Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned over 400 essays for "Maggie"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets - Maggie: A Girl of the Streets by Stephen Crane is a short novel about a young girl and the people in her life. Despite its brevity, this book displays many significant themes that its author intertwines in the story plot. Such themes are determinism, hypocrisy, false morality, self-deception, and appearance verses reality.Maggie’s mother, Mrs. Johnson, is a symbol of hypocrisy in the story. She lost her husband, and had to raise her children by herself in poverty. She drinks to heal her pain so that she doesn’t have to face reality....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 547 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets - The novel, Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets, by Stephen Crane, takes place in the slums of New York City during the 1890’s. It is about a girl, Maggie Johnson, who is forced to grow up in a tenement house. She had a brother, Jimmie, an abusive mother, Mary, and a father who died when Maggie was young. When Maggie grew up, she met her boyfriend, Pete. In Maggie’s eyes, Pete was a sophisticated young man who impressed Maggie because he treated her better than she had been treated to all of her life....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 1095 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Maggie: A Girl of the Streets and Huck Finn - Maggie Girl of the Streets & Huck Finn Life in the 1800s has taken on an almost idealistic quality in the minds of many Americans. The images linked to this era of our history are, on the surface, pleasurable to recall: one room school houses; severe self-reliance; steam-powered railroads and individual freedom. All in all, we seem to recall a well-scrubbed past. Maybe, as we cross into the next century, it's time to take another look at the so-called "good old days." Two very well written works that help to see the latter side of family life in the late 1800s are Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 937 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Stephen Crane's Maggie, A Girl of the Streets - Stephen Crane's Maggie, A Girl of the Streets Stephen Crane’s first novel Maggie (girl of the streets) is a tale of uncompromising realism. The story chronicles the titular Maggie, a girl who lives in the Bowery with her emotionally abusive parents and brothers Jimmie and Tommy. The novel revolves around the trials and tribulations of Maggie and her family in the Bowery. Highlights of the story include the death of Maggie’s father and brother Tommie which drive Pete to turn into a cold and hard person by novels end....   [tags: Realism Crane Maggie] 1525 words
(4.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Power And Control In Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets - The world of Stephen Crane’s novel, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, is a dark, violent place. People curse one another openly and instigate fights over petty issues. The intense poverty of the populace leads to a feeling of general despair and creates a lack of self-confidence in each individual. People want to feel that they mean something. They want to know that their life does not go unnoticed. They desire power over others lives. The poor, who are constantly controlled by the rich, yearn for the opportunity to control their world....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 1329 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Steven Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets - Maggie A Girl Of The Streets Maggie and Jimmie are two siblings being raised within the slums of New York City in the Stephen Crane novel; Maggie: A Girl of the Streets. The parents of these two are constantly fighting as broken furniture and fistfights are an everyday occurance in the decrepid family apartment. The mother and father fight while their children hide frightened as "There was a clash against the door and something broke into clattering fragments .... (Jimmie) heard howls and curses, groans and shrieks, confusingly in chorus as if a battle were raging" (11)....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 1314 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Hypocrisy in Steven Crane’s Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets - Hypocrisy in Steven Crane’s Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets One of the many themes shown in Maggie: a Girl of the Streets is that of hypocrisy. Hypocrisy occurs when one pretends to be something that he or she is not. Most people associate hypocrisy with a person that speaks poorly of something, yet commits that something him or her self. In Maggie, many of the main characters in the novel display the trait of hypocrisy. The trait is displayed by the characters of Pete, Jimmie, and both Mr. and Mrs....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 689 words
(2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Hypocrisy in Steven Crane’s Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets - “Maggie: Girl of the Streets,” written by Stephen Crane, is the common tale of girl fallen victim to the environment around her. Embedded in the story is the Darwin theory survival of the fittest, in which Maggie, the main character does manage to survive, but with drastic consequences. Born into a hell-hole with no positive role models around her, her tragic fate was expected to some degree. Prostitution for women in poverty was not an uncommon occupation and suicide as death was also a common form of an ends to means for literature of that time as well....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets 2014]
:: 6 Works Cited
3400 words
(9.7 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Maggie: A Girl of the Streets: She Never Had a Chance - Maggie Never Had a Chance “She imagined a future rose-tinted because of its distance from all she had experienced before,” (53). The distance from the broken furniture and drunken bawls was not far. Maggie’s new wonderful cultural experience was a short glimpse at New York’s museums with time spent at cheap theatres and dance halls. Instead of a fairy tale story, Crane told of reality in Maggie: A Girl of the Streets – the reality that would face a young girl from a dirt poor, chaotic existence....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 1256 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Naturalism in Stephen Crane's Maggie: A Girl of the Streets - Naturalism in Stephen Crane's Maggie: A Girl of the Streets Stephen Crane's interpretations of life are spawned from his own opinions of the world. These opinions correspond with naturalistic train of thought. He makes use of an observation technique to show the natural law of the universe: One can either accept the laws determining social order or become their victim. In the Novella, Maggie is used as a medium to paint the picture of the devastating consequences that befall one who attempts to violate this unspoken law, breaching the social and economic boundaries set upon them at birth....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets]
:: 1 Works Cited
1120 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Steven Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets - Steven Crane’s Maggie A Girl Of The Streets Many times in novels, authors use themes to support subjects written for the book as a whole. In Steven Crane’s Maggie A Girl Of The Streets , he uses the theme hypocrisy to better portray the family’s life style and the unfair frustration it gives Maggie because of it. Her brother Jimmy and mother Mary Johnson are prime examples of this theme. Throughout the novel, both characters say one thing and do the exact opposite to Maggie without a residue of guilt in their actions....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 742 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Maggie's American Dream by James P. Comer - Maggie's American Dream is Margaret Comer's inspiring biography written by her son James P. Comer. It also doubles as the autobiography of James P. Comer himself. It a great story of a person overcoming obstacles to reach their goals and dreams. Maggie was born in Woodland, Mississippi. Her parents were Jim and Maude. Her father was a sharecropper, even though he was more educated that the man he worked for. He was the leader of the farm, other than the fact that the white owner got all the money....   [tags: Maggie's American Dream] 1441 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Analysis of Stephen Crane's, Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets - Analysis of Stephen Crane's, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets Today in modern America, it has become almost impossible to avoid the tales of horror that surround us almost anywhere we go. Scandals, murders, theft, corruption, extortion, abuse, prostitution, all common occurrences in this day in age. A hundred years ago however, people did not see the world in quite such an open manner despite the fact that in many ways, similarities were abundant. People’s lives were, in their views, free of all evil and pollution....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets]
:: 14 Works Cited
2477 words
(7.1 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
A Destructive Society Exposed in Steven Crane’s Maggie A Girl Of The Streets - A Destructive Society Exposed in Maggie In Maggie, Stephen Crane deals with poverty and vice, not out of curiosity or to promote debauchery but as a defiant statement voicing the life in slums. Drawing on personal experience, he described the rough and treacherous environment that persisted in the inner-city. By focusing on the Johnsons, Crane personalizes a large tragedy that affected and reflected American society as a whole. His creation of Maggie was to symbolize a person unscathed by their physical environment....   [tags: Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets] 552 words
(1.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Maggie: A Girl of the Streets - Some people are made tough; others are born with a certain resilience that makes them less susceptible to being brought down by their surroundings or their predispositions. Stephen Crane’s character Maggie in his work Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is one of those unique few who has a little something extra in her being, some fiber that is stronger. Others in Maggie’s situation would likely fold under the pressure and succumb to what some might see as an inevitable destiny. Maggie, however, withstands great amounts of pressure and survives it for much longer than a weaker personality would....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Stephen Crane] 2653 words
(7.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Maggie: Dead on the Streets - Since its publication in 1896, Stephen Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets has generated speculation and debate over issues like censorship (Dowling 37) and class consciousness (Lawson), but what is possibly the most heated debate concerning Maggie is less about social or literary criticism and more about a plot point—the cause of death of Maggie Johnson; some critics claim that she is murdered, while others claim that she commits suicide (Dowling 36), and, while both arguments have strong cases, they seem to have neglected the most probable cause of the death of a Stephen Crane character—death by natural causes....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 5 Works Cited
2381 words
(6.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
From Maggie to Aglaia - Myth: Constellations A long time ago, a greek soldier named Achelous fell in love with a girl named Aglaia, meaning beautiful. They would go everywhere with each other and were madly in love. They couldn’t even imagine life without each other. One Day, Achelous and Aglaia were walking in the park and Achelous pulled out a ring and proposed to Aglaia. She was so excited that the second he put the ring on her finger she was already planning for the wedding. She had always dreamed of having a wedding at the peak of Mt....   [tags: Greek Mythology] 965 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Maggie's Everyday Use - After evaluating the short story “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker, I came to the conclusion that the narrator made the right choice of giving her daughter, Maggie, the family quilts. Dee (Wangero), her older sister was qualified for the quilts as well, but in my opinion Maggie is more deserving. Throughout the story, the differences between the narrator’s two daughters are shown in different ways. The older daughter, Dee (Wangero), is educated and outgoing, whereas Maggie is shy and a homebody. I agree with the narrator’s decision because of Maggie’s good intentions for the quilts and her innocent behavior....   [tags: Alice Walker short story] 764 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Maggie: A Girl of the Streets by Setephen Crane - Stephen Crane’s novella, “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets” deals with many difficult concepts and situations. However, the most prevalent seems to be the people that find themselves caught in a vicious cycle of violence. Although some claim that a literary label cannot possibly contain Crane’s work, his ideas certainly have much in common with other naturalistic writers of his time. He portrays poor Irish immigrants, the dregs of humanity, struggling for survival during the Industrial Revolution. Even while relating terrible events, Crane remains detached in the typical naturalistic style, seeming to view the world as a broad social experiment....   [tags: survival, industrial revolution]
:: 1 Works Cited
1318 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Stephen Crane’s “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets” - After the Civil War, realism became a dominant form of writing in the United States, with writers attempting to write about everyday life. After realism came naturalism, a form of writing similar to realism, but with more pessimism. One of the reasons for this pessimism stems from free will and the question of whether people possess it or not. In realism, it is definitely true, while in naturalism it seems less so, but the options are often less than ideal. Because choices do exist for characters, free will is still there, which indicates that naturalism is a derivative form of realism....   [tags: Character Analysis] 1288 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Maggie and Hobson in Hobson's Choice - Maggie and Hobson in Hobson's Choice The play "Hobson's Choice" is an invigorating character comedy set in Salford, a town near Manchester. It is also a biting commentary on the Victorian values that overhung into the early twentieth century, when it was written. It pits Henry Horatio Hobson, an alcoholic old shop owner, against his forceful daughter Maggie, who is determined to break out of the dull boot shop and the life of genteel spinsterhood that awaits her. "Hobson's Choice" looks at the Victorian class and gender stereotypes, and then blows them to pieces....   [tags: Papers] 1626 words
(4.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Final Gifts a Book by Maggie Callahan and Patrician Kelly - After reading the different stories in the book “Final Gifts”, I believe I have a better understanding of the nurse’s role in caring for the needs of the dying patient and how their families need to be guided through this experience. The different stories in this book provide insight into the experiences of the dying as well as how their loved ones cope with their loss. The authors Maggie Callahan and Patrician Kelly, experienced hospice nurses who have extensive exposure to dying patients and their families, through their shared stories, paint a picture of what the dying want....   [tags: hospice experience, nearing death ] 883 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Viewpoints of Stephen Crane and His Novel Maggie: A Girl on the Streets - ... Although he lost his position the following year, journalism remained a main principle of support towards his successful future. (“Stephen Crane Biography”) In the year 1893 the novella, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets was written and ready to be published. This became almost impossible due to publishers considering it too risky and didn't find it appropriate to be out for the public to read. Being only 22 years old, Crane financed the publication of the book himself. This 1893 edition was printed under the pseudonym Johnston Smith....   [tags: religious, reality, impurity, naturalism] 811 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Relishing the Ambrosia of Hope in Stephen Crane´s Bowery in Maggie: A Girl of the Streets - ... This force eats their hope and corrupts the innocence and life of its prey. Chastity is unable to survive in the Bowery because the culture of diminishing in the value of life and purity is a cyclical perspective. Their surroundings ensure that every inhabitant holds these views. These people live in a “dark region where, from… careening [buildings], a dozen gruesome doorways [give] up loads of babies to the street and the gutter” (Crane 5). Before birth, depreciation in the worth of virtue surrounds these people....   [tags: addictions, desperation, culture, victims] 3392 words
(9.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Maggie Anderson's Use of Grief Throughout Her Book Windfall - In Windfall, Maggie Anderson's use of grief in her poems are explicit in the beginning, then transitions to a more abstract implementation in the end, displaying how the poet's grief becomes stronger and more complex as the selection of poems progresses. In the first section, she describes the grief itself in an apparent way. By the the last section of the book, her illustration of grief is given in a very symbolic way. The first section of the book gives very fixed expressions of grief. In the poem “What Grief Does”, Anderson is describing the feeling of grief in detail....   [tags: poems, poetry, poetry analysis] 1555 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Major Character Analysis in Maggie a Girl of the Streets and The Awakening - Major Character Analysis In the late nineteenth century people obtained more freedom. The American rags to riches story struck a chord with many people and they tried to change their social class. For some, even with new opportunities in life, it would be hard for them to climb the class ladder. Many people live lives full of hardship and obstacles, such as Maggie Johnson from Stephen Crane's Maggie a Girl of the Streets, who grows up in the slums of New York City. Edna Pontellier from Kate Chopin's The Awakening lives a life of extravagance and wealth but still ends up dying a sad and lonely death because she makes poor decisions....   [tags: Comparative Literature] 1989 words
(5.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Maggie Hobson and Will in Tim Sheader's Hobson's Choice - Maggie and Will in Hobson's Choice Maggie and Will are two of the main characters in "Hobson's Choice". Maggie works in her fathers shop for very little pay at all, as does Will, who is a shoemaker for Hobson and is very good at his job. Maggie married Will (being very dominant for a woman in those days) and they left Hobson's shop to start up a shoe business of their own because of the way Hobson exploits them. Will and Maggie eventually fall in love and Maggie manages to get her father to pay for her two sisters weddings and because of Hobson's drinking problem they decide to join business with Hobson so that Will can manage the shop and Maggie can manage Hobson....   [tags: Hobson's Choice] 1237 words
(3.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Maggie Hobson in Tim Sheader's Hobson's Choice - Maggie Hobson in Tim Sheader's Hobson's Choice Maggie is an extremely bossy person, used to getting her own way. She is also stubborn and can easily manipulate people to do what she wants and is unlikely to change her mind on most matters. In act one of "Hobson's Choice." Maggie walks straight into the shop and immediately starts work "she crosses the shop and takes her place at the desk... she busies herself with an account book." This shows she has a sensible 'business like' mind....   [tags: Hobson's Choice] 2286 words
(6.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Dee Versus Maggie: A Struggle For Self-Understanding - The twenties, a time marred by prohibition and television's implantations, were widely known as a time of struggles such as the Great Depression and the beginning of what later became known as women's rights. However, presumably the greatest struggle was that of ‘colored' people. Because of limited resources, limited speech, and limited economic opportunities many ‘colored' people sought ways to escape ‘everyday' life and the hardships they often faced. One of these ways came by beginning to express themselves more freely....   [tags: Everyday Use Alice Walker Analysis] 1450 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Response to Maggie Gallagher's editorial The Divorce Debate - Response to Maggie Gallagher's editorial The Divorce Debate This article, by Maggie Gallagher, a scholar at the Institute for American Values, is in response to an unsigned editorial in the New York Times called "The Divorce Debate." Gallagher opposes the views of the editorial and tries to answer the question: "What, if anything, can we do about the fact that at least half of our marriages fail?" I was very turned-off by this article. First, it starts off with what the author thinks should be a shared assumption; the assumption stated that divorce is harmful for children....   [tags: Free Essays] 408 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Everyday Use by Alice Walker - In the short story “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker, Mama describes both the personalities and relationships of the two sisters Dee and Maggie. Although the sisters spend a lot of time together throughout the story, they are portrayed as total opposites of each other. Both sisters highly differ from one another throughout the story. Dee is seen more as a static character, whereas Maggie goes through changes, thus making her a dynamic character. Mama says that Maggie isn’t very confident in herself due to the burns that she has on her face and arms because of a house fire that happened about twelve years ago....   [tags: dee, maggie, family] 735 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Symbolism in Everyday Use by Alice Walker - When an object is being expressed or represented by different ideas it is called symbolism. Symbolism is used everywhere. For example symbolism is used in physics when you have this equation W=Fxd. The letter W represents how much work is done by force, F represents the force on the object when it’s in motion, and d represents the distance the object is moving while force is acting on it. Another example is the traffic light each light symbolizes something, red is to stop, yellow is for precaution, and green is to go....   [tags: dee, mama johnson, maggie]
:: 7 Works Cited
1209 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Family’s Heritage in Everyday Use by Alice Walker - A Family’s heritage in Everyday Use Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” is a story about a mother and her two daughters and their heritage. Heritage can be defined as a property that is inherited; a birthright; or traditions, and values passed down other generations of family members. The climax in the story is when Dee asks to two particular quilts that Mama had promised to Maggie. “But they’re priceless!” “Maggie would put them on the bed and in five years they’d be in rags. Less than that.”(2442)....   [tags: dee, maggie tradition] 521 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
E. E. Cummings' Message from Objects in Nature - E. E. Cummings’ poem, “Maggie and Milly and Molly and May,” tells of an adventure of four girls who each learn a lesson in their experiences. To explain these lessons, Cummings uses poetic devices such as alliteration, simile, and symbolism, to elucidate the messages in an appealing way. In “Maggie and Milly and Molly and May,” Maggie, Milly, Molly, and May find a shell, starfish, crab, and stone, in which each object sends a message. In the beginning of the poem, Cummings swiftly describes the initial encounter at the beach: “and maggie discovered a shell that sang / so sweetly she couldn’t remember her troubles, and” (3-4)....   [tags: Maggie and Milly and Molly and May]
:: 1 Works Cited
524 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
A Fallen Woman and an Upright Man: The Sexual Double Standard - ... This idea was also evident in “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets”. Maggie in “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets,” worked in a factory; but after leaving with Pete and “becoming impure”, she was cast out and forced to become a prostitute (Crane 64-65). Through this, she was able to illustrate the sexual double standard because her reputation was ruined, she was disowned by her family, yet Pete continued his life as if nothing had happened. Women were expected to stay "pure" until marriage, therefore women choosing to have sex outside of the bonds of matrimony, were considered scandalous and outrageous....   [tags: Maggie, a Girl of the Streets]
:: 6 Works Cited
1346 words
(3.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Everyday Use by Alice Walker: How to Appreciate One’s Culture - ... The mother explains, “I could have carried it back before the Civil Way through the branches” (464) Dee could not understand the cultural significance of her name, the very same name that came from her loved ones and not by her oppressors. She fails to appreciate the cultural significance of the name Dee. Dee wants to appreciate her family quilts by framing them in her home, but Maggie would most likely put them to everyday use and have them in order to remember her Grandmother Dee. Everything Wangero (Dee) wants is for her home décor and she never tries to understand the sentimental value of the items....   [tags: family, dee, maggie]
:: 1 Works Cited
646 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Everyday Use, by Alice Walker - ... Through-out the beginning of the story, Mama sings her daughters praises, speaking of her education and her beauty. She compares Dee against her younger sister Maggie, “Dee is lighter than Maggie, with nicer hair and a fuller figure” (Walker par 10), but her praises remain only on superficial good qualities that Dee possesses. Although Mama speaks highly of her daughter, the tone that Walker writes Mama’s attitude gives the reader an understanding that Mama was slightly resentful toward her daughter, and had hard feelings for Dee’s materialistic love for the finer things in life....   [tags: maggie, dee, materialistic love]
:: 2 Works Cited
1094 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Psychology in Every Day Use by Alice Walker - Sigmund Freud’s theories of the unconscious mind focus on the dark aspects of fears and repressions that plague an individual in childhood, and follow them unresolved into adulthood. Freud divides the unconscious mind into a tri-part; Id where our deepest desires lie, ego our conscious mind, and super-ego our moral guide based on our culture. Deconstructing the function of each tri-part can seem biased, especially with Freud’s belief that women were inferior to men and people of color inferior to all....   [tags: dee, maggie, super ego] 1523 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Everyday Use by Alice Walker - How does the difference between the way Dee (Wangero) and Maggie would use the quilts represent their two different ways of defining and treating their family’s heritage. Does the narrative give approval to Dee’s way or Maggie ’s. The idea of heritage is very different from one person to another. The story of “Everyday Use” shows a dynamic picture of two sisters that see their family history and upbringing nearly opposite points of view. The quilts become the catalyst for a cultural battle between Dee’s (Wangero) new “enlightened” lifestyle and Maggie’s contentment with her upbringing....   [tags: black women, maggie, dee] 1476 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Culture in Alice Walker’s Story, Everyday Use - The courage to be expressive and unique in your own ways without being influenced by the criticisms of the external environment and society is not very easy to do. This is because you’re in an environment that has established their own culture for you to adhere to and for you to stand out and distance yourself and follow what you believe, is very hard and difficult and it also takes a great deal of courage to do so. This is an issue that is present in Alice Walker “Everyday Use.” Dee and Maggie conflict stems from different ways of seeing their culture....   [tags: custom, society, Mama and Maggie]
:: 7 Works Cited
1992 words
(5.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Taboo in Tennessee Williams´ Literature - Tennessee Williams is known for his ability to portray the unspeakable and force people to face their disputes in the most artful form. He is clearly a professional at one-upping everyday problems, but there are many different reasons why Williams decided to expose these real life issues to not only America, but the world. “A playwright is concerned, as an artist, to present a slice of life or of human experience.” (Reid 440). Many of his works are rumored to be based off of actual experiences, and yet some believe his work is immoral....   [tags: poet, maggie, unspeakable]
:: 11 Works Cited
535 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Account for George Eliots Decision to Give Maggie a Tragic Ending - There are several ways in which George Eliot's decision to give Maggie a tragic ending in The Mill on the Floss can be substantiated. The examination of Maggie's character in relation to her family and the society of St Oggs, a bustling commercial town is a major factor to acknowledge. Consideration should also be given to the suggestion that the creation of Maggie's character and the hopeless inevitability of her ultimate demise, was an attempt by Eliot to highlight the social realities that existed for women in the 19th century and possibly a reflection of her own situation....   [tags: World Literature] 1058 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Amy Tan's Two Kinds and Maggie Scarf's The Beavers' Scale of Family health and Competence - Why are children, pianos, and bad mothers a recipe for disaster. Maggie Scarfs essay” The Beavers scale of Family health and Competence” may be able to answer this question that haunts many families. Maggie Scarf compared and contrasted many families and was able to come up with the Family scale that puts these families on 5 different levels. Level 5 being the worst while level 1 being the most docile and best family unit. Using Scarfs essay we will be able to help the reader understand the level 4 family type to explain Amy Tans essay called” Two Kinds” were Jing-Mei battles her mother for self-control and her own social freedom....   [tags: books analysis and comparison] 841 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Theme of Heritage in “Everday Use” - In her late twentieth-century short story “Everyday Use,” African-American writer Alice Walker contrasts the struggle between the main characters involving the recurring theme. The story takes place in a rural Georgia setting during the 1970s. The plot circulates around Mama, Maggie, and Dee. Throughout, heritage develops and remains a central theme revolving them. Each of these women in the Johnson family tries to stay true to heritage value. But different roles of heritage exist between each woman, so their ways of achieving this mission differs....   [tags: Character Analysis, Mama, Maggie, and Dee] 1457 words
(4.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Symbolism in Everyday Use by Alice Walker - In “Everyday Use” Alice Walker used symbolism throughout the story. Symbolism is an object that has a special meaning for person. For example, Puerto Rican flag have one star and the star represent one colonies of United State. It also has three stripes. The stripes represent when you United State freedom us from Spain. The Egyptians use symbols to communicate by writing. Symbols are use in math equations, shape and sets of numbers. In the equation 1+2-4=-1, the symbols - is use for subtraction or to show a negative number, and the symbol + is use for addition....   [tags: maggie, dee, black power movement]
:: 8 Works Cited
953 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Maggie's Ozymandias - In developing an insightful central theme, Percy Shelley avails of two potent literary tools, imagery and irony, to jolt readers with a striking epiphany. Imagery for one, navigates the audience to what is truly emphasized in the poem: literary art as opposed to physical, plastic art. It also serves to characterize a key figure in the poem—Ozymandias—whom is ascribed as having cold, arrogant, and pretentious qualities. The speaker juxtaposes the words inscribed on the pedestal with the image of dilapidated monuments and the bare boundless sands which surround it....   [tags: Analysis, Percy Shelley] 1099 words
(3.1 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Symbolic References in Everyday Use by Alice Walker - Symbolism is the taking of an object big or small, and giving it something to stand for. It could be your everyday math symbols for addition, subtraction, division, and etc. Although math symbols are perfect examples of symbolism, there’s also objects that can be more than what they are. For example animals, Lions are known to be symbolized as strength, aggression, and assertiveness. Birds like doves are symbolized as love and peace. Colors are also held symbolically, for instance the color black resembling death, and depression....   [tags: dee, maggies, understanding, compassion]
:: 9 Works Cited
1838 words
(5.3 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Personal Narrative: Family Affairs - Margie, Jenn and Lilly played cards at a table and chairs in the hotel lobby. Lilly would not stop asking to see Tom. Margie left a few messages for Tara, but had yet to hear back from her. “Tara always returns phone calls. She’s worrying me,” Jenn said when Lilly left the table to retrieve a lollipop from the bowl on the front desk. Jenn sent a text, hoping it would be more successful than phone calls. “Maybe she’s meeting with a doctor.” “She’s with Brad. He won’t let anything happen to her.” “I don’t know that I trust him....   [tags: tara, margie, jenn, lilly] 623 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Opera of Power: Recitatif by Toni Morrison - The haunting arioso pulses of the memories in “Recitatif” by Toni Morrison recount the intersections of the lives of two women of different race. Twyla, the story’s narrator, and Roberta, a girl of the opposite race, are dumped at St. Bonaventure, a state home, by their mothers. Tossed and held together by the bond of abandonment, the girls form a friendship that carries them through their allotted time at St. Bonny’s. One day, the girls witness Maggie, the mute kitchen worker, fall in the apple orchard, as the older girls in the state home scorn Maggie....   [tags: Dichotomy of Race, Plot Summary]
:: 4 Works Cited
1313 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
True Inheritence in Alice Walker’s Short Story, Everyday Use - In Alice Walker’s short story “Everyday Use” an object becomes the cause of conflict between Maggie and her sister Dee. The object of conflict between these two polar opposite sisters is a handmade quilt passed down from their ancestors. They both associate the quilt with their heritage but it is obvious their views on heritage are quite different. Dee, the older daughter, represents a misconception of heritage as material while to Maggie heritage is both knowledge and form which is passed down from one generation to another through learning and experiences....   [tags: literary analysis] 734 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
People and Society - People from any society or culture can become negative products of their environment if their environment and families are built on negative foundations. Stephen Crane, and Toni Morrison show examples of women who have unstable backgrounds and are affected in their lives by constant negativity. Maggie, and Florens share the constant struggle of negative environments and unstable families that cause lasting effects on them mentally. Many may argue that there is no such thing as being a “product of the environment,” but rather the choices individual make is what affect their lives....   [tags: Culture, Social Issues, Informative] 2326 words
(6.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Walker's Message of Personal Heritage in "Everyday Use" - Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” is a short story about a mother and two very different daughters set in rural Georgia during the late 1960’s. The plot is centered around on the two daughters, Dee and Maggie, and focusing on the differences between the two and who will gain possession of two hand-made quilts that are seen as a coveted trophy by Dee and are viewed as everyday items Maggie. The final decision of which daughter ultimately receives the quilts will be made by Momma Johnson. Momma, who is never given a first name in the story, is a strong black woman with many man-like qualities....   [tags: Literature Review]
:: 2 Works Cited
1795 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams - “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” by Tennessee Williams explores two comparable, but dissimilar characters Maggie and Brick. Maggie’s character comes from a poor family; she is a lonely, sociable, jealous, seductive, devious, cunning, and greedy. While Brick comes from a rich family and is lonely, has a sense of guilt, is an alcoholic, unsociable, and a coward when it comes to problems. Brick and Maggie grew up with incredibly opposite lifestyles that helped mold them into the people they are today. Brick was born into a family of wealth, who lived on a 28,000 acre plantation....   [tags: guilt, wealth, jealousy]
:: 1 Works Cited
993 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Alice Walker's Everyday Use - In every family there seems to be a child that is bestowed with all of the positive aspects of her parents. Unfortunately, for every perfect child there is, it seems that there is one child that is less talented and less beautiful. In the short story, "Everyday Use", these two character descriptions fit perfectly in relation to the characters of Dee and Maggie. Dee is the gifted and beautiful child, whereas Maggie seems to have been left behind by the gene pool and luck. In her short story, "Everyday Use", Alice Walker utilizes language, the tragedy of the fire burning down Maggie's family's house, and her portrayal of Dee to pain an extremely sympathetic portrait of Maggie....   [tags: Everyday Use Alice Walker] 1207 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Importance of Personal Identity in Alice Walker's Everyday Use - Author Alice Walker, displays the importance of personal identity and the significance of one’s heritage. These subjects are being addressed through the characterization of each character. In the story “Everyday Use”, the mother shows how their daughters are in completely two different worlds. One of her daughter, Maggie, is shy and jealous of her sister Dee and thought her sister had it easy with her life. She is the type that would stay around with her mother and be excluded from the outside world....   [tags: heritage, perspective, family]
:: 1 Works Cited
623 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Separating the Flames of Reality - In Alice Walker's short story, "Everyday Use," Wangero could have thought: "Ashes to Ashes. Dust to Dust." Once the house burned, it, and its history is dead--lost in the flames-- the joy in a new start, a new life, a new name must have made Wangero want to "dance around the ashes (66)" of the house. Dee did in fact change her name to "Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo." When her mother asked her why she didn't use her name anymore Wangero answered: "She's dead, I couldn't bear it any longer being named after the people who oppress me." (68) `She' died in the same fire that burned down the house I suppose....   [tags: American Literature] 581 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Symbolism References in Everyday Use - Symbolism the use of symbols to ideas and qualities by giving them symbolic meanings that are different meaning. For example, there are different varieties of flowers like the roses stand for romance, violets represent shyness, lilies for beauty and temptation, and chrysanthemums represent perfection. Symbols are also used in colors to symbolize on what they represent. For instance, black is used to represent death or evil, white stands for life and purity, red can symbolize passion, purple is a royal color, yellow stands for violence or decay, and blue represents peacefulness and calm....   [tags: semiotics, sociological analysis]
:: 6 Works Cited
978 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Hobson's Choice: Movie Review - Henry Hobson runs a successful boot makers shop in nineteenth-century Salford. A widower with a weakness for the Moonraker’s club, he tries forcefully to run the lives of his three unruly daughters. When he decrees “no marriages” to avoid the expensive matter of settlements, eldest daughter Maggie rebels and sets her sights on Will Mossop, Hobson's star, but lower class boot maker. Maggie and Will leave to start up in competition, and she then turns her mind to helping her sisters marry their chosen partners....   [tags: film and character analysis] 1208 words
(3.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Everyday Use by Alice Walker - In Alice Walker’s short story, “Everyday Use”, the narrator is the mother who is uneducated, but loving and hard working. Dee and Maggie are her daughters, whom she cares for deeply. Maggie, the youngest daughter, shares many outlooks on life the way her mother does. She has never been away from home and she and Mama are very close. She learned valuable traditions and their history from her family members. In contrast to Maggie, Dee is in college and couldn’t wait to leave home. She always had ambition and goals that she had set high....   [tags: Short Story, Literary Analysis, Review]
:: 3 Works Cited
1148 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The story Everyday Use Review - The story “Everyday Use” tells the story of a mother and her two daughter's differing views about their identities and heritage. In “Everyday Use” Alice Walker uses descriptive imagery and metaphors to communicate to readers the importance of heritage. She also shows how it is a part of life that is meant to be shared with each generation. The main characters in this story, "Mama" and Maggie on one side, Dee on the other, each have conflicting views on various items of historical and cultural significance....   [tags: heritage, identities, mothers] 724 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Maternal Impact in The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot - The Mill on the Floss is full of recreations of George Eliot’s memories of her youth and infancy. This is very much similar to Wordsworth’s style. Given the topic of discussion this not only suggests that Eliot was influenced by Wordsworth but that perhaps their style was somewhat determined by lack of maternal influence. Biographical studies suggest that although Eliot’s mother was present Ruby Redinger speculates in her biography of George Eliot that her mother was strong-willed and incapable of relating to her children....   [tags: isolation, relationships, mother] 842 words
(2.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Characters of Everyday Use - The Characters of Everyday Use “Everyday Use” is a short story written by a 1940’s black writer, Alice Walker. She did a fantastic job illustrating her characters. There are different types of character in her story from round to static. Her use of clear-cut symbolism prompts the reader to be able to take a deeper look into the characters of the story. When reading this story I felt anger for Dee, while for the narrator and Maggie I felt sympathy. It was easy to feel anger and disrespect for the character Dee....   [tags: Character Analysis] 745 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Dramatic Devices in Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - Dramatic Devices in Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof "Williams instinctively understands the loneliness of a human being - his or her constant and desperate attempt that is to escape the reality that is there loneliness and their subsequent failure to do so". Williams portrays this loneliness to an audience through the spatial distances on stage between characters, which is suggested in the stage direction. "Margaret is alone". It is also emphasised through symbolism and the dialogue between characters....   [tags: Papers] 689 words
(2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Symbolism used in Everyday Use by Alice Walker - Symbolism is a literary technique used by a manifold of authors. Symbolism is using an object, person, place to represent something greater than what it actually is or means. For example, the crucifix symbolizes the honor and sacrifice and love off all men. Symbols also represent suggestions for ideas, like traffic lights, red symbolizes stop, yellow symbolizes slow down, and green symbolizes to go. Symbolism is even used to celebrate, in the Hispanic culture a quincenera is used to symbolize a female child becoming a young lady....   [tags: guilts, crucifix, african-american women]
:: 4 Works Cited
1056 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Valuing and Understanding One’s Heritage Article Summary - In “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker one can see that a person’s heritage is very important and sacred. Dee and Maggie grew up in the same household reared by the same mother. The sisters were exposed to the same values but matured to express them differently. A person’s values and heritage of their culture are cultivated by the way they are taught and what they value important and sacred. A person’s values originate from their exposures growing up. Mama is telling (narrating) the story. She has no education....   [tags: Article Review]
:: 8 Works Cited
1165 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Valuing and Understanding One’s Heritage Article Summary - In “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker, one can see that a person’s heritage is particularly important and sacred. Dee and Maggie grew up in the same household nurtured by the same mother. The sisters are exposed to the same values but matured to express them differently. A person’s values and heritage of their culture are cultivated as they are taught and what they value important and sacred. A person’s values originate from their exposures growing up. Mama is the raconteur. She has no education and in in 1927, after second grade the school closed down (110)....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 7 Works Cited
1176 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Importance of Heritage in "Everyday Use" - In “Everyday Use ” by Alice Walker the exact setting is never revealed and therefore, can only be guessed, but it has been guessed that the story takes place on a country side in Georgia. At one point in the story Augusta is mentioned. The time is also estimated to be during the Civil Rights Movement around the year of 1973. Mrs. Johnson, along with her two daughters, reside in a small three room house, and take pride in there small yard. As Maggie and Dee grow older they start to realize how important their heritage, and family heirlooms are, Maggie in particular....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 5 Works Cited
844 words
(2.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Symbolism in Everyday Use By Alice Walker - Symbolism isn’t as simple as it sounds. Symbolism is for objects that have true meaning to them. For example when you see a stop sign its true symbol it’s trying to show us is to stop. When it’s your birthday and you get something from someone really special to you it gets a true symbolism to you. The symbol on the streets explains to us in what directions we may go and what no to do, so the symbols in the streets are to show us what to do. In this short story ‘Everyday Use’ Alice Walker uses symbolism for the objects that had been passed from the ancestors....   [tags: heritage, slavery, stop sign, ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1367 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Symbols found in Alice Walker's Everyday Use - On a daily basis, symbols are encountered everywhere. Symbols can be used to identify colors, objects or people. It can have a different meaning to what it really stands for. For example, yellow can symbolize sunshine and happiness and black can symbolize sadness and isolation. Like in the book Divergent, each faction had a symbol that symbolized what they were. The Dauntless symbol represented bravery and force while Abnegation stood for peace and happiness. Symbols are everywhere and are very useful....   [tags: semiotical and literary analysis]
:: 7 Works Cited
1512 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Hobson's Choice by Harold Brighouse - Hobson's Choice by Harold Brighouse Maggie can be described as a woman of many qualities; there are many aspects of the play that can verify this statement. The scene starts with Maggie saying "Dinner at half past one girls, we’ll give him half an hour" This looks as if Hobson has gone to the pub but Maggie has told him that lunch is at one but he says its not. So Maggie says it’s at half one. From the words "We'll give him half an hour" it seems as if this argument is a regular occurrence. Maggie is a very dominant character and because of this, she makes a great saleswoman....   [tags: Hobson's Choice Harold Brighouse Essays] 1184 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Weaver Girls Cognitive Development - Four young girls that I babysit for, Mackenzie, Maggie, Meredith and Morgan, are sisters of varying ages and developmental levels. Mackenzie is eight years old, Maggie is six years old, Meredith is three years old and Morgan is sixteen months old. Each girl is at a different stage in cognitive, physical, mental, social and emotional development. I have babysat for the girls for four years now and was able to watch them grow and change in many different ways. Since they are from the same family, I was also able to see how nature and nurture played into their development....   [tags: psychological analysis, personal observations] 813 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Interpersonal Relationships In Swamp Angel and Fifth Business - Interpersonal Relationships In Swamp Angel and Fifth Business In the novel Swamp Angel the main character, Maggie, asserts that "swimming is like living , it is done alone". This is, in fact, a very telling statement with respect to the life of both Maggie and the life of Dunstan, the main character in the novel The Fifth Business. Maggie's comparison of life to swimming raises interesting points about the way in which each of the two characters proceed along the road of life. Maggie's statement is actually a simile which compares swimming alone to living life....   [tags: essays papers] 1447 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Review of The Laughing Falcon by William Deverell - Review of The Laughing Falcon by William Deverell "The Laughing Falcon," a novel by William Deverell, is about a middle aged woman by the name of Maggie Schneider, who wants no more than a two weeks vacation in Costa Rica. The story begins with Maggie's last day of work, before her Christmas vacation, at CSKN-TV where she works as a copywriter, despite her desire to be a fulltime writer. It is the company Christmas party and she is only thinking about her long flight out of the cruel winter of Saskatoon, to the relaxing tropics of Costa Rica....   [tags: Papers] 1465 words
(4.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A Critique of the Effectiveness of Alice Walker’s Text Everyday Use - “Walker, as an artist, tells a story in which she explores the limits of both art and the authentic. She plays with the problem by knowing that art cannot simply or purely give voice to the voiceless. . .” (Whitsitt) Everyday Use is still regarded as one of the most significant texts of Alice Walker’s writing career. It was first published in 1973 as a part of her short story collection In Love and In Trouble. The story follows the significance of cultural heritage, materialism, and the importance of having a voice....   [tags: Quilt, Characters]
:: 5 Works Cited
1057 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Use of Symbolism in Everyday Use by Alice Walker - Pieces of fabric stitched together, to us, may seem like a quilt used to cover oneself for warmth. However, in Everyday Use a quilt is used to symbolize the family heritage passed down from generation to generation. Symbolism is when an object such as a crucifix is used to depictsomething greater like a religion and not justa piece of wood. A crucifix can also be used to represent the pain held by man and the heavy burden we carry each day. Many authors, including Alice Walker, use symbolism in order to get the reader to have a sense of deeper meaning within the story....   [tags: crucifix, quilt, family heritage, self conscious]
:: 7 Works Cited
1462 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Importance of Relying on Oneself in Novels - Henry David Thoreau and Stephen Crane wrote about the importance of relying on oneself in their novels, Walden and Maggie: A Girl of the Streets respectively, while disagreeing on the significance of philanthropy and material possessions. Thoreau writes about his expedition to Walden Pond to find the true core values of life and connect with nature in his novel, Walden. He expresses romantic and philosophical views on life in Walden, emphasizing different themes such as simplicity, obscurity, and self-sufficiency....   [tags: self-reliance, wealth, materialistic possesions]
:: 2 Works Cited
1092 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot - The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot It is said that George Eliot’s style of writing deals with much realism. Eliot, herself meant by a “realist” to be “an artist who values the truth of observation above the imaginative fancies of writers of “romance” or fashionable melodramatic fiction.” (Ashton 19) This technique is artfully utilized in her writings in a way which human character and relationships are dissected and analyzed. In the novel The Mill on the Floss, Eliot uses the relationships of the protagonist of the story, Miss Maggie Tulliver, as a medium in which to convey various aspects of human social associations....   [tags: Mill Floss George Eliot Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1829 words
(5.2 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Everyday Use by Alice Walker has a Great Moral - Alice Walker’s story “Everyday Use” tells a great moral. It is narrated by Mama, and she has two daughters. Dee, the beautiful and educated daughter is visiting home. Mama says: “Maggie will be nervous until after her sister goes,” she is the shy and jealous daughter (Walker 166). Their house burned down ten or twelve years ago. Dee watched the house she hated engulf in flames, as Mama carried out a badly burned Maggie. Dee dislikes that she was raised in a poor family, and she went off to school to gain an education....   [tags: african descent, heritage, oppressive]
:: 1 Works Cited
569 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
See The Stars Come Out? - For a young solder, Hal Mason distinctly had patience. So, when Lourdes had rejected his embrace and glanced at him through a creature of perish eyes, he did not relent. He had persisted, choosing to visit her everyday despite her protests. When she eloquently articulated to him, her voice would be monotone and the twinkling light in her eyes unquestionably would die out. It had that magnanimous relentlessly worried so that he had paced throughout the night; it was only when Anne had comfortably sat him down and reported him on Lourdes’ recovery, and he got peace....   [tags: personal narrative] 1593 words
(4.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Day and Night through a Mother's Eyes - In Alice Walker's "Everyday Use" the reader is introduced to three main characters, a mother and her two daughters. The first daughter, Maggie, still lives at home with her mother and is her companion. Dee, however, moves on with life and goes out to make something of herself in the world. The story is an account of one of Dee's visits, but the narrator, the mother, makes a very obvious comparison between Dee and Maggie's looks, intelligence, behaviorism, and values. The reader has a lesson to learn since the story is told through the mother's eyes....   [tags: American Literature] 928 words
(2.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]


Your search returned over 400 essays for "Maggie"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>