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Teaching The Confessions of St. Augustine - Teaching The Confessions of St. Augustine ABSTRACT: Augustine's passionate and immensely personal account of his conversion has enthralled readers for centuries. Unfortunately, the passion and personal nature of the writing can stand as a barrier to comprehension, especially when the text is taught at the undergraduate level. Add to this the fact that the work has the character of one long and substained prayer to God, contains many passages that are tediously introspective, and refers to a time and place that are foreign to today's undergraduates, the task of helping students to understand and appreciate the work is daunting, to say the least....   [tags: The Confessions of St. Augustine]
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3949 words
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St. Augustine’s Confessions - St. Augustine’s Confessions St. Augustine is a man with a rational mind. As a philosopher, scholar, and teacher of rhetoric, he is trained in and practices the art of logical thought and coherent reasoning. The pursuits of his life guide him to seek concrete answers to specific questions. Religion, the practice of which relies primarily on faith—occasionally blind faith—presents itself as unable to be penetrated by any sort of scientific study or inquiry. Yet, like a true scientist and philosopher, one of the first questions St....   [tags: St. Augustine Confessions Philosophy Essays] 1939 words
(5.5 pages)
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Confessions - Saint Augustine’s book Confessions talks about how increasing your knowledge through reading leads you through a “conversion” in which you begin to recall things and their relevance through memory. Socrates stresses the concept of increasing knowledge as a way to grow. Socrates also was the one who wanted to have a “field day” teaching Saint Augustine. Saint Augustine uses his life to display to us the way one’s quest for God should be like. He believed that one must begin their journey by first reading about God through books such as the Bible....   [tags: Saint Augustine Confessions Book Review Analysis] 1254 words
(3.6 pages)
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Augustine’s Journey to the Truth in The Confessions of St. Augustine - ... As a boy at school, he would find it hard to discipline himself and would often criticize his teachers for making him read fictional stories. Other than the teachings from his mother, Augustine felt like he was malformed at an early age. This behavior carried into adolescences, as he was addicted to sex. He also had an episode where he and a few friends stole pears from someone else’s pear tree out of mischief. This was an act of rebellion and he then compared this act to that of Adam and Eve....   [tags: philosophy, religion, The Confessions of St. Augus]
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967 words
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Augustine's Confessions - Augustine's Confessions The content of my paper will be an analysis of Augustine’s Confessions. I will focus on the first nine chapters of the book. First, I will write an introductory page about Augustine. Second, I will explain why Augustine wrote the Confessions and the importance of the Confessions as a philosophical work. I will analyze Augustine’s view of God and show the main theme of his book, which is, the sovereign God of grace and the sovereign grace of God. I will focus on Augustine’s view of God and His grace....   [tags: Papers] 1109 words
(3.2 pages)
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Confessions by Augustine - Confessions by Augustine Truth and piety are two terms Augustine illustrates throughout his book Confessions. There are two types of truth: the truth found in God, but also the truth found in oneself. The truth found in and through God is quite obvious throughout the whole book. The other requires the reader to search deeply in the text. Augustine feels that if you develop self knowledge, then you can find truth. You have to be true to yourself and God. With self knowledge, you can reveal your true beliefs and pursuit in a religion that is fit for you....   [tags: Papers] 766 words
(2.2 pages)
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Augustine And Love - Augustine and Love Augustine states continuously that he was not yet in love, but was in love with love. This statement doesn't make sense to me. I don't believe that someone can be in love with something, if he or she doesn't understand what love is. "I was not yet in love, but I was in love with love, and from the very depth of my need hated myself for not more keenly feeling the need." (pg....   [tags: Augustine Analysis ] 1056 words
(3 pages)
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Confessions - Augustine titled his deeply philosophical and theological autobiography Confessions to implicate two aspects of the form the work would take. To confess, in Augustine's time, meant both to give an account of one's faults to God and to praise God (to speak one's love for God). These two aims come together in the Confessions in an elegant but complex sense: Augustine narrates his ascent from sinfulness to faithfulness not simply for the practical edification of his readers, but also because he believes that narrative to be itself a story of God's greatness and of the fundamental love all things have for Him....   [tags: essays research papers] 1003 words
(2.9 pages)
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Augustine's Confessions Paper - ... And finally through his story, use his conversion and change as a way to praise God to show that even someone who "strayed off" the path was able to redeem themselves and how merciful and good God is to accept someone even as sinful as he was. To bring this all together, Augustine uses details and parallels between some biblical references to furthermore bring out this narrative-style writing and make it interesting to read. For example, when Augustine is in Milan sitting under the fig tree, he was heavily troubled and was laying prostrate under the tree until he had an epiphany of the clarity and purpose that he was seeking (Merriman 1)....   [tags: Literacy Analysis ]
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augustine - Augustine "I loved the happy life but I feared to find it in Your house and so I ran from it even as I sought after it. I thought that I would be miserable if I were kept from a woman's arms. I did not believe that a cure for this disease lay in Your mercy; I had no experience of such a cure. I believed that continence was within a man's own powers, though I was unaware of such a power within me. I was a fool and did not know - as it is written [in Scripture] - that no man can be continent unless You grant it to him....   [tags: essays research papers] 1535 words
(4.4 pages)
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Biography of Augustine the African - Biography of Augustine the African Augustine was born in Tagaste (modern Souk Ahras, Algeria) in 354 and died almost seventy-six years later in Hippo Regius (modern Annaba) on the Mediterranean coast sixty miles away. In the years between he lived out a career that seems to moderns to bridge the gap between ancient pagan Rome and the Christian middle ages. But to Augustine, as to his contemporaries, that gap separated real people and places they knew, not whole imaginary ages of past and future....   [tags: Augustine Africa Emperors Essays] 5149 words
(14.7 pages)
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Saint Augustine’s Confessions Outline - Saint Augustine’s Confessions Outline This paper will outline specific points in Saint Augustine’s Confessions that highlight religious views following the fall of Rome. Though Augustines views on religion may not reflect that of most people in his time period, it still gives valuable insight into how many, namely Neoplatonists,, viewed God and his teachings. I. Book I a. Attributes of God Augustines first book is devoted to his early childhood and his reflections on human origin, memory, and desire....   [tags: Religion Religious] 1158 words
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A Review of Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo - A Review of Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo          Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo is a dense, scholarly work outlining the entire life of the Catholic bishop.  The University of California Press in Berkeley, California published the work in 1967.  My version was the 1973 second paperback printing, found in the University library.  Its smallish, scholarly, serifed, typewritten font allows for a instant respect for the subject matter:  the words are at first imposing, but then revealing as their serious tone complements the complexity of the text.  The pages are studded with footnotes, filling out this work with evidence of Brown’s exhaustive research.  There is a three-page preface before the work, and, after the work, a seventeen-page bibliography, and ten-page index....   [tags: Augustine Hippo] 1540 words
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Plato and Augustine’s Conceptions of Happiness - Plato and Augustine’s Conceptions of Happiness Both Plato and Augustine offer unusual conceptions of what one must acquire to live a truly happy life. While the conventional view of happiness normally pertains to wealth, financial stability, and material possessions, Plato and Augustine suggest that true happiness is rooted in something independent of objects or people. Though dissimilar in their notions of that actual root, each respective philosophy views the attaining of that happiness as a path, a direction....   [tags: Plato Augustine Happiness Essays Philosophy]
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Cervantes’ Don Quixote and St. Augustine’s Confessions - Cervantes’ Don Quixote and St. Augustine’s Confessions Christianity teaches that in order to be able to truly serve God, one must give up worldly pleasures, which are deemed selfish. Throughout literature, many authors touch on this subject, some in very direct manners. Such is the case in Cervantes’ Don Quixote and St. Augustine’s Confessions. In excerpts from each, the narrator describes how he had undergone a change from relishing in worldly and selfish activities to renouncing such immoral pleasures in order to follow the moral path to God....   [tags: Cervantes St.Augustine quixote Essays] 1044 words
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St. Augustine’s Confessions and The Bhagavad Gita - Confessions vs. Gita When ancient people look to understand religion, it is easier for them to relate to a higher power, also known as a god. Throughout the world and through time, there have been hundreds of different religions that have been established, and in the writings by people of these various groups there are often stories about conversation with the gods. This helps other people in understanding and conforming to the same beliefs. Two of such examples of this style of analyzing what gods are, are found in St....   [tags: essays research papers] 554 words
(1.6 pages)
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Excessive of Self-restraint in Saint Augustine’s Confessions - Excessive of Self-restraint in Saint Augustine’s Confessions When it comes to renunciation, "no pain, no gain" is what I've slowly, reluctantly, inexorably come to believe. And when Pete opted for scholarly monkhood, I think he was just trying to outsmart his pain. . . . He'd calculated that by considering the physical world "illusory" and burying his nose in metaphysical texts he could go on doing something comfortable--while his ignorance and sufferings and hometown and troublesome family just fell away like so much excess poundage....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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1701 words
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Augustine and the Problem of Evil from a Christian Basis - Augustine and the Problem of Evil from a Christian Basis In his Confessions, St. Augustine writes about a large number of topics that continue to have relevance today. The text documents the development of Augustine’s faith and his Christian philosophy, and one thing of particular interest is his argument for the nature of evil. Christianity predicates several important ideas that Augustine builds upon in his philosophy, and within its context, he presents a thorough, compelling argument against the problem of evil that identifies evil as a misperception....   [tags: Augustine Evil Religion Christianity Essays]
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2418 words
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Confessions For the Rest of Us - ... Augustine went to great lengths to achieve this image, especially in the commencement of his narration. He begins by hyperbolizing his sin even in childhood stating, “At the time of my infancy, I must have acted reprehensibly” (Augustine 9), and continues this pattern of self-degradation throughout, not out of false humility, but to prove to his audience that he was not born a saint. Augustine spends greater time than necessary covering his ‘sin’ of stealing pears (Augustine 29-34), an act that most would consider a childish prank, and his sexual desires (in which he certainly was not the greatest sinner of his time) not only to explore the nature of transgression but also to build his reputation (or lack of it) with his reader (Augustine 24-28)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, God, Augustine of Hippo ] 993 words
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Augustines Confessions - Augustine’s Confession Augustine on his own view stole the fruit for the mere enjoyment of the sin and theft that the stealing involved. He says in (II,4) “Behold, now let my heart tell you what it looked for there, that I should be evil without purpose and there should be no cause for my evil, but evil itself. Foul was the evil, and I loved it.'; Augustine knew that what he was doing at the time of the crime but he did not care to think about the outcome of his actions....   [tags: essays research papers] 1392 words
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Augustines "confessions" - Augustine's "Confessions" A philosophical question faces Christians, and in fact all theists, that challenges the belief in God. To theists, God is an omnipotent, perfect God. He is good. Theists accept this, and embrace it, for how else can they worship God and give their lives to Him unless He is good. However, n this world evil is constantly seen all around us. Because God is the author of all things in this world, and he is good, theists must then ask themselves what evil is and where it came from....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Love and Duty in Virgil’s Aeneid and Augustine’s Confessions - ... Augustine considers his greatest sin to be the sin of lust. He is held fast by the chains of love and its physical pleasures. Augustine says that his “one delight was to love and be loved” (Augustine 1118). As an adolescent he “could not distinguish the white light of love from the fog of lust” (Augustine 1118). There is a difference between love and lust. Love is pure and noble; lust is a base desire. Augustine went to study at Carthage, “where a cauldron of illicit loves leapt and boiled about [him]” (Augustine 1121)....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Augustine on Death - Augustine on Death Death is a very natural occurrence in life, and everyone experiences death differently, but yet in the same way. When Augustine was a young boy his father died, and he makes a small account of this in the Confessions. Later on in life, he loses a dear friend, and his loving mother. With time, he mentally matures and death affects Augustine differently each time. The death of his father was merely mentioned in the Confessions, while the death of Monica, his mother, was an elaborate detailed account of the time of her death....   [tags: Papers] 1185 words
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Saint Augustine - Many consider Saint Augustine of Hippo a main figure in the development of orthodox Christian doctrine during the early Christian Church. Augustine was born in Northern Africa in AD 354. His father was a pagan and his mother a Christian. Though his parents were not extremely well to do, they had enough money to allow Augustine to obtain an education in the liberal arts. This education will eventually affect how he sees Christianity, especially concerning the use of neo-Platonic ideas in Christian theology....   [tags: Biography] 1501 words
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Saint Augustine - Saint Augustine was born on 354 CE in Tagaste, Africa. His given name was Aurelius Augustinus. His father was Patricius, a pagan who was baptized Christian before he died, and his mother was Monica, a baptized Christian with an influential role in the life of her son. Augustine is regarded as one of the most intelligent Christian theologians and bishops of all time. His works and actions have left a major imprint on the Church and its doctrine. As a boy, Augustine was not baptized and grew up in the Roman Empire....   [tags: essays research papers] 973 words
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Saint Augustine - Saint Augustine Saint Augustine, b. Nov. 13, 354, d. Aug. 28, 430, was one of the foremost philosopher-theologians of early Christianity and, while serving (396-430) as bishop of Hippo Regius, the leading figure in the church of North Africa. He had a profound influence on the subsequent development of Western thought and culture and, more than any other person, shaped the themes and defined the problems that have characterized the Western tradition of Christian Theology. Among his many writings considered classics, the two most celebrated are his semi-autobiographical Confessions, which contains elements of Mysticism, and City of God, a Christian vision of history....   [tags: Papers] 704 words
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St. Augustine - ... However, he stayed with the sect for nine years. He then began looking for a religion that would be philosophically relevant. Augustine began to travel with his teaching career. He went to Carthage where he taught rhetoric. The custom of the day was to pay at the end of the year after the student had received all the instruction. Because of this custom, Augustine got cheated out of his money. Therefore he left and went to Rome. In Rome, he became a professor of rhetoric again. In Rome he could watch debates and other things of this sort....   [tags: Biography]
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St. Augustine - Saint Augustine of Hippo Theologians, Biblical scholars and Christians all over the world often wrestle with two extremely important questions about their faith. These questions are, "What is God like?" and "How should we live in response to God?" Some feel that we need others to direct us, some feel we need them to challenge us, but everyone agrees that we need others. That is exactly how Saint Augustine struggles to find his faith and beliefs. He found it extremely difficult to come with a conclusion when it was staring at him straight in the face, but just as he did, we draw up our own conclusions with the guidance of others....   [tags: essays research papers] 919 words
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St. Augustine's Conversion to Christianity - St. Augustine's Conversion to Christianity Aurelius Augustinius, St. Augustine, was born in 354 A.D. in Tagaste, a town in North Africa. Born just over a century before the fall of Rome, Augustine would live his entire life within the Roman empire. Augustine was a great Christian thinker and wrote numerous works which survive today, and offer us a vivid glimpse into the period. His works and thoughts on Christ, the nature of God, the role of the Church, and myriad other topics, shaped much of medieval thought....   [tags: Papers] 1117 words
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The Two Visions Of St. Augustine - A common thread of faith and reason runs through the two different theological visions of St. Augustine in his Confessions. This can be seen by comparing the ascent, the vision, the descent, and language in the two visions. Although other parts of the text will be referred to, the central part of these visions are as follows:Vision 1: "... in an instant of awe, my mind attained to the sight of the God who IS. Then, at last, I caught sight of your invisible nature, as it is known through your creatures....   [tags: essays research papers] 1061 words
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Transformation: Augustine's Journey to Christianity - ... With respect to that, not only does it introduce him to God’s benevolence, it instructs him on how to change his daily prayer routines, and even, his fervor towards loving God. In addition, Hortensius also altered Augustine’s perception of philosophy, as it instructs him to use his passion for knowledge as a means of advancing his effort towards understanding God. Although Augustine’s finds a renewed sense of intellectual purpose through the ideas conveyed in Hortensius, it only fuels his need to broaden his knowledge, so much to the point where his first contact with dogmatism is realized....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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St Augustine and classical education - Saint Augustine and Classical Education In Saint Augustine’s deeply personal work, Confessions, he shares the story of his life up to his eventual conversion to the Christian faith. His odyssey through life is, at times, one of bitter inner conflict between his intellect and faith. Augustine’s classical education had a profound affect on the way he viewed the world, and eventually had a major affect on the way he approached Christianity. He is definitely an “intellectual” Christian, and viewed many aspects of his faith from this perspective....   [tags: essays research papers] 1028 words
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St. Augustine’s Pursuit of Solace - St. Augustine’s Pursuit of Solace In his autobiography, Confessions, Augustine gives a chronological, emotional, and religious based account of his journey in life as he progresses from his youth to adulthood. The various life experiences that occupy Augustine throughout his progression in life leave a lasting imprint on his personal beliefs. As such Augustine changes his character slowly from book to book. From his youth to his early twenties, Augustine pursues a hedonistic lifestyle in which he only pays attention to his bodily desires, and thus he unknowingly neglects the needs of his soul....   [tags: Autobiography Review] 1491 words
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Saint Augustine’s View on Sexuality - Saint Augustine’s View on Sexuality The famous bishop of Hippo, St. Augustine, is claimed as a cornerstone of Christian theology by both Catholics and Protestants. Many of his views are regarded by Christians as authoritative interpretations of the Bible because they have withstood heated debate throughout the centuries. Christians ought to ask, however, whether such allegiance is justifiable in all cases. Augustine's idea of sex after matrimony, for example, is very narrow, restricting actions and emotions married Christians today consider part of the beauty of intercourse....   [tags: Religion]
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St. Augustine: A Man of Great Genius - ... It was this Augustine who was confused, and such a bewildered being that would procreate a child with a concubine, no less. What is astonishing for such a man who was lost in both his faith and his emotions, was his ability to latch onto his wits long enough to make it through rhetorical college, before his spiraling aspirations of faith would make the best of him. His first religious adventure, as he could not grasp his mother’s piety, was his adherence to Manichaeism. This teaching can be described as “envisaging the world as the product of a struggle between two co-equal and co-eternal powers of Light and Darkness—a struggle which would not be ended until the end of time, when both would be finally separated and the world destroyed in a great conflagration” (Bonner 1963, 58)....   [tags: Theologians ]
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Using Teachings of Augustine to Examine Life - "We who carry our mortality about with us, carry the evidence of our sin and with it the proof that you thwart the proud." (Augustine 39) This quote from the first book of Saint Augustine's "The Confessions" is a reflection of how Augustine brought Pagan meaning to interpret Christianity as a part of his life. In fact, it has direct correlation to the Holy Bible in the first letter of Peter: "God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble." (Peter 5:5) The parallel that lies between these two quotes is a manifestation of the parallel that lies between Augustine and Paul's theology....   [tags: World Cultures] 1124 words
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Misrepresentation of Love - ... He is of an intangible and unfathomable realm, capable of being everywhere and nowhere. He has no limitations of body, mind, matter, or time because He is of the purely spiritual world. Furthermore, any attempt to pin God down to the physical realm, be it through language, description, or other means, distorts one’s conception of God. While these things might be helpful to help one to begin to fathom God’s nature, one must be careful to remember that God’s nature is not within these words and descriptions....   [tags: Analysis, St. Augustine’s Confessions] 1879 words
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Freely Choosing Between the Divided House - ... However, by turning to those things with the wrong reason may have caused The First Sin, the devil choosing himself over God. Free will was given to angels and with that the devil first sinned. A sin not caused by anything but rather a deficient cause (having no good being in it). To better understand this concept let us consider the following example: a mother gave her son a car out of love and desire that her son will use it for good. Unfortunately, he, being full of pride, takes advantage of this privilege, drives recklessly, crashes the car, and gets himself paralyzed....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Augustine] 2232 words
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St. Augustin - From the analysis of St. Augustine Confessions and Beowulf, it is clear that the two authors, St. Augustine and the poet respectively, differ on their views of death, which helps to paint a better picture of the world that each writer lived in. In Augustine's writings, death plays a major role in life; it serves as the stepping stone to a greater existence in heaven. In Augustine's world, Christianity and God both play an important role in how death is viewed. In the poets writings we see a different perspective, one in which the time you spend on earth is of great importance; very little thought is given to life after death....   [tags: essays research papers] 1249 words
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Divine Comedy - St.Augustine in Dante’s Inferno - St.Augustine in the Inferno It is hard to place St. Augustine within just one of the levels of Dante’s hell for his sins were varied and not great. Today many of his sins are commonplace. For example, most people attempt to better their own lives without regard of others. They attempt to increase their standard of living and gain more worldly possessions. They are neither good nor evil but are just trying to make a living and keep up in today’s fend-for-yourself society. Before Augustine’s conversion, this was his goal....   [tags: Divine Comedy Inferno Essays] 1160 words
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America's Ultimate Concern - America's Ultimate Concern There are only a handful of universal truths to be found, and sex is one of them. Other than life, death, and the need for food, shelter, & society, sex and all that it entails is a fundamental and pervasive fact of human existence. Augustine knew of sex all too well. He guiltily wallowed in & enjoyed it for the majority of his life. When it comes to sex, Augustine was not very different than the millions of Americans who live today, some 1,500 years after him. The world is made up of approximately 7 billion males and females, all of whom are genetically and culturally wired to procreate and/or enjoy the pleasures that the sexual experience provides....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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Philosophy - Interpreting Plato Alfred North Whitehead once remarked that all of philosophy is but a footnote to Plato. This proves true in the case of St. Augustine’s Confessions, where he specifies Plato’s good as God by personalizing the forms, Eros, sin, and recollection. Specifically, Augustine’s idea of “original sin,” forgetfulness and recollection follow the philosophy of Plato, bringing them into the “God realm,” rather leaving them in a figurative sense open for interpretation. In the Confessions, Augustine says that “the soul commits fornication when it is turned away from you and, apart from you, seeks such pure, clean things as it does not find except when it returns to you” (2.6.14)....   [tags: essays research papers] 1130 words
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The Essence Of a Soul - Since the dawn of man, humans have always wanted to seek out the truth. Man has pondered and explored great thoughts and concepts that have caused much confusion. Perhaps the one question that has plagued man the most is what exactly is a soul. During the Roman Era, people believed in many gods, spirits, and life after death. As time progressed, different religious beliefs arose, and new sects of faith were established. The belief in one God replaced the belief in many gods and the belief of one's soul transforming into the after life was established....   [tags: World Literature] 645 words
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What Is Required To Be A Good Christian - What is required to be a good Christian. Such strong language seems to indicate a rejection of the body, of human relationships, of human reason, or any good which is not God. Is such a rejection required if one is to be a true Christian. Human relationships, the body, and human reason are presupposed to be good in Ms. Kreis's statement. Although Saint Augustine, the author of Confessions, would not consider those to be of the highest good (God), he would be hard-pressed to deny that each does not maintain some degree of good....   [tags: Religion Christian] 1872 words
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Evil and Sin - ... The slothful, those who failed to cultivate their love inhabit the next level (Alighieri 189-199), and finally the sins of avarice, gluttony, and lust, characterized by loving something good too strongly, are found near the top (Alighieri 203, 237, 266). It is clear that Dante did not yield to the simplistic view that all sin emanates from some evil power and is somehow beyond our control. Dante saw sin in our very nature – love. In canto seventeen he explains, “Not the Creator nor a single creature, as you know, ever existed without love, the soul's love or the love that comes by nature” (Alighieri 185)....   [tags: Religion Philosophy]
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The God and Evil Problem - The God and Evil Problem A strong argument against the existence of a Christian God is contained in the theodicy problem. The existence of suffering is not compatible with an omniscient, omnipotent, omni benevolent superior being. An all-knowing being would be aware that suffering is and always will be in existence; an all-powerful being would be able to prevent suffering; and a perfectly good being would desire to end suffering. Many Christian thinkers have sought to justify this contradiction, and one of the most common counterarguments to the theodicy problem is contained in the free-will defense....   [tags: Religion Christianity Free Will Essays Papers]
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A Study of the Pelagian Controversy - ... When the two are together Jerome asks Augustine about the teaching of Pelagius and Celestius. Augustine informs Jerome of the synod of Carthage and tells of some of his writings in refutation of Pelagian teaching. In the same year Jerome wrote his Dialogues against Pelagius in Bethlehem. During his time in Palestine Pelagius had won the confidence of Bishop John of Jerusalem who was an opponent of Jerome. The controversy over the teachings of Pelagius caused a synod to be called in Jerusalem which was presided over by Bishop John....   [tags: Christianity]
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Evil and Sin - ... By loving the wrong thing or loving a good one too much or not enough humans sin. Purgatory was created to right our absent or misguided affections (Alighieri 187). Further on, Dante expounds on the concept of corrupted love. By sentencing various offenses to different punishments, he clarifies his hierarchy of sin. Those found the farthest from heaven are those whose love was directed towards something harmful - the proud, envious and wrathful (Alighieri 104, 136, 147). The slothful, those who failed to cultivate their love inhabit the next level (Alighieri 189-199), and finally the sins of avarice, gluttony, and lust, characterized by loving something good too strongly, are found near the top (Alighieri 203, 237, 266)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Dante Alighieri] 1461 words
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Definition Of Good And Evil - Throughout human existence, questions have arisen concerning the nature of good and evil. Many scientist, philosophers, and theologians have been intrigued by these questions. Through Augustine’s Confessions and E. O. Wilson’s In Search of Nature, one is accessible to two distinct perspectives concerning the nature of good and evil. Augustine sets up an argument in his Confession that attempts to define evil. God is the author of everything. Augustine says, “nothing that exists could exist without You [God]” (Book I, Chapter II)....   [tags: essays research papers] 813 words
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The Quest for the Good - The Quest for the Good Is the Good something concrete to be obtained, or is it a way of life unique to individuals. This question is asked most assuredly in a biased manner, directing us along a path to the answer. It raises many logical questions of how, exactly, the Good is framed, and what it means to live a good life. To do this, an understanding must be found of what exactly the Good is. The questions of how the Good is structured and what the Good is are intricately tied together, and as such both shall be explored....   [tags: Essays Papers] 4185 words
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The Metaphysical One in Platonic and Augustinian Thoughts - The Metaphysical One in Platonic and Augustinian Thoughts The legacy of Plato left its distinctive brand of influence on St. Augustine's beliefs and writings, of this there is no doubt. In Confessions, Augustine himself professed that it was the Platonic books that enabled him to attach himself to his God. However, it is evident that Augustine re-augmented much of the Platonic thoughts and, combining them with the early Christian doctrines, configured the hybrid into what became the foundation of Catholicism....   [tags: Philosophy Essays] 2190 words
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Love as a Higher Form - Love as a Higher Form Love has always been a sensation that has both mystified and captured humanity. It is a unique emotion and, while it means something different to everybody, it remains to all a force that is, at its purest form, always one step above mankind. In love’s ability to exist differently from person to person, one can find love to be a conglomeration of different branches. It can be said that there are six such categories: Agape, a love which sets store on physical attraction in order to remain all-giving and intense; Eros, a love based on high passion; Storge, a love that is friendship-based and down to earth; Pragma, the searching for a partner to build a life with; Ludus, a love that is low on emotional feeling and high on sexual tendencies (often involving several partners); and Mania, a type of love that dwells on jealousy and possessiveness while creating an experience of great emotional highs and lows (Gayton v)....   [tags: essays research papers] 1213 words
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Beyond the Problem of Evil - Beyond the Problem of Evil Introduction: The problem of evil is, in my opinion, the best point of departure for a fruitful dialogue between Christianity, traditionally conceived, and those strands of modern philosophy which have been perceived--indeed, have sometimes perceived themselves--as a threat to that tradition. As such, I will attempt first, to outline the problem of evil in the starkest terms possible, presenting Augustine's approach to its solution followed by a critical analysis; second, to present an alternative approach to the questions which give rise to the problem--an approach derived in large part from Spinoza and Nietzsche; and, third, to show how this more philosophically acceptable alternative can be expressed in the categories of faith, allowing us to reappropriate the tradition *beyond the problem of evil*....   [tags: Papers] 6492 words
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John 11:35 Analysis - The empathy that Jesus held for mankind was never so well summarized in the bible as in John 11:35. Christ’s emotions were narrated very rarely in the Gospel. For the large part of his ministry Christ spent his time teaching instead of expressing his emotions. Christians have for years come to one of three conclusions about why Jesus wept. The first was that Christ (being human) was in fact emotionally disturbed by his friend’s death. Second that Christ mourned with his friends to comfort them. Or that Christ, was disturbed by his friends lack of faith in him....   [tags: Christianity] 1583 words
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The Composition of a True Christian - ... It was after Mother Theresa found her calling, “in abolishing herself, by virtue of that unique Christian transformation, manifested in the Crucifixion and the Resurrection, whereby we die in order to live” (Muggeridge, 16). It is this self-denial that leads Christians to live out God’s purpose for them, rather than their own. Likewise, change involves identifying one’s sinful habits and changing them to righteous ones. Before Wilberforce had his conversion experience, he “had reckoned his money and time his own, to do with as he pleased, and had lived accordingly” (Metaxas, 63)....   [tags: Christianity ]
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Freaks of the Core - Freaks of the Core Wherein lies the odd attraction and power of the freakish. Just as often as it introduces us to expressions of common human experience, study in the Humanities also introduces us to the decidedly uncommon--to writers, artists and thinkers who push conventional limits of language and narrative, vision and imagination, memory and history, or logic and rationality. For our Freaks of the Core colloquium, we explored the outer limits of human expression and experience. What, we asked, defines the abnormal or the outlandish....   [tags: Essays Papers] 592 words
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The Absurdity of Consumeristic Truth - The Absurdity of Consumeristic Truth Imagine a world devoid of a God, where tangible objects and experiences such as clothing and movie watching have come to define and fulfill an entire society. Imagine a culture lacking any philosophical truth, where each individual is running wildly about in their isolated schedules, gleaning comfort and love from any inanimate object that can provide such, in whatever shape or form. Imagine a world where imperfect humans turn to themselves in the search for perfection, and the ultimate source of perfection is blatantly denied for the simple reason that it is too perfect to be understood....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1693 words
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The Purpose of Love - ... The triad was the original notion that man was governed by an absolute. This absolute connected with man through nature. The triad eventually shifted to the diad; the absolute was dropped, God was no longer a figure for guidance. It was simply man and nature. The monad arose with autonomy. Now it was man and his mind interacting and living in society. From St. Augustine, society was given a new method of seeking the good, of reaching the end goal of being happy. In his Confessions, he has an inward turning, a self-understanding of his true self, and then directs his self upwards, towards God, in order to reconnect with nature....   [tags: Philosophy Reasoning]
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The Aim of Human Life - The Aim of Human Life What is the aim of human life. Tolstoy ponders this thought in his Confessions. His philosophy was that the aim was a union with God. A lack of faith was death as shown in his quote from the Confessions, as quoted by Stumpf (Elements, 549). The rational knowledge brought to me the recognition that life was meaningless, -my life stopped, and I wanted to destroy myself. When I looked around at people, at all humanity, I saw that people lived and asserted that they knew the meaning of life....   [tags: Papers] 2114 words
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Elements of Interreligious Dialogue in The Waste Land - Elements of Interreligious Dialogue in The Waste Land “The House Of His Protection The Land Gave To Him That Sought Her Out And Unto Him That Delved Gave Return Of Her Fruits” -Engraved above the Western-most door of Joslyn Art Museum Beyond all doubt, T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” is one of the most excruciating works a reader may ever attempt. The reading is painful to the point of exhaustion for the poetry-lover as he scrutinizes the poem pericope by pericope. However, all this suffering (self-inflicted or otherwise) suggests that the author has likewise labored over the poem, emptying himself into his work--pericope by pericope....   [tags: Waste Land Eliot papers] 3037 words
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The Problem of Loneliness - The Problem of Loneliness In theology class, loneliness was defined as the experience of being disconnected, unrelated, or cut off from the Other. The Other is something that fulfills a dimension of the human person, that pushes one to enter into relationships, be it with God or another human. In core humanities we examined St. Augustine’s spiritual autobiography, The Confessions of St. Augustine, and credited him with defining the concept. However, many other writers since Augustine’s time have also worked with this notion of loneliness....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 850 words
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Bruner and Wittgenstein: Language Learning - Bruner and Wittgenstein: Language Learning A crucial phase in the child's development comes with its acquisition of language, but before we can engage in any pedagogical efforts to further infant development or to aid atypical cases, we need to understand methodologically what occurs during language learning. Jerome Bruner, in a methodological adaptation of Ludwig Wittgenstein's middle and later work in an extension of Noam Chomsky's LAD, has put forth one influential proposal (Bruner 1983). Ludwig Wittgenstein's own remarks on the topic also furnish an interesting story independent of Bruner's selective use of his corpus, especially insofar as his approach results in an irreducible riddle and a hypothesis by his own account (Wittgenstein 1953 and 1958)....   [tags: Psychology Children Communication Papers]
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Legacy of Rome and Christianity - Legacy of Rome and Christianity Christianity came into existence almost 2000 years ago. Christianity, like Judaism, rose from obscurity to become the dominant religion of Western culture. Christianity also became the dominant faith of Rome at the end of fourth century A.D. (Matthews 157.) Both Christianity and Rome influenced Europe in a number of ways. Christianity soon became the greater part of the empire. Between 284 and 476, Roman civilization went through two stages. One stage involved Diocletian's reforms -- paganisms last pinnacle, and the second part, when the empire began to fall after Constantine's reign -- the vibrant Christian age....   [tags: Papers History] 913 words
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The Philosophical Investigations - The Philosophical Investigations ABSTRACT: The Philosophical Investigations is an inherently pedagogical work. Wittgenstein claims throughout his later writings to be teaching a method and this method is both philosophical and pedagogical. It is the claim of this paper that if we do not take Wittgenstein's methodological claim seriously, we do not engage with the text in the manner for which it was written. Consequently, we begin and end in the wrong places and the text becomes (in the words of Wittgenstein) 'variously misunderstood, more or less mangled and watered-down.' §1 is philosophically and pedagogically complex....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Papers]
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The Art Of Torture - The Art of Torture Going by the title of this paper you are probably asking yourself “How in God’s name can torture be seen as an art, were these people mentally ill?” well it was, but I talk about that later, let me tell you a little about the history of torture. Torture has been around since the times of Ancient Greece and is still around today, usually in the Mafia. Other than the mob, torture isn’t very common in our society. Punishments aren’t near as harsh as they used to be back in medieval times....   [tags: History Punishment society Essays]
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Waste Land Essay: Love and Sex - Love and Sex in The Waste Land      Attitudes toward love and sex are one of the major themes of the poem. The introduction to "The Waste Land" in The Norton Anthology of English Literature states that "This is a poem about spiritual dryness," and much of this spiritual dryness relates to the nature of the modern sexual experience (although there are also other aspects of spiritual dryness the introduction also notes that major themes include a lack of a "regenerating belief" that gives "significance and value to people" and a type of death that "heralds no resurrection")....   [tags: T.S. Eliot Waste Land Essays]
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A Thematic Unity for Heidegger's Was Heisst Denken? - A Thematic Unity for Heidegger's Was Heisst Denken. ABSTRACT: This essay is primarily an analysis of Heidegger's Was Heisst Denken. I aim to provide a thematic unity for this enigmatic text, thereby rendering Heidegger's thoughts on thinking more available to those investigating the nature of human rationality and thinking. The procedure is to gather together some of the sundry themes and puzzling features resolved by unpacking this sentence: 'Most thought-provoking in our thought-provoking time is that we are still not thinking.' The chief results of this study include the establishment of a global logic to the text, the identification of 'being-thoughtful' as the proper phenomenon to be studied, and receptivity ('listening for what calls for thinking') as the distinguishing mark of the thoughtful....   [tags: Heidegger Was Heisst Denken Essays]
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The Aeneid by Virgil - The Aeneid by Virgil In Virgil’s famous text The Aeneid he writes about the history of the coming of Rome and the journey of its Trojan founder, Aeneas, from the wreckage of his old home at Troy. While this text is extremely supportive of the greatness of the Roman Empire, it also has a distinctly private second voice that talks about loss. We also find that in Confessions by Saint Augustine the author at times addresses God very personally, and at other times does not refer to him much at all....   [tags: Greek Gods Shipwreck Essays]
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Plotinus on The One and the Good - Plotinus on The One and the Good In Ennead VI, 9, Plotinus discusses the nature of The One with respect to goodness, and particularly the supreme concept of goodness, which he calls the Good. The One is a model for the highest virtue or principle; however, we find that it is difficult to characterize The One in such a way because Plotinus explains that it supercedes all description that we attribute to it. While Plotinus’ account of The One is an interesting argument that develops somewhat logically, in the end, it becomes difficult to reconcile the lack of qualities of The One with Plotinus’ claim that it is the cause of existence....   [tags: Plotinus The One Good Essays] 2120 words
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Why Did People React So Strongly to Witchcraft in History? - Why Did People React So Strongly to Witchcraft in History. Throughout history, people’s reactions to witchcraft have started mass panic, hysteria, disturbing witch trials, and countless executions and hangings. Witchcraft was once and still can be a very controversial topic, as it challenges other’s religions and beliefs and is against Christianity. Back when the Church was the main source of authority and guidance, reactions to witchcraft were particularly strong and heated, as there are even bible quotes ordering the instant death of any witch or wizard....   [tags: Witchcraft] 1868 words
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Can Education be Classical and Christian? - ... Origen (c. 185-250) became head of the catechetical school in Alexandria at the age of seventeen or eighteen. Educated in both the Scriptures and Greek literature himself, Origen urged others to continue this practice. He compared this classical, Christian education to the Israelites plundering Egypt before the Exodus, a comparison which continued to be repeated by future generations as they pondered a classical, Christian education. In his analogy, he demonstrated that the gold and silver of the pagan Egyptians was used to make the holiest vessels in the tabernacle (178)....   [tags: Informative, Church Schools] 1352 words
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Ludwig Wittgenstein - ... Thus, sentences are only meaningful if they correspond to facts in the world. This led Wittgenstein, a religious man himself, to believe that statements of ethics, religion, aesthetics and metaphysics are not meaningful as they are non-factual. For example, ‘The Mona Lisa is beautiful’, ‘Humans deserve equal rights’ and ‘God is our Father’ aren’t propositions at all as they don’t tell us anything, they are neither true or false. He acknowledges that the sentences of the Tractatus are not meaningful either as they speak about the relationship between language and the world rather than describing facts in the world....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Transcendentalism in Beowulf and Antigone - Transcendentalism in Beowulf and Antigone As time progressed through the various ages, Ancient to Renaissance, a trend began to form in the literature. The Ancient periods, reflected in the writings of the Taoists and the Greeks, were basically a time of transcendentalism. The gods of this era were treated almost as if they are friends to the people, or advisors; the gods controlled their fates and the uncontrollable, but the people were still very individualistic. As time progressed forwards, a trend swept Europe towards a period of theism, where the god or gods are treated as father figures; the gods controlled the lives of all their people just as parents control their children, even, as Martin Luther stated, with an attitude of fear....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 2094 words
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Self Discovery - Self Discovery “What are you going to do after you get your degree?”Whenever I announce my occupation, this trite, well-intentioned question never fails to follow. I am a student, a senior at Metro, studying Literature and History. Not only a student, I am a mother, wife, daughter, sister, friend and female. No, I don’t bring in a paycheck, but my life is fulfilling, gratifying, deserving and challenging. Will I teach, write, join the downtown business crew again, or become a clerk in the bookstore....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays]
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Modernism in T.s. Eliots's the Wasteland - Modernism in T.S. Eliot's "The Wasteland" Modernism has been defined as a rejection of traditional 19th-century norms, whereby artists, architects, poets and thinkers either altered or abandoned earlier conventions in an attempt to re-envision a society in flux. In literature this included a progression from objectivist optimism to cynical relativism expressed through fragmented free verse containing complex, and often contradictory, allusions, multiple points of view and other poetic devices that broke from the forms in Victorian and Romantic writing, as can be seen in T.S....   [tags: Poetry] 891 words
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Education Throughout the Many Centuries - Education Throughout the Many Centuries How could one possibly get through life without learning something new about one thing or another. That is what is considered getting an education. Learning about life, about the world and about how to be an individual. Dating from ancient Rome through the central Middle Ages, education has taken on many different forms, but one thing always stayed the same. Education has always been a vital part of society and the general way of life. In the early centuries of existence, education was in the form of religious awakening....   [tags: Papers] 899 words
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