christian ideals which focus on human free will as the cause of what seems to be evil. Unlike the Manichean teachings Augustine once believed, the Saint developed a teaching in which evil does not truly exist and what humans call evil originates from free will, which allows them to make their own decisions....   [tags: evil, creations, free will] 783 words
(2.2 pages)
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Augustine's Treatment on God in the Confessions - CONDIMENT OR INGREDIENT: AUGUSTINE’S TREATMENT ON GOD IN THE CONFESSIONS “The desire for God is written in the human heart”, the Catechism states (n.27). In one way or another, human beings try to pinpoint out the ultimate reality of things, i.e. the composition of the universe, its, purpose, its goal, etc. At some point, their painstaking search somehow leads them out to a reality which, or Who, can possibly be the definitive, decisive, relational, communicatory factor of everything “under the sun”....   [tags: God, Religion, Divine Revelation]
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Augustine's Confessions - Augustine's Confessions The content of my paper will be an analysis of Augustine’s Confessions. I will focus on the first nine chapters of the book. First, I will write an introductory page about Augustine. Second, I will explain why Augustine wrote the Confessions and the importance of the Confessions as a philosophical work. I will analyze Augustine’s view of God and show the main theme of his book, which is, the sovereign God of grace and the sovereign grace of God. I will focus on Augustine’s view of God and His grace....   [tags: Papers] 1109 words
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The Confessions of Saint Augustine - Day after day, goals are set before us. Expectations for improvement or achievements. Objectives to accomplish tasks or simply to do nothing. Plans constructed to dictate how we are to live; how we are to speak, act, and think. These goals, whether consciously or subconsciously, are influenced by our worldviews. Throughout our lives, aims are in constant creation. Babies cry in order to secure the attention of the caretaker so that nutrients or a clean diaper may be obtain. Young children may fight over one another in hopes to play with a certain toys....   [tags: The God-Shaped Hole] 1359 words
(3.9 pages)
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Saint Augustine of Hippo’s Confessions - Saint Augustine of Hippo’s Confessions (398 C.E.) is a theological autobiography, what we would call today a conversion story. The book is an apologia, which means it is both a confession of faith as well as an account of a life. It is meant to be a testimony of faith and a defense of Christian doctrine. The book is not a biography in our modern sense of the term. The book is about the birth of faith. This is the heart of the book. Through the telling of his own life story -- the indiscretions of his youth, his experiment with Manichaeism, the birth of a child out of wedlock, his father Patrick who converted to Christianity only at his death bed, the persistent hope of his Christian mother M...   [tags: autobiography, apologia]
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1470 words
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The Path to True Happiness: Choosing Love over Desire - ... The war served as an opportunity for many to find honor and glory, as they could be gained through great, gallant deeds in battle. Achilles and Hector are both portrayed as great fighters seeing that their presence greatly affect a battle. Paris, on the other hand, must be dragged out of the city to fight in the war he instigated. Only when Hector “raked [him] with insults, stinging taunts” and shameful things about his character did he return to battle (6.384). Good social standing is essential to the fame and power that the heroes desire....   [tags: Homer's Iliad, Augustine's Confessions] 686 words
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Confessions by Augustine - Confessions by Augustine Truth and piety are two terms Augustine illustrates throughout his book Confessions. There are two types of truth: the truth found in God, but also the truth found in oneself. The truth found in and through God is quite obvious throughout the whole book. The other requires the reader to search deeply in the text. Augustine feels that if you develop self knowledge, then you can find truth. You have to be true to yourself and God. With self knowledge, you can reveal your true beliefs and pursuit in a religion that is fit for you....   [tags: Papers] 766 words
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TFF: True Friends Forever: Childhood Friend vs. Nebridius - ... Augustine writes, “For I had lured him from the true faith, which he had held in a thoroughly immature conviction, to the superstitious and baneful fables which my mother deplored in me” (The Confessions, Book IV, paragraph 7). Augustine and his childhood friend held the attitude of many young people trying to get away from their parents and community, rebelling against the faith and teachings of those that raised them. Augustine was one of those rebellious adolescents insistent on finding his own way in life and faith; the problem comes as he influences his friend to come with him on his journey....   [tags: The Confessions, Augustine]
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1596 words
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Saint Augustine’s Confessions Outline - Saint Augustine’s Confessions Outline This paper will outline specific points in Saint Augustine’s Confessions that highlight religious views following the fall of Rome. Though Augustines views on religion may not reflect that of most people in his time period, it still gives valuable insight into how many, namely Neoplatonists,, viewed God and his teachings. I. Book I a. Attributes of God Augustines first book is devoted to his early childhood and his reflections on human origin, memory, and desire....   [tags: Religion Religious] 1158 words
(3.3 pages)
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St. Augustine and the Problem of Evil from a Christian Basis - St. Augustine and the Problem of Evil from a Christian Basis In his Confessions, St. Augustine writes about a large number of topics that continue to have relevance today. The text documents the development of Augustine’s faith and his Christian philosophy, and one thing of particular interest is his argument for the nature of evil. Christianity predicates several important ideas that Augustine builds upon in his philosophy, and within its context, he presents a thorough, compelling argument against the problem of evil that identifies evil as a misperception....   [tags: Christianity, Confessions, St. Augustine]
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2416 words
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Love and Duty in Virgil’s Aeneid and Augustine’s Confessions - In his Confessions, Augustine relates that, in his school years, he was required to read Virgil’s Aeneid. The ill-fated romance of Aeneas and Dido produced such an emotional effect on him. Augustine says that Virgil’s epic caused him to forget his own “wanderings” (Augustine 1116). He wept over Dido’s death, but remained “dry-eyed to [his] own pitiful state” (Augustine 1116 – 7). Augustine later rejects literature and theater because he believes that they distract the soul from God. Nonetheless, Augustine shares many of the same experience as the characters in the Aeneid....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1593 words
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Augustine of Hipo's Ideas of Creation and Time in The Confessions - Augustine of Hippo writes extensively on his life, conversion, and learning in his spiritual autobiography The Confessions. After detailing his conversion, however, Augustine begins to explore topics of particular interest to him as a philosopher and theologian. One of the greatest reflections Augustine writes is contained in Book XI of The Confessions, in which Augustine reflects on the ideas of eternity and time. In this Book, Augustine addresses the concept of eternity, and how to define what is eternal and what is not....   [tags: autobiography, genesis, convertion]
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1999 words
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Cervantes’ Don Quixote and St. Augustine’s Confessions - Cervantes’ Don Quixote and St. Augustine’s Confessions Christianity teaches that in order to be able to truly serve God, one must give up worldly pleasures, which are deemed selfish. Throughout literature, many authors touch on this subject, some in very direct manners. Such is the case in Cervantes’ Don Quixote and St. Augustine’s Confessions. In excerpts from each, the narrator describes how he had undergone a change from relishing in worldly and selfish activities to renouncing such immoral pleasures in order to follow the moral path to God....   [tags: Cervantes St.Augustine quixote Essays] 1044 words
(3 pages)
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St. Augustine’s Confessions and The Bhagavad Gita - Confessions vs. Gita When ancient people look to understand religion, it is easier for them to relate to a higher power, also known as a god. Throughout the world and through time, there have been hundreds of different religions that have been established, and in the writings by people of these various groups there are often stories about conversation with the gods. This helps other people in understanding and conforming to the same beliefs. Two of such examples of this style of analyzing what gods are, are found in St....   [tags: essays research papers] 554 words
(1.6 pages)
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Excessive of Self-restraint in Saint Augustine’s Confessions - Excessive of Self-restraint in Saint Augustine’s Confessions When it comes to renunciation, "no pain, no gain" is what I've slowly, reluctantly, inexorably come to believe. And when Pete opted for scholarly monkhood, I think he was just trying to outsmart his pain. . . . He'd calculated that by considering the physical world "illusory" and burying his nose in metaphysical texts he could go on doing something comfortable--while his ignorance and sufferings and hometown and troublesome family just fell away like so much excess poundage....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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1701 words
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Rewinding Time - Life moves rapidly, often leaving a minimal amount of time to look back and ponder. Taking time to reflect is a choice one must make and can leave one refreshed, energized, and motivated. However, if done in the wrong way, reflection can lead to regret, depression, and discouragement. Reflection means to carefully consider or contemplate past events. Contemplation of previous occasions - specifically those occurring in one’s own life – is beneficial to one’s soul. Through reflection, beauty, joy, pain, and healing can emerge....   [tags: reflection, Saint Augustine, The Confessions]
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1420 words
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Confessions - Saint Augustine’s book Confessions talks about how increasing your knowledge through reading leads you through a “conversion” in which you begin to recall things and their relevance through memory. Socrates stresses the concept of increasing knowledge as a way to grow. Socrates also was the one who wanted to have a “field day” teaching Saint Augustine. Saint Augustine uses his life to display to us the way one’s quest for God should be like. He believed that one must begin their journey by first reading about God through books such as the Bible....   [tags: Saint Augustine Confessions Book Review Analysis] 1254 words
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Misrepresentation of Love - “Our hearts find no peace until they rest in you” (21). The return to God, the means of doing so, and the manners by which man is turned from him in the first place, are central themes in St. Augustine’s Confessions; a historical work serving as confession, praise, and examination of faith. Autobiographical in nature, Augustine’s work retells the story of his life and of his spiritual journey in retrospect, considering each event and its importance to the larger framework of his religious philosophy, a result of the merging of Neo-Platonist thought and Catholic theology....   [tags: Analysis, St. Augustine’s Confessions] 1879 words
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Confessions For the Rest of Us - Novels are written with the intent to entertain, textbooks to educate, and scripture to exhort. All writing has a purpose, intentional or otherwise. If this were not the case, writing would contain nothing of value. Autobiographies typically serve to inform the reader about the life of a specific person, yet, in Confessions, Augustine of Hippo displays loftier aims. Among other goals, he attempts to use his life story to indirectly guide others to God and truth, an objective to which he applies his considerable literary skill....   [tags: Literary Analysis, God, Augustine of Hippo ] 993 words
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St. Augustine Accepts Platonic Concept - ... We know that things are beautiful because it participates in the Form of Beauty. In Plato’s words, “if there is anything beautiful besides the Beautiful itself, it is beautiful for no other reason than that it shares in that Beautiful.” This Form of Beauty is invisible, eternal, and unchanging, unlike the things in the visible world that change and lose their beauty. The Theory of Forms envisions a whole world of things such as these, a world that exists outside of time and space. This is where Beauty, Justice, Courage, Temperance, and other things like it exist, where they remain untarnished by the changes and imperfections of the visible world....   [tags: philosophy, Christian Platonist, Confessions] 764 words
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God's Relentless Pursuit of St. Augustine - ... In a praise to God, Augustine himself describes this by saying, “steadfast in her fidelity, my mother had by this time rejoined me, for so completely did she trust in you that she had not feared to follow me over land and sea” (Saint Augustine 134). Once again, God uses Monica to relentlessly pursue Augustine. Without the vision, Monica, most likely, would have given up hope and would not have continued to seek after Augustine’s salvation. This shows how God works in such creative and indirect ways to pursue somebody when the more direct ways will not work....   [tags: the Confessions, philosophical analysis]
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819 words
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Augustine And Love - Augustine and Love Augustine states continuously that he was not yet in love, but was in love with love. This statement doesn't make sense to me. I don't believe that someone can be in love with something, if he or she doesn't understand what love is. "I was not yet in love, but I was in love with love, and from the very depth of my need hated myself for not more keenly feeling the need." (pg....   [tags: Augustine Analysis ] 1056 words
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A Review of Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo - A Review of Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo          Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo is a dense, scholarly work outlining the entire life of the Catholic bishop.  The University of California Press in Berkeley, California published the work in 1967.  My version was the 1973 second paperback printing, found in the University library.  Its smallish, scholarly, serifed, typewritten font allows for a instant respect for the subject matter:  the words are at first imposing, but then revealing as their serious tone complements the complexity of the text.  The pages are studded with footnotes, filling out this work with evidence of Brown’s exhaustive research.  There is a three-page preface bef...   [tags: Augustine Hippo] 1540 words
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Dante's Inferno and Saint Augstine's Confessions - “There must be contrast before there can be comprehension, we can realize good only through the ministry of evil (122 Blow).” Dante’s Inferno and Saint Augustine’s Confessions are both like the Bible, they both have some good advice but they are nothing more than someone’s vision. Augustine is able to give the reader a close experience of his journey through life, just as Dante carries the reader with him through his journey through hell. Both of these works paint a vivid picture of the expeditions of man through his search for a deeper spiritual connection....   [tags: the pursuit of heavenly grace] 1750 words
(5 pages)
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Biography of Augustine the African - Biography of Augustine the African Augustine was born in Tagaste (modern Souk Ahras, Algeria) in 354 and died almost seventy-six years later in Hippo Regius (modern Annaba) on the Mediterranean coast sixty miles away. In the years between he lived out a career that seems to moderns to bridge the gap between ancient pagan Rome and the Christian middle ages. But to Augustine, as to his contemporaries, that gap separated real people and places they knew, not whole imaginary ages of past and future....   [tags: Augustine Africa Emperors Essays] 5149 words
(14.7 pages)
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Augustines Confessions - Augustine’s Confession Augustine on his own view stole the fruit for the mere enjoyment of the sin and theft that the stealing involved. He says in (II,4) “Behold, now let my heart tell you what it looked for there, that I should be evil without purpose and there should be no cause for my evil, but evil itself. Foul was the evil, and I loved it.'; Augustine knew that what he was doing at the time of the crime but he did not care to think about the outcome of his actions....   [tags: essays research papers] 1392 words
(4 pages)
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Augustines "confessions" - Augustine's "Confessions" A philosophical question faces Christians, and in fact all theists, that challenges the belief in God. To theists, God is an omnipotent, perfect God. He is good. Theists accept this, and embrace it, for how else can they worship God and give their lives to Him unless He is good. However, n this world evil is constantly seen all around us. Because God is the author of all things in this world, and he is good, theists must then ask themselves what evil is and where it came from....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1509 words
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Reflecting on St. Augustine at ACS - ... Ambrose provided Augstine the tools for his conversion to Christianity. “The Odyssey,” “The Aenid,” and “The Inferno” explore literature and poetry by examining the heroes epic journeys. Odysseus, Aeneas, and Dante use adventures set upon by a greater force to achieve their own respective goals – whether it is to figure out how to get home or how to start a home or just who you are. These characters use their heroic personalities to overcome struggles to achieve their respective goals. These stories correspond with “The Confessions” because the book is full of questions that are confusing to understand....   [tags: personal journey] 1477 words
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Augustine and The Problem of Evil - In the beginning, God created the world. He created the earth, air, stars, trees and mortal animals, heaven above, the angels, every spiritual being. God looked at these things and said that they were good. However, if all that God created was good, from where does un-good come. How did evil creep into the universal picture. In Book VII of his Confessions, St. Augustine reflects on the existence of evil and the theological problem it poses. For evil to exist, the Creator God must have granted it existence....   [tags: God, Creation, Evil]
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The Theodicies of Augustine and Boethius - A foundational belief in Christianity is the idea that God is perfectly good. God is unable to do anything evil and all his actions are motives are completely pure. This principle, however, leads to many questions concerning the apparent suffering and wrong-doing that is prevalent in the world that this perfect being created. Where did evil come from. Also, how can evil exist when the only eternal entity is the perfect, sinless, ultimately good God. This question with the principle of God's sovereignty leads to even more difficult problems, including human responsibility and free will....   [tags: Christianity, Good, Evil] 771 words
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The Early Enlightenment of Augustine - ... This method was so highly praised due to those who came before Augustine the character, and had “laid out the hard paths that he was forced to follow” (Bk. 1, Ch. 9, Pg. 10). As well as being a slow learner, Augustine the character was also a sinner in the fact that he did not try as hard in school. This was not due to lack of memory or intelligence, but because he liked to play rather than learn. Therefore, this led to him being punished. Augustine the narrator goes on to question this logic by comparing it to adults and business....   [tags: Catholic faith, religious philosophy] 1174 words
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Transformation: Augustine's Journey to Christianity - You prompt us yourself to find satisfaction in appraising you, since you made us tilted toward you, and our heart is unstable until stabilized in you. Quintessentially, this quote from Confessions symbolizes Augustine’s perilous journey towards Christianity. Although appearing earlier in what is colloquially known as the “first autobiography”, Augustine expounds on this very idea throughout his writings. Whether that includes his attraction and disdain for Manichaeism or his affinity with Neo-Platonism, one could argue this quote acted as the foundation of his inquisitions of these pre-modern dogmatic sects....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Augustine and the Locus of Collective Memory - In the books X and XI of his Confessions, Augustine aims to tackle the intriguing questions of memory and time, respectively. His phenomenological as well as rigorous approach has attracted many later commentators. Also Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005) can be taken as one of these, although Ricoeur’s angle is decisively distinct from that of Augustine’s – it can be said to represent a certain “hermeneutical rationality”. By using Ricoeur’s material as a springboard, this paper aims to examine both the possibility and the locus of collective memory (part I) as well as Ricoeur’s reply to Augustine’s challenging question “quid est enim tempus?” (part II)....   [tags: hermeneutical rationality, Paul Ricoeur]
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St. Augustine: Thoughts on Good and Evil - Author Claudia Gray stated, “Self-knowledge is better than self-control any day” (Goodreads). Evil and sin exists in our world today and the temptation they bring bounds many human’s spiritual being. Finding the root of all evil is a hard and torturous concept to understand, but knowing one’s own free will helps bring understanding and deliverance from the evils of the world. Throughout the book Confessions Saint Augustine “ponders the concepts of evil and sin and searches the root of their being” (Augustine 15)....   [tags: religion, phylosophy, ]
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Philosophies of Augustine, Descartes, Arendt on Morality - Philosophical musings on the nature of morality are often expressed by thinkers who focus on human nature. Among the factors which determine human behaviour, a moral analysis of the concepts of right and wrong is often prominent. In investigating human behaviour through the relationship between reflection and action, this morality is often observed. Therefore, in the course currently entitled Human Sciences 101: Reflection and Action, both phiolosophy and morality are key themes. However, the calendar description for the course is as follows, “What is the relationship between thinking and action....   [tags: reflection, action, morality] 1413 words
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Perception of God and Evil by Augustine of Hippo - Augustine of Hippo (354-430) is among the most influential thinkers in Christianity. He contributed a great number of ideas and notions to Christian theology that would have lasting effect on belief systems in Christian churches. One of his most notable contributions is the notion of “original sin” and his concept of “evil.” These notions evolved over the years. Augustine traces their evolution in his Confessions, a thirteen-volume autobiography he wrote when he was in his forties. An essential part of Confessions is Augustine’s conversion to Christianity and his evolving understanding of good and evil....   [tags: manichaeism, good and evil, christianity]
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The Declassification of Faith: Viewpoints of Saint Augustine - Just as the Roman society began to fall into the hopelessness of philosophical skepticism, abandoning all pursuit of truth, the reputable Christian philosopher-theologian, Saint Augustine, reveals to the world in his book of Confessions, the hope of a foundational truth. Reflecting over the whole course of his life, Augustine honestly tells of all the mischief he caused as a child and the burdens of adulthood. He was smart and cunning as a boy, always being pressured by his father to excel in school where it was required for students to be proficient in reading and writing....   [tags: truth, writer, life, creative] 556 words
(1.6 pages)
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St. Augustine of Hippo, Bishop and Theologian - St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, was one of the greatest theologians of his time. He is still regarded in the highest manner. He was raised in a divided home, but through time he found the truth. He was always a superb student. He fully mastered Latin; however, he never grasped Greek. He was also very crafty in speech - a black-belt of rhetoric if you will. After his teenage flings and rebellions, he found a heretical sect in which he became involved for a while. He traveled and landed in Milan for a while where he met the bishop....   [tags: Biography]
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St. Augustine’s Pursuit of Solace - St. Augustine’s Pursuit of Solace In his autobiography, Confessions, Augustine gives a chronological, emotional, and religious based account of his journey in life as he progresses from his youth to adulthood. The various life experiences that occupy Augustine throughout his progression in life leave a lasting imprint on his personal beliefs. As such Augustine changes his character slowly from book to book. From his youth to his early twenties, Augustine pursues a hedonistic lifestyle in which he only pays attention to his bodily desires, and thus he unknowingly neglects the needs of his soul....   [tags: Autobiography Review] 1491 words
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St. Agustine and His Path to Christianity - As an adolescent, many experience different life style changes where they learn about their true nature. Parents usually call these instance phases. As a teen, Saint Augustine lived an immoral lifestyle. Although he was the son of a pagan father and Christian mother, St. Augustine experienced life on his own terms. Conflicting faiths and cultural values helped him grow from his past wicked ways and become one of the most influential advocates of Christianity. His most renowned work refers to Confessions, a spiritual journey into St....   [tags: Youth, Confessions] 639 words
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Augustine on Death - Augustine on Death Death is a very natural occurrence in life, and everyone experiences death differently, but yet in the same way. When Augustine was a young boy his father died, and he makes a small account of this in the Confessions. Later on in life, he loses a dear friend, and his loving mother. With time, he mentally matures and death affects Augustine differently each time. The death of his father was merely mentioned in the Confessions, while the death of Monica, his mother, was an elaborate detailed account of the time of her death....   [tags: Papers] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Confessions - Augustine titled his deeply philosophical and theological autobiography Confessions to implicate two aspects of the form the work would take. To confess, in Augustine's time, meant both to give an account of one's faults to God and to praise God (to speak one's love for God). These two aims come together in the Confessions in an elegant but complex sense: Augustine narrates his ascent from sinfulness to faithfulness not simply for the practical edification of his readers, but also because he believes that narrative to be itself a story of God's greatness and of the fundamental love all things have for Him....   [tags: essays research papers] 1003 words
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St. Augustine's Conversion to Christianity - St. Augustine's Conversion to Christianity Aurelius Augustinius, St. Augustine, was born in 354 A.D. in Tagaste, a town in North Africa. Born just over a century before the fall of Rome, Augustine would live his entire life within the Roman empire. Augustine was a great Christian thinker and wrote numerous works which survive today, and offer us a vivid glimpse into the period. His works and thoughts on Christ, the nature of God, the role of the Church, and myriad other topics, shaped much of medieval thought....   [tags: Papers] 1117 words
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Augustine´s View on the Origins of Sin, Grace, and Free Will - Augustine uses the genre of an autobiography to demonstrate his thoughts on how he ultimately accepted Christianity and his development as a Christian in his work, Confessions. The beauty of his book is that even though it is presented as an autobiography, the events depicted show the mysterious yet graceful acts of God and his journey through those very events. He presented many ideas, but focused primarily on his ideas of the origins of sin, grace, and free will. In some ways, Augustine describes a free will that cannot be understood without considering the nature of sin and grace....   [tags: christianity, catholicism, autobiography] 1195 words
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The Two Visions Of St. Augustine - A common thread of faith and reason runs through the two different theological visions of St. Augustine in his Confessions. This can be seen by comparing the ascent, the vision, the descent, and language in the two visions. Although other parts of the text will be referred to, the central part of these visions are as follows:Vision 1: "... in an instant of awe, my mind attained to the sight of the God who IS. Then, at last, I caught sight of your invisible nature, as it is known through your creatures....   [tags: essays research papers] 1061 words
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St Augustine and classical education - Saint Augustine and Classical Education In Saint Augustine’s deeply personal work, Confessions, he shares the story of his life up to his eventual conversion to the Christian faith. His odyssey through life is, at times, one of bitter inner conflict between his intellect and faith. Augustine’s classical education had a profound affect on the way he viewed the world, and eventually had a major affect on the way he approached Christianity. He is definitely an “intellectual” Christian, and viewed many aspects of his faith from this perspective....   [tags: essays research papers] 1028 words
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augustine - Augustine "I loved the happy life but I feared to find it in Your house and so I ran from it even as I sought after it. I thought that I would be miserable if I were kept from a woman's arms. I did not believe that a cure for this disease lay in Your mercy; I had no experience of such a cure. I believed that continence was within a man's own powers, though I was unaware of such a power within me. I was a fool and did not know - as it is written [in Scripture] - that no man can be continent unless You grant it to him....   [tags: essays research papers] 1535 words
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Knowledge Rather than Correct Opinion: Analyzing the Nature of Augustine’s Confession and Reflection - ... Correct opinion, in this sense is not stationary, and it only transforms to knowledge by recollection. Correct opinion is more like “temporary knowledge”, which seems superficial until evidence is found to support it. The concept of “tied down” is particularly interesting. Correct opinion does not belong to a person until that person him/herself manages to fully understand and explain the meaning of that opinion, which we then call knowledge. Therefore, knowledge, according to Socrates is of higher level than correct opinion, for it belongs to the person who owns it and does not vanish as time evolves....   [tags: Christianity, Truth]
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Saint Augustine - Many consider Saint Augustine of Hippo a main figure in the development of orthodox Christian doctrine during the early Christian Church. Augustine was born in Northern Africa in AD 354. His father was a pagan and his mother a Christian. Though his parents were not extremely well to do, they had enough money to allow Augustine to obtain an education in the liberal arts. This education will eventually affect how he sees Christianity, especially concerning the use of neo-Platonic ideas in Christian theology....   [tags: Biography] 1440 words
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Using Teachings of Augustine to Examine Life - "We who carry our mortality about with us, carry the evidence of our sin and with it the proof that you thwart the proud." (Augustine 39) This quote from the first book of Saint Augustine's "The Confessions" is a reflection of how Augustine brought Pagan meaning to interpret Christianity as a part of his life. In fact, it has direct correlation to the Holy Bible in the first letter of Peter: "God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble." (Peter 5:5) The parallel that lies between these two quotes is a manifestation of the parallel that lies between Augustine and Paul's theology....   [tags: World Cultures] 1124 words
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Comparing St. Augustine's and Jonathan Edwards' Views on the Origin of Sin - The origin of sin into the world is a theological topic that many theologians have expressed their views and thoughts. Of course, it is interesting for the theologians to guide the believers on how sin got into the world. This helps the believers in making cautious and informed decisions that may not lead them to wrong directions leading to sin. Although many theologians have given their views on this topic, my paper seeks to analyze comparatively the views of Saint Augustine and Jonathan Edwards....   [tags: religious phylosophy and beliefs]
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Saint Augustine’s View on Sexuality - Saint Augustine’s View on Sexuality The famous bishop of Hippo, St. Augustine, is claimed as a cornerstone of Christian theology by both Catholics and Protestants. Many of his views are regarded by Christians as authoritative interpretations of the Bible because they have withstood heated debate throughout the centuries. Christians ought to ask, however, whether such allegiance is justifiable in all cases. Augustine's idea of sex after matrimony, for example, is very narrow, restricting actions and emotions married Christians today consider part of the beauty of intercourse....   [tags: Religion]
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Plato and Augustine’s Conceptions of Happiness - Both Plato and Augustine offer unusual conceptions of what one must acquire to live a truly happy life. While the conventional view of happiness normally pertains to wealth, financial stability, and material possessions, Plato and Augustine suggest that true happiness is rooted in something independent of objects or people. Though dissimilar in their notions of that actual root, each respective philosophy views the attaining of that happiness as a path, a direction. Plato’s philosophy revolves around the attainment of eternal knowledge and achieving a metaphysical balance....   [tags: Philosophy Essays ]
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Innate Sin of Selfishness - ... In terms of food, it is lawful to eat as much as possible, but it is not necessarily beneficial. The inability to stop eating demonstrates that human nature is concerned with satisfying physical needs without restraint and without a care for the future. Augustine similarly concludes that the fulfilling of his sexual needs was his most natural tendency. Augustine says, Bodily desire, like a morass, and adolescent sex welling up within me exuded mists which clouded over and obscured my heart, so that I could not distinguish the clear light of true love from the murk of lust… I was tossed and spilled in the broiling sea of my fornication....   [tags: christianity, confessions, conrinthians] 1412 words
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Biography of St. Augustine of Hippo - ... However, Augustine did not start until 17, because his father had to save up for the expenses. During his time at Carthage, Augustine came to realize he developed passion for stage plays. From understanding plays, he realized that many of the students were “overturners.” These were students who claimed to have “wild actions with lack of discipline” (p.1230). Because he did not like this, he chose to set a goal and wanted to shine. He went on to read about the importance eloquence and then a book, Hortensius, written by Cicero to search for the truth....   [tags: Bishop, Christianity, Morals]
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Analysis of The Levels of Dante's Hell - ... Therefore, Augustine cannot be placed within this first circle of hell. The second circle of hell, a realm for those who fell victim of their carnal desires, is another level at which to place Augustine’s soul for he was consumed by lust in his pre-conversion days. He was encouraged by his family to learn the art of persuasion and making of fine speech when he was only sixteen. He used these skills, which he developed very well, along with his good looks to seduce as many women as possible. It was “in that sixteenth year of my life in this world, when the madness of lust....   [tags: hell, sins, augustine, dante] 872 words
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The Early Days of the Christian Church: Sin and Salvation - ... However, the medieval church replaced the view in favor of the view that children go to limbo. Additionally, he believed that sin takes over human will and we have no choice but to sin. As a result, whatever choices we make are sinful. Consequently, the choice to choose can only be restored by the Grace of God. Grace - Pelagian View Pertaining to grace, Pelagius believed grace does not change human will because humans have free will. He thought that humans could always overcome sin because God created us good....   [tags: god, christ, augustine, obedience] 1293 words
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From Fear to Love: Motivations in the Christian Search for God - With weary eyes, wretched souls, and wounded hearts, people pray to God for deliverance. Throughout salvation history, in times of suffering, grief, and strife, fear motivates people to seek refuge in God. Simultaneously, love inspires people to remain steadfast in God, trusting that, “All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well” (Julian 80). Both fear and love dynamically shape the Christian search for God. The following essay will, firstly, examine how Israel’s state of fear and oppression in Exodus, in contrast with John’s assurance of love, shapes understandings of God; secondly, explore how fear “pushes” and love “pulls” Augustine closer to God; thi...   [tags: augustine, Martin Luther]
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Freely Choosing Between the Divided House - One of the many questions that are raised in the discussion of the freedom of the will is the reason why we as humans do not love and have turned away from the highest good. According to Augustine’s philosophy, the chains or bonds of bad habits are self-forged by our divided will, also referred to as the divided house. In Book XII of “City of God” Augustine declares it pointless to look for the cause of the evil will. For the cause, he argues, is “deficient,” not “efficient.” Before I can discuss the issues of the divided will, I will explain what Augustine means by “deficient” as opposed to” efficient” cause as the cause of the divided will....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Augustine] 2232 words
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St. Augustine: A Man of Great Genius - Throughout the ages, there have been countless influences on not only social and political life, but on religious character and prevalence as well. Aurelius Augustine, who would eventually rise to the position of bishop in the early Catholic Church, was one of the most interesting characters that would surely leave his mark on the Roman Empire, especially in the few decades before the western part of the empire was to be taken over by Germanic tribes from the North. Perhaps, his most influential characteristic that history still records today, was his striking tenacity to preserve the Christian religion as it was ‘supposed’ to be and to spread that influence to all who walked the earth....   [tags: Theologians ]
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Compare and Contrast: Belief Systems - Compare and Contrast: Belief Systems The question that literature brings to all readers is what motivates a character to strive to overcome an obstacle. For some, it is to fit in society; still others, it is an individual goal. Whatever it is, it is a silent partner in the person’s makeup that cannot be identified with simple logic. Some define it as an emotion; still others, devotion. That force that makes people get up every morning to perform a great deed is based on their belief. According to University of Alicante: Department of Applied Mathematics....   [tags: Socrates, Augustine, Classical, Ancient World]
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Saint Augustine - Saint Augustine was born on 354 CE in Tagaste, Africa. His given name was Aurelius Augustinus. His father was Patricius, a pagan who was baptized Christian before he died, and his mother was Monica, a baptized Christian with an influential role in the life of her son. Augustine is regarded as one of the most intelligent Christian theologians and bishops of all time. His works and actions have left a major imprint on the Church and its doctrine. As a boy, Augustine was not baptized and grew up in the Roman Empire....   [tags: essays research papers] 973 words
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Saint Augustine - Saint Augustine Saint Augustine, b. Nov. 13, 354, d. Aug. 28, 430, was one of the foremost philosopher-theologians of early Christianity and, while serving (396-430) as bishop of Hippo Regius, the leading figure in the church of North Africa. He had a profound influence on the subsequent development of Western thought and culture and, more than any other person, shaped the themes and defined the problems that have characterized the Western tradition of Christian Theology. Among his many writings considered classics, the two most celebrated are his semi-autobiographical Confessions, which contains elements of Mysticism, and City of God, a Christian vision of history....   [tags: Papers] 704 words
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St. Augustine - Saint Augustine of Hippo Theologians, Biblical scholars and Christians all over the world often wrestle with two extremely important questions about their faith. These questions are, "What is God like?" and "How should we live in response to God?" Some feel that we need others to direct us, some feel we need them to challenge us, but everyone agrees that we need others. That is exactly how Saint Augustine struggles to find his faith and beliefs. He found it extremely difficult to come with a conclusion when it was staring at him straight in the face, but just as he did, we draw up our own conclusions with the guidance of others....   [tags: essays research papers] 919 words
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St. Augustin - From the analysis of St. Augustine Confessions and Beowulf, it is clear that the two authors, St. Augustine and the poet respectively, differ on their views of death, which helps to paint a better picture of the world that each writer lived in. In Augustine's writings, death plays a major role in life; it serves as the stepping stone to a greater existence in heaven. In Augustine's world, Christianity and God both play an important role in how death is viewed. In the poets writings we see a different perspective, one in which the time you spend on earth is of great importance; very little thought is given to life after death....   [tags: essays research papers] 1249 words
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Mythological Content in "Confessions of a Shopaholic" - In many movies today there is usually some form of mythological content. The movie doesn’t have to be related to mythology in any way, shape, or form. The movie Confessions of a Shopaholic is a movie that you would not expect to have any mythological content in it, but it does. In Confessions of a Shopaholic there is a definite hero archetype. This movie has the hero archetype in it because it fulfills all of the phases in Joseph Campbell’s study A Hero with a Thousand Faces. The first phase of Campbell’s study is Departure....   [tags: Confessions of a Shopaholic, movies, heroes, ] 1669 words
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Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister, by Gregory Maguire - In most fairytales, there is a character that stands out as a visionary; the one who defends happiness, and leads the way allowing others to find their destiny. This person usually has the will power to influence not only them self, but also has the ability to influence the person who seems to be the least likely to accept another’s view of the world, especially if they’re living in a world that is detached from everyone else's. In Gregory Maguire’s book, Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister, the visionary to see beyond her own sanity and look into the depths of another person’s chaos is Iris....   [tags: Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister]
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Augustine's Thoughts on Free Will - ... .customarily used by those who speak of it in connexion[sic] with the position of the stars when someone is conceived or born. . .” (Augustine, 201). In other words, fate is an empty and meaningless explanation for things we don't understand, and look to the stars for understanding. This is nothing like foreknowledge, which is just absolute knowledge of the future, whatever it may be, but is most definitely not the cause of what will be (198). In Augustine's eyes, this is what God has, the ability to see, not necessarily to cause....   [tags: free will, saint augustine, god]
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St. Augustine as the True Heir of Plato - Aristotle and St. Augustine have both been influenced by Plato. Their philosophy on morality, politics, and the purpose of life has been platonically influenced. St. Augustine is the true heir of Plato because he has taken Plato’s ideal state, and revealed the implications of the lives that the citizens of the earthly city lead, in the City of God. Plato’s state is an ideal state, that would not function in reality. St. Augustine has taken Plato’s notions, and have furthered the implications of living a life that strives towards a common good....   [tags: Aristotle and St. Augustine]
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False Confessions and the Norfolk Four Case - ``In criminal law, confession evidence is a prosecutor’s most potent weapon’’ (Kassin, 1997)—“the ‘queen of proofs’ in the law” (Brooks, 2000). Regardless of when in the legal process they occur, statements of confession often provide the most incriminating form of evidence and have been shown to significantly increase the rate of conviction. Legal scholars even argue that a defendant’s confession may be the sole piece of evidence considered during a trial and often guides jurors’ perception of the case (McCormick, 1972)....   [tags: confession evidence]
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Self-knowledge and the Sciences in Augustine's Early Thinking - Self-knowledge and the Sciences in Augustine's Early Thinking ABSTRACT: The idea of a firm connection of the seven artes liberales came first into being in Augustine's early concept of education (I. Hadot). Whereas this idea has been analyzed primarily in view of its philosophical sources, this paper is supposed to clarify its internal logic. The main feature of Augustine's concept is the distinction between the two projects of a critique of reason and of a metaphysics, and the coordination of these projects within a treatise on theodicy....   [tags: Augustine Philosophy Philosophical Essays]
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Creation and Augustine vs. Evolution and Charles Darwin - In this philosophical scientific research paper, I will proceed as follows. First I will address the pros and cons of creation and evolution. Second, I will analyze the philosophical scientific causes of this issue in light of St. Augustine and Charles Darwin. Last I will infer my own results and therefore propose some scientific suggestions. Many people have asked the question, where did we come from. According to creationists a higher power, or “God” created the universe. Some believe that “God” started off the universe and let it form by itself....   [tags: Creation, Augustine, Evolution, Charles Darwin,]
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The Self-hatred of Kochan in Confessions of a Mask - The Self-hatred of Kochan in Confessions of a Mask In his semi-autobiographical novel, Confessions of a Mask, Yukio Mishima examines the struggle for acceptance by a man living outside of the socially accepted norms. A motif that strongly pervades this novel is death and the images of blood associated with it. Kochan, a Japanese adolescent living in post-war Japan, struggles with his homosexuality and his desire to be "normal." In order to survive, he must hide behind a mask of propriety. At a young age, Kochan shows signs of being attracted to male beauty....   [tags: Confessions Mask Essays] 712 words
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