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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Native American"
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Native American Spiritual Beliefs - I have decided to discuss the topic of Spirituality in Native Americans. To address this topic, I will first discuss what knowledge I have gained about Native Americans. Then I will discuss how this knowledge will inform my practice with Native Americans. To conclude, I will talk about ethical issues, and dilemmas that a Social Worker might face working with Native American people. In approaching this topic, I first realized that I need to look up some general information about Native Americans in the United States....   [tags: Native American]
:: 8 Works Cited
2347 words
(6.7 pages)
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Native American Stereotypes in the Media - Native Americans have been living on American soil for quite a while now. They were here before the European colonists. They have been here and still continue to be present in the United States. However, the way the media represents Native Americans disallows the truth about Native Americans to be told. Only misinterpretations of Native Americans seem to prosper in the media. It appears the caricature of Native Americans remains the same as first seen from the first settler’s eyes: savage-like people....   [tags: misinterpretation of Native American history] 1522 words
(4.3 pages)
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Native American Mascots Are Racist - Teams in every sport, at every level of competition, have a mascot. It is the mascot that represents the competitive spirit and team identity, motivating players and fans alike. Does the symbol chosen have any impact on whether a team wins or loses. Unlikely. But the choice of a Native American mascot continues to ignite debate and controversy among athletes, fans and alumni, as well as those people who might otherwise be disinterested in sports. Utilizing an Indian mascot is nothing more than a veiled attempt at hate speech....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
600 words
(1.7 pages)
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Native American Cruelty - For many years Native American removal has caused a lot of pain and suffering for many Indians in America. How we have treated Native Americans in the past is an embarrassment to our history. Removing Native Americans from their land when we first settled here was wrong because we caused them a lot of hardships, took something from them that wasn’t ours to take, and in the end we all the pain and suffering we caused them was really for nothing. People still believe today that taking away their land was the right thing to do because they think that we were technically the first people to settle here so it was rightfully ours to take....   [tags: Native American] 1164 words
(3.3 pages)
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Native American Cultures, Tribes, and Religion - Even though there are numerous Native American tribes and cultures, they all are mostly derivatives of other tribes. For instance, in the southwest there are large number of Pueblo and Apache people including, the Acoma Pueblo tribe, Apache Chiricahua, Jemez Pueblo, and Apache Western. In this section, largely populated groups in certain regions (northwest, southwest, The Great Plains, northeast, and southeast) religious ideas, practices, and impact on American culture will be discussed. First, the northwestern region, which includes the areas from: the northwestern coast from Oregon to Washington, the Rocky Mountains, and the Cascades Mountains consist of mainly Paiute, Shoshone, and Blackf...   [tags: Native American Studies]
:: 2 Works Cited
849 words
(2.4 pages)
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Native American Flutes - Although Native Americans are known for their voice being a vital instrument, most rituals, songs, and dances are accompanied by an assortment of instruments such as, drums, rattles, flutes. Every instrument has it is own meaning and a purpose. In this section, the significance of these instruments as well as their structure and functionality is explored. The drums are a vital aspect to the Native American culture; they understand the drum to be more than an instrument. In a web article written by Elisa Throp entitled, “The importance of drums to Native American culture”, Elisa says, “It is a Voice....   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 4 Works Cited
1025 words
(2.9 pages)
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Native American Religion - When Europeans first set foot upon the shores of what is now the United States they brought with them a social structure which was fundamentally based around their concept and understanding of Western European Christianity. That the indigenous peoples might already have a thriving civilization, including religious beliefs and practices, that closely paralleled the beliefs and practices of European civilization, was a concept not considered by these early explorers and settlers. This European lack of cultural understanding created tensions, between Native Americans and Europeans, and later between Native Americans and Euro-Americans, that eventually erupted into open warfare and resulted in g...   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 22 Works Cited
2446 words
(7 pages)
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Native American Sports - Native Americans are known for many different qualities they had as a part of their lifestyle. The games and sports they created to play that are now used in today’s society, lacrosse being the most famous. Some of the games played in the early times are either drastically changed or no longer played. There are many different Native American tribes that factor out cultural differences and depending on the tribe, the lifestyle qualities such as sports, games, and rituals differentiate between one another....   [tags: native american history, athletics] 1831 words
(5.2 pages)
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Native American Arts - ... Native American art is created as symbols such as bears, walruses, eagles, and people. Basket and blanket weaving are a very popular form of art, and the Navajo tribe is most well known for their hand woven baskets. The most publicly recognized methods of art are jewelry, blankets, rugs, pottery, baskets and sand painting. Sand painting consists of various patterns drawn using colored sand. The patterns might be “insignificant” figures representing a bigger picture. Sand paintings hold a very symbolic meaning for the Natives American tribes....   [tags: symbolism, culture, Native American life] 749 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Debate Regarding the Use of Native American Mascots - Teams in every sport, at every level of competition, have a mascot. It is the mascot that represents the competitive spirit and team identity, motivating players and fans alike. Does the symbol chosen as a mascot have any impact on whether a team wins or loses. Unlikely. But the choice of a Native American mascot continues to ignite debate and controversy among athletes, fans and alumni, as well as those people who might otherwise be disinterested in sports. Why all the controversy. The dispute over whether Native American mascots should be used as a team symbol dates back to the 1970’s (Price 2)....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]
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1352 words
(3.9 pages)
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Use of Native American Mascots Should be Banned - In his Sports Illustrated article, “The Indian Wars,” S.L. Price argues that there is no easy answer to whether or not the use of Native American mascots by high school, college, and professional sports teams is offensive. “It's an argument that, because it mixes mere sports with the sensitivities of a people who were nearly exterminated, seems both trivial and profound -- and it's further complicated by the fact that for three out of four Native Americans, even a nickname such as Redskins, which many whites consider racist, isn't objectionable.” Whereas Price provides ample evidence that his claim is true, I disagree with the way it was presented and I still insist that Native American nam...   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays] 849 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Jesuit Missionaries and Disease in Native American Society - There is data to suggest that around the beginning of the 16th Century, there were approximately 18 million Native Americans living in North America. By 1900 the population of the Indigenous peoples had declined to about 250,000. The common belief has been that this rapid decrease in population has been due to the disease that Europeans brought with them when they migrated to the “new world”. Historian Alfred W. Crosby writes that “it is highly probable that the greatest killer was epidemic disease, especially as manifested in virgin soil epidemics.” Many reports and essays focus on disease as the main killer of the Indigenous population, but few often look at how the European and Indigenou...   [tags: Native American History ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1389 words
(4 pages)
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Native American’s, Stereotypes, Discrimination, and Ethnocentrism - Many races are unjustly victimized, but Native American cultures are more misunderstood and degraded than any other race. College and high school mascots sometimes depict images of Native Americans and have names loosely based on Native American descent, but these are often not based on actual Native American history, so instead of honoring Native Americans, they are being ridiculed. According to the article Warriors Survive Attack, by Cathy Murillo (2009) some “members of the Carpentaria community defended Native American mascot icons as honoring Chumash tradition and the spirit of American Indian Warriors in U.S....   [tags: Native American Culture]
:: 1 Works Cited
990 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Impact of the Indian Removal Act on Eastern Native American Tribes - The United States expanded rapidly in the years immediately prior to and during the Jackson Presidency as settlers of European descent began to move west of their traditional territories. White settlers were highly interested in gaining Native American land and urged the federal government to allow them to obtain it. President Andrew Jackson encouraged Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act in 1830, which gave the federal government the authority to move consenting eastern Native American tribes west of the Mississippi River....   [tags: Native American History ]
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2206 words
(6.3 pages)
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Kennewick Man and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) - Kennewick Man is one of the most complete ancient skeletons found to date. The discovery initiated scholarly and public debate of the legal and ethical implications of anthropological study of Native American human remains. The Kennewick Man controversy has called into question the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA)’s ability to balance tribal, museum, and archaeological interest in ancient human remains. Kennewick Man was found on July 28, 1996 below Lake Wallula, a section of the Columbia River, in Washington....   [tags: Native American Studies]
:: 8 Works Cited
1063 words
(3 pages)
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Use of Native American Mascots is NOT Racist - Issue of whether to keep Mascots in schools or not, started in late 1970’s and from then this debate is going on. Most of the schools have Indian Mascots in place for half a century and suddenly it become problem to use Indian Mascots. Over 500 Native American organizations also announced their support for the removal of those mascots and over 1200 schools across the United States have changed the name of their sports teams and some school refused to play with those schools using Indian mascots....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays] 609 words
(1.7 pages)
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Native American Mascots Should be Banned - The sun beat down upon the pale skin of the crowd as a consistent murmur echoed across the field. Hands simultaneously lifted and then dropped, repeatedly, while every eye gazed with intent upon the figure who stood alone on the grass in the center of the field. He had a glowing red face, an oversized nose, and a red and white feather that pointed to the sky. As the chant continued to resonate, the figure began to dance to the soft harmony of an organ. His nose humorously bounced up and down while the stupid grin on his face never seemed to dissipate....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1266 words
(3.6 pages)
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Native American Repartition - Tensions between science and religion have recurred throughout history. The issues of what to do with the remains of our ancestors are viewed differently by people. Some people believe that the burial site should be left untouched. Among this group of people fall the Native Americans. Archaeologists, on the other hand, think we should uncover the burial site to be able to discover more about the history of the land from which the grave lies. The Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act was signed into law on November 1990 by President George Bush....   [tags: Native American History] 1574 words
(4.5 pages)
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Native American Literature - Native American Literature Spending this semester reading Native American Literature, really brought me to make comparisons to my past experience. I think in each story, there was always something significant that seemed similar to my life. There were stories that had similar connections, and as I read them, I put my mind to connect what the author was saying and to what I remember from my life and make a connection. Actually, I thought every story was good and well to understand. For the most part, the story that really brought my attention and that made a connected to my life was reading Indian Education by Sherman Alexie....   [tags: Native American Literature] 718 words
(2.1 pages)
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Use of Racist Native American Mascots in Professional Sports - I awaited the day before the big game in nervous apprehension. Would the Red Sox be able to rebound from a 0-2 series deficit and advance to face the Yankees. They had already won two straight games and evened the series at 2-2. The next game would be the do or die situation. I stylishly dressed in all of my Red Sox apparel (even the lucky red socks) and prepared for an invigorating game. Mike from the third floor came down to the first floor lounge to watch the big game. Being from Cleveland, Mike was sporting all of his Indians apparel....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays] 809 words
(2.3 pages)
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Use of Native American Mascots Should be Banned -      What is considered offensive. Is it considered offensive to use obscenities around children. According to many people in the United States, it is sport team names and mascots that depict a certain group of people are considered offensive. People around the United States are trying to get professional sport teams to change their names and mascots because they feel it depicts their certain race in bad way. Teams should have to change their mascot and their name if they are named after a certain group of people....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays] 1034 words
(3 pages)
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Sports Mascots Honor the Native American Indian -      The year is 1991.  The Atlanta Braves had just completed their first trip to the Fall Classic in four decades, and the Washington Redskins were undefeated, well on their way to their third Super Bowl title.  All across the eastern seaboard, sports fans were tasting success - while American Indians were in an uproar.  This year witnessed the peak of the protests over the use of mascots with American Indian themes.  With two of the major professional sports teams in question making front-page news across the country, many of us heard American Indians' complaints for the first time.  Suddenly, thanks to the cries of thousands of demonstrators, the names of many Americans' favorite...   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
1808 words
(5.2 pages)
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The Native American Experience as Portrayed Through the Essay Titled, Address, and the Painting Titled, Among the Sierra Nevada - The Native Land Imagine living in a place where you feel free, and safe all of your life, and then one day it’s all taken away from you. Native Americans have always depended on the land to take care of them. Had the Great Spirit forsaken them. These are the thoughts that pondered the mind of Seattle as he answered to the Governor of Washington, in the essay titled “Address”. What was the purpose or message behind Albert Bierstadt’s painting titled “Among the Sierra Nevada”. How are these two separate works associated....   [tags: native american indians, american history, art] 907 words
(2.6 pages)
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Repression of the Native American Society - Intro: Ever since the first white settlers arrived at America in 1492, the Native American population has been seen as a minority. People who weren’t as good as the new “white” settlers and unfit to live the new found land of America. As America expanded westward with the Louisiana Purchase and war with Mexico that ceded the south west to the U.S. as a result of the treaty of the 1803 Guadaplupe-Hildago Treaty, white settlers continued to move westward. They found rich fertile land, but there was a problem....   [tags: Native Americans] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Native American Youth - Native American Youth The United States educational system faces a major challenge in addressing the disenfranchisement of youth due to poverty and racism in the schools. The U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 found that “currently about one-quarter of Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans are living in poverty in the U.S. compared to less than 10% of Asian Americans or Whites.” (Hughes et al. 2010, p. 2) Hughes, Newkirk & Stenhjem (2010) identified the stressors children living in poverty faced caused young adolescents to suffer mental and physical health issues which resulted in anxiety, hypertension, fear and depression....   [tags: Native Americans ]
:: 4 Works Cited
1760 words
(5 pages)
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Native American Education - Native American Education Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and fundamental way of life stripped from them almost unceasingly for decades. Although they were the real “natives” of the land, they were driven off by the government and coerced to assimilate to the white man’s way. Unfortunately, the persecution of the Natives was primarily based on the prevalent greed for money and power....   [tags: Native Americans]
:: 11 Works Cited
1534 words
(4.4 pages)
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Native American Education - Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and basic way of life stripped from them almost constantly for decades. Although they were the actual “natives” of the land, they were forced by the government to give it up and compelled to assimilate to the white man’s way. This past scarred the Native American’s preservation of culture as many were discouraged to speak the native language and dress in traditional clothing....   [tags: Native Americans]
:: 6 Works Cited
1361 words
(3.9 pages)
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Native American Education - The modern American society is best defined by its education. The “American dream” is founded on going to school, getting a good job, and becoming successful. Ironically, the actual native peoples of this country are actually the least likely to attain this dream. The largest obstacle they face is lack of proper education. The standard educational practices being used for the instruction of Native American peoples is not effective. There are many pieces to this road-block, and many solutions. This can be rectified by having more culturally aware teachers and parents, and by teaching the general population more about the Native American cultures....   [tags: Native Americans]
:: 1 Works Cited
897 words
(2.6 pages)
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Native American Voices - Lesson 5 Short Answers Q1. Based on this chapter, in what ways does Eastman seem to distance himself from white culture and ally himself with Native American culture. In the midst of the Ghost Dancers uprising, Eastman declares that “it is [his] solemn duty to serve the United States Government” (718). Though he does not side with the “malcontents” (719), Eastman allies himself with the Native American people. Eastman refers to his fellow Native Americans as “my people” (717), identifying himself with them....   [tags: Native Americans] 1529 words
(4.4 pages)
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Native American Museum - George Gustav Heye Center - The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian is a fascinating building at the Bowling Green area of Lower Manhattan. It’s close to Battery Park that displays an elegant view of the water. You can see ferries floating by headed towards Staten Island, since South Ferry Terminal is nearby. It allows you to appreciate the hidden gems of the city located in the outskirts Manhattan. One of those very treasures is the museum mentioned previously. The Museum of the American Indian is directly in front of the Bowling Green Park with a water fountain at the center....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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1581 words
(4.5 pages)
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Native American Voices Know the Definition of Native American - Many school children celebrate a cliché Thanksgiving tradition in class where they play Indians and Pilgrims, and some children engage in the play of Cowboys vs. Indians. It is known that some died when colonization occurred, that some fought the United States government, and that they can be boiled down to just another school mascot. This is what many people understand of the original inhabitants of America. Historical knowledge of these people has been shallow and stereotyped. The past 150 years has given birth to a literate people now able to record their past, present, and future....   [tags: American History, Oral Tradition] 1821 words
(5.2 pages)
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Sherman Alexie and Native American Writing - Sherman Alexie began his literary career writing poetry and short stories, being recognized for his examination of the Native American (Hunter 1). Written after reading media coverage of an actual execution in the state of Washington, Sherman Alexie’s poem Capital Punishment tells the story of an Indian man on death row waiting for his execution. The poem is told in the third person by the cook preparing the last meal as he recalls the many final meals he has prepared over the years. In addition to the Indian currently awaiting his death, the cook speaks of a black man who was electrocuted and lived to tell about it, only to be sent back to the chair an hour later to be killed again....   [tags: Native Americans, Author, Poet]
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1428 words
(4.1 pages)
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Native American Issues in Today's Society - What if everyday in America there was not an action someone could take because someone of an opposite race sexually assaulted or domestically abused that person. Often news outlets only focus on major even in cities or towns, but never the reservations. With the lack of awareness of the number of rapes and domestic abuse victims on reservations, at large society is saying America doesn’t care due to reservations having sovereignty. Even with new laws signed into place by President Obama to deal with the rape and abuse problems to Native American women, that come from non Native Americans, the problem with this is it’s a pilot only on three tribes (Culp-Ressler,1).It is said it will expand s...   [tags: native americans, domestic abuse, tribes]
:: 7 Works Cited
1123 words
(3.2 pages)
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Native American Medicine and Spiritual Healing - Throughout time, mankind has persistently been seeking ways to maintain their health and to cure those that had not been so fortunate in that task. Just about everything has been experimented with as a cure for some type of illness; whether physical, spiritual or mental. There has always been evidence of spiritual healing and it will continue to be an important part of any healing process, large or small. In particular the roots of Native American Medicine men (often a woman in some cultures) may be traced back to ancient times referred to as Shaman....   [tags: spiritual healing, medicine, Native Americans, Sha] 1088 words
(3.1 pages)
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Native American Folklore As Mythology - Throughout history, and all over the world, mythology has been developed as a way of explaining the unknown and coping with one’s existence. Why does the sun shine. Well, seemingly, to generations past, something is controlling the universe, so there must be a god in charge of the sun and many other natural phenomenon. During the creation of Native American myths, “there was much in the way of free-range food, but hunting wasn't as easy as getting up in the morning, taking a stroll and shooting a few passing bison with your bow” (Godchecker)....   [tags: us history, american history]
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1068 words
(3.1 pages)
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Assimilation of Native American Education - Assimilation of Native American Education During my research in the assimilation of Native American Education, it was both interesting and alarming to learn of how the Americans assimilated the Native Americans into their White society. The focus of my paper is on how the assimilation of Native Americans was carried out in relation to their education and culture change. As well as, listing and describing certain types of schools created by the government to attain this. It is necessary to include how a typical day in the life of a Native American was spent; therefore, I have included a brief description of a day....   [tags: inclusion in the American public education system]
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1940 words
(5.5 pages)
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Historical Challenges That Native American Women Have Faced - Martha Garcia and Paula Gunn Allen both write in their essays of the challenges that Native American women have historically faced and continue to confront to this day. Major contributors to these challenges are the stereotypes and misconceptions by white male anthropologists and missionaries who studied the Native American tribes and found the women subservient and passive. Both of these authors strongly disagree in this characterization of Native American women and instead portray them as important and honored members of their tribes who will struggle but will continue to have a tremendous impact on the future of their tribes....   [tags: Native Americans] 757 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Systematic Destruction of the Native American Nations in the 1830's - In the 1830’s, the American government decided to relocate the Native American peoples to territories west of the Mississippi. The government came up with many reasons that the Native Americans had to move. Those tribes that did not move voluntarily were forcefully relocated from their ancestral lands. This forced move would later be known as The Trail of Tears. The American government came up with many reasons that the Native American peoples needed to move west of the Mississippi. Many Easterners felt that the move would protect Native American culture.1 Many Indians tried to assimilate into the white culture in order to stay on their ancestral lands.2 But the settlers did not like the I...   [tags: Native Americans]
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1871 words
(5.3 pages)
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Integrating Holistic Modalities into Native American Alcohol Treatment - Alcoholism is identified by severe dependence or addiction and cumulative patterns of characteristic behaviors. An alcoholic’s frequent intoxication is obvious and destructive; interfering with the ability to socialize and work. These behavior patterns may lead to loss of work and relationships (Merck, 1999). Strong evidence suggests that alcoholism runs in families (Schuckit, 2009). According to a study published by Schuckit (1999) monozygotic twins were at a significantly higher risk of alcoholism if one twin was an alcoholic....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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1289 words
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The Native American - ... It is used to communicate with the spirit world and is also used as a medicine. Native American religions and Christianity are far from the same. Even though they do consist of many great differences there are some similarities. Both believe in one creator although the name of that creator is different between the two. The Natives call this creator “Master Spirit” where the Christians call it God. The two also believe in an after life. The Natives though believe that the afterlife is becoming a spirit of the animal....   [tags: religion, church, life ]
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846 words
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Lasting Effects of European Colonization on Native American Indians. - Effects of Colonisation on North American Indians Since the Europeans set foot on North American soil in 1620,they have had a devastating effect on the native population. I will be discussing the long term effect of North American colonisation on the Native Americans, focusing on such issues as employment opportunities, the environment, culture and traditions, health, as well as social justice. I will begin with the important issue of employment opportunities. The unemployment rate for Native Americans is a staggering 49%....   [tags: native americans, indians, colonial america] 1035 words
(3 pages)
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The “rightness” of Native American boarding school - In the 1870s, the U.S. government enacted a policy of assimilation of Native Americans, to Americanize them. Their goal was to turn them into white men. Schools were an important part of facilitating their goal. In 1879, Richard Henry Pratt founded the Carlisle Indian School. It was the first school in which Native American children were culturally exposed to American ideology. The idea for the boarding school first came through treatment of Cheyenne warriors. In the 1860s, Americans were in the midst of a major western migration....   [tags: American History]
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1213 words
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Native American History - Popular culture has shaped our understanding and perception of Native American culture. From Disney to literature has given the picture of the “blood thirsty savage” of the beginning colonialism in the new world to the “Noble Savage,” a trait painted by non-native the West (Landsman and Lewis 184) and this has influenced many non native perceptions. What many outsiders do not see is the struggle Native American have on day to day bases. Each generation of Native American is on a struggle to keep their traditions alive, but to function in school and ultimately graduate....   [tags: American Indian Culture]
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2137 words
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Politics and the Reduction of Native American Land - ... The constant misunderstanding between the natives and the United States has come from a multitude of things. Largely it was the difference in culture that created a lot of disputes. With vast differences in culture came large dissimilarities in political action. That whites government structure has always had a king or president, established sections like the Senate or the House of Representatives, and bureaucracies that carryout federal action. Natives on the other hand have never really had large established governments....   [tags: Earth History, American History] 591 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Rise of a Native American Balladry - The Rise of a Native American Balladry First, it will be necessary to review some important points. In the early days (1600-1770s), importation/adaptation was the dominant process. British songs and ballads were adapted to the frontier experience, Victorian morality and Puritan ethics. Songs which contained subject matter which was completely irrelevant to the frontier or unacceptable to moral and ethical standards were either discarded altogether, new lyrics were added to old melodies, or lyrical changes were made....   [tags: Music Ballads Native Americans Essays]
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1457 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Continued Oppression of Native American Communities - The United States Government was founded on the basis that it would protect the rights and liberties of every American citizen. The Equal Protection Clause, a part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, provides that “no state shall deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws”. Yet for hundreds of years, the US government and society have distressed the Native American people through broken treaties, removal policies, and attempts of assimilation....   [tags: american indians, equal protection clause] 1295 words
(3.7 pages)
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Native American In Colonial America - In the wake of Europe’s Age of Exploration, explorers roamed different parts of the ocean in search of a faster water route to Asia. Along the way, Europeans explorers discovered a whole new continent, America. Thinking that he was in India, Christopher Columbus, an Italian sailor, called the indigenous Native Americans he met “Indians,” a misnomer that is still used frequently even up to this day. Europeans soon shifted their attention away from the water route to Asia but toward the colonization of the New World....   [tags: Europe, Age of Exploration, America]
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1174 words
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Southeastern Native American Literature - Southeastern Native American Literature Native American literature from the Southeastern United States is deeply rooted in the oral traditions of the various tribes that have historically called that region home. While the tribes most integrally associated with the Southeastern U.S. in the American popular mind--the FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole)--were forcibly relocated to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) from their ancestral territories in the American South, descendents of those tribes have created compelling literary works that have kept alive their tribal identities and histories by incorporating traditional themes and narrative elemen...   [tags: Native Americans Literature papers]
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1226 words
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American Treatment of Native Americans - Before, during, and after the Civil War, American settlers irreversibly changed Indian ways of life. These settlers brought different ideologies and convictions, such as property rights, parliamentary style government, and Christianity, to the Indians. Clashes between the settlers and Indians were common over land rights and usage, religious and cultural differences, and broken treaties. Some Indian tribes liked the new ideas and began to incorporate them into their culture by establishing written laws, judicial courts and practicing Christianity, while other tribes rejected them (“Treatment”)....   [tags: history, native americans]
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1568 words
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Native American Sign Language - Native American Sign Language Very basic, elementary and logical characteristics made the Native American Sign Language the world's most easily learned language. It was America's first and only universal language. The necessity for intercommunication between Indian tribes having different vocal speech developed gesture speech or sign language (Clark; pg. 11). Although there is no record or era dating the use of sign language, American Indian people have communicated with Indian Sign Language for thousands of years....   [tags: Native Americans Sign Language Communication] 1455 words
(4.2 pages)
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History of Native American Literature - ... Many stories bring together the natural and supernnatural, speaking of “the Great Spirit” and what it can do. Their writing also told of the struggle they had to live in that new world. They had been alone and had their own way of life until the Europeans arrived. They were now forced to deal with strange people and their cultures and habits. The strangers came, stole their land and made them unwelcome where they lived. In the 19th and 20th centuries, most of their works were autobiographies....   [tags: story telling, tribes, spiritual] 1017 words
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Issues with Native American Education - Education has been a topic of controversy for many years now, and will continue to be for years to come. The modern American society is best defined by its education. A good part of the average person’s life is spent at school, going to school, and paying for school. However, even though education is so obviously very important, there are many groups in America that are getting shorted. The Native Americans are a key group that has struggled the most. The largest obstacle they face is lack of proper education....   [tags: culture, minorities]
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Racism in Native American Mascots - When we are young, we are taught to treat everyone equally. Naturally, as children you learn and apply and hope that another person does the same. Rights, they are basic and unalienable to all humans upon entering a foreign or country of citizenship. Fighting for equal treatment to the prominent race has created history that is left for future activist to involve themselves with past history, and revive movements. Equal treatment amongst the different cultures is necessary for the social and political success for this country....   [tags: Racial Inequality, Civil Rights, Discrimination]
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Alcoholism in Native American Communities - The power to be able to fall into a trance where reality and emotions are destroyed seems attractive to minority communities. Substances such as alcohol and drugs are a popular tool abuse by young teens and adults since these materials are easy to possess. However, using a substance to fall into the trance will only be harmful to the individual and their community. Sherman Alexie, a Native American writer, experiences numerous sorrows from alcohol in his life on the reservation and outside of the reservation....   [tags: indian reservations, substance abuse]
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Writing in Native American Issues - Writing In Native American Issues Seminole Baptist The purpose of writing this paper is so the unique group of people will be represented properly from one of their own people. This will get a view into the culture and history that is not usually seen from the outside. In the world of today Native Americans have to be properly represented and understood or misconceptions can happen. Traditionally the Muscogee people practiced opvnkv hacogee, which means drunken, crazy, or spirited dance. More commonly known as the stomp dance they are social dances that included all community members-men, women, and children....   [tags: Muscogee, Seminole Baptist]
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2090 words
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The Native American Experience: Through The Eyes of Poetry - Code “What I’m about to tell you, Corporal, cannot leave this room. Under no circumstances can you allow your code talker to fall into enemy hands. Your mission is to protect the code… at all cost.” In the movie, Windtalkers, this is how a commander wants his marine to treat the paired Navajo code talker. That is, if it’s necessary, his marine could kill the Navajo, just like abandoning one of his properties. Even in the mid 1900s, the Native Americans were still treated not as human beings, but rather, machines; therefore, it is not hard for us to imagine how even more frightening the Native Americans’ circumstances were in the early days when they were first colonized by the western sett...   [tags: Native Americans Literature] 1864 words
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The History of Native Americans - The United States was a new nation in the 18th century when most of the world was divided among the European imperialist governments. Looking right of religion, technology and military power, people from these nations began to claim the land and lock up new worlds of natural resources to meet their needs, that is why some decided to immigrate to the United States seeking freedom and the opportunity for economical improvements; but this search for improvement, among other things, only brought suffering and death to Native American tribes....   [tags: Native American History ]
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Native American Ritual Dancing - Native American Ritual Dancing “It has often been said that the North American Indians ‘dance out’ their religions” (Vecsey 51). There were two very important dances for the Sioux tribe, the Sun Dance and the Ghost Dance. Both dances show the nature of Native American spirituality. The Ghost Dance and the Sun Dance were two very different dances, however both promote a sense of community. “The Sun Dance was the most spectacular and important religious ceremony of the Plains Indians of 19th-century North America” (Lawrence 1)....   [tags: Native Americans Rituals Traditions Dance Essays]
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Banning Native American Mascots - ... Finally, Native American mascots are a giant stereotype of the entire Native American culture. All of these examples go to show how Native American mascots not only insult Native Americans and all they that they represent, but also lead people to believe that Native Americans are just animals and not on par with humans. Though many supporters of Native American mascots believe that they aren’t harming anyone, it ends up dragging many people down. Next, Native American mascots teach children that racism is acceptable....   [tags: team, insulting, racist] 516 words
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Native American Stereotype Representation - Native American Stereotype Representation Stereotyping may be historical, but the emotions it arouses are eminently present today. According to Jack G. Shaheen, “Stereotypes are especially confining images. They are standardized mental picture[s] . . . representing oversimplified opinion[s] . . . that [are] staggeringly tenacious in [their] hold over rational thinking,” (303). It is obvious today that the presence of the Native American Indians is historically significant. Attitudes of those in the nineteenth century, who viewed images of American Indians, were shaped through the means of media....   [tags: traditional, image, savages] 1751 words
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Native Americans and Alcohol - Northern Native Americans were faced with many great hardships with the arrival of the Europeans, Spanish and the French. American Indians had thrived on American soil for thousands of years with great prosperity. Living among each other in a local economy and communities The Native Americans created a civilization that was harmonious with the land and spiritual world that surrounded them. They were able to sustain their survival from the living plants and animals that lived among them in this over abundant country and all of it's rich resources....   [tags: Native American History]
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Native Americans And Treaties with the Government - “We must protect the forests for our children, grandchildren and children yet to be born. We must protect the forests for those who can't speak for themselves such as the birds, animals, fish and trees" Chief Qwatsina’s of the Lakota Tribe. The plain natives, a respectful people, took from the land what they needed and always gave back. The settlers that came thought they were smarter and more advanced than the natives, and viewed the natives as being inferior. In reality it was the exact opposite....   [tags: Native American Tribes, Beliefs, Traditions]
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History and Relocation of Native Americans - 1. Trace the history of relocation and Indian reservations. In what ways did reservations destroy Native American cultures, and in what ways did reservations foster tribal identities. Be sure to account for patterns of change and consistency over time.   When one hears the word “relocation”, I assume, they think of taking one thing exactly as it was and placing it in a different location, but placing it as it was and with the same resources. Relocation is a loaded term because before the word relocation came about settlers of early America were forcefully pushing native peoples off their homelands; they just didn’t have the term “relocation”....   [tags: Indian Reservations, Native American Cultures]
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The Relationship Between Native American and Modern Medicine, As Explained "Native American Medicine" - The article "Native American Medicine," adapted from article appearing in Paraplegia News, June 2004 for academic purposes, explains that the Native American Medicine, it's beliefs, its origin, and what its difficulties from its appearing until now. While the article appears to be objective, offering the relationship between Native American medicine and Western modern medicine, in the end of the article seem to show more differences to give us the opportunity to choose the suitable one. In the article, "Native American Medicine"(NAM) the author Johnston states that the (NAM) has six categories: contribution, Indigenous medicine, role of spirit and connection, cultural rebirth, disabilit...   [tags: spiritual, healing, disability]
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Native American Culture - Overview “Perhaps there is no other group in the world that has quite so diverse and rich culture as that of the Native Americans. With their gilded history that is rich in strife, struggle, and triumph, the Native American culture is indeed very colorful” (Bantwal). Native American culture is very diverse and it has a very colorful history. It is extremely diverse and in fact the term Native American is a broad term that is used to cover all Native tribes in America. Throughout history there has been conflict not only among the different tribes but also there was plenty of fighting against the white men....   [tags: communication, tribes, alaska]
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Native American Education - Children were taken away from their homes and told everything they knew was wrong. They were sent to boarding schools to change their culture. These boarding schools were run by the United States government. The government's goal was to civilize Native Americans. They sent children to these schools against their will. Native American children were educated like Americans and they had to change their native ways to be more like whites (Cayton 266). Teachers abused their students and beat their native ways out of them....   [tags: children, schooling, violation, rights, culture]
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Native American Religions - Over the century Native American religions have been repressed and misunderstood. There has been little room for them to actually be able to explain their rituals and why it is important to them as a society. This ignorance’s has resulted in the loss of land, false practices with sacred objects, and a lack of education within the rituals of indigenous religions. The indigenous population deserves support to preserve their practices and language. Since most of these religions have been repressed for so long many elders do not wish to teach their kin about their religion in fear of rejection from the modern society....   [tags: society, rituals, religious freedom]
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Native American Slaveholders - Essay Slavery had different forms in space and time. The Native Americans had slavery before Europeans came to America. However when Europeans come Native American cultures need to adapt to their influences. In this essay I will discuss how Native American cultures adapted to European influences by examining the enslavement of African Americans. For Native Americans slavery was “a legitimate fate for captives of war”. They used captives as forced laborers . Sometimes they could exchange slaves, but never participated in slave market....   [tags: European Lifestyle, Racial Equality]
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The Struggles and Benefits of Being a Native American - ... They didn’t have enough people to form their own communities and several non-Native American students didn’t understand or know the Native American students. Most of non-Native Americans students had the perceptions about the Native Americans from media which were mostly incorrect. Although UNL tried to increase the number of Native American students in the universities, it is not easy because most of Native Americans were poor and not able to pay for college. Third Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFZYVnO-rUA Mohawk storyteller fights stereotypes about Native Americans This was an interview of Kay Olan who was a retired school teacher and she was one of Native Americans....   [tags: resilient culture, unrepresented] 708 words
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African and Native American Influence in America - The African American slave influence in the beginnings of American culture and technology and Native Americans of the North American Continent were significant in creating America. By revealing the different ways this achieved, we can see the work and techniques that drove the new country and how this created by the political, as well as ideological ramifications of their labors. With all of these contributions to the new country of the United States, we see that the formation of the world power built on the principles that the early settlers created in their work....   [tags: Social Studies]
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Native American Music - There is an old ancient Haida saying that is, “A great chief dies poor”. The Northwest coast region takes a great pride in the act of giving. The value of generosity was measured by how many gifts are given. It is used to measure wealth in their region. When a certain host or leader wanted to bring all of the people together they would call for a potlatch. A potlatch traditionally takes months of preparation in preparing gifts for the invited guests, housing, food, as well as theatrical entertainments and the rehearsal of great stories....   [tags: generosity, leader, Northwest, tradition, culture]
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The Native American College Students and Alcatraz - On November 9th, 1969, a group of nearly one hundred Native American college students stood on the coast of San Francisco Bay, ready to take over the former federal prison known as Alcatraz, but the boats, their transportation to the island, never came. Refusing to accept defeat, protest leader Fortune Eagle convinced a Canadian sailboat skipper, Ronald Craig, to take them on a cruise, not to the island, but around it. Halfway through the journey, Richard Oakes and some of the other American Indians dove overboard in an attempt to swim to the island....   [tags: protest, defeat, rescue] 1636 words
(4.7 pages)
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Career Development of Native American Adolescents - Career Development of Native American Adolescents The vocational concerns of Native Americans as a whole are disturbing. Between 24 and 50 percent of Native Americans living on reservations are unemployed, making them the largest unemployed ethnic group in the nation (National Center for Education Statistics, 2008). Furthermore, post-secondary education completion rates for Native Americans are the second lowest in the country, compared to other U.S. minorities. Summary of Research and Relevance of Vocational Theory for Native Americans The research that exists in this area tends to fall into three categories as outlined by Turner & Lapan, (2003): the structure of vocational interests, the...   [tags: disturbing vocational concerns] 667 words
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Native American Symbols and Mascots in Sports - Our group had the task to present about Native American symbols and mascots in sports. We structured our presentation by presenting the cases of four major sports teams: Chicago Blackhawks, Florida State Seminoles, Cleveland Indians, and the Washington Redskins. Chicago Blackhawks The founder named his team the “Chicago Blackhawks” in honor of the Sauk Indian chief who sided with the British in the War of 1812. However this team has had it easy, because the major complaints they get involve their logo only, leaving the name and mascot in peace....   [tags: Blackhawks, Seminoles, Indians, Redskins]
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Sherman Alexie A Native American Writer - Sherman Alexie has made a name for himself as a prolific contemporary Native American writer, taking inspiration from his own past and experiences with modern Indian life. While there are many enduring themes throughout Alexie's writings: Native identity, modern reservation life, alcohol abuse etc. when it comes to his collection War Dances, the most apparent motif is fatherhood. Community and family are the heart of Native American cultures, with the father archetype holding great honor and expectation....   [tags: fatherhood, war dances]
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Sexual Assault of Native American Women - Introduction For the purpose of this assignment, I chose to analyze the overwhelming prevalence of sexual assault of Native American women. In order to create a solution to the issue, every facet of the matter must be addressed and analyzed. To keep within the constraints of this paper I will be touching on various aspects of sexual assault within the tribal community to give a general understanding of what is at hand, as well as to facilitate critical, solution-focused thinking. Without a holistic understanding, we cannot conjure, let alone implement effective changes in tribal communities, law enforcement agencies, or federal institutions....   [tags: tribal and federal law on sex crimes] 1464 words
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Native American Reservation Life and History - Many people today know the story of the Indians that were native to this land, before “white men” came to live on this continent. Few people may know that white men pushed them to the west while many immigrants took over the east and moved westward. White men made “reservations” that were basically land that Indians were promised they could live on and run. What many Americans don’t know is what the Indians struggled though and continue to struggle through on the reservations. Indians had been moved around much earlier than the nineteenth century, but The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was the first legal account....   [tags: Indian Removal Act of 1830, forced assimilation]
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Native American Tribes: The Choctaw Tribe - Prior to the first European settlers stepping foot onto what is now the United States, Native American tribes flourished for hundreds of years. Each tribe was unique, yet all shared in the practice of living off of natural resources the land provided. Once European settlers discovered the Americas, the tails of the country’s native inhabitants spread across the seas. These early settlers began to trade with the natives and eventually named the “Five Civilized Tribes” (Choctaw Indian Facts). These tribes included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole, and Choctaw Indians....   [tags: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole]
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Language Loss: Native American Languages - If one walks through one of the large cities’ streets in our country. They will hear and experience a variety of languages. Our history and tradition of being a land of immigrants is reflected in the languages we speak. This means that the USA is home to a vast number of languages, one would be hard pressed to find a language that is not spoken in the U.S. The official list as the number of languages spoken in the United States go as high as 322. The most spoken and prominent languages in the country being English, Spanish, and French....   [tags: tradition, history, immigrants, teaching]
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2009 words
(5.7 pages)
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Native American Poetry: Joy Jarjo - ... However, as the poem goes on, the speaker views the horse in different forms and sometimes appropriates the horse. In the first stanza, due to the incorporation of her culture in her writing, the horses are compared through nature, which as stated, plays a significant part in her culture. When Harjo writes, “She had horses who were bodies of sand”(2) and, “She had horses who were splintered red cliff”(8), can most likely be a reference to the landscapes that the speaker was surrounded by. The reference to the landscape can also emphasize the environment in which the speaker lives in, which ultimately places us in a setting for the poem....   [tags: society, adversities, culture, stanza] 915 words
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