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Medea - Susan Smith murdered her own two children in 1994. Kathleen Folbigg killed her only child in 1998. Caro Socorro killed her three children in 1999. And in 431 B.C. the fictional character, Medea, murderedmurdured her own two sons. When hearing about these extreme atrocities we are repulsed. What sane mother could murder her own children. But thats just the point isn't it, no sane mother would kill her own young. No, each of these women had underlying psychological issues that led to them committing these unnatural, morally wrong acts....   [tags: Medea Euripides Play Analysis] 1660 words
(4.7 pages)
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Euripides' Medea - Euripides' Medea Medea is the tragic tale of a woman scorned. It was written in 431 B.C. by the Greek playwright, Euripides. Eruipides was the first Greek poet to suffer the fate of so many of the great modern writers: rejected by most of his contemporaries (he rarely won first prize and was the favorite target for the scurrilous humor of the comic poets), he was universally admired and revered by the Greeks of the centuries that followed his death('Norton Anthology';). Euripides showed his interest in psychology in his many understanding portraits of women ('World Book';)....   [tags: Medea Euripides Essays] 1034 words
(3 pages)
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Murasaki and Medea - Murasaki and Medea       Although The Tale of Genji, by Murasaki Shikibu, is set in late tenth-century Japan, the plights of the characters are universal. In Chapter 12, Genji leaves his wife, who is named after the author, and goes into exile. Desperately in love with Genji, Muraskai is similar to Euripides' Medea in the play of the same name. She suffers because her husband, Jason, abandons her for a princess. Shikibu and Euripides seem to have shared the same worldviews about women's emotional dependence on their mates....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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The Evil Character Medea in Euripides' Medea - The Evil Character Medea in Euripides' Medea Euripides created a two-headed character in this classical tragedy. Medea begins her marriage as the ideal loving wife who sacrificed much for her husband's safety. At the peak of the reading, she becomes a murderous villain that demands respect and even some sympathy. By the end, the husband and wife are left devoid of love and purpose as the tragedy closes. In Medea, a woman betrays her homeland because of her love for a man. Jason is the husband that she ferociously loves and makes sacrifices for....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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The Character Medea's Revenge in Euripides' Medea - The Character Medea's Revenge in Euripides' Medea Medea is a tragedy of a woman who feels that her husband has betrayed her with another woman and the jealousy that consumes her. She is the protagonist who arouses sympathy and admiration because of how her desperate situation is. I thought I was going to feel sorry for Medea, but that quickly changed as soon as I saw her true colors. I understand that her emotions were all over the place. First, she was angry, then cold and conniving. The lower she sinks the more terrible revenge she wants to reap on Jason....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 757 words
(2.2 pages)
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Fate in Medea - Fate in Medea Works Cited Missing Observation and Interpretation: Throughout the text, fate and the gods are blamed for the cause of the problems, however subsequent choices made later on by the characters appear to be free will, however are actually influenced by fate and the gods. So what?: This makes the audience blame the gods for the overall out come, but still blame the main character for her choices. Quotes: P48 l. 1014-1015 “The gods/ And my evil-hearted plots have led to this.” P39 l....   [tags: Classics Medea Greek Essays] 858 words
(2.5 pages)
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Euripides' Medea - Euripides' Medea I see Medea as a woman who took a chance and stood up for herself. The kind of behavior that Medea displays was very rare for these times: she doesn?t accept the dramatic change in her life; she does something about it. On the other hand, Medea becomes so obsessed she loses herself to revenge. Medea is only heroic to an extent. Medea?s thirst for revenge begins when she finds out about her husbands unfaithfulness. Medea?s husband Jason decides to marry the princess Glauce to establish a position of power in Corinth....   [tags: Papers Medea Euripides Essays Papers] 761 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Wicked Character Medea in Euripides' Medea - The Wicked Character Medea in Euripides' Medea The character Medea is disliked by many that read Euripides' Medea. She is not really given much of a chance. It is difficult to read the tragedy without having negative feelings towards the main character. Some readers are content to just hate Medea, while others want to know what would compel a mother to come to be able to commit these crimes. Sara Warner writes, "Transgression must be built into any system in order for it to survive. For example, patriarchy, for lack of a better word, could not and would not exist if it simply operated on the brutal oppression and domination of the female sex" (Warner p....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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727 words
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Medea, by Euripides - Constructing Medea’s Compelling Persona - Medea, by Euripides - Constructing Medea’s Compelling Persona In the play Medea, by Euripides, many techniques are incorporated to augment the compelling persona of the protagonist, Medea. She has an overpowering presence, which is fashioned through the use of imagery, offstage action and language. Dramatic suspense, employment of the chorus and Deus Ex Machina also serve to enhance the intense persona assumed by Medea. Medea is frequently associated with images of violence and rage. “She’s wild....   [tags: Medea Euripides]
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1192 words
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Medea: Euripides' Tragic Hero - Medea: Euripides' Tragic Hero The rhetorical devices that Euripides uses throughout Medea allow Medea to become the poem's tragic hero. For Medea is not only a woman but also a foreigner, which makes her a member of two groups in Athenian society who had nearly no rights. Thus, the Athenian audience would have automatically aligned their sympathies with Jason instead Medea, and Medea would have been labeled the villain from the start. This would have negated Euripides' literary cause and given the play little dramatic merit....   [tags: Medea Euripides essays] 1405 words
(4 pages)
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medea - The tragic play Medea is a struggle between reason and violence. Medea is deliberately portrayed as not a ‘normal woman’, but excessive in her passions. Medea is a torment to herself and to others; that is why Euripides shows her blazing her way through life leaving wreckage behind her. Euripides has presented Medea as a figure previously thought of exclusively as a male- hero. Her balance of character is a combination of the outstanding qualities of Achilles and Odysseus. The problem set at the beginning of the play is that Jason has decided to marry another wife, Glauce....   [tags: essays research papers] 455 words
(1.3 pages)
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Medea - Title of Work: Medea Country/Culture: Greek Literary Period: Classical Type of Literature (genre): Drama/Tragedy Author: Euripides Authorial information: Euripides was born in 484 BC and took up drama at the young age of 25. At most drama competitions, however his plays came in last place until he was about 45 or 50 years old. In his entire life, he wrote 92 plays of which only five received first place awards at competition. Euripides despised women. He had been married twice to unfaithful women and had three sons....   [tags: essays research papers] 1747 words
(5 pages)
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Medea - Medea Medea is a Greek tragedy which was written in 431 BC by the Greek philosopher Euripides. The story of Medea is one filled with anger, jealousy, and death. The main character, Medea, has to overcome the personal heartache of seeing her husband, Jason, marry another woman. The ensuing struggle she has with this notion is the focus of this play. In a very important scene, Medea hatches her plan to murder the princess, who is Jason’s new bride, as well as Jason himself. She says that first, she will pretend to beg for Jason’s forgiveness, and then she will have him bring the children back to the palace....   [tags: essays research papers] 362 words
(1 pages)
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Love and Deception in Medea, by Euripides - Love and Deception in Medea, by Euripides There are many pieces of literature that may entail more than one theme throughout the story. The tragedy, Medea, by Euripides is very good example of this. Throughout this story, the themes of betrayal and love, revenge, and women’s rights arise. Euripides brings these points up to help the reader to realize that women are powerful.      Betrayal is a very important theme throughout this story. Her husband Jason betrays Medea, when he abandons her and her children for another woman....   [tags: Euripides Medea Grrek] 515 words
(1.5 pages)
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Essay on the Gods in Euripides' Medea - Antigone Medea has just killed four people which are Creon the king of Corinth, the princess whom Jason is in love with, and her two little children. Jason then prays to gods, especially Zeus, father of all gods, to punish Medea for her crimes. From the context of the quote, the chorus is addressing the audience about the unexpected and unbelievable end of the play. Medea then gets away to Athens with a chariot lent to her by Helios, the sun god and her grandfather. Euripides always uses this kind of conclusion to end most of his works....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 567 words
(1.6 pages)
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Justice in Euripides' Medea - Justice in Euripides' Medea How do we define reason as just. When asked this question, it really makes you begin to wonder how to depict what one might think is just. In the story of Medea, reason is what drives many of the characters actions. For example, the reason that Jason leaves Medea for Creon's daughter is for his own benefit. Is that just. Medea then kills Creon and his daughter for revenge against Jason. Is that just?. Throughout the whole story, you are torn with emotions between the characters....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 434 words
(1.2 pages)
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Medea - Title of work- Medea Country/Culture- Greek Literary Period- Classical Type of literature (genre)- Drama/Tragedy Author- Euripedes Authorial information- Euripedes lived from ca. 485 to ca. 406 B.C. making him younger thank Aeschylus and Sophocles, and making him the last of the great writers of tragedy in the golden age of Athens. His emphasis on human emotions and the psychology of individuals has proven more widely popular than philosophical beliefs shown in his older contemporary works....   [tags: essays research papers] 2047 words
(5.8 pages)
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Medea - It is easy to agree with a family member or friend about a bad decision, but it is much more difficult to agree with someone you do not like, or do not even know personally. When that person is a fictional character it is even more challenging. Medea is a very pitiful character, but she is also rather cunning in the way she carries out her actions. However, due to the overwhelming sense of wrong-doing, the reader may find it easy to identify with her. Medea makes a wonderful pathetic character because of her strange way of thinking and rationalizing, ability to manipulate people, and her strong desire to make Jason suffer....   [tags: Literature]
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1452 words
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Representation of Society in Euripides' Medea - Representation of Society in Euripides' Medea During the time of Euripides, approximately the second half of the fifth century B.C., it was a period of immense cultural crisis and political convulsion (Arrowsmith 350). Euripides, like many other of his contemporaries, used the whole machinery of the theater as a way of thinking about their world (Arrowsmith 349). His interest in particular was the analysis of culture and relationship between culture and the individual. Euripides used his characters as a function to shape the ideas of the play (Arrowsmith 359)....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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533 words
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Medea as Woman, Hero and God - Medea as Woman, Hero and God In Euripides' play the title role and focus of the play is the foreign witch Medea. Treated differently through the play by different people and at different times, she adapts and changes her character, finally triumphing over her hated husband Jason. She can feasibly be seen as a mortal woman, Aristotle's tragic hero figure and even as an exulted goddess. Medea's identity as a weak woman is emphasised at the very start of the play. It is made very clear that she has come to misfortune through no fault of her own and is powerless in her problem ("her world has turned to enmity")....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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2136 words
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Alternate Endings in Anouilh's Medea - Alternate Endings in Anouilh's Medea       To what purpose does Jean Anouilh alter the central conflicts and characters in his retelling of "Medea". In the classic play, Medea escapes without punishment and we are told as an audience it is not our place to question the motives and/or actions of the gods. Within the framework of modern, psychologically rendered characters and in the absence of supernatural meddling, Anouilh attempts not only to question the motives but to posit answers to the open ended questions left by Euripides....   [tags: Anouilh Medea Essays]
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The Representation of Femininity in Euripides? Medea - The Representation of Femininity in Euripides' Medea Works Cited Not At the time Euripides wrote Medea, Ancient Greece was a patriarchal society: women had little or no rights, and were treated as the weaker sex. Women were expected to stay at home and bear and care for their children, while men went to work ?wives to produce true-born children and to be trustworthy guardians of the household. (Resource Book 3, D5b . Demosthenes 59.122). Men made the rules, while women were expected to be passive and weak, and were thought to be ?silly creatures....   [tags: Portrayal Women Euripides' Medea] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
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A Close Reading of Euripides' Medea - A Close Reading of Medea Medea's first public statement, a sort of "protest speech," is one of the best parts of the play and demonstrates a complex, at times even contradictory, representation of gender. Medea's calm and reasoning tone, especially after her following out bursts of despair and hatred, provides the first display of her ability to gather herself together in the middle of crisis and pursue her hidden agenda with a great determination. This split in her personality is to a certain degree gender bias....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 650 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Role of Chorus in Euripides' Medea - The Role of Chorus in Medea In section 18 of the Poetics Aristotle criticizes Euripides for not allowing "the chorus to be one of the actors and to be a part of the whole and to share in the dramatic action, . . . as in Sophocles." Aristotle may be thinking of the embolima of Euripides' later plays (satirized also by Aristophanes), but he is certainly wrong about the Medea. Its choral odes are not only all intimately related to the action but are also essential for the meaning of the play, particularly because here, as elsewhere (e.g....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Medea - The two Greek plays, Medea and Antigone both exhibit opening scenes that serve numerous purposes. Such as establishing loyalties, undermining assumptions on the part of the audience, foreshadowing the rest of the play, and outlining all of the issues. Medea and Antigone share many similarities in their openings. Both plays begin with providing the audience with the history and the consequences of certain situations that the characters were involved in. It also brings the audience to the present time, in which the play occurs....   [tags: essays research papers] 813 words
(2.3 pages)
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Medea Vs. Hedda Gabbler - Medea vs. Hedda Gabbler Incomplete Essay      Medea and Hedda Gabbler are two different plays, yet both have very similar motives in the end. Both women seek to control the destiny of the men in their lives. The reasons are not by the decision of either women, but by the hands of Fate, something out of their control. Both women are respectively different, with different degrees of action and success. Two women needing to control destiny bring two very different motives together.      Medea and Hedda have two very different reasons for desiring control over the destiny of their men?s lives....   [tags: essays research papers Medea gabbler] 1045 words
(3 pages)
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Strategic Use of Dialogue in Euripides' Medea - Strategic Use of Dialogue in Euripides' Medea Euripides employs the technique of dialogue between two solo actors on stage throughout Medea to dramatize the core values underlying these conversations. In particular, through the conversations that Medea holds with three different males, she shows herself to be a person of great intellect. Females were rarely valued for their intelligence because the Athenians had a "complacent pride in the superiority of the Greek masculinity" (page 641 ). Men and women were considered to have very different roles in society with men being the far superior species....   [tags: Medea Euripides Essays] 1399 words
(4 pages)
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Comparing Women's Revenge in The Oresteia and Medea - Comparing Women's Revenge in The Oresteia and Medea Clytaemnestra and Medea are two women who are seeking justice for a wrong committed by their husbands. Clytaemnestra?s husband, Agamemnon, did not wrong here directly but rather indirectly. Agamemnon sacrificed their daughter Iphigeneia, in order to calm the Thracian winds. For Clytaemnestra this brought much hatred towards Agamemnon. Here Agamemnon had betrayed Clytaemnestra and their daughters trust, and for that she sought revenge. Medea's husband, Jason, had dishonored her with his unfaithfulness....   [tags: Oresteia Medea Revenge Essays]
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The Importance of the Role That the Chorus Plays in Euripedes’ Medea - The Importance of the Role That the Chorus Plays in Euripedes’ Medea The Chorus is very much an important part of Euripedes’ Medea, and indeed many other works written in the ancient Greek style. In this play, it follows the journey Medea makes, and not only narrates, but commentates on what is happening. Euripedes uses the Chorus as a literary device to raise certain issues, and to influence where the sympathies of the audience lie. In the list of characters at the beginning of the play, the Chorus is stated to be a chorus of Corinthian Women....   [tags: Euripedes Medea] 1154 words
(3.3 pages)
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Medea - Male And Female Perceptions Of The World - Medea - Male And Female Perceptions Of The World Ask yourself this, Is this world biased against a particular gender. Do we mainly focus on women's issues or men's?' What would your answer be. I bet most of you would say no, we aren't biased at all. And, in many cases, that would be correct. But look at some of the other parts of the world where women aren?t allowed a say, they aren?t allowed to put their point of view forward even in our own society. They aren?t allowed to know information until the male passes it on to them....   [tags: Male Female Medea Essays Feminist Equal] 719 words
(2.1 pages)
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Satisfaction and Turmoil in Medea and the Twenty-third Psalm - Satisfaction and Turmoil in Medea and the Twenty-third Psalm We are all familiar with the Bible and its contents in general, yet a few individuals know it better than others. The twenty-third Psalm in particular is one that some know by heart. Then, there are those of us that are fascinated with other ancient histories and literatures.  Medea is one such literature that illustrates the classical Greek culture of the day.  These two literary works come across as strikingly different, and their disparity can be attributed to the authors' different styles and the different ethical beliefs that lie behind the works....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 1190 words
(3.4 pages)
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Women Behaving Like Men in Antigone, Electra, and Medea - Women Behaving Like Men in Antigone, Electra, and Medea Throughout Antigone, Electra, and Medea, many double standards between men and women surface. These become obvious when one selects a hero from these plays, for upon choosing, then one must rationalize his or her choice. The question then arises as to what characteristics make up the hero. How does the character win fame. What exactly is excellent about that character. These questions must be answered in order to choose a hero in these Greek tragedies....   [tags: Antigone Electra Medea]
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Social Traditions in Medea, The Piano, and The Age of Innocence - Social Traditions in Medea, The Piano, and The Age of Innocence Traditions demonstrate a set of social norms that have been followed and adapted to for an elongated amount of time. In each of the plots, Medea, The Piano, and The Age of Innocence, the standard set by society was broken and the consequences imposed took form in varying degrees and shapes of violence. Whether it was outright murder as in Medea, or a more subtle but intense struggle as in The Age of Innocence, these consequences serve as the community's opinion of this breach of its expectations for its members....   [tags: Medea Piano Age of Innocence] 2113 words
(6 pages)
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Jason Brings His Own Downfall in Medea, a play by Euripides - In Medea, a play by Euripides, Jason possesses many traits that lead to his downfall. After Medea assists Jason in his quest to get the Golden Fleece, killing her brother and disgracing her father and her native land in the process, Jason finds a new bride despite swearing an oath of fidelity to Medea. Medea is devastated when she finds out that Jason left her for another woman after two children and now wants to banish her. Medea plots revenge on Jason after he gives her one day to leave. Medea later acts peculiarly as a subservient woman to Jason who is oblivious to the evil that will be unleashed and lets the children remain in Corinth....   [tags: Medea Euripides] 783 words
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Similarities Between Aristophanes' Lysistrata and Euripides' Medea - Similarities Between Aristophanes' Lysistrata and Euripides' Medea The poetic tone of Aristophanes' Lysistrata differs greatly from the poetic tone of the Greek tragedies we have read in class. However, after analyzing this Greek comedy, it seems to share some of the main characteristics of Euripides' Medea. Within these plays, we meet shrewd, powerful masculine women who use the art of manipulation to get what they want from others and to accomplish their goals. This theme of manipulation is employed through various means and techniques....   [tags: World Literature Lysistrata Medea Essays] 903 words
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Loyal Disobedience - A Social Tract of Euripides in Medea and Helen - Loyal Disobedience-A Social Tract of Euripides       In ancient Greece the females were considered to be conniving and deceiving whisperers, and men almost never trusted their wives.  The ideal woman was an obedient and placating wife.  They believed that the female should be strong but still yield to the power of the male in charge, whether it was older brother, father, or husband.  Euripides often used females in uncommon ways; he did not simply show them as complacent animals.  Women in Euripides' plays were used for social commentary.  They were not just simple characters; they could be both agathos and kakos.  The females in the works of Euripides were extremely strong and devious and they were loyal but at the same time hypocritical.                Ancient Greco society contained a vast amount of gods, demigods, and other godlike beings.  Even though it was widely known what females should be like, the gods themselves did not emulate this.  Hera was not obedient to Zeus.  There are other contradictory goddesses: the goddess of Peace, and the goddess of War.  In the time of Euripides there was a double standard.                In both Medea and Helen, the title characters are disobedient females.  They do not listen to the males around them.  In ancient Greece it was not acceptable for a female tolive by herself.  They believed that females should be the servant, or the subjugated property of a male.  Females relied on men for their protection but in return they gave their loyalty.  What might have been seen as obedience, most likely was loyalty.  Men might have thought they had an obedient wife but this was not the case....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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Euripides' The Medea: Medea and the Chorus - Medea and the Chorus The exchange that takes place between Medea and the Chorus serves several purposes in Euripides' tragedy, The Medea. It allows us to sympathize with Medea in spite of her tragic flaws. It also foreshadows the tragic events that will come to pass. Finally, it contrasts rationality against vengeance and excess. The Chorus offers the sane view of the world to the somewhat insane characters of Medea, Jason, and Creon. As the passage begins on page 176, the leader of the Chorus reveals that she has high regards for Medea despite the fact that she is "savage still." She acknowledges Medea as a foreigner and an outsider and yet is sympathetic towards her....   [tags: Euripides] 292 words
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Comparing the Themes of Vincenzio Bellini’s Norma and Euripedes' Medea - Comparing the Themes of Vincenzio Bellini’s Norma and Euripedes' Medea Vincenzio Bellini’s opera Norma is considered by many to be a reworking of Euripedes' classic Greek tragedy Medea. Both plots have many identical elements of Greek tragedy such as a chorus, unity of location, and a human decision and action culminating in tragedy. Richard Wagner greatly admired Greek tragedies, believing them to be “The highest point ever reached in human creative achievement…” (Wagner 1). In his essay Theories of Art, Wagner gives five reasons for this “artistic perfection:” 1....   [tags: Vincenzio Bellini Norma Euripedes Medea]
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Bernarda Alba And Medea: Created Millenia Apart, Yet So Similar - Most people would define a great female protagonist as intelligent, strong minded and willing to fight for what she believes in. Both Bernarda Alba from Federico Garcia Lorca’s The House of Bernarda Alba and Medea by Euripides fit this description. One is a tyrannical mother who imposes her choices on her five daughters, the other is arguably the strongest non-Olympian woman in all of Greek mythology. If we take a closer look, we notice that these two characters have many things in common. From their positions of strength, to the masculine aspects of their personalities; from the way they deal with situations to the part they play in the deaths of their children....   [tags: House Of Bernarda Alba Federico Garcia Lorca Medea] 1597 words
(4.6 pages)
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Condemnation of Medea - Medea is an impeccable example of a woman being controlled by the ravaging effects of love. Unfortunately, those effects lead Medea to commit a serious transgression: murder. She takes the life of not only a king and his daughter, but also of two of her own children. Although the king’s death was more of an adverse consequence than a direct murder, Medea planned all of their deaths down to the last detail. Medea’s nurse observes Medea’s transformation from a jilted lover to an enraged murderer from the beginning....   [tags: Euripides, literary analysis] 667 words
(1.9 pages)
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Plato & Medea - In ancient Greece women were viewed as many things. They were not viewed as equivalent to males by any means. Women were portrayed usually as submissive domestic, and controlled. They played supporting or secondary roles in life to men, who tended to be demanding of their wives, but expected them to adhere to their wishes. In the tragedy Medea, written by Euripides, Medea plays the major role in this story, unlike most Greek stories with women playing only minor roles, but she also demonstrates many behavioral and psychological patterns unlike any other Greek women....   [tags: essays research papers] 1086 words
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Medea and Lysistrata - Medea and Lysistrata Medea and Lysistrata are two Greek literatures that depict the power which women are driven to achieve in an aim to defy gender inequality. In The Medea, Medea is battling against her husband Jason whom she hates. On the other hand, in Aristophanes' Lysistrata, the protagonist Lysistrata plotted to convince and organize the female gender to protest against the stubbornness of men. In terms of defining the purpose of these two literatures, it is apparent that Euripedes and Aristophanes created characters that demonstrate resistance against the domination of men in the society....   [tags: World Literature Gender Inequalities Essays] 536 words
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Medea by Euripdes - Medea by Euripdes The tragic tale, Medea, by Euripdes proposes a certain question which creats speculism. Wether or not Medea is the villan, or is she a product of her environment, is frequently crictly analyzed. Medea, in the tale, committs a series of evil actions against the people which betrayed her. The cruel betrail which Medea endures can be interpreted as motif for her actions. Critical analysis of the circumstances surounding Medea can help explain the vile deeds she comitted. In order to fully understand the actions taken by Medea we must grasp the socialogical postion of woman and men of the time....   [tags: Papers] 504 words
(1.4 pages)
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Medea And Othello - Two tragedies from two different time period, Medea and Othello show similarities and differences in their characters, story plots and settings. Euripedes’ Medea written in the classical period and Shakespeare’s Othello written in the romantic era, the two tragedies shows different feel of what tragedies are. First of all, the most obvious difference between these two play is how Medea shows unities (time, place and action) whilst Othello has none. It’s clearly shown in the first scene, as soon as the characters come out, that in the Medea, it’s a set place, and there would be no movement....   [tags: Compare Contrast] 1557 words
(4.4 pages)
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Medea a Mad Bitter Woman in Medea - Medea is a story about love, passion, fear, and most importantly revenge. Throughout the story the reader witnesses a odd connection between Medea and Jason, they are both quarrelsome, surreptitious, and vigilantes. The characters, Medea and Jason, share many similar traits that they do not even notice mainly because they are both so egotistical. These connection are what really makes the story prominent. In the story, Medea and Jason are seen fighting in numerous occasions. This quarrelsomeness starts when Jason states, ?You could have stayed in Corinth, still lived in this house,/ if you had quietly accepted the decisions....   [tags: essays research papers] 817 words
(2.3 pages)
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Medea Notes - Medea Notes Would that the Argo had never winged its way to the land of Colchis through the dark-blue Symplegades!1 Would that the pine trees had never been felled in the glens of Mount Pelion and furnished oars for the hands [5] of the heroes who at Pelias' command set forth in quest of the Golden Fleece. For then my lady Medea would not have sailed to the towers of Iolcus, her heart smitten with love for Jason, or persuaded the daughters of Pelias to kill [10] their father and hence now be inhabiting this land of Corinth, *separated from her loved ones and country....   [tags: Papers] 2528 words
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Medea as a Heroine in Euripides - Medea as a Heroine in Euripides In Euripides' Medea, the main character of the same name is a controversial heroine. Medea takes whatever steps necessary to achieve what she believes is right and fair. She lived in a time when women were expected to sit in the shadows and take the hand that life dealt them without a blink of their eye. Medea took very radical steps to liberate herself and destroys the life of the man who ruined hers. She refused to accept the boundaries that a patriarchal society set upon her....   [tags: Papers] 344 words
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chorus role in medea - The Chorus influences our response to Medea and her actions in both a positive and negative manner. The Chorus, a body of approximately fifteen Corinthian women who associate the audience with the actors, is able to persuade and govern us indirectly through sympathy for what has been done to Medea, a princess of Colchis and the victim of her husband’s betrayal of love for another woman. The Chorus also lead us to through sympathy for Medea to accept her decision of taking revenge on princess Glauce and Jason....   [tags: essays research papers] 798 words
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Jason as the Foil of Medea - Jason as the Foil of Medea In Medea, by Euripides, the two main characters Jason and Media are forced to leave Lolkos and have taken refuge in Corinth. Jason has the possibility of establishing a position of standing in the community by marrying King Creon’s daughter. Medea is enraged by Jason’s betrayal of her and their two children and she vows to stop the marriage and exact revenge. In the play, Medea and Jason are set up as foils. Medea is completely dependent on the dominance of passion over reason....   [tags: Papers] 1304 words
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What Is the Role of the Chorus in Medea? - In Medea an essential character is the chorus of Corinthian women. They help obtain Euripides' truly genius paradox of achieving empathy from the readers for a mother who sheds her own children's blood. One of the major turning points in the play is when Medea asks for the chorus of women's silence as she contrives an evil plot to gain revenge. They agree immediately and are henceforth wrapped up in the play and the malicious plot. "This I promise. You are right, Medea, / In paying your husband back....   [tags: World Literature] 664 words
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Gender Roles in Euripides' Medea - In Euripides' Medea, the protagonist abandoned the gender roles of ancient Greek society. Medea defied perceptions of gender by exhibiting both "male" and "female" tendencies. She was able to detach herself from her "womanly" emotions at times and perform acts that society did not see women capable of doing. However, Medea did not fully abandon her role as a woman and did express many female emotions throughout the play. In ancient Greek society, murder was not commonly associated with women. Throughout the play, however, Medea committed several acts of murder....   [tags: Euripides essays research papers]
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Feminism in Medea by Euripides - Feminism in Medea by Euripides The play Medea by Euripides challenges the dominant views of femininity in the patriarchal society of the Greeks. While pursuing her ambition Medea disregards many of the feminine stereotypes/ characteristics of the patriarchal Greek society. She questions the inequality of women in a patriarchal society, contradicts Jason?s chauvinist beliefs, challenges the stereotype that women are weak and passive and completely disregards the feminine role of motherhood....   [tags: Feminism Euripides]
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Medea: Vengeance Will Be Mine! - In Euripides play, Medea, the outcome of the play can be discerned before the final curtain falls. Medea’s plans to destroy Jason, to work her black magic on Creusa and Creon, and to murder her sons, is continually foreshadowed through dialogue, literary elements, and omens. From the beginning, Medea’s dialogue and actions do not bode well for Jason. She is out for revenge and wishes death upon her enemies. Her heart is “bitter” and is filled with “black hatred” for Jason because of his betrayal....   [tags: Literary Review] 848 words
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Controversy in Greek Tragedy Medea - Controversy in Greek Tragedy Medea The Greek tragedy Medea is a tale of a woman scorn and the wrath that follows. The story is one of outright deceit, crippling revenge and questionable justice. It is typical of Greek tragedies in its simplicity, but atypical in the way it justifies horrific revenge. Medea is one of Euripides' most enduring plays. It and only a handful of others have survived the several thousand years since their conception. Medea is a typical Greek tragedy. The opening monologue sets the stage for the rest of the play, a typical prologue....   [tags: Papers] 571 words
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Gender Roles in Medea by Euripides - Centuries of traditions has enabled men and women to define gender roles in society. Although some critics declare gender roles do not exist today, others believe they do. In society, men and women are defined by gender roles throughout their activities and emotions. A doctor is typically portrayed by a male while women rear the children and cook for the men. However, although still in existence, today these roles are less obvious but tend to have similar meaning when compared to the past. In ancient Greece, women suffered great hardships....   [tags: Gender Roles in Greek Society] 1283 words
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The Character of Medea in Euripides - The Character of Medea in Euripides Medea was a very diverse character who possesses several characteristics which were unlike the average woman during her time. As a result of these characteristics she was treated differently by members of the society. Media was a different woman for several reasons; she possessed super natural powers , she was manipulative, vindictive, and she was driven by revenge. The life that Medea lived and the situations she encountered, (one could say) were partly responsible for these characteristics and her actions....   [tags: Papers] 368 words
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Medea and Jason and the Golden Fleece - Medea and Jason and the Golden Fleece “Medea and “Jason and the Golden Fleece” are two well known Greek stories. In both these stories the Olympian gods in the stories play important roles that affect the lives of both Jason and Medea. The behaviors of these two character also have a great contrast between them. In the story of “Jason and the Golden Fleece”, Jason is the son of Aeson who is the legitimate king of Iolcus, in Thessaly. Aeson’s half brother Pelias steals the throne away from Aeson making himself the new king of Iolcus....   [tags: Greek Stories Greece Olympian Gods Essays] 667 words
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Medea and the Greek Idea of Control - Medea and the Greek Idea of Control Nothing bothered the Ancient Greeks more than chaos. Of this there is proof in the many artifacts recovered from Ancient Greek sites; their pottery, sculpture, architecture, and literature all convey the importance of balance and control to their society. "Medea," written by Euripedes, reveals this idea of the Greeks. The play illustrates many evils of the society: a civilian fighting against social morals, and, even worse, committing murder. More importantly, though, it proves though chaos and evil are powerful forces, "good" ones, balance and control, for example, will always prevail....   [tags: Papers] 421 words
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Medea and Hedda Gabler - ... When Tesman returns home after seeing the last of his dying Aunt Rina, Hedda, his wife, reveals she has burnt Eilert Lovborg’s (George’s academic rival) manuscript. In a fit of raw anger, Tesman questions Hedda why she has committed such an act; then, after she claims to have done the deed “for your sake, George” (Ibsen 63), Tesman calms down and responds with joy. This short dialogue between the two reveals Tesman is surmounted by that which he immediately feels. His impulses render him insensitive to the long-term effects an event may have and leave him concerned with only the short term consequences he may have to address....   [tags: Theatre]
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Medea Via Neumann - In The Great Mother, Erich Neumann attempts to provide a structural analysis of the archetype. He states in the preface that not only does it "provide the foundation for all psychotherapy," it also provides for each man a view of the world that "enriches his own personality" as well as his "new perspective on life and on mankind as a whole." When referring to an archetype, Neumann refers to "an inward image at work in the human psyche." By examining the separate aspects of the archetype, one can approach a more thorough understanding of the archetype and, finally, the implications of its structure and its appearances in the real world....   [tags: World Literature] 881 words
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Medea and Nietzsche's Will to Power - Medea and Nietzsche's Will to Power When Medea kills her children, audiences react with shock and horror. Any sympathy viewers have built for the woman is, in the words of Elizabeth Vandiver, “undercut” by this act (15). Since Medea is the protagonist, we question why Euripides chose to make her a child murderer. Most scholars agree that he invented this part of the myth. He also lessened her role as witch by drawing attention to her human qualities. This only highlights the infanticide (14) because we cannot excuse her ruthless act as monstrous and non-human....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
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Shakespeare's Macbeth and Euripedes' Medea - Shakespeare's Macbeth and Euripedes' Medea   Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Euripedes' Medea, are both tragic plays in the classical sense. Both Medea and Macbeth lust for the unattainable, and that lust destroys them. It cannot be said which character is a truly tragic figure, because both fit the description. However, if either character deserves more sympathy it is Madea, the jilted wife, not Macbeth the King killer. Macbeth's lust for power and his willingness to please his wife leads to his downfall....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Representation of Womens Roles in Society- Medea - Women’s lives are represented by the roles they either choose or have imposed on them. This is evident in the play Medea by Euripides through the characters of Medea and the nurse. During the time period which Medea is set women have very limited social power and no political power at all, although a women’s maternal and domestic power was respected in the privacy of the home, “Our lives depend on how his lordship feels”. The limited power these women were given is different to modern society yet roles are still imposed on women to conform and be a dutiful wife....   [tags: essays research papers] 1102 words
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Medea - Bitter Fury Run Amuck - Told from the perspective of an oppressed and scorned woman, Medea tells the tale of bitter fury run amuck. Set in the city-state of Corinth, Greece in 431 B.C. Medea is a Greek tragedy. The story begins with Medea’s nurse bemoaning the day Medea met Jason, starting this tragic chain of events. The Nurse, not only laments the lengths, up to and including murder, that Medea has already went to in her love of Jason, but also the fact that she knows Medea is not going to put up with the treatment she is now receiving....   [tags: Literature Review] 606 words
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The Role of Vengeance in Euripides’ Medea and Bacchae - Medea and Agaue, the tragic heroes of Euripides’ Medea and Bacchae, represent similar ideas. For both plays, the plot focuses on those two characters’ attainment of vengeance, so that their desire for a form of retribution is the primary driving force behind the plays’ conflicts. In each case, the revenges taken by Medea and Agaue are the results of their acting on their most basic, instinctual emotions without the self-control given by a more reasoned nature. Accordingly, the women and their pursuit of revenge become representative of the emotional side of human thinking....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Greek tragedy] 1943 words
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The Most Tragic Character in Medea by Euripides - The Most Tragic Character in Medea by Euripides Medea is the story of an estranged woman who wishes to seek revenge on her husband (who has left her for another woman) by poisoning his new wife. This, however, is made more difficult when the King of the land, Creon, tells Medea to leave, mainly because he is scared of her. She appeals to him for one more day to sort things out, and uses persuasion by making him feel pity for her when she says "This one day let me stay, to settle some plans for my exile…since their own father is not concerned to help them....   [tags: Papers] 1346 words
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Free Essays - Essay on Medea and Antigone - Medea and Antigone are two stories of women fighting back for what they want, or what they feel is right. These stories take place in ancient Greece, around the time of its rise to power. Medea and Antigone are both strong, sometimes-manipulative characters but have different moral settings that control what they do. Medea is often very demanding in getting what it is that she wants; Antigone, will do what she need to do in order to get what she wants. With Antigone she is defies the law of a king to uphold the law of her spiritual belief....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 578 words
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Euripedes Medea versus Aristotlean Poetics - Aristotle, a philosopher, scientist, spiritualist and passionate critic of the arts, spent many years studying human nature and its relevance to the stage. His rules of tragedy in fact made a deep imprint on the writing of tragic works, while he influenced the structure of theatre, with his analysis of human nature. Euripides 'Medea', a Greek tragedy written with partial adherence to the Aristotelian rules, explores the continuation of the ancient Greek tales surrounding the mythology of Medea, Princess of Colchis, and granddaughter of Helios, the sun god, with heartlessness to rival the infamous Circe....   [tags: essays research papers] 1558 words
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Comedic Violence in The Medea, The Oresteia, and Antigone - Comedic Violence in The Medea, The Oresteia, and Antigone       Almost no Greek tragedy escapes the use of violence. The Medea, The Oresteia, Antigone, and other classic works of Grecian tragoidia all involve huge components of violence in many prominent places, and for all of these stories, violent action is an integral part of the play. Medea, especially, is a character worthy of note in this regard; her tumultuous life can be plotted accurately along a path of aggression and passionate fits, and her bloody history lends tension and ascendance to the cathartic events of the gripping Medea....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Comparing the Characters of Lysitrata, Penelope, and Medea - The purpose of the paper is to compare and contrast the characters of Penelope in the epic, The Odyssey, Lysistrata in the comedy, Lysistrata, and Medea in the tragedy, Medea. The writer will first give a brief synopsis of each character, followed by a comparison and climaxing with the contrast. Penelope, a loyal, faithful and patient wife is faced with suitors pressuring her daily to remarry. She uses her wit and cleverness to hold them off. She assures the suitors that she will remarry as soon as she finishes the burial shroud for her husband, which she has no intention of finishing until her husband returns....   [tags: World Literature] 728 words
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A Comparison of Creon of Antigone and Jason of Medea - A Comparison of Creon of Antigone and Jason of Medea     Both of these two male characters are not title roles. They both fall prey to the actions of a woman, one whom they both originally thought they had complete control over. Antigone's martyrdom and conflict with the State brings Creon's destruction and Medea's double murder and infanticide brings his destruction. However, how much is this brought about through their own weakness and how much can we attribute this to a cruel fate. The issue is essentially whether a stronger person than Jason or Antigone could have avoided the destruction, and were they crushed by their own internal weakness ('hamartia')....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Free Essays - Comparing Odysseus and Medea - Free Essays on Homer's Odyssey: Odysseus and Medea "Let me hear no smooth talk of death from you, Odysseus, light of councils. Better, I say, to break sod as a farm hand for some poor country man, on iron rations, than lord it over all the exhausted dead." Right before restless Odysseus leaves Circe, she tells him that he must go down into Hades to visit the shade of Teiresias, the blind prophet who advises Odysseus of his homecoming (the Wanderings). He then goes on to meet the shades of the queens and lovers of dead heroes and finally the heroes themselves....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 696 words
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Race and Gender Discrimination in ‘Medea’ and ‘Othello’ - The related topics of racism and sexism remain some of the most ugly, taboo and controversial fields of our contemporary era, and it is safe to say that active manipulation of national consciousness to rid people of these traits were present only in the latter half of the last century, with the last apartheid state of South Africa only relenting in its collective repression as late as 1994. However, one has to remember that in both Classical Athens and Elizabethan England such mindsets were allowed, and indeed, sometimes actively cultivated as a rallying call to a state’s strength in national, cultural and ethnic homogeneity....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Euripides' Medea - Exposing the True Nature of Mankind - Euripides' Medea - Exposing the True Nature of Mankind “Euripides is not asking us [the audience] to sympathise with Medea…” This famous quote delivered by HDF Kitto from Greek Tragedy (p. 197), is a powerful and controversial statement. Medea audiences from around the world have expressed both similar and contrary opinions, and raised further enigmas regarding the subject. This essay will explore this statement as well as relating topics from different perspectives, and finally conclude with the author’s perception....   [tags: Classics] 1707 words
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Sympathy in Medea, Aeneid, Metamorphoses, Orlando Furioso, and Hamlet - Sympathy in Medea, Aeneid, Metamorphoses, Orlando Furioso, and Hamlet       Euripedes tugs and pulls at our emotions from every angle throughout The Medea. He compels us to feel sympathy for the characters abused by Medea, yet still feel sympathy for Medea as well. These conflicting feelings build a sense of confusion and anxiety about the unfolding plot. In the beginning, the Nurse reveals the recent background events that have caused Medea so much torment: "She herself helped Jason in every way" (13) and now he "has taken a royal wife to his bed" (18)....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
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Medea - the conception of drama within theatrical production - “The Conception of Drama within Theatrical Production” In Euripides’ tragic play, Medea, the playwright creates an undercurrent of chaos in the play upon asserting that, “the world’s great order [is being] reversed.” (Lawall, 651, line 408). The manipulation of the spectators’ emotions, which instills in them a sentiment of drama, is relative to this undertone of disorder, as opposed to being absolute. The central thesis suggests drama in the play as relative to the method of theatrical production....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Women in Euripides' Alcestis, Medea, Andromache, and Bacchae - Women in Euripides' Alcestis, Medea, Andromache, and Bacchae missing works cited Euripides portrayal of women in his plays has been somewhat bizarre. His female characters kill out of revenge, kill out of jealousy and kill because a god possessed them too. In Alcestis and Andromache Euripides does produce classic heroic female characters. The women in Medea and The Bacchae are not your typical heroines but serve to show the same theme of female liberation as the women in Alcestis and Andromache....   [tags: Females Euripides Plays] 2893 words
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Comparing Two Pieces of Stimuli: The Hurricane and Medea - Comparing Two Pieces of Stimuli: The Hurricane and Medea In this essay, I am going to compare and contrast two pieces of stimuli. The two that have been selected are 'The Hurricane' and 'Medea'. 'The Hurricane' is a song written by Bob Dylan, in 1974. Bob Dylan was an American artist and wrote about issues in America at that time. The focus in America during the 1960's was the struggle of Black Civil Rights. Racism was a major factor in America; most of the bills going through congress were related to racism across America....   [tags: Papers] 936 words
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Attributes Traditionally Associated With Masculinity And Femininity And Their Contrasts In Medea And Pygmalion - Medea Medea is a character existing outside of the typical Greek value and social systems that existed in the Greek Polis’s at the time of the play’s inception. She is strong willed, powerful, intelligent, cunning, volatile and independent. She possesses many traits and characteristics reserved and associated with Greek heroes in other plays common at the time. It could be possible to assume that a typical Greek audience of the time (likely predominantly male) would find this character absurd and ridiculous....   [tags: George Bernard Shaw Comparison] 1458 words
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Contrasting Gender Differences in in Medea versus Wide Sargasso Sea - Gender Differences in in Medea versus Wide Sargasso Sea Stereotypical attributes traditionally associated with women, such as having a propensity to madness, or being irrational, frivolous, dependent, decorative, subordinate, scheming, manipulative, weak, jealous, gossiping, vulnerable and deceitful were common in the times relevant to both works, i.e. Ancient Greece and in the 19th and early 20th Century. Masculine attributes in Euripides' time were more along the lines of being valiant, heroic, noble, dominant (over women,) politically powerful, assertive, and competitive....   [tags: Gender Sex Masculine Feminine Euripides Rhys]
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