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Plato's The Republic: Analysis of the Chapter Entitled "Allegory of the Cave" - One of the world’s most revered philosophers, Plato, was born in 428 BC. As a young man, Plato, became a devout student of Socrates. Plato quickly adopted Socrates’ teachings and turned his studies toward the question of virtue and noble character. After the execution of his beloved mentor, Plato founded the first English university called the Academy. He wanted thinkers to have a place were they could word toward better government for Greek cities. Over the duration of his life Plato wrote many books, and his most influential work is The Republic....   [tags: The Republic, Plato] 582 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Republic By Plato - "The Republic" by Plato The Republic written by Plato examines many things. It mainly is about the Good life. Plato seems to believe that the perfect life is led only under perfect conditions which is the perfect society. Within the perfect society there would have to be justice. In the Republic it seems that justice is defined many different ways. In this paper I am going to discuss a few. First I am going to discuss the reason why Glaucon and Adeimantus see justice as being a bad thing and it is better to live a unjust life....   [tags: Republic Justice Plato Essays] 1084 words
(3.1 pages)
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Justice in Plato´s The Republic - In book four of Plato's “The Republic” Socrates defines justice in the individual as analogous to justice in the state. I will explain Socrates' definition of justice in the individual, and then show that Socrates cannot certify that his definition of justice is correct, without asking further questions about justice. I will argue that if we act according to this definition of justice, then we do not know when we are acting just. Since neither the meaning of justice, nor the meaning of good judgement, is contained in the definition, then one can act unjustly while obeying to the definition of justice....   [tags: Plato's The Republic]
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565 words
(1.6 pages)
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Model of Justice in Plato's The Republic - Model of Justice in Plato's The Republic In what is perhaps his most well-known text, The Republic, Plato explores the fundamental concept of justice, how it is observed in the world, and its application to the lives of men. When he identifies the good in Book VI, which is reality and knowledge in their true forms, Plato also describes the visual world of shadows and false reality that people perceive and is cast by the sun. What follows from these definitions is that, while justice is a concept that exists autonomously from injustice and other fleeting conditions, injustice requires justice to be a medium for it to exist, develop, and spread itself....   [tags: Republic Plato Philosophy]
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1719 words
(4.9 pages)
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Observations on the Writing Profession in The Republic by Plato - Questioning of the Writing Profession Plato’s The Republic For all the time today’s students spend learning to write well, Plato is skeptical of those who spend their lives crafting words. In the tenth chapter of The Republic, Socrates condemns poets as imitators. In the dialogue that bears his name, Phaedrus wonders whether words in the constructed rhythms of speech or poetry will obscure Truth, the philosopher’s ultimate goal. Speech-writing is just the clever use of rhetorical device, poetry is faulty imitation, and both empty voices can deceive us....   [tags: Plato's Republic Essays]
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1406 words
(4 pages)
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Plato’s Theory of The Soul in The Republic - Plato’s Republic introduces a multitude of important and interesting concepts, of topics ranging from music, to gender equality, to political regime. For this reason, many philosophers and scholars still look back to The Republic in spite of its age. Yet one part that stands out in particular is Plato’s discussion of the soul in the fourth book of the Republic. Not only is this section interesting, but it was also extremely important for all proceeding moral philosophy, as Plato’s definition has been used ever since as a standard since then....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Plato, Republic]
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1754 words
(5 pages)
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Plato’s Republic and the Just War Theory Versus Humanitarian Intervention - American involvement in humanitarian intervention is one of the most controversial issues in contemporary US foreign policy. The definition of humanitarian intervention is a military intervention; entering into a country for the purposes of saving lives and protecting citizens from the violation of their human rights. As in all debates, there are always two sides. One side disputes that military force should only be applied when, in the words of former Secretary of Defense Weinberger, ‘a vital national interest is at stake.’ ¹ The opposing side disputes that the US should apply military force to mediate when in the words of former president Clinton, “someone comes after innocent civilians…an...   [tags: plato, republic, war]
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1033 words
(3 pages)
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Plato's The Republic and Aristophanes The Birds - Plato's The Republic and Aristophanes The Birds      It is evident, by Plato's The Republic and Aristophanes The Bird's, that one's vision of an ideal state is not the same mystical utopia. Plato's Republic is an well-ordered society that emphasizes the development of the community, which leads to its people believing in this philosophy. Cloudcuckooland, the idea of two lazy Athenians, is an unorganized society that lacks the substance to make it a workable society. I would much rather live in the organized Republic to the unorganized Cloudcuckooland....   [tags: Plato Republic Aristophanes Birds Essays] 1197 words
(3.4 pages)
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Justice In Plato's The Republic - Justice In Plato's The Republic Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote “One man’s justice is another’s injustice.” This statement quite adequately describes the relation between definitions of justice presented by Polemarchus and Thrasymachus in Book I of the Republic. Polemarchus initially asserts that justice is “to give to each what is owed” (Republic 331d), a definition he picked up from Simonides. Then, through the unrelenting questioning of Socrates, Polemarchus’ definition evolves into “doing good to friends and harm to enemies” (Republic 332d), but this definition proves insufficient to Socrates also....   [tags: Plato Republic Justice Philosophy Essays] 999 words
(2.9 pages)
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Human Nature and Moral Theory in Plato’s Republic - Human Nature and Moral Theory in Plato’s Republic In Chapter 2 of Republic, Glaucon uses the Myth of the Lydian Shepherd to portray a pessimistic view of human nature. Plato, the author of Republic, uses his brother Glaucon to tell the Myth of the Lydian Shepherd. We are led to believe that Plato takes the myth and its implications on human nature very seriously by use of a personal character. The argument, originally given by Thrasymachus, contends that at the root of our human nature we all yearn for the most profit possible....   [tags: Plato Republic]
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1916 words
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Plato’s Republic: Justice and Injustice in Thrasymachus' Account - Plato’s Republic: Justice and Injustice in Thrasymachus' Account ABSTRACT: This paper has a two-fold task. First, I show that there are three types of individuals associated with the Thrasymachean view of society: (a) the many, i.e., the ruled or those exploited individuals who are just and obey the laws of the society; (b) the tyrant or ruler who sets down laws in the society in order to exploit the many for personal advantage; (c) the "stronger" individual (kreittoon) or member of the society who is detached from the many and aspires to become the tyrant....   [tags: Plato Republic]
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6573 words
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Justice in Plato's Republic - Justice in Plato's Republic Justice. What is justice. In this world where many people look out only for themselves, justice can be considered the happiness of oneself. But because selfish men do not always decide our standards in society, to find a definition, society should look at the opinions of many. Just as in the modern society to which we live, where everyone feels justice has a different meaning, the society of Plato also struggled with the same problem. In this paper, I will look into the Republic, one of the books of Plato that resides heavily on defining an answer to the meaning of Justice, and try to find an absolute definition....   [tags: Papers Justice Plato Republic Essays] 971 words
(2.8 pages)
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Plato’s View of Division of Labor in Plato’s Republic - Plato’s view of division of labour is divided into three types of peoples’ task in life which are workers as farmers, military type and guardians. Actually, the ruling task of Plato’s Republic is the guardian’s responsible who had achieved the greatest wisdom or knowledge of good. Due to that, Plato claims that “philosopher must become kings or those now who called kings must genuinely and adequately philosophise’’ (Nussbaum1998, p.18). However, people argue about the reasons that the philosopher should rule the city, while the philosophers prefer to gain knowledge instead of power, thus they don’t seek this authority....   [tags: Plato, Divisions of Labor, Plato’s Republic, Repub] 981 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Importance of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic - The Importance of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic      Dr. Malters’s comments: This student does two things quite remarkable for an undergraduate student. In his compact essay, not only does he display an in-depth understanding of complex perspectives on justice put forth by the protagonist Socrates, he deftly explains how Plato has artfully made rude objections by a seemingly minor character early in the dialogue function as a structuring device for nearly all the important ideas examined thereafter....   [tags: Plato Republic Essays]
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932 words
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Plato's Republic - Plato's Republic In Plato’s Republic, Glaucon is introduced to the reader as a man who loves honor, sex, and luxury. As The Republic progresses through books and Socrates’ arguments of how and why these flaws make the soul unhappy began to piece together, Glaucon relates some of these cases to his own life, and begins to see how Socrates’ line of reasoning makes more sense than his own. Once Glaucon comes to this realization, he embarks on a path of change on his outlook of what happiness is, and this change is evidenced by the way he responds during he and Socrates’ discourse....   [tags: Plato Republic Glaucon Essays] 1033 words
(3 pages)
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Justice and Moderation of the Soul in The Republic, by Plato - In his philosophical text, The Republic, Plato argues that justice can only be realized by the moderation of the soul, which he claims reflects as the moderation of the city. He engages in a debate, via the persona of Socrates, with Ademantus and Gaucon on the benefit, or lack thereof, for the man who leads a just life. I shall argue that this analogy reflecting the governing of forces in the soul and in city serves as a sufficient device in proving that justice is beneficial to those who believe in, and practice it....   [tags: The Republic Essays]
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3023 words
(8.6 pages)
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The Republic of Plato - Plato and Aristotle were both very influential men of there time bringing vast knowledge to the world. I honestly believe that Democracy does a lot of good but it definitely has some common side effects. Out of all of Plato's significant ideas, his best was the idea of democracy opening political decisions to the majority who cannot think on behalf of the community. Aristotle on the other hand is very optimistic when it comes to democracy so it becomes a rather interesting compare and contrast between these to men....   [tags: democracy, aristotle, corrupt souls] 1306 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Republic by Plato - ... I agree with what Plato says, the reasoning for this is simple, if you take out of someone’s life, the gold, silver, family, why would they commit selfish acts. The answer is they wouldn’t, they would rule purely for the good of their citizens. Now to transition to the way democracy is ran today, in my eyes democracy today is filled with greed of politicians taking bribes from various people in the political system, not the way Plato’s ideal society is ran. The next problem I observe with democracy is it gives power to self-interest people, within a democracy self control and moderation disappear thus anarchy takes the place of the soul....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 1423 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Republic by Plato - Wisdom, courage, moderation and justice are four essential virtues the ideal state must be built upon, as explained by Socrates in Plato’s Republic. Throughout the eight books of Socratic dialogue the ideal state and ideas of justice are debated, on both individual and state levels. The guidelines for a perfect state and how it will come about are thoroughly described. Socrates covers every aspect of political life and how it should work stating that “until power and philosophy entirely coincide… cities will have no rest form evils” ....   [tags: Socrates, Caractersitics] 1211 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Republic by Plato - In Plato’s Republic Book 1, Thrasymachus argues that morality is the advantage of the stronger. To support his view, Thrasymachus first claims that the governments, which are the stronger parties, always pass laws based on their own interest, and then argues that subjects must always obey these laws, therefore morality is the advantage of the stronger. Socrates gives two sets of counter arguments. First, by differentiating apparent advantage and actual advantage to the stronger, Socrates argues that the obedience to the laws by the subjects can be occasionally not in the actual interest of the rulers....   [tags: Thrasymachus' Morality, ruling party]
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1661 words
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The Republic of Plato - In Book one of the Republic of Plato, several definitions of justice versus injustice are explored. Cephalus, Polemarchus, Glaucon and Thracymicus all share their opinions and ideas on what actions they believe to be just, while Socrates questions various aspects of the definitions. In book one, Socrates is challenged by Thracymicus, who believes that injustice is advantageous, but eventually convinces him that his definition is invalid. Cephalus speaks about honesty and issues of legality, Polemarchus explores ideas regarding giving to one what is owed, Glaucon views justice as actions committed for their consequences, and Socrates argues that justice does not involve harming anybody....   [tags: Cephalus, Polemarchus, Glaucon]
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1279 words
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The Republic, by Plato - Plato’s ideal society is one that depends on the just actions of its people. In his utopia, all men and women are able to maximize their potential and in turn utilize their talents and skills for the good of all. Happy citizens form a happy society. This perfect society has been both praised and criticized on the basis of some radical elements it possesses: The citizens of Plato’s ideal society are able to curb their self-interest, and because they are happy, or at least psychologically conditioned to believe that they are, these people choose to join in the collective effort and submit to the philosopher-king’s rule for the benefit of all....   [tags: Reflection, Utopia, Conditioning] 894 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Importance of Education in The Republic by Plato - ... To achieve a good soul, people must first understand the soul and this is achieved through learning. Another reason for his concern, is that education is what led to the creation of the idea of specialization which has allowed for humanity to grow at an increasing rate. This is because it gives everyone in society a specific role and allows people to focus on what they’re good at instead of having everyone try to do everything and be self-sustainable. Although he never quite directly links these two, they are both parts of his founding principles for the city....   [tags: Dialogue, Learning, Socrates] 1069 words
(3.1 pages)
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Attaining Virtue in The Republic of Plato - ... In this way it is the same for the city, for in the city, wisdom lies with the guardians as they are the philosophers. The guardians are put in charge of the city because of their knowledge of how the city should be run. Because of this, the Guardians wisdom becomes the City’s. (Book IV) The second virtue that must be attained is courage. For the Individual, courage must be in the soul to resist temptations, and to be ready to fight. The same is for the collective, for in the city courage lies with the auxiliaries, as the auxiliaries are the ones who will defend the city and fight its enemies....   [tags: courage, wisdom, justice] 704 words
(2 pages)
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Socrates' Aim in "The Republic of Plato" - From the very beginning of The Republic of Plato it has been Socrates’ aim to prove to Adeimantus and Glaucon, why men lead just lives. In order to thoroughly explain his point of view as we now know Socrates went about setting up his city of thought. Through the formation of the city of thought we are first introduced to Socrates idea of what his ideally just city would be like and how it would be formed. We are from the formation of this completely just city introduced us to the minds of the “philosopher-kings” who are to be the rulers of Socrates’ city....   [tags: Philosophy] 932 words
(2.7 pages)
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Education in The Republic of Plato - The educated have a duty to help the less educated in a respectful way. Education, Every society throughout history has respected their scholars and scientists, but what responsibilities do the educated have. Some might argued that the educated must take care of the less educated or that they have no civic duty, however according to the famous Greek philosopher Plato this is simply not true. Plato was born around the year 428 BCE in Athens and was one of Socrates students; Socrates being another very influential Greek scholar laid the foundations for many of Plato’s theory’s that appear in his famous work “The Republic” (http://www.egs.edu/library/plato/biography/)....   [tags: analogy of the cave, death] 904 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Republic of Plato: The Debate - Thrasymachus, Polemarchus, Cleitophon, and Socrates’ heated debate over the nature of justice in Book 1 of The Republic of Plato comes to an intriguing point of argument wherein both parties go back and forth over justice being the “advantage of the stronger”(15). It is clear that Socrates presents a more sound and logical counterargument as he calls upon the duties and abilities of professionals in their fields and how they benefit not only themselves but humanity at large as well. His skill in argument serves him well and the clear victor in the debate as the textual evidence is easily observable both in Plato’s presentation of the squabble and in Thrasymachus’ responses....   [tags: Greek Literature] 1393 words
(4 pages)
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The Republic by Plato - Introduction The Republic began in 508 BC and lasted for 483 years. The office of the Praetor came about in 367 BC. The functions of the praetor were to aid the civil law, done through the grant of rights of actions for the enforcement of civil claims and to help the consuls in the day-to-day administration of justice. In 242 BC, thirty years later, another praetor was added, thus there were two praetors. The praetor urbanus had jurisdiction to decide cases and administer justice among Roman citizens whilst the praetor peregrinus had to take care of cases between citizens and foreigners, and foreigners amongst themselves....   [tags: roman state, the praetor]
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1590 words
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The Republic by Plato - The Republic by Plato At the beginning of Book I, we are introduced to the narrator, Socrates, and his audience of peers. We are made aware, however, of Socrates' special charm and intellectual gifts through the insistence of Polemarchus and the other men for the pleasure of his company. The tone is casual and language and modes of expression rather simple, as is commonly the case in Plato's dialogues. However, Plato's unaffected style serves at least two purposes. For one it belies the complexity and elevation of the ideas, thus it is in accord with Socrates' characteristic irony itself, which draws the "fool" in by feigned ignorance, only so that the master can show that he does...   [tags: essays research papers] 5382 words
(15.4 pages)
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Plato's Explanation of an Ideal State in his Work, The Republic - What is the ideal state. This question has sparked debate since the very formation of organized political society. In Plato’s The Republic, Plato seeks to define justice and in doing so he seeks to explain the ideal just state. In Plato’s explanation of an ideal state, there is an extreme emphasis on unity and harmony. The reason unity and harmony are so important to Plato are because they are responsible for bonding together Plato’s ideal state and protecting it from tyranny. Plato explains at great length the framework which ties together the individual soul with the ideal political society....   [tags: The Republic] 1874 words
(5.4 pages)
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The Dimensions of Morality in The Prince and The Republic of Plato - Morality is likely the most debated topic of all time, especially in regards to our moral responsibility for each other. Throughout history many writers and philosophers have taken different angles the concept of morality and have applied it in many ways. This includes: Niccolò Machiavelli with The Prince (we will be looking at The Qualities of the Prince) and Plato with The Republic (we will be looking at the section The Allegory of the Cave. The Prince (1513) essentially lays out a how-to guide of how to obtain power and how to keep it; The Qualities of the Prince contains a list of qualities that one should appear to have while in power; this work will be used to represent the case agains...   [tags: philosophy, allegory of the cave]
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1016 words
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The Allegory of the Cave by Socrates and The Republic of Plato - In my paper I will address the interdisciplinary relationship between the Western philosopher Socrates’ in the Allegory of the Cave, an excerpt from Republic by Plato, and the Eastern mystic Paramhamsa Yogananda’s Autobiography of a Yogi. I will examine Yogananda’s Autobiography through the Platonic monocle and reason on why there are flaws in the allegory and how that can be corrected by adopting bifocals that combines both. The objective of this is to inspect, delve, and widen Socrates’s perspective that there are extra factors that relate to the steps that lead up to the light....   [tags: autobiography, prisoners, philosophy]
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1500 words
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Plato's Ideas About Philosopher Kings Depicted in Republic - In Plato's most famous work 'Republic' he puts forward the view that only the study of philosophy would allow man to see what was good and just. Therefore to cure the ill's of society it would be necessary to either make kings philosophers or make philosophers kings. I intend to show how Plato justifies this view and then attempt to point out some possible problems with this justification and to forward my own view that 'the people' should ultimately be king. Plato's starting point was his recognition that justice was one of four cardinal virtues, along with wisdom, courage and moderation, that when working harmoniously together in a high level of order - he felt equalled the elusive 'good l...   [tags: Republic] 1710 words
(4.9 pages)
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Beauty and Love in the Republic of Plato - ... He claims that any object’s beauty is determined by whether it is shaped like the type of the thing that object is. It is referred to by Plotinus as ‘formedness’. This theory is further explained in his work, the “Enneads”, where he says: “We hold that all the loveliness of this world comes by communion in Ideal-Form. All shapelessness whose kind admits of pattern and form, as long as it remains outside of Reason and Idea, is ugly from that very isolation from the Divine-Thought. And this is the Absolute Ugly: an ugly thing is something that has not been entirely mastered by pattern, that is by Reason, the Matter not yielding at all points and in all respects to Ideal-Form....   [tags: philosophy, objective, subjective] 778 words
(2.2 pages)
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Plato's The Republic - ... He emphasizes that the soul is rational and assumes that people, who choose occupations based on what they are good at, will uphold justice in the society. However, Plato fails to reflect on those who are born with desires to cheat and manipulate. For example, In Boyle’s Platonic Thoughts, he discusses a philosopher from the University of Cambridge, Simon Blackburn, who argues, “Machiavellians…check their passions so they can practice even greater injustice” (Boyle). Blackburn uses the example dated back to 416 BC, when “Athens sent 10,000 men against the tiny island of Melos, which fielded scarcely 500....   [tags: ruling class, political theory, literary analysis] 1069 words
(3.1 pages)
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Plato's Meno and Plato's Republic - 1. In Plato’s Meno, Socrates claims that all learning is actually recollection (80d – 86c). What prompts Socrates to make this claim, and what does he mean by it. As Socrates and Meno were trying to find out the essence of virtues, Socrates said: “The soul, then, as being immortal, and having been born again many times, and having seen all things that exist, whether in this world or in the world below, has knowledge of them all; and it is no wonder that she should be able to call to remembrance all that she ever knew about virtue, and about everything; for as all nature is akin, and the soul has learned all things1.” As he suggested, the soul has already known everything, and thus the acqui...   [tags: Socrate, philosophical analysis] 1624 words
(4.6 pages)
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Justice and Good in The Republic by Plato. - In The Republic, Plato strives to display through the character and conversations of Socrates that justice is better than just the proper good for which men must strive for, regardless of whether they could receive equal benefit from choosing otherwise. His method is to use the dialogue from Socrates, questions which led the reader from one point to another, supposedly with convincing logic by obtaining agreement to each point before proceeding to the next, and so constructing an intriguing argument....   [tags: essays research papers] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
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Justice in The Republic by Plato - Justice in The Republic by Plato In Plato's The Republic, justice is depicted as a major part in a perfect society. Justice is said to breed a good society, whereas injustice will breed a bad one. Plato defines justice in dialogue as "keeping what is properly one's own and doing one's own job." (Pg. 146) Under the rules set for this perfect society, people are to practice the one profession at which they perform best. This profession also corresponds to a certain social class. Under no circumstances can one change this profession....   [tags: Papers] 496 words
(1.4 pages)
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Socrates and Plato's The Republic - Socrates and Plato's The Republic Throughout his life, Socrates engaged in critical thinking as a means to uncover the standards of holiness, all the while teaching his apprentices the importance of continual inquiry in accordance with obeying the laws. Socrates primarily focuses on defining that which is holy in The Euthyphro – a critical discussion that acts as a springboard for his philosophical defense of the importance of lifelong curiosity that leads to public inquiry in The Apology. Socrates continues his quest for enlightenment in The Crito, wherein he attempts to explain that while inquiry is necessary, public curiosity has its lawful price, thus those who inquire must both contin...   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Republic Essays] 2169 words
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The Ethical Egoist in Plato's Republic - The ethical egoist is one who believes that it is morally right to act strictly in one's own self-interest. Understandably, this belief poses a threat to social cooperation and, therefore, clearly introduces a significant political problem. I believe that the best example of ethical egoism is displayed in Book I of Plato's The Republic. In this Book, Plato introduces the idea of ethical egoism, explains the political problem posed by it, and addresses the problem through the words of Socrates. I will use this paper to explain and clarify the arguments for and against the concept of ethical egoism, with specific focus on the political problem it poses and the proper approach to addressing th...   [tags: politics, ethical egoism, socrates]
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Plato's The Republic and The Apology - ... The third and highest class is things that are desirable both for their own sake, and for their consequences, such as medical treatment. Glaucon argues that if a man had the Ring of Gyges, a ring that makes the user invisible, that even the most just man could not help but act unjustly. Glaucon believes that if we followed a man with the Ring of Gyges, “we shall catch the just man red-handed in exactly the same pursuits as the unjust, led on by self-interest (The Republic, 359C).” Glaucon then places the challenge upon Socrates to prove that justice lies in the highest class of good things; that justice is of such importance that even someone who could act unjust, and get away with it,...   [tags: Socrates, literary analysis, justice] 1698 words
(4.9 pages)
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Taking a Look at Plato's Republic - ... In order to discover the truth, Plato must abandon the old method and start anew. He must build up knowledge without traditional beliefs. Plato abandons the method of elenchus and restarts the discussion. The challenge to Socrates is the same: he must prove that justice is something good and desirable for its own sake, that it is more than convention, that it is connected to intuition, and that it is in our interest to adhere to it. In my own interpretation, this relates to the question regarding how virtue can be acquired in a way that does not follow a path of least resistance....   [tags: Socrates, philosophical analysis] 1704 words
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An Analysis of Plato's Republic - Explain the passage’s meaning in context. Societies hold value in the respect and virtuous abilities over others often times put justice on a pedestal and hold tight to it. In the eyes of Socrates is Plato’s Republic, Book VI he states that “In a suitable one [constitution], his [a philosopher's] own growth will be fuller and he will save the community as well as himself” (Plato “Republic”, p. 177, 497a). When you break it down this quote means when abiding by the laws held by the community each man must try to pursue the most virtuous version of themselves....   [tags: virtuous, philosophy, justice]
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1076 words
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The Noble Lie: Plato's Republic - The concept of the noble lie begins with Plato in the Republic, where in search of an ideal state he told of a magnificent myth^1.The society that Plato imagined was separated into a three tier class structure- the Rulers, Auxiliaries, and the labor or working class. The Rulers, he said, would be selected from the military elite (called Guardians).The rulers would be those Guardians that showed the most promise, natural skill, and had proven that they cared only about the community’s best interests....   [tags: philosophy and politics]
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1371 words
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Plato's Republic - In reading the Republic, there is no reason to search for arguments which show that Platonic justice ('inner justice' or 'psychic harmony') entails ordinary justice. The relationship between inner justice and ordinary justice is of no importance in Plato's Republic. We note that Plato tries to argue from the very first book that the true source of normativity lies in knowledge attained by philosophical reason. What is crucial, then, is the relationship between inner justice and acts which brings about a just polis....   [tags: Philosophy Justice Plato Papers]
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4423 words
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Plato and The Republic - Plato and The Republic 360 BC THE REPUBLIC by Plato translated by Benjamin Jowett 360 B.C. THE INTRODUCTION THE Republic of Plato is the longest of his works with the exception of the Laws, and is certainly the greatest of them. There are nearer approaches to modern metaphysics in the Philebus and in the Sophist; the Politicus or Statesman is more ideal; the form and institutions of the State are more clearly drawn out in the Laws; as works of art, the Symposium and the Protagoras are of higher excellence....   [tags: Papers] 12073 words
(34.5 pages)
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Plato and the Republic - The Sun of Knowledge: Platonic Epistemology as Discussed in The Republic The history of philosophy can be viewed as the result of the work of an obscure Athenian whose voluminous works, penetrating questions, novel ideas, and didactic teachings have shaped the flow of nearly all philosophic thought. It has been said that the influence of the ancient Greek philosopher named Plato has laid the foundation for Western culture. Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens in 428/427 B.C....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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2575 words
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Plato's Republic - The Philosopher King stands far above others in ancient Athens. At his own peril, amidst constant political chaos and corruption, Plato takes a brave stand for justice, for freedom, and for equality. The Republic, written around 375 B.C., isn't just Plato's treatise on the ideal state, nor is it just a state-of-mind journey from ignorance to enlightenment. Plato also taught at his Academy, the first university in Europe, that political science is the science of the soul. Indeed, Plato's wisdom is a striking example of visionary perfection, where a pure idea of virtue allows the greatest possible human freedom in accordance with laws by which the freedom of each is made to be consistent with...   [tags: Philosophy] 852 words
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Plato’s Republic: Proto-traditional Feminism and Modern Feminism - In book five of Plato’s Republic, Socrates argues that in the ideal city of Kallipolis, both men and women will serve as guardians and auxiliaries. Consequently, Plato appears to endorse feminist ideologies. Firs,t I will define proto-traditional feminism, and modern feminism. I will then argue that Plato presents Socrates, and thereby himself, as an advocate for feminism. However, I will show that Plato is only a feminist under the proto-traditional definition of feminism. He fails to fit the modern definition of feminism, as this definition is contingent on equality and equity....   [tags: Feminism, Plato, proto-traditional]
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Justice in Plato's Republic - What is justice. Obviously, the word can have multiple meanings. If we were to walk in the Student Center and ask ten people what justice was, they probably all would have different responses. I am not saying that they would not have some of the same ideas, but ultimately, their responses would vary. Having said that, what if one of the people's ideas of justice included injustices. For example, Adolf Hitler believed that justice would be reached by completely wiping out Jewish people and creating a "perfect" blonde-haired, blue-eyed Aryan race....   [tags: Plato Philosophy Society]
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Analysis of Plato´s Republic - Republic, perhaps Plato’s most famous work focusing on justice and its values, is also home to Socrates’ unique ideas and the challenges that he faces throughout his dialogues with other philosophers. Nevertheless, justice is not the only topic that Plato examines in his work. In the Republic, a simple discussion of the justice and the different characteristics of cities, escalates into a discussion about the souls of individuals. Socrates starts out by offering an agreement to the fact that since cities are made of individuals, their characteristics can also be found in individuals....   [tags: justice, value, soul, individual, logic] 984 words
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“A Truly Just City?” - In the book “The Republic,” by Plato, Socrates constructs a utopia of a pure aristocracy to channel his visions of what he constitutes to be a just city. Socrates’ ideal of justice, is of a virtue that can be developed out of reason and knowledge, and when tuned correctly can be the justified way of governing a city. Fundamentally, the rulers are driven by specific appetites and virtues, that develop a cycle of ruling between the stages of aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy and eventually a tyranny....   [tags: The Republic, Plato, Socrates]
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Arguments of Plato in The Republic and Aristotle in Poetics - What does imitation (mimesis) involve for Plato and Aristotle. Explain its different features. Mimesis, the ‘imitative representation of the real world in art and literature’ , is a form that was particularly evident within the governance of art in Ancient Greece. Although its exact interpretation does vary, it is most commonly used to describe artistic creation as a whole. The value and need for mimesis has been argued by a number of scholars including Sigmund Freud, Philip Sydney and Adam Smith, but this essay will focus on the arguments outlined by Plato in The Republic and Aristotle in Poetics, attempting to demonstrate the different features of imitation (mimesis) and what it involves f...   [tags: imitation, mimesis]
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The Educated Imagination, by Northrop Frye, Bird by Bird, by Anne Lamott, and The Republic, by Plato - Can you imagine a world where literature did not exist. It’s very hard, nearly impossible. Literature plays a major role in shaping society. Literature is a word used to describe written or spoken material. Literature educates, informs, entertains and influences the reader or listener in a myriad of profound ways. Broadly speaking, “literature” is used to describe anything from creative writing to more technical or scientific works, but the term is most commonly used to refer to works of the creative imagination....   [tags: Literature's Influence on Society] 1192 words
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Glaucon's Challenge and Plato's Theory of Justice in Plato's Republic - Plato’s Republic focuses on one particular question: is it better to be just or unjust. Thrasymachus introduces this question in book I by suggesting that justice is established as an advantage to the stronger, who may act unjustly, so that the weak will “act justly” by serving in their interests. Therefore, he claims that justice is “stronger, freer, and more masterly than justice” (Plato, Republic 344c). Plato begins to argue that injustice is never more profitable to a person than justice and Thrasymachus withdraws from the argument, granting Plato’s response....   [tags: literary analysis] 1807 words
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The Allegory of the Cave - ... The trapped human finally comes to terms with what is reality and accepts it, then wants to free the other people in the cave. The allegory of the cave has kept people interest throughout the years and can be seen in many modern works such as movies like The Truman Show and The Matrix. The Matrix is just like the allegory of the cave because these people are trapped in a world that is being manipulated by others, and the trapped believe everything they see to be the absolute truth. Just like the allegory of the cave a man comes and frees Neo by showing him the true world....   [tags: Plato's Republic] 917 words
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Defining Justice in Plato’s the Republic - ... Throughout these tools man is exposed to the pleasures of gain, knowledge, and honor. It is with these tools that man is able to properly position themselves on the scale of pleasure and pain. However, it is not merely enough for these elements of reason, spirit, and desire on an individual level and lovers of wisdom, reason, and spirit on a social level to exist separately. It is necessary for them all to coexist together in harmony to achieve justice. For “there is a point midway between the two [pleasure and pain] at which the soul reposes from both” (Plato, 116)....   [tags: soul, enlightened, ethics] 796 words
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The Noble Lie in Plato´s The Republic - ... Socrates could use this as an argument to make the whole “noble lie” seem more fair than it actually is, as a farmer’s son could one day become a king but I personally do not think that it is fair to choose someone’s social status and this whole process of not being able to guarantee a class to anyone cannot justify the fairness of the noble lie. Socrates also implies that this will help make more people more loyal and avoid a conflict within the society. He could also argue that lying to somebody young could become very beneficial as they would grow up knowing what they would want to be and enjoy it....   [tags: Society, Social Class, Noble] 1444 words
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Comparing Contemporary Politics to Plato's "The Republic" - Contemporary politics seems to more closely reflect Thraysmachus’ view of justice more so than Plato’s. Contemporary is defined as belonging to the present time adding on to it, politics, which are decisions and actions between parties with power. In “The Republic”, Socrates asks Thraysmachus to give him the answer to his question of what justice is. Thraysmachus was a sophist, who charged people for wisdom. The battle of seeking the true meaning of justice began when Socrates and Polemarchus were arguing....   [tags: justice, power, corruption]
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The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic - The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic This paper discussed The Allegory of The Cave in Plato's Republic, and tries to unfold the messages Plato wishes to convey with regard to his conception of reality, knowledge and education. THE ALLEGORY OF THE CAVE Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" is a story that conveys his theory of how we come to know, or how we attain true knowledge. It is also an introduction into his metaphysical and ethical system. In short, it is a symbolic explanation of his "Theory of the Forms" (or eidos)....   [tags: Papers] 909 words
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Socrates, Plato, Euthyphro, Apology and the Republic - ... This type of knowledge is true and sets aside any normative statements one may use to argue it. Through Plato’s three texts, Euthyphro, Apology and Republic, one can see how Socrates’ demonstrates the goal of philosophy. With Euthyphro, Socrates’ explains to Euthyphro how what is pious/impious differs among the gods and there is piety in justice but justice is not always in piety. It is the core concept of finding what is true in a statement, such as piety and justice that lays great knowledge and makes one wise....   [tags: philosophy concepts and discussion] 986 words
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Defining the Ideal in Plato's The Republic - Defining the Ideal in Plato's The Republic In 1921, Vance Palmer, the famous Australian author and poet, noted, in his essay titled "On Boundaries", that "it is the business of thought to define things, to find the boundaries; thought, indeed, is a ceaseless process of definition". As Palmer noted, humans, by their very nature, attempt to define all things. But, more than that, we attempt to redefine subjects and ideas that have already been defined so that we can better understand what they mean, where we came from, and, perhaps most importantly of all, who we are....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays] 758 words
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Justice and Morality in Plato's Republic - Introduction This essay discusses and clarifies a concept that is central to Plato's argument in the Republic — an argument in favour of the transcendent value of justice as a human good; that justice informs and guides moral conduct. Plato's argument implies that justice and morality are intimately interconnected, because the excellence and goodness of human life — the best way for a person to live — is intimately dependent upon and closely interwoven with those 'things that we find desirable in themselves and for their consequences [1]....   [tags: justice as a human good]
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Knowledge of Good in Plato's The Republic - An Intellectual Knowledge of Good in Plato’s Republic Socrates might be a wise philosopher but one of his ideas strikes me as particularly naive. In the allegory of the cave, he tells Glaucon that "in the world of knowledge the idea of good appears last of all, and is seen only with an effort [·] and that this is the power upon which he [the intellectual] would act rationally" (517b-c). In other words, he seems to be implying that knowledge of goodness is a sufficient condition for being good....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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Plato's The Republic and The Old Testament - Plato's The Republic and The Old Testament A Buddhist teaching suggests that practicing Buddhism is like taking a raft over a great river. One riverbank represents the realm of ‘samsara,’ the cycle of suffering that we are all spinning around in. On the other side is ‘wakefulness,’ or ‘nirvana,’ an enlightened state of awareness characterized by an infinite sense of unity and bliss. The raft symbolizes Buddhism; its purpose being to help us cross over from samsara to nirvana. According to the teaching, however, a curious thing happens to the individual who manages to reach the ‘banks of enlightenment.’ Having climbed off of the raft, she turns around to discover that she cannot now see any...   [tags: Philosophy Buddhism Religion Essays]
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Plato Republic The Noble Lie - As with all other topics discussed in “The Republic of Plato,” the section in which he discusses the myths of the metals or the “noble lie” is layered with questioning and potential symbolism, possible contradiction, and a significant measure of allusion. In Chapter X of “The Republic,” Plato presents “The Selection of Rulers: The Guardians’ Manner of Living.” In it, he discusses the necessities of education as they apply to the appropriate selection of and reparation for the community’s leaders....   [tags: essays research papers] 1183 words
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Justice in Plato's The Republic - Justice in Plato's Republic       In Plato’s The Republic, he unravels the definition of justice.  Plato believed that a ruler could not be wholly just unless one was in a society that was also just. Plato did not believe in democracy, because it was democracy that killed Socrates, his beloved teacher who was a just man and a philosopher.  He believed in Guardians, or philosophers/rulers that ruled the state.  One must examine what it means for a state to be just and what it means for a person to be just to truly understand the meaning of justice.  According to Socrates, “…if we first tried to observe justice in some larger thing that possessed it, this would make it easier to observe in...   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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Comparing and Contrasting Plato's The Republic and Thomas More's Utopia - ... Men dedicated themselves to a specific trade. The most common trades in the Utopia world are the manufacturing of wool, flax and carpentering. Each person is required to work in one trade, but they are not limited. If someone wants to learn about multiple trades, they are welcome to do so. The Utopians have a 24-hour cycle in which the time is divided in half; half for the day and half for the night. Of the 12 hours in the day, 6 of them are required for work and the other 6 hours are divided into 3 before dinner and 3 after dinner....   [tags: work, duties, abilities]
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Analysis of Plato's The Republic - An Analysis of The Republic The Republic is an examination of the "Good Life"; the harmony reached by applying pure reason and justice. The ideas and arguments of Plato center on the social settings of an ideal republic - those that lead each person to the most perfect possible life for him. Socrates was Plato's early mentor in real life. As a tribute to his teacher, Plato uses Socrates in several of his works and dialogues. Socrates moderates the discussion throughout, as Plato's mouthpiece....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays] 2022 words
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Justice in Plato's "The Republic" - Plato creates a seemingly invincible philosopher in The Republic. Socrates is able to refute all arguments presented before him with ease. The discussion on justice in Book I of The Republic is one such example. Socrates successfully refutes each different view of justice presented by Cephalus, Polemarchus, and Thrasymachus. Socrates has not given us a definitive definition of justice, nor has he refuted all views of justice, but as far as we are concerned in Book I, he is able to break down the arguments of his companions....   [tags: World Literature] 521 words
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Conflicting Points in Plato's Republic - Conflicting Points in Plato's Republic In his Plato’s Republic Socrates tries to find the values of an ideal city in order to rightly define justice. Although I agree with most of his ideals for the city, there are also many that I disagree with. Some of his ideas that I accept are that women should be able to share the same responsibilities as the men, having women and children in common, , the recognition of honor based on the self rather than heredity, that the best philosophers are useless to the multitudes, and the philosopher / king as a ruler....   [tags: Free Essays] 402 words
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Socrates’ Examination of the City-State in Plato's Republic - ... As, city is bigger than an individual, it is easier to define the justice of the former than latter. That way it is easier to look for political justice for a city, and then, later, look for similar virtues in the individuals of that city. To quote Socrates: “Since we aren’t clever people, we should adopt the method of investigation that we’d use if, lacking keen eyesight, we were told to read small letters from a distance and then noticed that the same letters existed elsewhere in a larger size and on a larger surface” (Plato, 368d)....   [tags: injustice, guardians, luxuries] 847 words
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Democracy in Plato's the Republic - Democracy in the Republic In Plato's Republic democracy made a controversial issue in a critique by Socrates. The theory of the soul accounts for the controversy as it states that the soul is divided into three parts: the rational, the spirited, and the appetite which are ranked respectively. The idea of the soul's three parts and the soul being ruled by a dominant part is used as the basis for identifying justice and virtue. However, the theory of the soul is not only used to identify justice and virtue, but also used to show that the virtue within a city reflects that of its inhabitants....   [tags: essays research papers] 1270 words
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The Allegory of the Cave, from Book VII of Plato's Republic - The cave, symbolic of the mother's womb, is the source of life and death. In “The Allegory of the Cave”, from Book VII of Plato’s Republic, the theme of the cycle of life and the transition from the unborn to the deceased is representative of the cycle of entry and exit from the cave. If based upon this idea, one can conclude that the chains are symbolic of the umbilical cord. This concept reflects the Greek values of reproduction, humanism, and the anti-hero, because the anti-hero is symbolized by returning to the mother....   [tags: The Cycle of Life]
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The Tripartite of the Soul that Socrates Discussed in Plato's Republic - ... In Aristotle discussion On the Soul he talks about the kinds of souls possessed by different living things such as plants, animals and, beings. Aristotle then goes on describing the substance that makes up the soul, the first is matter which is not this in its own right, the second is form which makes matter this and the third form is the compound of matter and form. Every living body is a substance and the soul is the actuality of the body. The soul is not some sort of activity but the ability to engage in some sort of activity....   [tags: philosophical discussion and analysis] 1431 words
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Psychological Egoism in Plato's Republic and Other Literature - In Plato’s Republic and in Rachels' Egoism and Moral Scepticism, the authors attempt to combat psychological egoism, which is the ethical theory which asserts that all human motivation is ultimately self-interested. Each author rejects the possibility of this being a valid conclusion of philosophical ethics, and each instead offers an alternate solution to the origin of human motivation. Whether we are capable of acting out of non self-interested ways directly affects the implementation of ethics around the world....   [tags: moral scepticism, human motivation]
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Analysis of Plato's Republic - Philosophy is a Greek word meaning "love of wisdom." Throughout Plato's Republic, wisdom plays an important role. According to Plato, education is wisdom. In the passage, 518d, Plato discusses the true meaning of education vicariously through Socrates. Some literary mechanisms can be found in the passage and I will show how they fit in the text and how they contribute to the main themes of Plato's Republic. In Book VII Socrates has finished listening to other opinions and is now formulating a response....   [tags: World Literature] 465 words
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Believing is Seeing - In Plato’s The Republic, Book seven, he discusses the cliché “seeing is believing”. By Plato’s use of symbols to help explain his point of ignorance in truth due to our traditions, society’s constant fear of change and our natural ability to question what we see. In this allegory, the depictions of humans as they are chained, to only learn by sight. Plato toy’s with the notion of what would happen to people should they embrace the concepts of philosophy, to become enlightened by it, to see things as they truly are....   [tags: Plato, The Republic] 947 words
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Plato's Republic - Plato's Republic Plato, one of the most ingenious and powerful thinkers in Western philosophy, born around 425 B.C. Plato investigated a wide range of topics. Dominant among his ideas is an immense discourse called The Republic. The main focus of Plato is a perfect society. He outlines a utopian society, out of his disapproval for the tension of political life. Plato lived through the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC), in which much of Greece was devastated. This created poverty and political confusion and corruption....   [tags: Papers] 977 words
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Plato's Republic - Plato's Republic “the having and doing of one’s own and what belongs to one would be agreed to be justice.” (The Republic 434a) In other words the above statement means that justice, according to Plato, is doing only the tasks assigned to them by nature. This is the fundamental notion for his creation of an ideal city. It is both knowing what true justice is and where one belongs in the city that the ideal can be achieved. What this means to politics in the ideal city is that only a certain class of person has the ability to engage in politics, just as only a certain person has the ability to engage in carpentry....   [tags: Papers] 906 words
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