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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Ode on a Grecian Urn"
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Truth and Art: Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn - Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn" offers a paradoxical concept of Beauty. It describes the frozen beauty portrayed on the Urn as sweeter than reality, for its expiration is a locked impossibility. The lover's kiss is sweeter when in waiting, and her timeless beauty and devotion are worth the kiss's impossibility. Thus, the observation of beauty is more sweet than its reception, and objects in their prime are best just before their expiration. This poem is reminiscent of Shakespeare's sonnets in its zeal for permanent youth and disdain for time's drain on youth's beauty....   [tags: Ode on a Grecian Urn Essays] 394 words
(1.1 pages)
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Physical Value in Keats' Ode on a Grecian Urn - Physical Value in Keats' Ode on a Grecian Urn The poetry of John Keats contains many references to physical things, from nightingales to gold and silver-garnished things, and a casual reader might be tempted to accept these at face value, as simple physical objects meant to evoke a response either sensual or emotional; however, this is not the case. Keats, in the poem Ode Upon a Grecian Urn, turns the traditional understanding of physical objects on its head, and uses them not solid tangible articles, but instead as metaphors for and connections to abstract concepts, such as truth and eternity....   [tags: Ode on a Grecian Urn]
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Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats - Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats Summary In the first stanza, the speaker, standing before an ancient Grecian urn, addresses the urn, preoccupied with its depiction of pictures frozen in time. It is the "still unravish'd bride of quietness," the "foster-child of silence and slow time." He also describes the urn as a "historian," which can tell a story. He wonders about the figures on the side of the urn, and asks what legend they depict, and where they are from. He looks at a picture that seems to depict a group of men pursuing a group of women, and wonders what their story could be: "What mad pursuit....   [tags: Ode Grecian Urn John Keats Essays] 1531 words
(4.4 pages)
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Truth in Keats' Ode on a Grecian Urn and Cummings' since feeling is first - Truth in Keats' Ode on a Grecian Urn and Cummings' since feeling is first Truth remains a mysterious essential: sought out, created, and destroyed in countless metaphysical arguments through time. Whether argued as being absolute or relative, universal or personal, no thought is perceived or conceived without an assessment of its truth. In John Keats' "Ode on a Grecian Urn" and E.E. Cummings' "since feeling is first" the concern is not specifically the truth of a thought, but rather, the general nature of truth; the foundation which gives truth is trueness ....   [tags: Ode Grecian Urn]
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1807 words
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Ode on a Grecian Urn - In “Ode on a Grecian Urn” Keats uses the urn as a symbolism he talks about the urn being a human being. The poet speaks of the urn designs that are process in time by the artist which the urn became a beautiful master piece of art that comes alive. The urn is a beautiful ancient object designed with fascinated pictures imprinted on the side. He brings the pictures to life as he goes into a fantasy world thinking of lovers that are frozen in time. He thinks of a relationship the lovers could have and what if they pursue their love interest....   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 476 words
(1.4 pages)
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Ode on a Grecian Urn - Born on October 31st, 1895 John Keats was the eldest of four siblings to his two parents, Thomas and Frances Jennings Keats, in the town of Moorgate, England. His family was finically stable early in his life due to his father’s job as a manager and then later owner of his father-in-laws stable. With this income they had the ability to purchase a home and to also send John and his siblings to a small liberal academy nearby their home (Contemporary Authors Online). While at school, he met and befriended a boy named Charles Clarke who was the son of the head master....   [tags: John Keats, Biography, Poet]
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Ode to a Grecian Urn by John Keats - “ Forever warm and still to be enjoyed; Forever panting and forever young….” These words from the poem, Ode to a Grecian Urn was written by John Keats, an English poet of the nineteenth century. This sentence expresses the romance and love of life that John Keats represented. Keats lived during the romantic period, which was a time that focused on the individual, emotions and nature. Although Keats died very young, during his short life he wrote many poems, particularly odes. An ode is a type of poem that can be about an object; a person or anything that one feels extremely passionate about....   [tags: Poem, Poetic Analysis, Biography, Writer]
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John Keats: Ode on a Grecian Urn - ... By the expression 'Sylvan historian', Keats wants to suggest that this man is not only a man of knowledge, but a man of nature, he symbolises the perfect coexistence and symbiosis of man and nature. Keats also lays emphasis on the fact that this man is able to be better, than him: 'who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme:'. It seems like Keats acknowledges that the urn is not only better than him, but it's even better than poetry itself. Then Keats addresses a couple of questions in relation with the urn, it seems like he does not really know what is on the urn, what happens there....   [tags: english romanticism, antique world] 1762 words
(5 pages)
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Poetry Analysis: "Ode On a Grecian Urn" - The twenty-four old romantic poet John Keats, “Ode on a Grecian Urn” written in the spring of 1819 was one of his last of six odes. That he ever wrote for he died of tuberculosis a year later. Although, his time as a poet was short he was an essential part of The Romantic period (1789-1832). His groundbreaking poetry created a paradigm shift in the way poetry was composed and comprehended. Indeed, the Romantic period provided a shift from reason to belief in the senses and intuition. “Keats’s poem is able to address some of the most common assumptions and valorizations in the study of Romantic poetry, such as the opposition between “organic culture” and the alienation of modernity”....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]
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Kubla Khan and Ode on Grecian Urn - Although both “Kubla Khan,” by Samuel Coleridge and “Ode on Grecian Urn,” by John Keats are poems originating from the poets’ inspiration from historical figure, the two poems convey different messages through their respective metaphors. While Coleridge emphasizes on the process of creating a Romantic poem, Keats expresses his opinion about art by carefully examining the details of the Grecian urn. In “Kubla Khan,” Coleridge expresses his desire to use the inspirations from nature to create his own “Paradise” of poetry (54, p.1634)....   [tags: Comparative, Coleridge, Keats] 826 words
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Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn, and Ode to Autumn - Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn, and Ode to Autumn The casual reader of John Keats' poetry would most certainly be impressed by the exquisite and abundant detail of it's verse, the perpetual freshness of it's phrase and the extraordinarily rich sensory images scattered throughout it's lines. But, without a deeper, more intense reading of his poems as mere parts of a larger whole, the reader may miss specific themes and ideals which are not as readily apparent as are the obvious stylistic hallmarks....   [tags: John Keats Poetry Poem Symbolism Symbol] 1467 words
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Ode to a Grecian Urn - Ode to a Grecian Urn In the early 19th century it was not unusual to make a work of art, painting or sculpture a subject of a poem. Taken literally, the poem 'Ode to a Grecian Urn' is a poem about a vase, but Keats has inverted the traditional understanding of physical, tangible objects and transformed them into metaphors for abstract concepts, such as truth and time. An urn is primarily used to preserve the ashes of the dead. The theme of the Ode, accordingly, has to do with the relationship between imagination and actuality, and the supremacy and immortality of a work of art if compared to our ordinary life....   [tags: John Keats Poems Poetry Vases Essays]
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John Keats' Ode on a Grecian Urn and Ode to a Nightingale - John Keats' Ode on a Grecian Urn and Ode to a Nightingale John Keats, in "Ode on a Grecian Urn" and "Ode to a Nightingale" attempts to connect with two objects of immortality to escape from the rigors of human life. In "Ode to a Nightingale", Keats attempts to connect with a bird's song because the music knows nothing of aging and mortality. Keats has the same motivation in "Ode on a Grecian Urn" while trying to connect with three separate images on a mysterious urn. Connecting in this sense means to either fully understand the object or become the object itself....   [tags: Papers Keats Poem Poetry Essays]
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Ode On A Grecian Urn - Critical Analysis - “More happy love. more happy, happy love!” (Keats, line 25). When one reads lines such as this, one cannot help but think that the poet must have been very, very happy, and that, in fact, the tone of the poem is light and filled with joy. However, this is not the case in John Keats’s poem, Ode on a Grecian Urn. At first glance, the tone of the poem seems light and flowery. However, when one looks deeper into the poem to find its underlying meanings, one discovers that the tone of the poem is very morbid....   [tags: John Keats Poem Poetry]
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A Critical Analysis of Ode on a Grecian Urn - A Critical Analysis of Ode on a Grecian Urn The Romantic Period introduced a variety of writing styles. The authors of the early eighteenth century altered many of the earlier romantic pieces. The early writers primary area of concern was nature. It was not until the ladder part of the eighteenth century that authors began to focus on the supernatural as well as nature. John Keats unique style of writing gave the world a great respect for his work. Keats felt his poetry should effect the readers emotions, and only great poetry could move the reader to the point of enjoyment....   [tags: Papers] 1126 words
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An Ode to a Grecian Urn by John Keats - An Ode to a Grecian Urn by John Keats John Keats's poem "An Ode to a Grecian Urn", is written encompassing both life and art. Keats uses a Grecian urn as a symbol of life. He refers to the Greek piece of art as being immortal, with its messages told in endless time. Walter J. Bate explains that the Sisobas Vase that Keats traced at the home of his artist friend Haydon, the Townly Vase at the British Museum, or the Borghese Vase in the Louvre, are suggested by scholars to possibly be the ones that Keats had in mind while writing his poem (510-511)....   [tags: Papers] 567 words
(1.6 pages)
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Role of Works of Art in Ode on a Grecian Urn and Musée des Beaux Arts - While differing in technique and subject matter, John Keats’ “Ode on a Grecian Urn” (1820) and W.H. Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” (1940) demonstrate how using the rhetorical device of Ekphrasis in poetry helps to guide the reader to the central themes and messages of the poem. Both poems confront and explore the works of art differently: while Keats uses the rustic urn (in which scenes and myths are depicted upon it) to confront the nature as well as the limits of the world of art and fantasy; Auden uses Brueghel’s painting, The Fall of Icarus, in his second stanza to help reinforce the speaker’s comments (stated within the first stanza) on the apathy or indifference that seems to be presen...   [tags: ekphrasis, poetry, composition]
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Keats and the Senses of Being: Ode on a Grecian Urn (Stanza V) - Keats and the Senses of Being: "Ode on a Grecian Urn" (Stanza V) ABSTRACT: With its focus on the pathos of permanence versus temporality as human aporia and on the function — the Werksein — of the work of art genuinely encountered, John Keats’s Ode on a Grecian Urn is a particularly compelling subject for philosophical analysis. The major explications of this most contentiously debated ode in the language have largely focused, however, on various combinations of the poem’s stylistic, structural, linguistic, psychological, aesthetic, historical, symbolic, and intellectual-biographical elements....   [tags: Keats Poem Ode Essays]
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How John Keats used Symbolism in his Ode to a Grecian Urn - How John Keats used Symbolism in his “Ode to a Grecian Urn” John Keats was born in 1795 in Moorfields, England. He was the son of a stableman who married the owner’s daughter and eventually inherited the stable for himself. He was fourteen when his mother died of tuberculosis. Having been apprenticed to an apothecary at the age of fifteen, John felt the need to leave medical field to focus primarily poetry. Keats’s imagery ranges from all of our physical sensations: sight, touch, sound, taste, and sexuality....   [tags: essays research papers] 1458 words
(4.2 pages)
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Imagery Used in Keats' Poems - Imagery Used in Keats' Poems Strong imagery is the basis of structure in many poems. Literal and metaphorical imagery words aid the reader with interpreting the main ideal of the poem. Ode to a Grecian Urn, Ode to a Nightingale and On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer are three of John Keats’ poems which contain this descriptive imagery to give structure and meaning. Keats makes the decorative language as the medium for the passion that he holds for his subject. Ode to a Grecian Urn is a poem in which Keats makes imagery explain the physical aspects of an urn as well as the message behind its appearance....   [tags: John Keats Ode to a Grecian Urn Essays] 532 words
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The Beauty of Potentiality in Keats’ “Grecian Urn” - John Keats’ belief in the beauty of potentiality is a main theme of him great “Ode on a Grecian Urn.” This idea appears in many of his other poems that precede this ode, such as “The Eve of St. Agnes,” but perhaps none of Keats’ other works devote such great effort to showcase this idea. The beauty of the Grecian Urn (likely multiple urns), and its strength as a symbol, is a masterful mechanism. Just about all facets of this poem focus on an unfulfilled outcome: but one that seems inevitably completed....   [tags: Poetic Themes] 909 words
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Ode On A Grecin Urn - Ode on a Grecian Urn Throughout his “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, Keats uses innocent, unfulfilled images painted on the urn, to demonstrate the theme of innocence and eternal beauty.      In the first stanza the speaker standing before an ancient Grecian urn, addresses the urn, preoccupied with its depiction of pictures frozen in time. This is where Keats first introduces the theme of eternal innocence and beauty with the reference to the “unvarnished bride of quietness”(Keats). Because she has not yet engaged in sexual actions, the urn portrays the bride in this state, and she will remain like so forever....   [tags: John Keats]
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Free Essays - Ode to a Nightingale - Ode to a Nightingale One must be armed with a little knowledge of Greek mythology before taking on Keats; Hyperion, for example, is filled with allusions to Milton's Paradise Lost. After reading and re-reading Ode on a Grecian Urn I decided that it would be best to only comment on Ode to a Nightingale (because I'm baffled with Keats). I found him very hard to understand. You can't just sit down and read Keats like a Grimm's fairy tale. Keats must be read with great scrutiny; otherwise, you'll miss his point....   [tags: Ode Nightingale Essays] 586 words
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John Keats's Ode to Indolence - John Keats has many memorable and distinct poems. He is well known for his ability to write and adored by many. Ode on Indolence is a poem that can be relatable to its readers due to its idea of how indolence interferes with life’s opportunities, in particular the three mentioned in the poem, love, ambition and poesy. Keats refers to these three figures as “ghosts” (51) therefore insinuating that they once lived, but now they are mere figments of energy and air. Keats’ poem six stanzas of ten lines each in iambic pentameter, he begins his poem with a passage from Matthew 6:28, “They toil not, neither do they spin”, he uses this as reference for describing the three figures of the poem....   [tags: Keats, indolence, poetry]
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“Beauty is truth, truth beauty” - Of the five odes written by John Keats, this ode was written to show the beauty of love through a work of art. This work of art is a Grecian Urn, one side adorned with a woman being pursued by a “bold lover” and on the other a priest leading a heifer to be sacrificed. The beauty of this poem is given in five stanzas of iambic pentameter with a two part rhyme scheme, giving the poem a sense of a two part structure and, furthermore, two meanings just as there are two sides of the urn. The manifest meaning is one of the picture being timeless and the love eternal, while the latent meaning is that of silence and how love can be expressed without word or sound....   [tags: Poetry Analysis]
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Keats and Ekphrasis - In John Keats’, “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, there is an noticable emphasis on the ambiguity of this Ode when compared to the others Keats wrote at that time. “What are we to make of the tonal perplexity with which Ode on a Grecian Urn… begins…- since the performance of ekphrasis is supposed to exude a speaker’s confidence for the task?” (Kelley 172) Here, Theresa M. Kelley also debates, at first, the truth of the sonnet. In the Ode, the Urn is the object to visualize and the speaker is to absorb the object....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Comparative, Character Analysis] 1456 words
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Oh, Tis' Beauty We Learn - John Keats, a second generation romantic, is regarded as one of the most influential poets of all time. Though his work was anything but sad or bleak, Keats led a life of many tragedies. At the age of 8, Keats’ father passed away and only 6 years later his mother died of tuberculosis. After studying to be a doctor Keats realized his true passion was in composing poetry and followed his dream, but through another series of unfortunate events his brother died of tuberculosis and he could not marry his romantic love because of his health and financial state....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]
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Keats: A Life Lesson from A Piece of Marble - Time is an ever constant moving aspect of life. It can build one up and tear one down in an instance, for everything revolves around time. In John Keats’s ever famous poem “Ode On A Grecian Urn” Keats ponders over the immortal world painted on the structure and the changing one in which all humans live in. The structure that makes the poem is one of many characteristics, two being rhyme and meter. “Ode On A Grecian Urn” is dominantly iambic pentameter (with ten syllables per line and five feet) which gives the poem a nice flow....   [tags: Literature]
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Troublemaking Interpretations of Horation Ode - Troublemaking Interpretations of Horation Ode         There exists debate of how one is to read Marvell's "Horation Ode," One of the most unexamined issues in the three essays, yet one which seems to be a presupposition for most of the argumentation that goes on between both parties, is Brooks's careful caveat early in his essay that his project is not to "reveal triumphantly that what it [Marvell's poem] really says is something quite opposed to what we have supposed it to be saying" ("Ode" 323)....   [tags: Horation Ode]
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The Last Hope for Beauty In Truth - Literature, as does philosophy and art, follows a continuous wave; with every the crest of a new era, there is a trough from the pervious era. When a new age of style and ideals surfaces, the ideas are often directly against the ideas of the previous period. The Romantic period was an era of emotion, it was no longer about logic or preciseness as it was during the time of Enlightenment period. Both artists and poets of the Romantic period, like John Keats, focused on the expression of feeling and demonstrated an affinity for nature....   [tags: Literary Elements]
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Poetry that Exemplifies the Characteristics of The Romantic Movement - ... 12-14)." In response, the persona likewise feels the flowers' happiness, saying that "A poet could not but be gay,/ In such a jocund company (li. 15-16)." The most important lines that indicate the adherence of the poem to the Romantic movement is when the persona says that "I gazed-and gazed-but little thought/ What wealth the show to me had brought (li. 17-18)." As he looked at the daffodils that brought him the emotion of joy, he was not thinking at all, but feeling. At the end of the poem, when he would feel "vacant or in pensive mood (li....   [tags: emotion, nature, beauty] 643 words
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An Analysis of Ode to the West Wind - An Analysis of Ode to the West Wind Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" appears more complex at first than it really is because the poem is structured much like a long, complex sentence in which the main clause does not appear until the last of five fourteen line sections. The poem's main idea is held in suspension for 56 lines before the reader sees exactly what Shelley is saying to the west wind, and why he's saying it. In the first four sections Shelley addresses the west wind in three different ways, each one evoking the wind's power and beauty....   [tags: Ode to the West Wind Essays] 1369 words
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Wordsworth's Ode: Intimations of Immortality - Wordsworth's Ode: Intimations of Immortality The fifth stanza of Wordsworth’s “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” is especially interesting to me because of the images it presents. It is at this point in the poem that Wordsworth resumes his writing after a two-year hiatus. In the fourth stanza, he poses the question, “Whither is fled the visionary gleam?” Stanza five is the beginning of his own answers to that question. Contrary to popular enlightenment ideas, Wordsworth suggests that rather than become more knowledgeable with age, man if fact is born with “vision splendid” and as he ages, that vision “dies away” and he left empty....   [tags: Wordsworth Ode immortality intimations Essays] 390 words
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Romanticism and Shelley's Ode to the West Wind - Romanticism and Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind"     M.H. Abrams wrote, "The Romantic period was eminently an age obsessed with fact of violent change" ("Revolution" 659). And Percy Shelley is often thought of as the quintessential Romantic poet (Appelbaum x). The "Ode to the West Wind" expresses perfectly the aims and views of the Romantic period. Shelley's poem expresses the yearning for Genius. In the Romantic era, it was common to associate genius with an attendant spirit or force of nature from which the genius came; the Romantics perceived the artist as a vessel through which the genius flows....   [tags: Ode West Wind]
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John Keats: The Next Shakespeare - ... The second structure Keats uses in his poems is personification, which can mostly be seen in “Ode on a Grecian Urn.” The use of personification in this poem can be seen when the poem states, “Sylvan historian, who canst thus express.” (Keats, Ode to a Grecian Urn, page 891, line 3) In these lines Keats is comparing the urn to a historian because of the ancient art work that covers the side of the urn. Keats throughout the entire poem talks to the urn as if it is a real person, he almost has a real conversation with is almost like two people would have together....   [tags: Poet, Structure, Poems]
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John Keats’ Ode to a Nightingale - John Keats’ Ode to a Nightingale As a poem, distinguished by a beauty that contrasts "real melancholy" with "imaginary relief" (Wullschlager, 4, quoting Leigh Hunt), Ode to a Nightingale was written at a time in his life when Keats found himself caught at the junction between two worlds. Published in the spring of 1819 (May, 1819), Keats' poem is written soon after a previous December that marked both the death of his brother Thomas Keats and an engagement to Fanny Browne. Struggling between "imaginative escape" and "human limitation" (Sperry, 264), Ode to a Nightingale pits tensions echoed in Keats' personal life....   [tags: Poem Poet John Keats Ode Nightingale Papers]
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Keats' Attitude Toward Art Revealed in His Poetry - Keats' Attitude Toward Art Revealed in His Poetry In order to be able to comprehend John Keats attitude toward art it is highly important to be aware of what he considers art to be. If it’s true art, it is certainly very beautiful and not heading toward becoming any worse in the future since “a thing of beauty is a joy for ever” ( Endymion: A poetic Romance). Art is simply frozen in time. However, a piece of art can not be taken as wonderful unless it has been adored by numerous people over a very long period of time....   [tags: Papers] 808 words
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Finding Deeper Meaning in Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat - Finding Deeper Meaning in Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat        First impressions are important when meeting new people, applying for jobs, and even when reading literature. It provides us with an idea of what is going on, where things are taking place, and who the important characters are. This first impression can be described is the Pre-Critical Response; the average reader performs this type of analysis every time he or she reads. For some people, this simplistic perspective is satisfactory; others find the quest for deeper understanding intriguing and part of the ultimate experience gained through literature....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays]
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Formalistic Approach to Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Formalistic Approach to Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) Formal analysis of poetry helps to unfold the underlying meaning of a poem. This technique does not focus on the author of the poem, or what was happening in history during the time when the poem was written, but instead puts emphasis on the actual mean of the work. Formal analysis breaths life into the literary work and allows the poem to speak for itself. For example, in Thomas Grays' poem "Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes," paying close attention to word choice, structure, and rhyme scheme illuminates the actions of the prowling cat....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 583 words
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Formalistic Approach to Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Formalistic Approach to Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) Ode to the Death of a Favourite Cat is a very interesting poem especially when you begin to break it down using the formalistic approach to literature. This poem at first glance could be taken as just another story about a cat that drowns trying to eat his prey, the goldfish. As we look more closely we realize that the poem has so many more meanings. The form of a poem is also a large component on the effectiveness. This poem has 7 stanzas with 6 lines in each....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 627 words
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Morals of Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Morals of Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) It is very difficult to understand what a writer mean when they write a poem, because you have to get in to a frame of mind that you think the writer was in when they composed the poem. In the Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes, Thomas Gray uses a cat and fish to teach a moral. In the Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes the setting was set in the first stanza. The poem gave you an idea that it took place in a very nice house that had a large china vase, that held water, also it give the allusion that in this vase were flowers and fish....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 662 words
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A Freudian Analysis of Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - A Freudian Analysis of Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) "Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat" can be a poem that represents a sexist view of women while identifying the three psychological entities; the id, ego, and superego. The cat in the poem represents the human female. Throughout the poem it is referred to as a "she", and identified with similar, sexist traits that women have. These traits are laziness, the need for shiny, pretty objects, and an unquenchable desire for material goods....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 545 words
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Formalistic Approach Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Formalistic Approach Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) In Thomas Gray's poem "Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat," we find many examples of the Formalistic Approach. In this poem, we find numerous examples of alliteration, rhyme scheme, puns, and creative word choice. This poem is very joyful and fun to read because the author is very creative in his choice of words and phrases. In the first stanza, we figure out where this event is taking place or in other words, we find out the setting....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 698 words
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The Dead Kitty in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - The Dead Kitty in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) Gray's "Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes" is a story of a curious cat that ends up in Purrgitory (ha ha). Gray uses not only formalistic literary devices, but he also uses dialog. As Gray speaks to the reader, he uses word choice and allusions to convey the correlation between women and cats. Word choice plays a major roll in this poem, due to the fact that it helps set up allusion and other literary devices....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 626 words
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Greed in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Greed in Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite)   Greed is one of the underlying themes found in Thomas Gray's Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat. This greed becomes the ultimate demise of the lead character, Selima the Cat. Mr. Gray uses a few different literary techniques to bring to life the inanimate written words. These techniques along with word choice allow for the possibility of many different interpretations of the text.   The general format Mr. Gray follows is seven stanzas of AACBBC form, wherein the A and B lines consist of eight syllables and the C lines consist of six....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 616 words
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Use of Birds in Keats' Ode to a Nightingale and Shelley's To a Sky-Lark - Use of Birds in Keats' Ode to a Nightingale and Shelley's To a Sky-Lark Of particular interest is the use of birds by two romantic poets. John Keats once listened to a bird song and gifted us with his Ode to a Nightingale. The sky-lark inspires Percy Shelley and through his vision of the bird we are privy to its beauty. Birds have always held a significance in human lives. While some animals were companions, others for labor or a source a food, our flying companions held an other-worldly place....   [tags: Ode to a Nightingale Essays]
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To Autumn, by John Keats - The poem “To Autumn” by John Keats was written with a sense of him describing his girl as a person, of whom he loved very dearly. This was the last great ode he was able to write before he died (Prince). This poem was written on crisp, fall day in September (Flesch). After Keats had composed this poem, he wrote a letter to his friend calling his work a genesis (Flesch). Even though this poem was written for Keats lover, it also described how as the seasons are changed to fall, summer still has a small grasp and sharpness to it as the seasons changed (Flesch)....   [tags: Alliteration, Poem Analysis]
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The Roman and Grecian Effects on Society - There are many areas in today’s society that reflect empires from early in human history. Much influence can be found from the Roman and Grecian empires, more than from any other sources. The basic forming of our own government can be traced back to the ideals that formed the Roman and Greek governments, paying attention their strengths and also to what caused the demise of those societies as well. (teachergenius.teachtci.com) Let us examine the Roman influences and facts first. Roman Governmental Influence: There was almost a caste system of sorts, an upper class of government which consisted of the Senatorial class which were rich and had much political clout....   [tags: Ancient Civilizations ]
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The Etruscans Set the Stage for Future Civilizations - The Etruscans were a fascinating civilization located in the city of Rome. Although they are practically unheard of in present day, they set the stage for all future civilizations ahead of them. While we do not have many remains of their culture, the few that we have give us an insight on to what life was like living in an Etruscan city. Cerveteri, also known as Caere, was an Etruscan metropolis located just outside Rome. It was thought to be home to around 25,000 people in 600 BCE. During the 7th century, Cerveteri went through a brisk economic advancement, causing it to become one of the main trading centers....   [tags: rome, grecian, tomb] 768 words
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John Keats Speech - John Keats Speech The writer I have chosen to speak about is the romanticist John Keats. I chose this particular poet as I believe his ideas are the best expressed of the composers we have studied. I have looked at "Ode on a Grecian Urn," "Ode on Melancholy" and "Ode to Autumn" and I think some important comparisons can be drawn from them. Each poem has been chosen because I think that the ideas conveyed in them are among the more significant in Keats's works. "Ode on a Grecian Urn" discuses the idea of immortality in a picture, and how if a moment is captured on an urn then does it exist always....   [tags: essays papers] 794 words
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Ode to the West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey by Wordsworth - "Ode to the West Wind" by Percy Bysshe Shelley and "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" by Wordsworth The two chosen pieces both have a dominant theme of nature. Shelley, in his poem 'Ode to the West Wind,'; uses poignant tone, while using personification and imagery to unravel his theme of nature. While Wordsworth's '...Tintern Abbey'; contains a governing theme of nature, Wordsworth uses first person narration, illusive imagery, as well as an amiable tone to avow his connection to nature....   [tags: Shelley Wordsworth Ode Tintern Essays] 705 words
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The Literary Techniques Used to Evoke the World of Senses in Keats Odes - Imagery is a primary literary technique a poet uses to capture the readers or listeners senses. We gain comprehension of the world through the use of our sense. Therefore, how the reader perceives a poem is always the most important aspect every poet considers whilst writhing. The images of a poem have the ability to appeal of each of our senses, taste, smell, touch, hearing and sight can all be heightened by certain aspects of poetry. The imagery of a poem has the ability to transport us into a different place or time, allowing the reader to experience new observations....   [tags: Literary Analysis ] 1576 words
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Plot in England in the Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - ... Heathcliff was gone for three years before returning. It is important to understand that Heathcliff returning to Wuthering Heights is for the purpose of seeking revenge on the people that have wronged him. Hindley receives money and squanders it away and once he dies Heathcliff takes over. Catherine dies also during childbirth, and Heathcliff ask to be haunted by her spirit on earth. Nelly Dean was her nursemaid. Heathcliff is cruel to his own son, Linton who he forces into pursuing Catherine; this is the only way that he can own interest in Thrush cross Grange and get revenge on Edgar Linton for taking his Beloved Catherine as his wife....   [tags: heathcliffe, alcoholic, nightingale] 717 words
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Keats Escaping from Reality - John Keats by all counts had a life riddled with sadness. His father died when he was young, and his mother left his life for a period after his death. Then when she reappeared, she was in poor health and died soon after. Not too long after that, his brother passed away as well. Keats struggled with money for most of his life. Despite being in good health, Keats was overwhelmed by the feeling that he too was destined for an early death. He ended up being right, and died at age 25. There was a period of time where Keats was crushed by critics and he was described by Percy Shelley as “a pale flower” in Adonais....   [tags: John Keats, reality, poetry, escapism, refuge]
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La Belle Dame Sans Merci by John Keats - La Belle Dame Sans Merci by John Keats John Keats was born in London on October 31, 1795. He was the son of a stable attendant who married the owner's daughter and later inherited the stable for himself. The elder Mr. Keats died when John was eight, leaving the family tied up in legal matters that lasted the rest of John's life. He was fourteen when his mother died of tuberculosis, and fifteen when his guardian apprenticed him to an apothecary-surgeon. Soon after, John left the medical field to focus primarily on poetry....   [tags: John Keats Belle Dame Sans Merci Essays] 418 words
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To Autumn - The Final Season In the Life of a Poet - To Autumn - The Final Season In the Life of a Poet        The years between 1818 and 1821 mark the final stage in John Keat's life. During this time period, Keats created some of his best poetry. These works would forever elevate Keats as a brilliant and talented poet whose mark would be left on the literary world forever. The last years of Keat's life were met with many challenges as well as inspirations. It was a combination of these which not only influenced, but inspired Keats to write such poems as, "The Eve of St....   [tags: Keats To Autumn Essays]
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Mortality and Immortality in Ode to a Nightingale - When talking about poetry and Romanticism, one of the most common names that come to mind is John Keats. Keats’ lifestyle was somewhat different from his contemporaries and did not fit the Romantic era framework, this is most likely the reason he stood out from the rest. Keats wrote many poems that are still relevant, amongst them Ode to a Nightingale, which was published for the very first time in July, 1819. The realistic depth and lyrical beauty that resonates in Ode to a Nightingale is astounding....   [tags: romantic poet, romantic era, john keats]
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Romantic Expressions of Mutability and Mortality - Romantic expressions of Mutability and Mortality The Romantic movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was a direct reaction to the established cultural ideals of the European Enlightenment. The values of the Enlightenment were based upon scientific rationality, but eventually this movement culminated in the bloodthirsty French Revolution, which, in turn, spawned violent upheaval throughout Europe. Many of the Romantic poets were greatly disenchanted by the barbarity displayed by their fellow man, and as a result, began to reject the logic-based, `enlightened' mindset of the times, aspiring instead to emotional ideals....   [tags: Poetry] 870 words
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Romanticism In Literature - Romanticism In Literature Romanticism in literature, began around 1750 and lasted until 1870. Different from the classical ways of Neoclassical Age(1660-1798), it relied on imagination, idealization of nature and freedom of thought and expression.      Two men who influenced the era with their writings were William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, both English poets of the time. Their edition of “Lyrical Ballads';, stressed the importance of feeling and imagination. Thus in romantic Literature the code was imagination over reason, emotion over logic, and finally intuition over science....   [tags: essays research papers] 513 words
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John Keats’ ODE ON MELANCHOLY - ODE ON MELANCHOLY by John Keats is the one of six poems that make up THE GREAT ODES all of which he had written in 1918. In contrast to the other odes, Keats himself fails to appear in the poem creating a divide between poet, author and reader; he speaks directly to the audience rather than to an abstract object or emotion. In doing this, Keats draws upon the readers own personal experience, since everyone – at some point – has experienced melancholy. Keats offers his insight on the topic by presenting two complementary ideas....   [tags: The Great Odes, Poetics Analysis]
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Biography of William Wordsworth - ... Tennyson grew up in a negative family environment, which ultimately led to Alfred writing poetry in order to mentally escape. As he aged, Tennyson’s work demonstrated the use of objects and sceneries to express a state of intense emotion. One common aspect within all of these poets’ works is that they dedicate admiration to certain objects. Each poem can be considered a love poem and each writer implements objects in order to become immersed within metaphysical insight. In Wordsworth’s, Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, he returns to a natural setting where once before he immersed himself in the heart of nature....   [tags: romatic poets, human perception] 2015 words
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Dionysus in Grecian Myth - Dionysus in Grecian Myth The god, Dionysus, fills an integral role in Grecian Myth. According to Euripides' Bacchae, Dionysus represents the animalistic and mystic life force that connects humanity to its innate earthy roots—roots that are illogical, chaotic, and instinctual. In this paper I will be discussing this aforementioned mystic life force and its existence in ancient Greece's supremely logical society. Being as completely logical as the ancient Greeks tended to be, they needed some sort of release valve that kept them from all going crazy in their otherwise rigid existence....   [tags: Papers] 575 words
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The Esthetic Theory and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - The Esthetic Theory and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man    In A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Dedalus defines beauty and the artist's comprehension of his/her own art. Stephen uses his esthetic theory with theories borrowed from St. Thomas Aquinas and Plato. The discourse can be broken down into three main sections: 1) A definitions of beauty and art. 2) The apprehension and qualifications of beauty. 3) The artist's view of his/her own work. I will explain how the first two sections of his esthetic theory relate to Stephen....   [tags: Portrait Artist Young Man]
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Ode to a Nightingale - Charles Brown, a friend with whom Keats was living when he composed this poem, wrote, In the spring of 1819 a nightingale had built her nest near my house. Keats felt a tranquil and continual joy in her song; and one morning he took his chair from the breakfast table to the grass-plot under a plum-tree, where he sat for two or three hours. When he came into the house, I perceived he had some scraps of paper in his hand, and these he was quietly thrusting behind the books. On inquiry, I found those scraps, four or five in number, contained his poetic feeling on the song of our nightingale....   [tags: poetry analysis] 2329 words
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Ode To A Nightingale - Ode To A Nightingale Choose a poem which you think could be described as a “quiet” or “reflective” poem. Show how the poet has achieved this effect and discuss to what extent you find it a suitable way of dealing with the subject matter in the poem. In your answer you must refer closely to the text and to at least two of mood; theme; sound; imagery; rhythm or any other appropriate feature. “Ode To A Nightingale” by John Keats is a poem which Keats wrote when he was dying. Due to this, the poem is extremely reflective on the things Keats considers important to him, namely life, death and his imagination....   [tags: English Literature] 834 words
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Effects of the Apostrophe on Communication in 'Ode to the Apostrophe' - ... The vocabulary used by Zeitlin is casual while incorporating some complex words, and examples of interesting word choices include “doge” as found in: “you probably doge traffic / on a ten speed” (7, 8). Interestingly, “doge” has no definition that fits the context where it is found, possibly being an intentional misspelling of “dodge” and “brevity” which is found in a sentence inspired by Shakespeare's Hamlet . Apart from the structure and vocabulary of the poem, the insight that Zeitlin delivers about the apostrophe must be analyzed further to understand the poem....   [tags: Elizabeth Zeitlin's poem analysis] 1035 words
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Ode of the West Wind by Percy Shelley - Percy Shelley was a rebellious writer. Many of the things that he had written didn’t really follow the social standards of his time. Many times, he would call something out or introduce many ludicrous ideas. He also was a huge fan of William Wordsworth, a poet who thought the Industrial Revolution was ruining our connection towards nature. So, Shelley tended to follow this theme, except in a more rebellious way and Adam Kirsch agrees when he states, “Unlike the average radical, then, Shelley didn't just challenge social taboos; he openly violated them, living his personal life in accordance with unpopular principles like equality, women's rights, and free love.” (Kirsch, Adam)....   [tags: too a skylark, spirit, nature]
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Comparison: Ode to a Nightingale & Dover Beach - John Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale,” and Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach” were written at different times by very different men; yet their conclusions about the human condition are strikingly similar. A second generation Romantic, Keats’s language is lush and expressive, strongly focused on the poet as an individual; while Arnold, a Victorian in era and attitude, writes using simple language, and is focused on the world in a broader context. While Keats is a young man, struggling with the knowledge he is soon to die; Arnold is a man newly married, to all accounts healthy, and with a long life ahead....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Human Suffering]
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Ode to The West Wind Poem Analysis - Percy Bysshe Shelley was the definition of a Romantic poet. His philosophical ideals emphasized the importance of aestheticism and his poetry clearly portrayed the beauty and majesty of the natural world. Like many of his Romantic peers, Shelley’s own life was short, tragic, and full of hardships. Drowned in a boating accident before the age of thirty, his one desire that his words would impact and inspire did not become a reality until long after his departure. In his poem, “Ode to the West Wind,” Shelley uses symbolism, simile, meter, imagery, and many other devices to present the power of nature and the speaker’s hope for this power to become part of him in his mission to bring about ins...   [tags: percy shelley, romantic poet, poems]
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Ode to the West Wind by Percy Shelley - ... Percy was in a relationship with Harriet. Percy and Harriet had two children, daughter Elizabeth Lanthe born in (1813-1876) and son Charles born in 1814. Percy made several trips to London to the bookshop and the home of William Godwin the father of Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin. He also studied the writing of Godwin’s and embraced his radical philosophy. Percy Shelley’s understanding of Godwin’s resulted to acquaintance with his daughter Mary. The love they had for each other grew in 1814. He eloped a second time with Mary and her stepsister Claire in tow settling in Switzerland (www.dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist)....   [tags: harriet, elizabeth, biography]
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I Am Beautiful! - Beauty is like potential and kinetic energy. Potential energy is the energy that has yet to be acted on, while kinetic energy is energy being used from that build-up of potential energy. Beauty that is yet to be realized is potential, and it is the connotation we have of ourselves that can be acted on, either in a negative or positive way. Let us shoot for the latter. As aforementioned, two spectrums of the issue always exist, and there is always a harmful ideology of beauty. Many women possess dangerously low self-esteems....   [tags: Beauty] 752 words
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Essay on Art in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - Art in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man               Stephen Dedalus' philosophy of art, expressed in his discussion with Lynch in Chapter Five, seems essentially romantic, yet the novel is written in a very realistic mode typical of the twentieth century. This apparent inconsistency may direct us to one way of interpreting this novel. Dedalus' idea of art may be Romantic, but because his world is no longer the world of the Romantics he has to see art more as a fundamental validation of his own being than as a communication of a special vision....   [tags: Portrait Artist Young Man]
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Essay: Analysis of Sonnet 95 - Analysis of Sonnet 95 How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose, Doth spot the beauty of thy budding name. Oh, in what sweets dost thou thy sins enclose. That tongue that tells the story of thy days, Making lascivious comments on thy sport, Cannot dispraise but in a kind of praise. Naming thy name , blesses an ill report. Oh what a mansion have those vices got Which for thy habitation chose out thee, Where beauty's veil doth cover every blot And all things turns to fair that eyes can see....   [tags: Sonnet essays] 1294 words
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Ode to autumn not a poem? - J. Keats utilizes a vast array of vocabulary and diction in Ode to autumn. Yet with these layers upon layers of vocabulary comes a disintegration of the rawest form of human being: Emotion. Sometimes, the best form of emotion is a heartfelt prose without metaphors or imagery. It is a tool every writer learns to use, the ability to convey emotion. Loss, joy, anger, writers are able to find a way to express their emotion through the thickest of metaphors. If the writer is not able to convey a certain emotion, doesn’t that defeat the purpose of writing a poem....   [tags: essays research papers] 498 words
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Immortality and Symbolism in John Keat's Nightingale Ode - The nightingale and the discussion about it are not simply about a bird or a song but about human experience in general. Nightingale is not an eternal entity. There are many images of death within the poem. The images are particular and sensuous, but not highly visual. Nightingale experiences a sort of death but actually it is not a real death nightingale is mysterious and even disappears at the end of the poem but nightingale itself is symbol of continuity or immortality and is universal and undying in contrast with the morality of human beings....   [tags: Poetry Analysis, Poem Analysis] 541 words
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Ode to Autumn by John Keats - Ode to Autumn by John Keats This poem that I am going to be focusing on is titled "Ode to Autumn", written by John Keats. This poem shows an aspect of the natural world and I am going to prove in detail how the techniques used by the poet made me think more deeply about the subject. The title of this poem is "Ode to Autumn". This is basically what the poem is about. The poem focuses on autumn, one of the four seasons. I am going to be focusing on two techniques used by the poet which are mood and word choice....   [tags: Papers] 716 words
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Ode To The West Wind - Theme :- Inspiration in “Ode to the West Wind'; “When composition begins, inspiration is already on the decline'; - P. B. Shelley Shelley deals with the theme of inspiration in much of his work. However it is particularly apparent in ‘Ode to the West Wind’ where the wind is the source of his creativity. The cycles of death and rebirth are examined in an historical context with reference to The Bible. The word inspiration has several connotations that Shelley uses in this ‘Ode’....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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"Ode to a Nightingale" by John Keats - "Ode to A Nightingale" is a poem in which Keats uses detailed description to contrast natural beauty and reality, life and death. In the opening verse, the writer becomes captivated by the nightingale's peaceful song. Throughout, the song becomes a powerful spell that transcends the mortal world of Keats. Interwoven throughout the poem are his thoughts about death. It is important to note that Keats' father & mother died when he was young and his brother had recently died of tuberculosis, which probably accounts for this focus....   [tags: Poetry] 820 words
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Ode to the West Wind by PB Shelley : The Role of The Poet - The Role of the Poet in Ode to the West Wind The poem “Ode to the West Wind” by PB Shelley is a “highly thought provoking poem” (Rajasekharuni.) that makes the readers think about what makes life pleasant and unpleasant. The speaker in the poem tells that the answer lies “in the attitude of the liver” (Rajasekharuni). As humans, we find the cycle of seasons as natural but complain when we have to endure good and bad times. We do not see the course of the natural world in the same way as we see changes such as revolutions and war....   [tags: provoking poem, pleasant, readers]
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Tintern Abbey, Frost at Midnight and Ode to the West Wind - Romanticism was a revolutionary movement which began in English Literature (mainly poetry) around the Eighteenth Century in Western Europe and gained height during the times of the Industrial Revolution. Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Coleridge and Blake were regarded as the ‘Big Six’ of Romanticism. In ‘Tintern Abbey’ by William Wordsworth, ‘Frost at Midnight’ by Samuel Coleridge and ‘ Ode to the West Wind’ by Percy Shelley, we see clearly that nature is the central trigger for the poet’s imagination to take wings and to help each poet to seriously explore his inner world in a meditative manner; the treatment and responses to nature are also similar, despite some individual differences....   [tags: English Literature] 2048 words
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