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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Native American Culture"
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Native North American Culture and Its Demise - A topic specifically examined in Chapter 4 in section 4.4 is the conflict between the European colonizers and the indigenous people of the lands they conquered. The conflict between the two vastly different groups is the notion of religion and culture. Europeans could not tolerate the practice of non-Christian religions in their newly conquered lands and began to oppress the ethnic groups and destroy the cultures of the conquered. Specifically, in North America many Native ethnic groups’ cultures were destroyed by British, French and Dutch colonizers....   [tags: religion, culture, groups, conflict] 565 words
(1.6 pages)
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Native American Culture - Overview “Perhaps there is no other group in the world that has quite so diverse and rich culture as that of the Native Americans. With their gilded history that is rich in strife, struggle, and triumph, the Native American culture is indeed very colorful” (Bantwal). Native American culture is very diverse and it has a very colorful history. It is extremely diverse and in fact the term Native American is a broad term that is used to cover all Native tribes in America. Throughout history there has been conflict not only among the different tribes but also there was plenty of fighting against the white men....   [tags: communication, tribes, alaska]
:: 7 Works Cited
1399 words
(4 pages)
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Native American’s, Stereotypes, Discrimination, and Ethnocentrism - Many races are unjustly victimized, but Native American cultures are more misunderstood and degraded than any other race. College and high school mascots sometimes depict images of Native Americans and have names loosely based on Native American descent, but these are often not based on actual Native American history, so instead of honoring Native Americans, they are being ridiculed. According to the article Warriors Survive Attack, by Cathy Murillo (2009) some “members of the Carpentaria community defended Native American mascot icons as honoring Chumash tradition and the spirit of American Indian Warriors in U.S....   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 1 Works Cited
990 words
(2.8 pages)
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Native American Flutes - Although Native Americans are known for their voice being a vital instrument, most rituals, songs, and dances are accompanied by an assortment of instruments such as, drums, rattles, flutes. Every instrument has it is own meaning and a purpose. In this section, the significance of these instruments as well as their structure and functionality is explored. The drums are a vital aspect to the Native American culture; they understand the drum to be more than an instrument. In a web article written by Elisa Throp entitled, “The importance of drums to Native American culture”, Elisa says, “It is a Voice....   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 4 Works Cited
1025 words
(2.9 pages)
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Native American Religion - When Europeans first set foot upon the shores of what is now the United States they brought with them a social structure which was fundamentally based around their concept and understanding of Western European Christianity. That the indigenous peoples might already have a thriving civilization, including religious beliefs and practices, that closely paralleled the beliefs and practices of European civilization, was a concept not considered by these early explorers and settlers. This European lack of cultural understanding created tensions, between Native Americans and Europeans, and later between Native Americans and Euro-Americans, that eventually erupted into open warfare and resulted in g...   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 22 Works Cited
2446 words
(7 pages)
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Peyote and Native American Culture - Peyote and Native American Culture Peyote was originally described in 1560, however it was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that botanists were able to conduct field research and correctly classify the cactus (Anderson, 1980). Field studies have concluded that there are two distinct populations of peyote which represent two species. The first and most common, Lophophora williamsii extends from southern Texas reaching south to the Mexican state of San Luis Potosi. The second and least common of the two species is Lophophora difusa, which occurs in the dryer terrain of the Mexican state of Queretaro....   [tags: Botany Biology Research Papers]
:: 8 Works Cited
1756 words
(5 pages)
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Native Peoples: Learning About The Extensive Native American Culture - ... Furthermore, the magazine illustrates jewelry and clothing for women. Nevertheless, men can also find this magazine interesting to read not only because we see many art crafts and tourism but also because some might be interested in learning about the history. The articles that are found in Native Peoples Magazine are very diverse and amusing. For instance, the articles illustrate the colorful and extravagant paintings and potteries of the Native American culture. The pictures in the articles depict the lifestyles of Native Americans back in the days in comparison to today’s form of dressing....   [tags: design, magazine, history]
:: 5 Works Cited
694 words
(2 pages)
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Big Money for a Little Culture - The constant whirring of electric slot machines, the clatter of drink glasses on a bar, the plethora of bright, flashing lights – these are typical in an average Native American casino. However, beyond the trivial entertainment these establishments provide, a much greater purpose is served. Native American communities are rampant with jobless members and poor fiscal conditions. A shabbily maintained economy could eventually lead to a loss of traditional lifestyles. Gambling establishments, especially those who donate a portion of their income to their respective reservations, assist in keeping economic and cultural order amongst tribes and contribute to decreasing unemployment....   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 4 Works Cited
1354 words
(3.9 pages)
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Religion and Spirituality in Native American Culture - Religion & Spirituality in the Native American Culture When the topic of the beliefs of the Native American culture arises, most people have generally the same ideas about the culture’s beliefs: they are very strong. Being part Native American myself, from the Cherokee tribe, I was raised to know my culture pretty well and follow the same beliefs that they teach and follow. One thing f that my grandma, who is the great-granddaughter of a Cherokee Chief, instilled in me is the importance of my beliefs in God....   [tags: essays research papers] 1603 words
(4.6 pages)
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Comparing the Assimilation into American Culture of the Irish and the Native American - Comparing the Assimilation into American Culture of the Irish and the Native American Many people would agree that the Irish have been successful in assimilating into American culture and the Native American has been unsuccessful. There have been many boundaries that both groups have encountered but they are more of a hardship for the Native American. These include Racial and Cultural boundaries, Personal boundaries, Sociological boundaries, Political and Economic boundaries, and Geographical boundaries....   [tags: Compare Contrast Sociological Boundaries] 418 words
(1.2 pages)
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Native American Culture in a Modern America: House Made of Dawn by Scott Momaday - Native American Culture in a Modern America House Made of dawn by Scott Momaday is about a Native American named Abel who struggles throughout his journey, always wanting to belong to his tribe, but his failure to immerse himself with his own culture as well as struggle with modern life leaves him devastated. This causes Abel to develop an alcohol problem and communication problems, with his tribe and also causes him to distrust Caucasian men around him. The novel portrays the identity crisis that Native American’s suffer, through Abels search for identity as he struggles to cope with the two very different worlds he is forced to live in....   [tags: tribes, communication problem, fitting in]
:: 7 Works Cited
2018 words
(5.8 pages)
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Native American Youth Gangs: A Culture Divided - When a person thinks of a “gang,” Native Americans are often not the first group of people that come to mind. Throughout the past 20 years however, Native American gangs have begun to draw attention to themselves. Though they often contrast their urban counterparts, Native gangs are a difficult force to be addressed by tribal leaders and authorities, as well as parents, and educators. Understanding such gangs is a difficult concept, using Native history and culture; this essay will provide insight into the emergence of Native gangs, as well as some prevention strategies taken on by the tribal communities....   [tags: Teenagers, Exclusion, Frustration]
:: 17 Works Cited
1634 words
(4.7 pages)
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Pueblo Dwellings: Anasazi People and Culture - Introduction When researching Pueblo dwellings and the Anasazi people "Anasazi meaning ancient ones in the Navajo language"(Lynnd2012). Information retaining to the culture and how permanent dwellings did not start until the Anasazi started growing their food. Prior to agriculture, all food was product of hunting and gathering, this made moving across the country more frequent to be able to gather enough food. Once they started to farm and cultivate they stated building the first sets of housing which consisted of holes in the grounds and only later would they build on top of the holes with stone and mortar, this didn't happen till around 750AD and was a means for storage....   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 12 Works Cited
1300 words
(3.7 pages)
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Charles Eastman: Bridging the Gap Between Cultures - Charles Eastman made great strides to bridge the gap between the Native Americans and the white man. Born a Santee Sioux, Eastman excelled in his assimilated life, thereby gaining the respect of the white man, which he used to assist the Native American. He was able to give a voice to the culture and its people, which was quickly being silenced by a Eurocentric government. Eastman exemplified the abilities of the Native American through his accomplishments as an author, lecturer, physician, and activist....   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 7 Works Cited
1228 words
(3.5 pages)
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Language Preservation of the Coushatta Peoples - The Contemporary Issues in Native American Culture provides a lot of varied topics and interests. In this paper, the main issue will be the topic of tribal language preservation. How tribes are able to raise money to enhance language efforts, how tribes are working to preserve the language, and how tribes are using language to maintain cultural awareness and identity will be discussed. Tribes are working hard to preserve their language through many different methods. For example, Rindels (n.d.) explains that tribes are using technology to be able to save their languages....   [tags: Native American culture]
:: 9 Works Cited
1302 words
(3.7 pages)
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World Music: The Emotional Effect of Music - ... This instrument is personal to the owner and it is generally not used by another musician. This instrument accompanies the drum to give a depth to the music. This instrument gives off a feeling of movement when accompanied with the African dance gives an even deeper meaning to the music. These instruments are important to the culture as they used this instrumental music to accompany a dance to express spiritual and cultural of their everyday lives. (12) The music clip that I have chosen features these two instruments for a feel of the climate and area of the country....   [tags: african, native american, culture]
:: 17 Works Cited
855 words
(2.4 pages)
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Kwakiutl Tribal Mask of the Pacific Northwest - The Kwakiutl Indian tribe existed before the discovery of North America by the European culture and inhabited the coast of the Pacific Northwest of the United States and British Columbia in Canada. The tribe is rich in tradition and culture and has remained steadfast in their beliefs, history, teachings and artisan skills which have been passed down generation to generation. The artisans in the Kwakiutl tribe mastered the art of creating special ceremonial masks that are not only beautiful and aesthetically interesting to the eye, but also mechanically intriguing in which the masks serve a specific purpose to a theme during different ceremonies that are conducted by tribal specialists during...   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 3 Works Cited
1100 words
(3.1 pages)
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Icon Attractions in Alaska - Icon Attractions in Alaska There are numerous attractions within the State of Alaska that can be considered Icon Attractions. Statistics have shown that tourists come to Alaska to experience the majestic beauty of its mountains, glaciers and wilderness. They come to witness the phenomenon of the Northern Lights creating amazing patterns across the sky or the Midnight Sun and the spectacular twilights it creates. People want to understand the history, traditions and cultural differences of the Inuit peoples who live in this state and they want to feel the exhilaration of finding gold nuggets in amongst the river rocks....   [tags: national parks, native american culture] 580 words
(1.7 pages)
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Cultural Aspects of the Navajo Indians - Culture gives definition to a group of people’s way of life. Culture defines people; It is who the people are. The Navajo Indians are a group located in the southwestern part of the United States with a distinct culture. They originated there sometime between the year “1200 and 1500” (Craats 4). Unlike the beginning of their residence in the United States, different aspects of the culture have changed, but the Navajo people still remain a culturally rich group of people. To this day, their political organization, economy, social organization, and religious beliefs are the four major elements that make them who they are as a whole....   [tags: Native American, Culture, Indian tribe]
:: 8 Works Cited
2384 words
(6.8 pages)
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Rez Life - The author, David Treure, Ojibwe from Leech Lack Reservation in northern Minnesota, grew up on the reservation. He describes the Rez Life by using people’s stories and somehow connects these stories with historic evens. There are over three hundreds Indian reservations in the United States according to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. When you go to one of these, you will see the sign of welcome. The Rez is not much different from others. The landscape is the same. The fields, lacks, pines, swamps are the same....   [tags: Native-American culture, reservations]
:: 1 Works Cited
1178 words
(3.4 pages)
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Native American History - Popular culture has shaped our understanding and perception of Native American culture. From Disney to literature has given the picture of the “blood thirsty savage” of the beginning colonialism in the new world to the “Noble Savage,” a trait painted by non-native the West (Landsman and Lewis 184) and this has influenced many non native perceptions. What many outsiders do not see is the struggle Native American have on day to day bases. Each generation of Native American is on a struggle to keep their traditions alive, but to function in school and ultimately graduate....   [tags: American Indian Culture]
:: 7 Works Cited
2137 words
(6.1 pages)
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Tamales: History, Regional Differences, and Family Cultural Interpretations - Tamales: History, Regional Differences, and Family Cultural Interpretations Introduction: Tradition has been said to mirror a way of life. Observation has concluded that participants in tradition “actively construct as well as reflect culture and community” (Sacks 275). For most people in the 21st century, tradition only reveals itself during special times or certain seasons. For others it is simply a way of life. The foodways of Mexicans and Native Americans are of particular interest in this study because of the food that grew from necessity and is maintained as sacred or reserved for only special occasions....   [tags: Food Culture Native American Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
5914 words
(16.9 pages)
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Life-Size Indian by Beth Piatote - What is the value of one’s culture. Native culture is an integral part in a person’s life. A person consists of many different characteristics, such as personality and appearance; however, what makes a person more unique would be his own culture. Native culture is what a person grew up with and identifies him as, thus losing or forgetting it would mean losing himself. Although it is important to remain with one’s culture, many people end up losing it. This is the consequence of living in America, where people with diverse cultures exist....   [tags: Culture Piatote Indian Native American] 1581 words
(4.5 pages)
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How American Indians Have Adapted their Culture Since Colonization - My essay will have an outlook of the history of the first Americans “Indians” and how they’ve adapted with their religion, subsistence strategy, social organization, and material culture. Over the years things have change in the history of Native Americans, prior to the reconstruction period, Native Americans knew who they were and what they lived for. Before the Europeans came and changed their living they one with nature and the land they’ve came to know. They believe that America was there’s and they lived free....   [tags: American Indians, Native Americans, Colonies] 964 words
(2.8 pages)
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A Comparative Analysis of Shamanistic healers in Celtic and Native American Cultures - Many different forms of medicine are currently practiced in the world. In fact, as our text states, “in all cultures, some people have become recognized as having special abilities to treat and diagnose health problems.” (Miller 107) Without argument, phytomedicinal and supernatural healers are two forms of medical treatment that have been around for longer than any other, regardless of culture. It has been estimated that shamanism has been practiced for over ten thousand years (Tyson 3). Native American and Celtic healers are often known as shamans....   [tags: Culture ]
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1121 words
(3.2 pages)
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Native American Poetry: Joy Jarjo - ... However, as the poem goes on, the speaker views the horse in different forms and sometimes appropriates the horse. In the first stanza, due to the incorporation of her culture in her writing, the horses are compared through nature, which as stated, plays a significant part in her culture. When Harjo writes, “She had horses who were bodies of sand”(2) and, “She had horses who were splintered red cliff”(8), can most likely be a reference to the landscapes that the speaker was surrounded by. The reference to the landscape can also emphasize the environment in which the speaker lives in, which ultimately places us in a setting for the poem....   [tags: society, adversities, culture, stanza] 915 words
(2.6 pages)
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Native American Education - Children were taken away from their homes and told everything they knew was wrong. They were sent to boarding schools to change their culture. These boarding schools were run by the United States government. The government's goal was to civilize Native Americans. They sent children to these schools against their will. Native American children were educated like Americans and they had to change their native ways to be more like whites (Cayton 266). Teachers abused their students and beat their native ways out of them....   [tags: children, schooling, violation, rights, culture]
:: 18 Works Cited
2260 words
(6.5 pages)
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Culture Clash: The Puritans and the Native Americans - In 1608, a group of Christian separatists from the Church of England fled to the Netherlands and then to the "New World" in search of the freedom to practice their fundamentalist form of Christianity (dubbed Puritanism). The group of people known as the Native Americans (or American Indians) are the aboriginal inhabitants of the Northern and Southern American continents who are believed to have migrated across the Bering land bridge from Asia around 30,000 years ago. When these two societies collided, years of enforced ideology, oppression and guerrilla warfare were begun....   [tags: American America History] 948 words
(2.7 pages)
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Native American Cultures, Tribes, and Religion - Even though there are numerous Native American tribes and cultures, they all are mostly derivatives of other tribes. For instance, in the southwest there are large number of Pueblo and Apache people including, the Acoma Pueblo tribe, Apache Chiricahua, Jemez Pueblo, and Apache Western. In this section, largely populated groups in certain regions (northwest, southwest, The Great Plains, northeast, and southeast) religious ideas, practices, and impact on American culture will be discussed. First, the northwestern region, which includes the areas from: the northwestern coast from Oregon to Washington, the Rocky Mountains, and the Cascades Mountains consist of mainly Paiute, Shoshone, and Blackf...   [tags: Native American Studies]
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849 words
(2.4 pages)
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Native American Stereotypes in the Media - Native Americans have been living on American soil for quite a while now. They were here before the European colonists. They have been here and still continue to be present in the United States. However, the way the media represents Native Americans disallows the truth about Native Americans to be told. Only misinterpretations of Native Americans seem to prosper in the media. It appears the caricature of Native Americans remains the same as first seen from the first settler’s eyes: savage-like people....   [tags: misinterpretation of Native American history] 1522 words
(4.3 pages)
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Funds of Knowledge and Outcomes Among Native American Students - Introduction Funds of Knowledge (FoK) is that knowledge which is shared among cultures, communities, and families. A part of that shared knowledge is language, how we learn, how we communicate, how we interact socially. In order to effectively teach students, teachers need to know what skill sets Native American students bring with them into the classroom, and understand how to effectively build on those skills (Aguirre et al., 2012). This is essential to addressing the current crises endemic within American Indian education....   [tags: education reform, culture]
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2663 words
(7.6 pages)
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Native American Mascots Are Racist - Teams in every sport, at every level of competition, have a mascot. It is the mascot that represents the competitive spirit and team identity, motivating players and fans alike. Does the symbol chosen have any impact on whether a team wins or loses. Unlikely. But the choice of a Native American mascot continues to ignite debate and controversy among athletes, fans and alumni, as well as those people who might otherwise be disinterested in sports. Utilizing an Indian mascot is nothing more than a veiled attempt at hate speech....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
600 words
(1.7 pages)
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Repression of the Native American Society - Intro: Ever since the first white settlers arrived at America in 1492, the Native American population has been seen as a minority. People who weren’t as good as the new “white” settlers and unfit to live the new found land of America. As America expanded westward with the Louisiana Purchase and war with Mexico that ceded the south west to the U.S. as a result of the treaty of the 1803 Guadaplupe-Hildago Treaty, white settlers continued to move westward. They found rich fertile land, but there was a problem....   [tags: Native Americans] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Issues with Native American Education - Education has been a topic of controversy for many years now, and will continue to be for years to come. The modern American society is best defined by its education. A good part of the average person’s life is spent at school, going to school, and paying for school. However, even though education is so obviously very important, there are many groups in America that are getting shorted. The Native Americans are a key group that has struggled the most. The largest obstacle they face is lack of proper education....   [tags: culture, minorities]
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1512 words
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Ancient Native American Traditions - Ancient Native American Traditions The novel "Reservation Blues" does not describe or deal with real Indians. The real Native Americans were forever destroyed by the government the second that they set foot upon the makeshift reservation. That very second saw the perish of all the age-long values and traditions that, before that moment, defined, raised, and watched over every Indian boy and girl, every Indian husband and wife, and every Indian father and mother. The U.S. government easily and nonviolently accomplished what the army has been struggling to do for many years, it wiped out a whole race of people, turning them into a mindless horde that was of concern to no one....   [tags: History culture Indians Essays] 1468 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Debate Regarding the Use of Native American Mascots - Teams in every sport, at every level of competition, have a mascot. It is the mascot that represents the competitive spirit and team identity, motivating players and fans alike. Does the symbol chosen as a mascot have any impact on whether a team wins or loses. Unlikely. But the choice of a Native American mascot continues to ignite debate and controversy among athletes, fans and alumni, as well as those people who might otherwise be disinterested in sports. Why all the controversy. The dispute over whether Native American mascots should be used as a team symbol dates back to the 1970’s (Price 2)....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]
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1352 words
(3.9 pages)
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Native American Remedies - Native American Remedies "Mike Spring, paralyzed from the waist... down and in constant pain, sailed to the Azores and back. On his return, he confounded his TV interviewer with the statement that the only way he was able to obtain relief from the pain that continually racked his body was to press his back to an oak tree. This simple and cost-free action would then afford him several hours of complete relief and helped him to carry on in life. When asked for a scientific explanation, Mr. Spring replied that he had none-- it simply worked....   [tags: Medicine Culture Papers]
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2228 words
(6.4 pages)
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Native American Education - Native American Education Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and fundamental way of life stripped from them almost unceasingly for decades. Although they were the real “natives” of the land, they were driven off by the government and coerced to assimilate to the white man’s way. Unfortunately, the persecution of the Natives was primarily based on the prevalent greed for money and power....   [tags: Native Americans]
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1534 words
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Native American Voices - Lesson 5 Short Answers Q1. Based on this chapter, in what ways does Eastman seem to distance himself from white culture and ally himself with Native American culture. In the midst of the Ghost Dancers uprising, Eastman declares that “it is [his] solemn duty to serve the United States Government” (718). Though he does not side with the “malcontents” (719), Eastman allies himself with the Native American people. Eastman refers to his fellow Native Americans as “my people” (717), identifying himself with them....   [tags: Native Americans] 1529 words
(4.4 pages)
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Native American Education - Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and basic way of life stripped from them almost constantly for decades. Although they were the actual “natives” of the land, they were forced by the government to give it up and compelled to assimilate to the white man’s way. This past scarred the Native American’s preservation of culture as many were discouraged to speak the native language and dress in traditional clothing....   [tags: Native Americans]
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1361 words
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Native American Youth - Native American Youth The United States educational system faces a major challenge in addressing the disenfranchisement of youth due to poverty and racism in the schools. The U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 found that “currently about one-quarter of Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans are living in poverty in the U.S. compared to less than 10% of Asian Americans or Whites.” (Hughes et al. 2010, p. 2) Hughes, Newkirk & Stenhjem (2010) identified the stressors children living in poverty faced caused young adolescents to suffer mental and physical health issues which resulted in anxiety, hypertension, fear and depression....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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1760 words
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Native American Education - The modern American society is best defined by its education. The “American dream” is founded on going to school, getting a good job, and becoming successful. Ironically, the actual native peoples of this country are actually the least likely to attain this dream. The largest obstacle they face is lack of proper education. The standard educational practices being used for the instruction of Native American peoples is not effective. There are many pieces to this road-block, and many solutions. This can be rectified by having more culturally aware teachers and parents, and by teaching the general population more about the Native American cultures....   [tags: Native Americans]
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897 words
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Native American Museum - George Gustav Heye Center - The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian is a fascinating building at the Bowling Green area of Lower Manhattan. It’s close to Battery Park that displays an elegant view of the water. You can see ferries floating by headed towards Staten Island, since South Ferry Terminal is nearby. It allows you to appreciate the hidden gems of the city located in the outskirts Manhattan. One of those very treasures is the museum mentioned previously. The Museum of the American Indian is directly in front of the Bowling Green Park with a water fountain at the center....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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1581 words
(4.5 pages)
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Native American Music - There is an old ancient Haida saying that is, “A great chief dies poor”. The Northwest coast region takes a great pride in the act of giving. The value of generosity was measured by how many gifts are given. It is used to measure wealth in their region. When a certain host or leader wanted to bring all of the people together they would call for a potlatch. A potlatch traditionally takes months of preparation in preparing gifts for the invited guests, housing, food, as well as theatrical entertainments and the rehearsal of great stories....   [tags: generosity, leader, Northwest, tradition, culture]
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1078 words
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Integrating Holistic Modalities into Native American Alcohol Treatment - Alcoholism is identified by severe dependence or addiction and cumulative patterns of characteristic behaviors. An alcoholic’s frequent intoxication is obvious and destructive; interfering with the ability to socialize and work. These behavior patterns may lead to loss of work and relationships (Merck, 1999). Strong evidence suggests that alcoholism runs in families (Schuckit, 2009). According to a study published by Schuckit (1999) monozygotic twins were at a significantly higher risk of alcoholism if one twin was an alcoholic....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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1289 words
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Historical Challenges That Native American Women Have Faced - Martha Garcia and Paula Gunn Allen both write in their essays of the challenges that Native American women have historically faced and continue to confront to this day. Major contributors to these challenges are the stereotypes and misconceptions by white male anthropologists and missionaries who studied the Native American tribes and found the women subservient and passive. Both of these authors strongly disagree in this characterization of Native American women and instead portray them as important and honored members of their tribes who will struggle but will continue to have a tremendous impact on the future of their tribes....   [tags: Native Americans] 757 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Systematic Destruction of the Native American Nations in the 1830's - In the 1830’s, the American government decided to relocate the Native American peoples to territories west of the Mississippi. The government came up with many reasons that the Native Americans had to move. Those tribes that did not move voluntarily were forcefully relocated from their ancestral lands. This forced move would later be known as The Trail of Tears. The American government came up with many reasons that the Native American peoples needed to move west of the Mississippi. Many Easterners felt that the move would protect Native American culture.1 Many Indians tried to assimilate into the white culture in order to stay on their ancestral lands.2 But the settlers did not like the I...   [tags: Native Americans]
:: 7 Works Cited
1871 words
(5.3 pages)
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Alter Your Native Land - Alter Your Native Land. - Stiff Little Fingers, “Alternative Ulster,” 1979 By definition, a counterculture possesses values and mores that are in opposition to those of an established society. When one hears the word “counterculture,” it may prompt images of hippies, punks, demonstrators, or underground political movements – in other words, a group of people (usually young) with a purpose, who are trying to make a change or say something meaningful about the larger culture in which they live. In addition to demonstrations, music, or simply lifestyle choices, this kind of action may be taken in writing....   [tags: American Culture Cultural Essays] 950 words
(2.7 pages)
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Native Americans and Alcohol - Northern Native Americans were faced with many great hardships with the arrival of the Europeans, Spanish and the French. American Indians had thrived on American soil for thousands of years with great prosperity. Living among each other in a local economy and communities The Native Americans created a civilization that was harmonious with the land and spiritual world that surrounded them. They were able to sustain their survival from the living plants and animals that lived among them in this over abundant country and all of it's rich resources....   [tags: Native American History]
:: 5 Works Cited
2670 words
(7.6 pages)
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The Native Americans' Lack of Materialism - People have been living in America for countless years, even before Europeans had discovered and populated it. These people, named Native Americans or American Indians, have a unique and singular culture and lifestyle unlike any other. Native Americans were divided into several groups or tribes. Each one tribe developed an own language, housing, clothing, and other cultural aspects. As we take a look into their society’s customs we can learn additional information about the lives of these indigenous people of the United States....   [tags: Native Americans, USA, ] 610 words
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Connecting to Islam Through My Native American Roots - Logically, I cannot understand how the followers of any religion can have such unwavering blind faith in religious texts and practices and not question any corruption or contradictions. It seems the majority of true believers trade their critical thinking skills for exchange of feeling of belonging to the group, becoming the metaphorical and literal sheep. One of my favorite quotes was on plaque in my high school junior year history class that read, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” It is my belief that religious people do not remember corrupt leadership of the past and keep repeating the same mistakes in following the same leadership style over and over, like...   [tags: Religion, Culture]
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Alcohol in Iroquois Culture and Religion - Alcohol in Iroquois Culture and Religion Prior to the arrival of the whites, Native Americans experienced little to no contact with alcohol, or “firewater.” The main introduction of alcohol to Native Americans came through the fur trade. Quickly upon its initiation to Native Americans, alcohol had various social, economic, and political ramifications. [note] To form new relations with Native Americans and to continue existing ones, the consistent distribution of alcohol was established. Early French Jesuits linked alcohol to the destruction of the North American Indian, mainly because alcohol hindered their ability to converge the Native Americans....   [tags: alcohol, prohibition, native american] 2191 words
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Background on the Sioux Indian Culture - The three online movies I chose to learn more about the culture in which I chose to write about and depict the life and culture of the Sioux Indian, (both past and present) are all from YouTube, and are as follows: *500 Tribes, *Meet the Sioux Indians, Plains Indian Tribe, 1949, and *The Great Sioux Nation. The films portrayed the Sioux in an almost identical manor, and although each of the films ran from twenty-five minutes long, to an hour and a half, they covered the same amount of ground and produced the same information....   [tags: Native American Indian history]
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Lasting Effects of European Colonization on Native American Indians. - Effects of Colonisation on North American Indians Since the Europeans set foot on North American soil in 1620,they have had a devastating effect on the native population. I will be discussing the long term effect of North American colonisation on the Native Americans, focusing on such issues as employment opportunities, the environment, culture and traditions, health, as well as social justice. I will begin with the important issue of employment opportunities. The unemployment rate for Native Americans is a staggering 49%....   [tags: native americans, indians, colonial america] 1035 words
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Use of Native American Mascots is NOT Racist - Issue of whether to keep Mascots in schools or not, started in late 1970’s and from then this debate is going on. Most of the schools have Indian Mascots in place for half a century and suddenly it become problem to use Indian Mascots. Over 500 Native American organizations also announced their support for the removal of those mascots and over 1200 schools across the United States have changed the name of their sports teams and some school refused to play with those schools using Indian mascots....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays] 609 words
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Native American Spiritual Beliefs - I have decided to discuss the topic of Spirituality in Native Americans. To address this topic, I will first discuss what knowledge I have gained about Native Americans. Then I will discuss how this knowledge will inform my practice with Native Americans. To conclude, I will talk about ethical issues, and dilemmas that a Social Worker might face working with Native American people. In approaching this topic, I first realized that I need to look up some general information about Native Americans in the United States....   [tags: Native American]
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Native American Voices Know the Definition of Native American - Many school children celebrate a cliché Thanksgiving tradition in class where they play Indians and Pilgrims, and some children engage in the play of Cowboys vs. Indians. It is known that some died when colonization occurred, that some fought the United States government, and that they can be boiled down to just another school mascot. This is what many people understand of the original inhabitants of America. Historical knowledge of these people has been shallow and stereotyped. The past 150 years has given birth to a literate people now able to record their past, present, and future....   [tags: American History, Oral Tradition] 1821 words
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Sports Mascots Honor the Native American Indian -      The year is 1991.  The Atlanta Braves had just completed their first trip to the Fall Classic in four decades, and the Washington Redskins were undefeated, well on their way to their third Super Bowl title.  All across the eastern seaboard, sports fans were tasting success - while American Indians were in an uproar.  This year witnessed the peak of the protests over the use of mascots with American Indian themes.  With two of the major professional sports teams in question making front-page news across the country, many of us heard American Indians' complaints for the first time.  Suddenly, thanks to the cries of thousands of demonstrators, the names of many Americans' favorite...   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]
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Beauty in the Eyes of the Dine' Navaho Culture - Throughout this unique class, we have explored many amazing facets of the Dine’ people. From stories, to pieces of art, to the language itself, the beauty of Navajo culture is easily seen by all who have the fortune to come into contact with them. Unlike Navajo culture, however, the Western world uses a very loose definition for “beauty” that typically revolves around physical traits: a beautiful girl usually looks a certain way, a beautiful voice usually sounds a certain way, and a beautiful painting usually looks a certain way....   [tags: Native American peoples and beliefs]
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Native American Folklore As Mythology - Throughout history, and all over the world, mythology has been developed as a way of explaining the unknown and coping with one’s existence. Why does the sun shine. Well, seemingly, to generations past, something is controlling the universe, so there must be a god in charge of the sun and many other natural phenomenon. During the creation of Native American myths, “there was much in the way of free-range food, but hunting wasn't as easy as getting up in the morning, taking a stroll and shooting a few passing bison with your bow” (Godchecker)....   [tags: us history, american history]
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Assimilation of Native American Education - Assimilation of Native American Education During my research in the assimilation of Native American Education, it was both interesting and alarming to learn of how the Americans assimilated the Native Americans into their White society. The focus of my paper is on how the assimilation of Native Americans was carried out in relation to their education and culture change. As well as, listing and describing certain types of schools created by the government to attain this. It is necessary to include how a typical day in the life of a Native American was spent; therefore, I have included a brief description of a day....   [tags: inclusion in the American public education system]
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The Native American Experience as Portrayed Through the Essay Titled, Address, and the Painting Titled, Among the Sierra Nevada - The Native Land Imagine living in a place where you feel free, and safe all of your life, and then one day it’s all taken away from you. Native Americans have always depended on the land to take care of them. Had the Great Spirit forsaken them. These are the thoughts that pondered the mind of Seattle as he answered to the Governor of Washington, in the essay titled “Address”. What was the purpose or message behind Albert Bierstadt’s painting titled “Among the Sierra Nevada”. How are these two separate works associated....   [tags: native american indians, american history, art] 907 words
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Portrayal of Native Americans in Film - When Columbus first set foot in the New World, he believed that he had arrived in the islands just off the coast of Cipango, known today as China. Thinking this, he called the people that he met Indians, as they lived on the islands that he falsely believed were the Indies. The term Indian spread back to Europe, as did the term Indies, and to this day, Native Americans are known as Indians, and the Caribbean islands are referred to as the West Indies. The Indians populated a much greater area than Columbus could have imagined, covering the land of two Continents....   [tags: Native American Stereotypes in Film]
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Oral Traditions Link Native American Past and Present in Charles Eastman's Autobiography - A huge part of Indian culture has always been their knack for oral tradition; it’s what creates a link between the past civilizations and the current one making all cultures link together through the use of stories and events that went on. In this book Charles Eastman tells his autobiographical story of his life to the readers telling us about his story and shares a bit of his culture with us. Eastman is constantly finding himself a book of contradictions. Contradicting his feelings towards all the cultures he encounters through his journey through life....   [tags: culture, tribe, souix]
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American Treatment of Native Americans - Before, during, and after the Civil War, American settlers irreversibly changed Indian ways of life. These settlers brought different ideologies and convictions, such as property rights, parliamentary style government, and Christianity, to the Indians. Clashes between the settlers and Indians were common over land rights and usage, religious and cultural differences, and broken treaties. Some Indian tribes liked the new ideas and began to incorporate them into their culture by establishing written laws, judicial courts and practicing Christianity, while other tribes rejected them (“Treatment”)....   [tags: history, native americans]
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The Culture and History of Native Americans - Native American, or American Indians, have a rich culture comprised of struggle, strife and success. For this paper, i will discuss the Native American Culture and it's history. History Spotted Tail, Lakota Sioux Chief stated: "This war did not spring up on our land, this war was brought upon us by the children of the Great Father who came to take our land without a price, and who, in our land, do a great many evil things....This war has come from robbery from the stealing of our land. (Lazarus 1991)....   [tags: disease, unity, identity] 779 words
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Attitudes Towards the Navajo Tribe's Language and Culture - In this day and age, and with every passing day, there are numerous languages succumbing to extinction, falling into disuse and anonymity; being forever lost to the winds of time. But as they say, "Every cloud has its silver lining," the silver lining in this case is the increase and rise in awareness and efforts being undertaken to preserve, revitalize, and revive these languages that are not yet lost to us. Something that is revitalized is defined as "being given new life or vigor to," and should we abide by this definition, it is pleasing to see that numerous fit in this criterion; the criteria of being revitalized....   [tags: Preservation Of Language, Native American History]
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Native American Sports - Native Americans are known for many different qualities they had as a part of their lifestyle. The games and sports they created to play that are now used in today’s society, lacrosse being the most famous. Some of the games played in the early times are either drastically changed or no longer played. There are many different Native American tribes that factor out cultural differences and depending on the tribe, the lifestyle qualities such as sports, games, and rituals differentiate between one another....   [tags: native american history, athletics] 1831 words
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Hispanic and Native Americans Culture in California - Upon initial research of the rich heritage of California the two minority groups that stood out as especially influential in historic California and today’s society are the Native Americans and Hispanic Americans. To better understand and identify with these minority groups we must identify the common themes within their day to day life. By researching each culture’s common family traditions, religious beliefs, arts & entertainment, and language one can gain a greater appreciation of many different kinds of people, and in turn have more effective relationships in a multicultural society....   [tags: Culture ]
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Native American vs. European Way of Life - Native Americans and European Compare/Contrast Essay Europeans lived a much more modern way of life than the primitive lifestyle of Native Americans. Europeans referred to themselves as “civilized” and regarded Native Americans as “savage,” “heathen,” or “barbarian.” Their interaction provoked by multiple differences led to misunderstanding and sometimes conflict. These two cultures, having been isolated from one another, exhibited an extensive variation in their ideals. Europeans and Native Americans maintained contradictory social, economic, and spiritual practices....   [tags: Culture Society] 568 words
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Culture Conflicts: Native Americans versus The White Man - People had already been living in America long before the white man ever “discovered” it. These people were known as the Native Americans. Most of them had lived peacefully on the land, for hundreds of years until the early 1800s when white settlers began their move west. As these white settlers came upon the Native Americans, they brought with them unwavering beliefs that would end up causing great conflicts with the Native people, who had their own set of values. It was clear that the white man and the Native Americans could not live among each other peacefully for their values and culture were much too different....   [tags: native americans, land, conflicts]
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The Effects of Colonization on the Native Americans - The Effects of Colonization on the Native Americans Native Americans had inherited the land now called America and eventually their lives were destroyed due to European Colonization. When the Europeans arrived and settled, they changed the Native American way of life for the worst. These changes were caused by a number of factors including disease, loss of land, attempts to export religion, and laws, which violated Native American culture. Native Americans never came in contact with diseases that developed in the Old World because they were separated from Asia, Africa, and Europe when ocean levels rose following the end of the last Ice Age....   [tags: Native Americans Colonization History Essays]
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Cultural Differences Between Native Americans and the American Colonists - When the colonists came to America, they classified the Native Americans as complete brutal savages. But was that a correct assumption. The Native Americans lived a life that was a complete opposite from the way that the Europeans were accustomed to. The Native Americans believed that the land was shared by everyone and not one person could own it. The Native Americans also had a polytheistic religion which completely went against the beliefs of the colonists. The colonists viewed the Native Americans as savages and barbarians because their ways of living were different....   [tags: american history, American Indians, Colonial Ameri] 462 words
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The History of Native Americans - The United States was a new nation in the 18th century when most of the world was divided among the European imperialist governments. Looking right of religion, technology and military power, people from these nations began to claim the land and lock up new worlds of natural resources to meet their needs, that is why some decided to immigrate to the United States seeking freedom and the opportunity for economical improvements; but this search for improvement, among other things, only brought suffering and death to Native American tribes....   [tags: Native American History ]
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The Native American - ... It is used to communicate with the spirit world and is also used as a medicine. Native American religions and Christianity are far from the same. Even though they do consist of many great differences there are some similarities. Both believe in one creator although the name of that creator is different between the two. The Natives call this creator “Master Spirit” where the Christians call it God. The two also believe in an after life. The Natives though believe that the afterlife is becoming a spirit of the animal....   [tags: religion, church, life ]
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Kennewick Man and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) - Kennewick Man is one of the most complete ancient skeletons found to date. The discovery initiated scholarly and public debate of the legal and ethical implications of anthropological study of Native American human remains. The Kennewick Man controversy has called into question the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA)’s ability to balance tribal, museum, and archaeological interest in ancient human remains. Kennewick Man was found on July 28, 1996 below Lake Wallula, a section of the Columbia River, in Washington....   [tags: Native American Studies]
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The Southeast Native Americans: Cherokees and Creeks - The Native Americans of the southeast live in a variety of environments. The environments range from the southern Appalachian Mountains, to the Mississippi River valley, to the Louisiana and Alabama swamps, and the Florida wetlands. These environments were bountiful with various species of plant and animal life, enabling the Native American peoples to flourish. “Most of the Native Americans adopted large-scale agriculture after 900 A.D, and some also developed large towns and highly centralized social and political structures.” In the first half of the 1600s Europeans encountered these native peoples....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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The History and Culture of the Cherokee Civilization - Introduction The Cherokee, a very large tribe, lived in the region of the Smokey Appalachians Mountains. The Cherokee were forced to relocate to the Appalachian Mountains after they were defeated at war by the Delaware. The tribe was divided into seven clans. The tribe’s men were not allowed to marry within there tribes, this was a great taboo in the Cherokee society. The seven tribes inhabited North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Virginia and Georgia. Once the man married he left his tribe and went to live with his wife’s tribe....   [tags: Native American History ]
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Native American Medicine and Spiritual Healing - Throughout time, mankind has persistently been seeking ways to maintain their health and to cure those that had not been so fortunate in that task. Just about everything has been experimented with as a cure for some type of illness; whether physical, spiritual or mental. There has always been evidence of spiritual healing and it will continue to be an important part of any healing process, large or small. In particular the roots of Native American Medicine men (often a woman in some cultures) may be traced back to ancient times referred to as Shaman....   [tags: spiritual healing, medicine, Native Americans, Sha] 1088 words
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The Pursuit of the American Dream by African Americans, Native Americans, and the Working Class - America, for many, has long been a country where it was believed that you control your own destiny and prosperity. With hard work, persistence and struggle, success found in the “American Dream” can and will be achieved regardless of past social statuses and financial shortcomings. It is something that has rang true for most Americans, but certainly not without struggle. The late nineteenth century brought a great amount of obstacles to many groups of people living in America as they pursued comfort in social and economic aspects....   [tags: Essays on the American Dream ] 1486 words
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