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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Parkinson"
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Effects, Cure, and Causes of Parkinson's Disease - Today, we encounter wide varieties of problems and diseases. Nowadays, most poeple are only familiar with illnesses that have caused a big impact on society and those that made it to the headlines of newspapers such as cancer, diabetes, malaria, tuberculosis, and many more. Unfortunately, not everyone is given the opportunity to tackle each disease present and therefore, are not aware of the chances of themselves or their loved ones acquiring these diseases, the effects it may cause to the patient or to his or her relatives, and how it can be prevented or treated....   [tags: james parkinson, shaking palsy, diseases]
:: 5 Works Cited
930 words
(2.7 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease: The Stem Cell Approach - Michael J. Fox has been recognized for many great accomplishments having to do with his career as an actor. Throughout his career he played numerous roles in many films and television shows. His success has been recognized through his portrayal of characters such as Marty McFly from the Back to the Future trilogy and Alex P. Keaton from the once popular television show, “Family Ties.” However, at barely thirty years old, Fox was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson’s disease (Michael’s Story). Such a young man contracting a restrictive disease so early on in his life is nothing short of life changing....   [tags: Michael J. Fox, actor, Parkinson's]
:: 6 Works Cited
1896 words
(5.4 pages)
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Parkinson’s Disease - Parkinson’s Disease is known as one of the most common progressive and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. It belongs to a group of conditions known as movement disorders. Parkinson disease is a component of hypokinetic disorder because it causes a decreased in bodily movement. It affects people who are usually over the age of 50. It can impair an individual motor as well as non-motor function. Some of the primary symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are characterized by tremors or trembling in hands, legs and arms....   [tags: Parkinson’s Disease] 1450 words
(4.1 pages)
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Review of Research Paper on Parkinson's Disease Treatment - Abstract Attempts to cure or slow down the progression of Parkinson’s disease have largely failed; researchers in this paper maintain this is obviously a direct result of the lack of insight into the pathogenesis of the disease. Parkinson’s disease is the product of the deaths of a number of dopaminergic (dopamine-secreting) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta region (SNc) of the brain. But what causes these deaths. In the paper “‘Rejuvenation’ protects neurons in mouse models of Parkinson’s disease,” Chen and researchers find that older neurons in the SNc are unusually reliant on calcium channels and that after blocking these channels, the cells are “rejuvenated” and begin actin...   [tags: Biology Parkinson Parkisons] 2063 words
(5.9 pages)
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The Parkinson's Disease - ... It was first recorded by a British physician James Parkinson in his “Essay on the Shaking Palsy,” where Parkinson noted a disease impairing movement but keeping sanity. It occurs when nerve cells in the substantia nigra deteriorate, affecting dopamine production. Dopamine is crucial for brain connections and communications that control muscles. The medical community doesn’t know the exact causes of this, but it is known that there is evidence that the disorder might be caused by heredity or environment....   [tags: other movement disorders] 1602 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Parkinson's Disease - ... Despite recent advancements, research has been unsuccessful in discovering the exact etiologies of PD. Though researchers have gained a broad understanding of both genetic and environmental factors which contribute to PD, the relationship between the two has eluded researchers for nearly two centuries. Currently, the only consistent link between all PD cases is the loss of dopamine producing neurons. In the future, the causes of this dreaded disease will hopefully be better understood and appropriately classified in order to expedite the treatment Works Cited Golbe, Lawrence I....   [tags: nature, nurture, genetics]
:: 4 Works Cited
747 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Cause of Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson’s disease is a “neurodegenerative disorder of the basal nuclei due to insufficient secretion of the neurotransmitter dopamine” (Marieb & Hoehn, 2013, p. G-17). The cause of Parkinson’s disease is unknown, but many factors play a role in the development of Parkinson’s disease. One factor that has been found in an individual who has Parkinson’s disease causes over activity of targeted dopamine-deprived basal nuclei. This over activity is caused by the breakdown of neurons that release dopamine in the substantia nigra (Marieb & Hoehn, 2013)....   [tags: neurodegenerative disorder, treatment]
:: 4 Works Cited
1122 words
(3.2 pages)
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Taking a Look at Parkinson's Disease - ... Most individuals will experience tremors and they will often occur while that person is resting. Tremors are rhythmic muscles movements and it can affect the head, hands, arms, trunk, legs, and face. Rigidity limbs can increase during movement. This is the stiffness of the limbs or trunk and may create muscle aches and pain. Rigidity can cause the loss of fine hand movements making it difficult to do certain tasks. Bradykinesia is also a symptom and it affects voluntary movement. As this progresses it may be difficult to initiate movements because it is slowed way down, and with that they may not be able to control face muscles so they will always have a mask-like appearance (Heyn, PhD,...   [tags: movement disorders] 1458 words
(4.2 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease and Effective Medication - History of Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's has been around since the beginning of time. However, it has not always been know as Parkinson's disease. A London doctor by the name of James Parkinson first brought attention to the subject by publishing a medical essay. The publication titled "An Essay on the Shaking Palsy" help established Parkinson's disease as an accepted medical condition. Dr. Parkinson intended the publication to spark interest in others in hopes they may do further research on the disease....   [tags: shanking palsy, neurologic disorders]
:: 5 Works Cited
1450 words
(4.1 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease and Body Weight - Parkinson’s Disease: Relationship with Parkinson’s Disease and Body Weight Ethics are the key to the safe and reliable supply of services within an industry. Modern medicine has several ethical standards in place. The College of Nurses (CNO) states that considering ethical issues is essential to providing care. The ethical framework is in place to guide nurses in the changing times of new technology and to help prevent and work through ethical conflicts (College of Nurses, 2009, p. 3). A registered practical nurse has been documenting her patient Mr....   [tags: relationship, ethics, reliable supply]
:: 8 Works Cited
964 words
(2.8 pages)
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Advances in Parkinson’s Disease - About seven million people worldwide, one million people in America, and about 60,000 new people every year are all affected by one disease (Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, Statistics). That disease is Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s takes away little things like movement that many of us take for granted. Lives are changed because of Parkinson’s, but there is hope. Through medical breakthroughs discovered in recent years, my grandpa and many others suffering from Parkinson’s disease have a chance at a better life....   [tags: Medicinal Progress, Celebrity Endorsement]
:: 13 Works Cited
1342 words
(3.8 pages)
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What is Parkinson's Disease? - ... Two possible inhibitors of Parkinson’s disease that have been identified are caffeine and smoking cigarettes (Lau & Breteler, 2006). Lau and Breteler (2006) used epidemiological studies and found that cigarette smoking may have a neuroprotective effect and “the most likely explanations involve nicotine, as nicotine may stimulate dopamine release, act as an antioxidant, or alter activity of monoamine oxidase B.” Caffeine also demonstrated to have a positive effect on the likely hood of developing Parkinson’s, however the method in which it works has not been fully identified (Lau & Breteler, 2006)....   [tags: Neurodegenerative disorder, nervous system]
:: 9 Works Cited
1414 words
(4 pages)
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Treatments of Parkinson's Disease - Introduction Although Parkinson’s disease does not have a known cure, there are ways to treat and manage it. There are many components of treatments of Parkinson’s disease such as patient’s age, cognitive, life style, and symptom severity (Lyons & Pahwa, 2011, p. 29). With those components known, treatment can be modified based on the patient’s case. Treatment of Parkinson’s disease includes prescription drugs and non-pharmacologic treatment. One of the ways to manage Parkinson’s disease is prescription drugs....   [tags: Prescription Drugs, Therapies]
:: 9 Works Cited
1649 words
(4.7 pages)
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Stem Cells and Parkinson's Disease - The goal of this paper is to compare the utility of adult, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to treat Parkinson’s disease. As such several things will be assessed, dosage of stemcells, improvement in motor function, in combination with the presence of α-synuclein proteins and cell survival. To give a short overview of the steps that will be taken to complete the study. Obtaining stem cells, whether adult, embryonic or induced, shall be done using healthy mouse models and after ethical approval has been gained....   [tags: Stem Cell Research Study]
:: 4 Works Cited
2615 words
(7.5 pages)
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Case Study: Parkinson's Disease - There is not a reason known as to why a person contracts Parkinson’s disease. There is no mystery as to what causes it, but when it comes to a cure and why it happens, that is the real mystery that medical experts have been trying to discover for years. When it comes down to some cases, Parkinson’s disease is genetically linked to a past relative. Other than the genetically inherited cases, no one knows why Parkinson’s disease strikes the people it does. When a person is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, they will find that as the condition progresses, they lose control of their body more and more every day....   [tags: Medicine]
:: 15 Works Cited
2043 words
(5.8 pages)
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Dementia and Parkinson´s Disease - ... Initially these solutions were large and bulky and resembled a robotic arm, but over time they have become more compact. Using various types of constraints and braces, these contraptions force the patient’s tremor to cease. However, it is hard to imagine wearing these uncomfortable devices in public or trying to eat with them in the presence of others. San Francisco-based company Lift Labs recently developed a type of electronic utensil (called Liftware) to help offset the effects of tremors using stabilizing technology....   [tags: paralysis, tremors, liftware] 733 words
(2.1 pages)
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What is Parkinson´s Disease? - ... It has also been identified that individuals diagnosed with PD can experience cogwheel rigidity as well, which will cause a resistance in moving one’s wrist and arm causing them to be awkwardly flexed (Lees et al. 2009). These symptoms of PD can cause stiffening of the muscular tissues, which are specialized for contraction, as well as a loss of elasticity at a more rapid rate than what is expected with normal ageing (Tortora et al. 2012). PD is considered a neurodegenerative syndrome because of a lack of dopaminergenic input into the putamen from the pars compacta of the substantia nigra (Banich et al., 2011)....   [tags: Syndrome, Aging, Motion] 1059 words
(3 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's is an idiopathic, multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that attacks neurotransmitters in the brain called dopamine. Dopamine is concentrated in a specific area of the brain called the substantia nigra. The neurotransmitter dopamine is a chemical that regulates muscle movement and emotion. Dopamine is responsible for relaying messages between the substantia nigra and other parts of the brain to control body movement. The death of these neurotransmitters affects the central nervous system....   [tags: dopamine, muscle, swallowing, respiratory system]
:: 12 Works Cited
1507 words
(4.3 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson’s disease is an incurable neurological disorder that affects ~ 3% of the elderly population. Classified as a movement disorder, it often causes tremors, joint stiffness, and even difficulty with speech. The disease is progressive, meaning that it gets worse or does more damage over time. Although the most common and recognized symptoms are physical (tremors), the disease can also cause a number of mental or cognitive effects. Dementia, a broad term defined as a loss of mental ability beyond that of normal aging, is extremely common among Parkinson’s patients....   [tags: Health]
:: 1 Works Cited
847 words
(2.4 pages)
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Parkinson Disease - Parkinson disease (PD), also referred to as Parkinson’s disease and paralysis agitans, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is the third most common neurologic disorder of older adults. It is a debilitating disease affecting motor ability and is characterized by four cardinal symptoms: tremor rigidity, bradykinesia or kinesis (slow movement/no movement), and postural instability. Most people have primary, or idiopathic, disease. A few patients have secondary parkinsonian symptoms from conditions such as brain tumors and certain anti-psychotic drugs....   [tags: Informative Essay]
:: 5 Works Cited
1205 words
(3.4 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a striatal dopamine deficiency disorder as a consequence of neuronal loss in the substania nigra. It is named after James Parkinson, a British apothecary, who first fully documented its physical signs in 1817. Since then, significant advances have been made in our understanding of characteristic pathophysiology as well as in the medical treatment of different stages of PD. An overview of condition features in terms of epidemiology, manifestations, diagnosis and disease management will be discussed in this paper....   [tags: Health]
:: 12 Works Cited
1766 words
(5 pages)
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Parkinson's Law - According to Parkinson’s Law the growth in the number of managers and hierarchical levels is controlled by two principles: (1) “An official wants to multiply subordinates, not rivals,” and (2) “Officials make work for one another (Parkinson 14).” Hence, managers are building an empire for themselves, a tall hierarchy. The higher the empire increases, the higher the managers position become in the organization. One of the main reasons why managers create subordinates is to decrease the load of their work....   [tags: Business Management]
:: 2 Works Cited
2377 words
(6.8 pages)
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Parkinson’s Associated Dementia - ... The exact cause of Parkinson’s disease and the dementia that often follows is not fully understood, but every source scoured points to both heredity and environmental factors. The thought process seems to be that predominance is inherent, and can be environmentally triggered, though such triggers are vaguely defined as environmental toxins. There have been some known instances of drug induced Parkinson’s symptoms which disappeared when the drug was ceased. With accelerated awareness, understanding, diagnostic tools and drug developments, the last 50 years has introduced progressively improving prognosis for those suffering from Parkinson’s disease and the associative dementia....   [tags: neurons, detenoration, patient]
:: 4 Works Cited
658 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Symptoms and Signs of Parkinson’s Disease - ... This is often followed bradykinesia-or slowed movement-which can make previously simple tasks difficult and time-consuming as well as frustrating. This can be shown by shorter steps or dragging feet while walking or difficulty getting out of chairs. There can also be rigid muscle movements, limiting your movement and causing you pain; loss of automatic movements such at blinking can also occur. “Parkinson’s disease is often accompanied by these additional problems, which may be treatable.” (mayoclinic.org/disease-conditions) These problems include thinking difficulties, emotional changes, and sleep problems....   [tags: chronic illness, neurons, dopamine] 658 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Causes and Detrimental Effects of Parkinson's Disease - ... The dopamine-producing nerve cells of the substantia nigra begin to diminish. When eighty percent of dopamine is lost, symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, such as tremor and stiffness, begin to appear. Body movement is controlled by inter-connected groups of nerve cells, known as ganglia. Information is received by the striatum, which works with the substantia nigra to send impulses back and forth from the spinal cord to the brain .The cerebellum and the basal ganglia are responsible for ensuring that movement is carried out in a smooth and fluid manner (Mayfield clinic)....   [tags: nerves, neurotransmitter, speech] 600 words
(1.7 pages)
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Wolff-Parkinson White Syndrome - ... Wolff-Parkinson White pattern is when a person has no symptoms. “A person may have an extra electrical pathway in the heart but experience no fast heartbeat and no symptoms.”(Mayo Clinic Staff). This is discovered when a person has a heart exam for other reasons. Wolff-Parkinson White pattern is basically harmless. There are many reasons why a person has Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome. The extra electrical pattern is shown at birth but it comes from an abnormal gene. “Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome is associated with some forms of congenital heart disease, such as Ebstein's anomaly.” (Mayo Clinic Staff)....   [tags: symptoms, treatment, circuit]
:: 2 Works Cited
872 words
(2.5 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease and Other Movement Disorders - Many people around the world today suffer from Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. A movement disorder is a disorder impairing the speed, fluency, quality, and ease of movement. There are many types of movement disorders such as impaired fluency and speed of movement (dyskinesia), excessive movements (hyperkinesia), and slurred movements (hypokinesia). Some types of movement disorders are ataxia, a lack of coordination, Huntington's disease, multiple system atrophies, myoclonus, brief, rapid outbursts of movement, progressive supranuclear palsy, restless legs syndrome, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, tics, Tourette's syndrome, tremor, Wilson disease, dystonia, which causes invol...   [tags: dopamine processing in the brain]
:: 16 Works Cited
1613 words
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Parkinson Disease (PD) - Introduction Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized mainly by physical and psychological disabilities. This disorder was named after James Parkinson, an English physician who first described it as shaking palsy in 1817 (Goetz, Factr, and Weiner, 2002). Jean- Martin Charcot, who was a French neurologist, then progressed and further refined the description of the disease and identified other clinical features of PD (Goetz, Factr, and Weiner, 2002). PD involves the loss of cells that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine in a part of the brain stem called the substansia nigra, which results in several signs and symptoms (Byrd, Marks, and Starr, 2000...   [tags: progressive neurodegenerative disorder]
:: 20 Works Cited
2172 words
(6.2 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease: Is It All In the Brain? - Parkinson's Disease: Is It All In the Brain. "When I should go lay down on the couch, but I know that I will never find a comfortable position, so if I'm to be uncomfortable, it may as well be here, in front of this gently glowing screen. I feel the last of last night's meds burn away in my throat and then the dreaded "heebie-jeebies" come" (6). Parkinson's disease otherwise named the "shaking palsy" in 1817 by James Parkinson affects 50,000 Americans every year. The risk of the disease is higher amongst men giving them twice risk of developing Parkinson's disease compared to women (5)....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 6 Works Cited
1098 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Etiology and Treatment of Parkinson Disease - Parkinson Disease There exists a group of people who live the final years of their lives in glass boxes. They are perfectly capable of seeing outside, but incapable of reaching out to the world around them. Their emotions can not be shown through facial expression, and as their condition continues, speech also becomes difficult or even impossible. These people are men and women of all races and geographical areas, constituting one percent of the world’s population over 50 years old. Parkinson disease is their affliction....   [tags: Health Aging Medicine Papers]
:: 10 Works Cited
2617 words
(7.5 pages)
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Michael J. Fox Faces Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson’s Disease Michael Jay Fox is one of Hollywood’s biggest stars. In the year 1991, he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Being a movie star and dealing with such a disease was not easy to hide, but this past year in the T.V. sitcom “The Michael Jay Fox Show,” he is able to stop hiding Parkinson’s disease from the spotlight. If you watch an episode, right away you are able to pick up on specific habits he endures. Mr. Fox is a face for the manifestation of this disease, as he spreads the awareness of Parkinson’s disease....   [tags: nervous system, motor, brain]
:: 3 Works Cited
778 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Neurobiology of Parkinson's Disease - The Neurobiology of Parkinson's Disease In neuroscience it is assumed that the central nervous system governs and defines all aspects of behavior (Grobstein, 1998). Therefore, the brain, the hub of the central nervous system, is responsible for integrating all sensory and motor patterning. To understand the mechanisms of neurobiology it is often useful to observe the nervous system at the level of the neuron. Integration and communication between neurons is facilitated by neurotransmitters, chemicals which act as intermediaries at the synaptic gap (Delcomyn, 1998)....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 7 Works Cited
1526 words
(4.4 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery - Parkinson's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery Parkinson's disease, which affects over one million Americans, results in the progressive loss of coordination, unstable posture, and tremor (1). In 1817, James Parkinson, after whom the disease was named, was the first to document cases of what he called "the shaking palsy" and in doing so, began the scientific crusade to determine the causes and manifestation of the disease (2). The challenge before neuroscientists was to determine the link between Parkinson's behavior and alterations of the nervous system....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 1 Works Cited
1715 words
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Long Term Effects of Parkinson’s Disease - Long Term Effects of Parkinson’s Disease and how to Incorporate Daily Living with Health Care Regimen Parkinson’s Disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in the community resulting in significant disability. This global problem has consumed the lives of many. “Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson's disease each year, and this number does not reflect the thousands of cases that go undetected” (Statistics on Parkinson’s, 2014). Once this unbiased disease has begun to affect the patient it is a lifelong battle....   [tags: neurodegerative disorder, treatment]
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1529 words
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Parkinson's Disease and Tourette's Syndrome - Parkinson's Disease and Tourette's Syndrome Parkinson's Disease is a literally crippling neurodegenerative disorder, manifested in about 1% of the aged population. People who have Parkinson's Disease gradually lose control of their movements; specific symptoms include, "tremor, slowness of movement, stiffness, difficulty in walking, and loss of balance." (1) Evidence strongly suggests that Parkinson's Disease is the result of severe cell loss in the substantia nigra. This brain structure is principally involved in the production of dopamine....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 2 Works Cited
734 words
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Parkinson´s Disease - Parkinson’s disease Parkinson’s disease is a disease in the nervous system that affects your body movement. It belongs in the motor system disorders group (About Parkinson’s Disease). This disease can impair the person’s motor skills, speech, and writing skills (All About Parkinson's Disease). It can start off with small tremors in just one of the person’s hands, and progress to the other hand as well. Parkinson’s can affect the person’s whole body. Parkinson’s disease does not only cause tremors it could also cause stiffness or slower movements in your limbs (Dementia)....   [tags: Nervous System, Motor Skills]
:: 8 Works Cited
1493 words
(4.3 pages)
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Abnormality of the Heart Known as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome - The human heart is a remarkable organ. It has several functions in order to help humans sustain life each and every day. One of its biggest responsibilities is to pump oxygen and nutrient rich blood to areas of the body to tolerate all of life’s activities. Autonomic functions such as breathing require the heart to function properly. Averaging the size of a human fist, it continuously pumps around five quarts of blood each minute, or roughly 2,000 gallons every single day. Every second of the day, one’s heart is constantly working and how hard it has to work can be a determining factor on one’s health....   [tags: organ, breathing, pathways] 1016 words
(2.9 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease and Tissue Transplants - For nearly 100 years neural tissue has been transplanted in animals. Transplantation of neural tissue into humans, however, began only a few years ago (1). It has been found in animals, that fetal brain grafts in damaged adult host brains reduce some of the functional deficits caused by brain lesions. Even though some neurons from the transplanted tissue survive and develop reciprocal connections with host brain tissue, this is not enough to completely replace damaged fibers and support behavioral recovery Usually the grafts will not develop a normal morphological appearance, but some metabolic activity can be found within the transplant....   [tags: Health Medicine Medical Essays]
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1437 words
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Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease - Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease is a degenerative disorder of the nervous system. Parkinson's is a disease that may happen in younger people, but the risk mainly increases with age. This is because many of the cellular systems in the brain are difficult to renew by themselves while there are trillions of nerve cells in the brain to compensate for the loss of these cells. For example, in Parkinson's disease the symptoms are caused by the selective loss of a small population in the brain consisting of about 500,000 dopaminergic cells....   [tags: Papers] 1370 words
(3.9 pages)
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Parkinson’s Disease - Parkinson’s disease has a dramatic impact on one’s ability to control everyday movements, thus affecting quality of life and independence. (Sage, Johnston, & Almeida,2011). Parkinson’s disease is chronic, progressive, as-of-yet incurable(Hirsch, Iyer, Englert, & Sanjak,2011). Pharmacotherapy remains to be the primary treatment for Parkinson’s disease. However, it arouses complications such as motor fluctuations, dyskinesia and wearing off (Sage, Johnston, & Almeida,2011). It prompted the researchers to discover alternative therapies such as exercising, which may have the potential to improve the individual’s suffering from Parkinson’s disease, as exercise is commonly associated with cardiova...   [tags: Health, Diseases] 809 words
(2.3 pages)
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Parkinson’s Disease - Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a chronic neurological disease that effects about 329 per 100,000 people in the US. The average onset of this disease usually is for people over the age of 50, with the baby boomers getting older there may be an increase in this disease, as much as 9 million people worldwide. (Pawha 2010) Etiology The disease happens when the cells in the brain are damaged or stop-producing Dopamine, which helps with muscle movement, thus leaves those patients unable to control their movements....   [tags: Health] 1309 words
(3.7 pages)
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Parkinson’s Disease - Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson’s Disease (PD), known for its degenerative abilities and debilitating affects, is an illness that affects approximately 1 million Americans. The cause of this disease has not been pinpointed, although strides have been made towards a cure. As our elderly population increases, so does our overwhelming need to find a suitable cure that may one day eliminate this disease. Concepts of PD After watching the video: My father, My Brother, and Me, viewable at www.pbs.org , I took away four significant concepts pertaining to PD....   [tags: Disease/Disorders]
:: 4 Works Cited
1270 words
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Parkinson’s Disease - Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders and is classified as a movement disorder with the presence of the motor symptoms bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity. The literature on the management of PD motor symptoms focuses extensively on the medical treatment and outlines the vast advancements that drug therapy has seen over the past 40 years. There are beneficial outcomes of medicinal therapy on the treatment of motor symptoms; however, extensive research also finds there is a wearing off effect as well as potential for motor and nonmotor side effects....   [tags: Health, Diseases] 1432 words
(4.1 pages)
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Parkinson’s Disease - Introduction/background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most frequent movement disorder and the second most common neurodegenerative disease (Bueler 2009). Over 1% of the entire population over the age of 60, and up to 5% of age 80, is affected by PD (Wood-Kaczmar, Gandhi et al. 2006). The pathogenesis of PD remains unclear, but can be categorized as sporadic, being the most common form, and Mendelian, which accounts for 5-10% of all PD cases (Guo 2008). The studies of Mendelian onset of PD have lead to the identification of five genes being linked to this neurodegenerative disease (Guo 2008)....   [tags: Disease]
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1300 words
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Parkinson's Disease - The world has many diseases and illnesses but we do not realize the destructiveness of these complications because there are cures for them. There are only a few diseases today that no cures exists for such as Cancer and HIV but the one we tend to overlook is Parkinson’s. This is a disease that affects many people in the United States today and has for many years. Parkinson’s will continue to be a disease of mystery because the causes and cures have yet to be discovered. I have had a direct relationship with the unpredictable and incurable disease, which resulted in the death of my great grandfather....   [tags: cure for diseases]
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1201 words
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson's Disease Damage to Broca's area in the frontal lobe causes difficulty in speaking and writing, a problem known as Broca's aphasia. Injury to Wernicke's area in the left temporal lobe results in an inability to comprehend spoken language, called Wernicke's aphasia. Cerebral palsy is a broad term for brain damage sustained close to birth that permanently affects motor function. The damage may take place either in the developing fetus, during birth, or just after birth and is the result of the faulty development or breaking down of motor pathways....   [tags: Papers] 577 words
(1.6 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson's Disease Parkinson’s Disease (PD), "the shaking palsy" first described by James Parkinson in 1817, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which affects in upwards of 1.5 million Americans. The disease begins to occur around age 40 and has incidence with patient age. One survey found that PD may affect 1% of the population over 60. Incidence seems to be more prominent in men, and tends to progress to incapacity and death over one or two decades. Clinical diagnosis of PD is currently solely dependent on the presentation of the symptoms by the patient which reflect a deficiency of striatal dopamine caused by the destruction of the cells in the substantia nigra....   [tags: Medical Medical Medicine Essays Treatment]
:: 5 Works Cited
1651 words
(4.7 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson's Disease In 1817, James Parkinson published his famous treatise: "An Essay on the Shaking Palsy," describing the symptoms which now collectively bear his name. Although many scientists before his time had described various aspects of motor dysfunction (ataxia, paralysis, tremor) Parkinson was the first to collect them into a common syndrome; one which he believed formed a distinctive condition. His sixty-six page essay contained five chapters describing symptoms, differential diagnoses, causality, possible treatments, and prospects for future study....   [tags: Disorders Illnesses Papers]
:: 9 Works Cited
3762 words
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson's Disease Five years ago, she could still show the world her pleasant demeanor with a smile. Four years ago, she could no longer smile, but she was still able to walk upright. Two years ago, she could no longer walk without aid from a walker, but she could still find her mouth with a fork while eating dinner. Eighteen months ago, she could no longer eat under her own power, as the involuntary 'tremors' in her hands flung the food from the fork long before it reached her mouth....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 1 Works Cited
1833 words
(5.2 pages)
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Understanding Parkinson's Disease - Understanding Parkinson's Disease Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease To date, there are no specific diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's Disease. Diagnosis can only be made by an expert examination after the person has already developed symptoms. Biochemical measures can be used such as a screening strategy monitoring the dopamine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Otherwise, specifically 6(18F)dopa positron emission tomography can be used for a direct measurement of dopamine activity. Using a computer to assess movement time is another test for Parkinson's disease....   [tags: Health Medicine] 1695 words
(4.8 pages)
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Parkinson's Disease - Parkinson’s Disease (from hereon PD) is an extrapyramidal disorder characterized primarily by massive idiopathic degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, resulting in greatly decreased levels of dopamine in the striatum. The diagnosis, which is essentially a clinical judgment due to the lack, thus far of a simple diagnostic test, has historically been on the basis of the presence of at least two of the three main features of PD: bradykinesia (or akinesia or hypokinesia), rigidity, and resting tremor....   [tags: Brain Aging Diseases Papers]
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Parkinson's Disease - the chances of a trembling body - Parkinson's Disease - the chances of a trembling body I have been closely following the news in the past months and I have noted a continuum in the coverage of the medical condition of one person who for many symbolizes the virtues of man, has been associated with the liberation of the minds of people under the communist era, has firmly supported the foundations of the Catholic faith and has been inspiration for many - the current Pope John Paul II. The newspaper photos of his almost expressionless face and the constant trembling hand which have started hindering his public activities and my deep respect to the his achievements made me look into the roots of the Parkinson's disease and its...   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Transplantation: Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease - Transplantation: Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a slowly-progressive disease which ultimately robs its victims of voluntary motor control. The disease manifests itself as a series of symptoms which include "bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and impairment of postural reflexes (Fitzgerald, 1992:215)". It is a result of a loss of neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Chemotherapy, in the form of drugs such as levodopa and carbidopa, has been effective in alleviating many of the symptoms in the early stages of PD; however, with increasing losses in the number of cells in SNpc, such therapy becomes more and more ineffective....   [tags: Health Medicine Papers]
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2474 words
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Do Implanted Embryonic Dopamine Neurons in Parkinson's Disease in Patients Provide Relief or Not - ... There was also a theory that damage to the STN would relief some of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and to prove this, a test was conducted on monkeys. The results were that there was an immediate relief of akinesia and bradykinesia in contralateral limbs, this was the first support of a positive role that the STN serves on hyperkinetic disorders. (Freed, 2001) The purpose of this study was to see whether implanted embryonic dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease patients led to a relieve of symptoms and also to see whether age played a role in whether the implanted neurons survived....   [tags: hyperkinetic disorders, involuntary movements] 1261 words
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Examining the Health Care Needs of a Patient with Parkinson’s Disease - ... Sufferers with this sickness are most often seen in outpatient facilities in the early stages of the disease and long term care hospitals in advanced and end stages (Baker & Gershanik, 2006). In the early diagnosis of Parkinson’s, patients are functioning independently and the treatments needed are simple. A family physician or general practitioner can provide the needed care for PD if trained properly. The more advanced stages demonstrate symptoms of motor complications that demand specialized attention....   [tags: brain, disorder, treatment, living]
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A Comparative Study of Parkinson’s Disease with Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease - ... Perea et al. compared different brain regions including the cingulum, corticospinal tract, corpus callosum, thalamus, putamen, temporal cortex, and frontal cortex. They compared white matter neural fibers using two markers. First marker used is the fractional anisotropy (FA); which is a scalar that used in diffusion process and has value between zero and one. It records the density of the neural fibers as well as the myelination of the white matter in different brain regions. Second marker used is mean diffusivity (MD); which is used to measure the diffusion of a specific brain region....   [tags: neurodegenerative diseases] 1192 words
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Depressive Symptoms in Population Affected by PD - Introduction. Some neuron-circuits, provide link of frontal cortex and basal ganglia. Basal ganglia involved in movement, attention, and memory processes. Knowing this, could clarify why disorders of the basal ganglia, are characterised by abnormalities of above mentioned processes (Ring & Serra-Mestres 2002). Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of basal ganglia function, which characterised by progressive destruction of the nigrostriatal pathway, thus ensuing decrease in striatal concentrations of neurotransmitter called dopamine (Porth et al 2005)....   [tags: Parkinson's Disease, Treatment, Depression]
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Music Therapy is the Best Medicine - Intense emotion and boundless energy courses through my veins when I listen to a song. I devour every note and without music I would feel starved. Not everyone feels the same way I do. To some people, life would continue to move on with or without songs. Whether a person loves or loathes music, music continues to be a significant aspect of everyone’s life. People are surrounded by pitch, melody, and rhythm every day. Before a child is even born, the fetus develops an auditory system between the seventeenth and nineteenth week of pregnancy, allowing it to experience the beauty of music for the first time (Musical Alertness in the Womb)....   [tags: parkinson's disease, melodic, patients] 830 words
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Selecting a Microorganism Able to Bioabsorb Aluminum from Water Systems - ... Physico-chemical methods such as chemical precipitation, chemical oxidation or reduction, filtration, ion exchange, electrochemical treatment, reverse osmosis, membrane technology and evaporation recovery have been widely used to remove heavy metal ions. These technologies usually produce wastes with high concentrations of metals which are a significant source of environmental pollution. Furthermore, the above methods may be ineffective or expensive, especially when the heavy metal concentrations are less than 100 mg/L (Ahluwalia and Goyal 2007)....   [tags: Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease prevention] 588 words
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Recent Advances in the Study of Protein Misfolding Diseases - ... The number of protein targets whose misfolding and aggregation is being shown to be associated with the onset of pathologic conditions is constantly increasing. Since the development of degenerative disorders is expected to increase at a similar rate than life expectancy, it is likely that in the years to come misfolding diseases would become more common and prevalent than previously thought. We should be prepared to deal with such a dramatic scenario and join research efforts to understand the molecular mechanism that underlie these devastating disorders without further delay....   [tags: degenerative disorders, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's] 574 words
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Stereotypes and Myths About The Use of Placebo in Medical Field - Nowadays, it is a generally acknowledged fact that most doctors prescribe or use placebo with or without patient’s consent in order to improve the outcome of the treatment. A placebo is a medically inert treatment or substance that is meant to delude the patient so that a physical relief of symptoms and enhancement in the patient’s medical condition can be observed. (Barnhill) Throughout the history, placebo has always been approached with apprehension and suspicion.(Horizon) It is quite a controversial subject in medicine but recent research shows that there is more to placebo than the stereotypes and the myths let on....   [tags: dopamine hormone, parkinson's decease]
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Dementia: Diseases Associated with Loss of Intellectual Functioning - Dementia is a broad term that describes a cluster of diseases associated with loss of memory, judgment, language, complex motor skills, and other intellectual functioning; usually caused by permanent damage of the brain nerve cells or neurons (Alzheimer’s Association, 2014). There are several types of dementia including: Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, dementia with lewy bodies, mixed dementia, Parkinson’s disease, frontotempal dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, normal pressure hydrocephalus, huntingtos disease, and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (Alzheimer’s Association, 2014)....   [tags: Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, nursing]
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Quantitative Study: Burdens among Parkinson’s disease Caregiver - Introduction “Parkinson’s is the second most common neurological disease after Alzheimer’s. It has been described as a chronic, progressive, neurological disorder, which generally not life-threatening but is incurable (Magennis & Corry, 2013). Parkinson disease has no antidote but has altered treatments. Patients require caregivers help when PD gradually starts to affects motor, cognitive and emotional functioning. Patients are hindered from fulfilling their daily needs, thus necessitating the caregiver’s assistance....   [tags: Neurological Disease, Literature Review]
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Brain Diseases: Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease - INTRODUCTION Brain, a complex organ, is vital for all of the body’s function. Any somatic and genetic variation in the brain can lead to various pathological and degenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Pick’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis etc. Injuries to the brain have a high tendency to perturb massive areas of the organ which in turn lead to defects in memory, cognition, learning, personality, and various other fundamental functions of the body. Injury can be a physical damage to the brain or the closed head injuries like the stroke, ischemia, and sudden blow, overdose of various drugs or the neurotoxins....   [tags: drugs, treatment] 2354 words
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Science Behind Alzheimer´s Disease and Parkinson´s Disease - Alzheimer’s disease (AD) In fact, the pathology of Aβ and tau in AD is not fully elucidated, it has been implied that intracellular Aβ oligomers impaired the proteasome activity which is contributing to the age-related pathological accumulation of Aβ and tau in AD mice model when Aβ oligomer levels are high (Tseng et al., 2008). Together with Aβ, tau which is an intrinsically unstructured protein associated with microtubules also involves in the pathology of AD (Lee et al., 2013; Selkoe, 2011). Whether the significance of Ub-independent and Ub-dependent degradation of tau within the cell through the UPS and autophagy is contradictory, accumulation of ubiquitin positive tau tangle, associatio...   [tags: system, influence, formation] 1011 words
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Division and Fusion in Mitochondria - Division and Fusion in Mitochondria Mitochondria are essential organelles in many cells. Each component of mitochondria have distinct roles that they must partake in for the sake of the cell’s survival. Mitochondria have their own genetic system that encodes directions for the mitochondria’s different processes. Oxidative phosphorylation, an activity that is necessary to the cell takes place within the mitochondria, along with electron transport. Mitochondria also take part in processes that benefit themselves, including fusion and division (Hales, 2010)....   [tags: cellular biology, parkinson's disease]
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Lee Silverman Voice Treatment - Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) is primary utilized as a voice treatment for individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and attempts to increase vocal loudness and improve vocal function (Ramig L, Sapir S, Fox C, and Countryman S, 2001) (Countryman S, Hoehn M, O’Brien C, Pawlas A, Ramig L, and Sapir S, 2001). There has also been success in utilizing this treatment protocol for patients with dysarthria associated with stroke, and traumatic brain injury as well as children who have cerebral palsy and Down syndrome (Spielman, J Ramig L Mahler L Halpern A Gavin W 2007, )R., Theodoros, D., & Cornwell, P....   [tags: Health, Parkinson’s Disease ] 552 words
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Lee Silverman Voice Treatment - Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) is primary utilized as a voice treatment for individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD), it’s main focus is that it attempts to increase vocal loudness and improve vocal function (Countryman S, Hoehn M, O’Brien C, Pawlas A, Ramig L, and Sapir S, 2001)(Ramig L, Sapir S, Fox C, and Countryman S, 2001). There has also been success in utilizing this treatment protocol for clients with dysarthria associated with stroke, and traumatic brain injury as well as children who have cerebral palsy and Down syndrome (Marchant, J., McAuliffe, M., & Huckabee, M....   [tags: Health, Parkinson’s Disease] 562 words
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Parkinson’s Disease and Medical Treatment Options - Parkinson’s Disease and Medical Treatment Options For many 50 year olds, tasks such as writing or walking can be easily preformed without much attention. In fact, the term “task” seems to stress that there is a greater level of effort than is truly exerted in order for the average person to perform these actions. However, for a patient of Parkinson’s Disease who is diagnosed on average at the age of 50, these every day activities take a great deal of time, attention, and effort to be preformed (Huston)....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
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The Controversy over Stem Cells and Parkinson's Disease - The Controversy over Stem Cells and Parkinson's Disease Without any thought, without even noticing it happens, when one has an itch, they scratch it. The arm moves up to the face, the fingers reach down and move across the skin. This series of actions, which many of us do everyday is something individuals with Parkinson's disease struggle with every moment of their lives. Simple movements are replaced by frozen limbs that they or their nervous system can not move. Described by many as a type of momentary paralysis, the disease causes gradual degeneration in patients until they are no longer able to perform the most basic bodily functions, such as swallowing or blinking....   [tags: Health Diseases Medical Medicine Essays]
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Fetal Brain Tissue Transplantation in Parkinson's Disease Patients - Fetal Brain Tissue Transplantation in Parkinson's Disease Patients Parkinson's disease is a neurological disorder characterized initially by muscular rigidity and slowing of voluntary movements (1). Ultimately, the characteristics are tremor, mask-like faces, decreased spontaneous blinking, flexion posture and sometimes cognitive impairment. The neuropathology of Parkinson's disease generally involves loss of cell bodies in all melanin-containing brain regions and invariably a loss of substantia nigra dopamine-containing neurons (DA)....   [tags: Medical Health Essays]
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Fetal Neural Transplantation in the Treatment of Parkinson's and Huntington - Two Diseases, One Hope: Fetal Neural Transplantation in the Treatment of Parkinson's and Huntington's Disease Parkinson's Disease (PD) and Huntington's Disease (HD) are neurodegenerative diseases that are caused by malfunctions within the motor sector of the nervous system. These malfunctions, which are caused either by the surplus (as in HD) or absence (as in PD) of hormones, are a direct result of neural cell deterioration within the brain. PD and HD illustrate two very different behavioral patterns that are subsequently caused by two opposite and extreme biological abnormalities....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Parkinson’s Disease and Action of Drugs on Movement - Parkinson’s Disease and Action of Drugs on Movement Introduction: Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder that seriously impairs motor function, with people afflicted with this condition exhibiting akinesia, muscle rigidity and having a tremor at rest. It is accepted that the loss of motor function is brought upon by the progressive degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, which leads to a corresponding loss of dopamine in the caudate/putamen part of the basal ganglia, which is accepted as the main receiving area in motor circuits....   [tags: Papers] 526 words
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Parkinson’s Disease - Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson’s disease is a disease with a wide variety of disabilities recognizable as changes in appearance, posture, walking, and balance. In 1817, the English physician James Parkinson described these symptoms in his patients and has had his name become synonymous with the disease. In 1893 the substantia nigra of the basal ganglia was identified as an area of disease for Parkinson’s. Examination with the naked eye reveals a lack of black pigment in this portion of the brainstem....   [tags: Medicine Health Biology Research]
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RNA Interference in Biotechnology and Pharmacetics - ... Dr. Youle and his colleagues worked alongside Scott Martin using robotics to introduce small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the human cell which individually inhibited around 22,000 genes. This was followed by automated microscopy to determine how silencing each gene would affect the ability of parkin to tag the mitochondria. The researchers used RNAi to identify genes that aid parkin in tagging damaged mitochondria. They found that genes, TOMM7, HSPAI1L, BAG4 and SIAH3, may assist in either inhibiting parkin (TOMM7, HSPAI1L) or enhancing tagging (BAG4, SIAH3)....   [tags: medicine, Parkinson’s and Lung Cancer]
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1196 words
(3.4 pages)
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Should Society Throw in the Towel on Boxing - Originating from the Ancient Greeks over 13 centuries ago, boxing has been a highly anticipated, globally entertaining sport watched by millions. However, today's society has began to raise an eyebrow over the relevance of boxing in today's age. Many, without much knowledge on the sport, would argue that it causes fatal injuries, brain damage and illnesses that boxers will have to live with for the rest of their lives. Some say it shows the dark side of sport for younger generations and ties them up in a life of violence....   [tags: brain injuries, muhammad ali, parkinson's]
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Stem Cells: The Cure for Uncontrollable Diseases of the Past - ... Naturally, he shares this belief with many people especially those viewing this from a religious standpoint. Religiously, people regard the use of embryonic stem cells as unnecessarily throwing away the lives of humans in the name of medical advancement, which, in the end, does not justify it. Some have even gone further to support this belief by citing part of the Hippocratic Oath which states “first, do no harm” (Kiessling 184-94). The opponents of embryonic stem cells stick to the belief that destroying one human’s life to save and cure others is not worth it because it makes you wonder, where will the line be drawn....   [tags: Parkinson's, Lou Gehrig, Alzheimer's disease] 1262 words
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Community Health Nursing Case Review - Parkinson’s disease is a disorder that affects the nerve cells, in a part of the brain that controls the movement of muscles. Symptoms of this debilitating disease include trembling of hands, arms, legs, jaw and face, stiffness of arms, legs and trunk, slowness of movement, poor balance and coordination. As symptoms get progressively worse, people may experience depression, sleep problems, swallowing and speaking problems. Till now there is no cure for this disease. Viewpoint of Client- This client lived her entire life very actively....   [tags: Medical Ethics, Parkinson’s Disease]
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Hunting Down Bad Genes - As people approach old age, often times, their bodies deteriorate. Along with the occasional knee replacement or mandatory walker they must push around, the mind also loses its youthful vigor. This languishment of the mind can commonly be linked to dementia or a prodigious amount of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Disease, or on a rare occasion, Huntington’s Disease. Huntington’s is a lesser-known problem that is associated with not only the declination of memory, but also the loss of muscle control....   [tags: alzheimer’s, parkinson’s disease]
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1669 words
(4.8 pages)
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The Brain and Parkinson´s Patients - ... All neural networks consist of something known as a learning rule which through the backpropagation modifies the weights of the connection according to the input pattern obtained. Neuroplasticity is the brains ability to undergo adaption and psychological change that results from ones interaction with ones environment. Neuroplasticity allows one to learn from and adapt to the different experiences in one’s life. It is considered the foundation for cognitive and physical rehabilitation by rebuilding and strengthening the connections between neurons....   [tags: brain damage, neural networks] 1231 words
(3.5 pages)
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