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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Letter From a Birmingham Jail"
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Letter from a Birmingham Jail - Letter from a Birmingham Jail      Is an individual ever morally justified in breaking a law?  The answer to this question is yes.  There are several reasons that have made me believe that it is morally justifiable in breaking the law; however the most convincing comes from Dr. Martin Luther King in his letter from a Birmingham Jail.  " We can never forget what that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal..." (Classic Arguments 668).  King went on in his letter to say that it would be against man made law to help a jew in Nazi Germany.  What King said in his letter has to make a person think that not all laws are good for the group in society and morality is a justifiable excuse...   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail]
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855 words
(2.4 pages)
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Letter from Birmingham Jail - Race. It is a word that is associated with many thoughts, words, and emotions. The color of peoples' skin is the first thing that is noticed. Throughout history people have judged and mistreated because they were of the wrong  race. A prime example of this is the racial tension between blacks and whites. The driving force behind this tension is the past. For many years blacks were mistreated and abused based solely on the color of the skin. In Martin Luther King J.R.'s "Letter from Birmingham  Jail", he uses references to the past and people of the past to strengthen his point....   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail Essays] 613 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Philosophy of Nonviolence of Dr. Martin Luther King in his Letter from a Birmingham Jail - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Letter from a Birmingham Jail gave the people an insight into the mind and his unwillingness to give up on his dream for better life and respect for ‘Negroes’. However, it was not just his mentality we have an insight on but also his philosophy, his mantra. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a devoted Christian and refused to use cruel, demeaning words and unnecessary violence to get his points across to the people. He fought against the injustices brought on upon the black people by the ‘white power’ in Birmingham....   [tags: Letter from a Birmingham Jail] 1340 words
(3.8 pages)
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Letter from a Birmingham Jail and The Declaration of Individualism - Letter from a Birmingham Jail and The Declaration of Individualism Although the time periods and goals may be different the method for bringing about change is usually the same, this method is protest. This method is supported by two different people, in two different time periods, with two different goals; these two people are Thomas Jefferson and Martin Luther King Junior. Martin Luther King Junior's letter from a Birmingham Jail was an expression of his encouragement for protest against tradition and established laws and a justification for his actions....   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail] 849 words
(2.4 pages)
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Pathos in MLK Jr.'s Letter from Birmingham Jail - Pathos in MLK, Jr.'s Letter from Birmingham Jail   In his "Letter," Martin Luther King Jr.'s ability to effectively use pathos, or to appeal to the emotions of his audiences, is evident in a variety of places. More particularly in paragraph fourteen, King demonstrates his ability to inspire his fellow civil rights activists, invoke empathy in the hearts of white moderates, and create compassion in the minds of the eight clergyman to which the "Letter" is directed. In response to the clergyman's claim that his use of direct action was "untimely," King states, "We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God-given rights." As you can see, this statement is in d...   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail] 579 words
(1.7 pages)
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Mr. Luther King's Letter From Birmingham Jail - "Martin Luther King Jr.'s letter from Birmingham Jail, which was written in April 16, 1963, is a passionate letter that addresses and responds to the issue and criticism that a group of white clergymen had thrown at him and his pro- black American organization about his and his organization's non- violent demonstrative actions against racial prejudice and injustice among black Americans in Birmingham. King writes the letter to defend his organization's actions and the letter is also an appeal to the people, both the white and black American society, the social, political, and religious community, and the whole of American society to encourage desegregation and encourage solidarity and equal...   [tags: Letter From Birmingham Jail King Essays] 408 words
(1.2 pages)
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Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter from Birmingham Jail - Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter from Birmingham Jail      Martin Luther King Jr. writes the Clergymen that have written him a letter disputing his actions in Birmingham. King is disturbed and offended by the Clergymen disagreeing with his purpose in Birmingham. King say he normally does not respond to criticism because it would waste to much precious time, but since these were men of good will he wanted to give his answers to their statements. In King's letter he appeals to many emotions as pathos, ethos, and logos to appeal to his audience....   [tags: Letter Birmingham Jail Luther King Essays] 1150 words
(3.3 pages)
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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter From a Birmingham Jail - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s “Letter From a Birmingham Jail” In King’s essay, “Letter From Birmingham Jail”, King brilliantly employs the use of several rhetorical strategies that are pivotal in successfully influencing critics of his philosophical views on civil disobedience. King’s eloquent appeal to the logical, emotional, and most notably, moral and spiritual side of his audience, serves to make “Letter From Birmingham Jail” one of the most moving and persuasive literary pieces of the 20th century....   [tags: Letter From Birmingham Jail Essays civil rights]
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1090 words
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Exploration of Civil Disobedience in Sophocles' Antigone, King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, and Plato's From Crito - Exploration of Civil Disobedience in Sophocles' Antigone, King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, and Plato's From Crito Civil disobedience spawns a major and widely debated issue by many who established by well-known intelligent scholars and many examples of civil disobedience become displayed. The acts of civil disobedience can be noted in major works such as Sophocles?s Antigone, King?s ?Letter from Birmingham Jail?, or even from Plato?s ?from Crito?. A specific claim exemplified throughout these works make that civil disobedience races in gaining popularity and should remain allowed, and continued to be seen as a solution to reform poorly established laws....   [tags: Antigone Letter Birmingham Jail Crito] 582 words
(1.7 pages)
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Morals in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown and King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail - Morals are set standards of right and wrong for society as a whole. One ’s self image of morals are what the individual thinks is right and wrong according to what he or she learns; however, this “Internal compass” can be influenced because society controls most of what they learn. One’s self image of morals allows an individual to provide compelling arguments, provides emotional stability and allows for an individual to have predetermined views of right and wrong; on account of the fact that said individuals choose to follow the revolutionary figures who provide a strong base for the creation of one’s self image of morals....   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail, 2014]
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The Letter from Birmingham Jail - On April 16, 1963, from a jail in Birmingham, Alabama, Martin Luther King Jr. composed an extensive letter to eight clergymen who condemned the timing of the civil rights movement. Although the letter was addressed to these eight clergymen, the Letter from Birmingham Jail speaks to a national audience, especially King’s “Christian and Jewish brothers”(King, 29). His peaceful but firm letter serves as a remarkably persuasive voice to an immensely chaotic mess, and is seen as a major turning point in the civil rights movement....   [tags: Martin Luther King] 1038 words
(3 pages)
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An Analysis of Letter from a Birmingham Jail - Letter from a Birmingham Jail was written by Doctor Martin Luther King Jr. in April of 1963, as he sat, as the title states, in a Birmingham, Alabama jail. King had been jailed for his participation in a peaceful protest of segregation in public places such as lunch counters and public restrooms (Berkley, 2003). While jailed, King read a criticism of the protest by a group of white ministers, who felt such demonstrations “directed and in part led by outsiders” were “unwise and untimely”, suggesting that blacks should wait for the court system to work....   [tags: Analysis, Martin Luther King Jr.] 1087 words
(3.1 pages)
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Analysis of Letter From A Birmingham Jail - In the year of 1963, Martin Luther King was imprisoned for peacefully marching in a parade as a nonviolent campaign against segregation. In Martin Luther King’s essay “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” the paragraphs that have the most emotional appeal are, just as the critics say, paragraphs thirteen and fourteen. King tugs at the reader’s emotions in these specific paragraphs using very detailed examples about the difficult, heart-wrenching misfortunes that have happened to the African American society and what they had to endure on a daily basis in Birmingham by using metaphors, contrasts, alliteration, anaphora, and imagery....   [tags: martin luther king, emotional appeal, emotions]
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King's Argument in A Letter from Birmingham Jail - King's Argument in A Letter from Birmingham Jail In Dr. King's essay 'Letter from Birmingham Jail' he addresses the claims made about his arrest by the eight clergymen. His responses are very long and detailed, giving a very compelling and moving point of view. His letter is directed to his audience, which consists of white middle class citizens who Dr. King refers to as the 'white moderates'. Dr. King's letter is very persuasive because his use of pathos makes the audience think or imagine themselves in the situation....   [tags: Luther King Birmingham Jail Essays Papers]
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950 words
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Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King - One of the most skillfully written compositions was done in a jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. who was heading a national political movement for the recognizable equal treatment of colored people wrote a letter to his fellow clergy men while being imprisoned. In one article, he was able to address not only the clergy, but a wide, diverse audience, send his message across thoroughly, and affect millions of lives because of his purpose and the different personas he assumed....   [tags: MLK Martin Luther King Birmingham Jail] 1122 words
(3.2 pages)
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A Letter From a Birmingham Jail - A Letter From a Birmingham Jail In Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," his thoughts and ideas are directly stated, well expressed, explained, and illustrated. King's style of writing gives the reader a clear glimpse into the world with which he struggled and allows his letter to be powerfully effective. In the introductory paragraph, King introduces his reason for writing the letter and details who the audience is to be. He explains that he rarely answers criticisms and gives his reasons for answering this particular one....   [tags: Papers] 719 words
(2.1 pages)
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Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail - It was change created by a human for the human, a change which made the life of others livable. During the civil rights movement in America in 1960’s various techniques were used to gain the civil rights for the black people in a series of which came the “Letter form Birmingham jail” written by Martin Luther King himself. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was a profound and persuasive written argument which captured the emotions of many people encompassing rigid life experiences, educated observances, and deeply rooted spiritual beliefs....   [tags: Civil Rights King Birmingham] 1166 words
(3.3 pages)
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Themes of The Holy Bible and Letter from Birmingham Jail - Themes of The Holy Bible and Letter from Birmingham Jail Arguably, throughout history, the most influential book ever written has been “The Holy Bible.” Whether it is a historical document, a children’s story, a fable, a story of moral lessons, or a multitude of novels; “The Holy Bible” and its themes have been passed down through generations. If one were to look at “The Holy Bible” as a whole then one could say that the themes of the Bible are all about freedom and how one has a responsibility to keep that freedom....   [tags: Bible, Non-violence] 1437 words
(4.1 pages)
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Rhetorical Analysis of the Letter from Birmingham Jail - ... In paragraph 2, King outlines the hierarchical leadership in his organization and the relationship between his organizations with other organizations that are contrary to the obvious reason he was striding to. It is of absolute no impact to tell the clergymen of the honor he serves as a president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He ought to have stated the exact reasons of his coming to the City and the link of the same to the mandates of the organization. I believe this was to reveal much on himself and the position he was in the SCLC and it was a nice approach to give them detailed information (The Atlantic Monthly, 78)....   [tags: Marting Luther King Jr, american history]
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980 words
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Rhetorical Analysis of Letter from Birmingham Jail - In the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail) written by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. the three artistic appeals of Aristotle are plainly apparent, especially logos. Dr. King repeatedly appeals to logos (Ruszkiewicz) throughout the entire piece; particularly when he says he was initially disappointed at being categorized as an extremist then gradually gained a matter of satisfaction from the label. He is very impassioned in his language and tone in this part of the letter, yet still makes a strong argument for logic....   [tags: Martin Luther King]
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654 words
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Martin Luther King: Letter from Birmingham Jail - Martin Luther King: Letter from Birmingham Jail Martin L. King in Birmingham In 1963, living in Birmingham, Alabama was tough to live in due to how segregated it was. Everything from businesses, diners, libraries, churches, and even bathrooms were segregated. Martin L. King went to Birmingham because he was called by affiliates from the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights contacted him in aiding them on a nonviolent direct action program. He wanted to help because of the injustices there and was said that anything unjust in Birmingham ultimately affects everyone....   [tags: civil rights, activists, segregation]
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Comparing Letter from a Birmingham Jail and Civil Disobedience - Martin Luther King and Henry David Thoreau each write exemplary persuasive essays that depict social injustice and discuss civil disobedience, which is the refusal to comply with the law in order to prove a point. In his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” King speaks to a specific audience: the African Americans, and discusses why he feels they should bring an end to segregation. Thoreau on the other hand, in “Civil Disobedience,” speaks to a broader, non-addressed audience as he largely expresses his feelings towards what he feels is an unjust government....   [tags: compare/contrast]
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Letter From Birmingham Jail - Letter From Birmingham Jail The American civil rights movement through the 1950's and 60's was a turning point for our country as a whole. Probably the most influential leader of that time was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. King became a leader because of his ability to captivate crowds with his powerful speeches. One of the most important letters he wrote was while he was incarcerated in Birmingham, Alabama. The letter was to eight fellow clergymen that were from Alabama....   [tags: Papers] 718 words
(2.1 pages)
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Martin Luther King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail - Martin Luther King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is an excellent example of an effective argument; it was written in response to an editorial addressing the issue of Negro demonstrations and segregation in Alabama at the time. He writes in a way that makes his argument approachable; he is not attacking his opposition, which consists of eight Alabama clergymen who wrote the editorial. This is illustrated in his opening sentence: “My dear Fellow Clergymen” (464). King was an activist for civil rights during this time, and came to Alabama to help out his fellow brothers that were facing opposition....   [tags: Martin Luther King Letter Jail essays]
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Letter from Birmingham Jail, An Analysis - Compelling, unfaltering and powerful are the three best words to describe Letter from Birmingham Jail. Martin Luther King Jr's intelligence is only exceeded by his amazing ability to illustrate the cruel and unsympathetic behavior towards colored people. Throughout the entire letter to the eight clergymen he never gets too far from the fight for equality in Birmingham. His incredible metaphors truly show his strong nature. His uses of elements such as allusion, rhetorical questions and juxtaposition all tied in with an element of hope to create a gripping argument for equality....   [tags: American Literature] 599 words
(1.7 pages)
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A Discussion of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham City Jail - A Discussion of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham City Jail Martin Luther King Jr. discusses the advantages and purposes for his theory of nonviolent direct action in his Letter From Birmingham City Jail. He shows four basic steps that must be taken to achieve nonviolent action. They include 1) collection of facts to determine whether injustices are alive; 2) negotiation; 3) self-purification; and 4) direct action. Each of these steps will be explained as part of King's argument later in this essay....   [tags: King Martin Luther Birmingham Jail Essays] 1372 words
(3.9 pages)
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Rhetorical Analysis "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr. - Rhetorical Analysis of “Letter From a Birmingham Jail” In the "Letter from a Birmingham Jail", Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. responds to an article by eight clergymen, in which he explains the racial injustice in Birmingham, and reasons why King's organization is protesting for Civil Rights. He introduces himself and his actions at the beginning of his letter. He states that the purpose of his direct action protest is to open the door for negotiation on the Civil Rights. He tries to convince his audience by providing evidence in order to gain his audience to be involved in his movement and support him....   [tags: racial injustice, clergymen, evidence] 708 words
(2 pages)
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Letter From Birmingham Jail, by Martin Luther King Jr. - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. one of many great influential speakers wrote a life changing letter after being arrested for peacefully protesting African American rights. While sitting in jail Dr. King received a letter from clergymen questioning his motives and timings for being in Birmingham. In a response Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. writes a “Letter from Birmingham Jail” vividly expressing physical and emotional purposes for his presence in Birmingham, AL. First, in the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” Dr....   [tags: Purpose, Racism, Laws] 753 words
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Letter from Birmingham Jail, by Martin Luther King Jr. - Is it not ironic that Martin Luther King Jr. s, “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, which testifies to his struggle for Civil Rights; not only contradicts the time Martin Luther King wrote it in, but also echoes the same sentiments of today’s moral causes and laws. . Dr. King (&*) then known as Baptist minister Martin Luther King Jr. wrote the Letter to Birmingham in response to his fellow clergymen’s criticisms of him being locked up for his actions in Birmingham’s Civil Rights protest. The letter’s emotional appeal of pathos and uprightness are apparent as Dr....   [tags: Analysis, His Struggle] 945 words
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Analysis of Martin Luther King Jr's Essay, Letter from the Birmingham Jail - In Martin Luther King’s Jr essay “Letter from the Birmingham Jail” he uses ethos, pathos, and logos to establish his argument. First, let’s establish what all these means to the reader. Ethos gives the writer credibility, Logos is establish to the reader at what is logical, and Pathos is established with sympathy. When you think of Justice for all, we tend to think of your constitutional rights for all walks of life. But King is saying that this is not the case for the African American race back in early history....   [tags: psychology, racism, civil rights] 544 words
(1.6 pages)
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Martin Luther King Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail - Power Analysis: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail A statement from eight white clergymen from Alabama prompted Martin Luther King’s “Letter From Birmingham Jail”. This statement criticized Kings actions of non-violent protests against racial segregation and the injustice of unequal civil rights in America (Carpenter elt al.). The eight clergymen considered Birmingham to be “their” town and King was disrupting the “Law and Order and Common Sense” established in coping with racial issues in Alabama during this time (Carpenter elt al....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1257 words
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Martin Luther King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail - Racial discrimination has always been an issue worldwide. Through the struggles of the individual’s who dealt with the social inequality due to their skin color deserve a stance, and ultimately a voice to the nation. However, it is never easy to raise a voice in a community where it is mainly populated by whites who discriminate themselves from colored people. One man decided to take a stance and raise a voice to nation, not only is he able to make a positive change to the nation, but he is also able to revolutionize the equality among the races because he knew everyone deserved a chance at the pursuit of happiness....   [tags: racial discrimination, social inequality, mlk] 1193 words
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Dr. Martin Luther King’s Letter From Birmingham Jail - In April of 1963, locked in a Birmingham jail, Martin Luther King Jr. wrote, “Human progress never rolls in on wheels of inevitability; it comes through the tireless efforts of men willing to be co-workers with God, and without this hard work, time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation”. In Dr. King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail he accurately displays his distinctive ability to influence public opinion by appropriating ideas from the Bible, the Constitution, and other canonical texts (Autobiography); by establishing his credibility, appealing to the audience’s logic, and invoking the emotional aspects of the African-American plight in this era....   [tags: Civil Rights]
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King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” - Martin Luther King’s "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a very sophisticated argument that gets to the point, but in the same time it gets very deep and complex. The letter is a historical and emotional letter that spoke to the hearts of people all across America. It was also well thought out and wrote with great deep meaning. By using three categories of persuasion, ethos, pathos, and logos, King was able to get on a much needed personal level with his audience. Along with letting the reader know that he had valid ideas and reasons....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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Letter from Birmingham Jail, by Martin Luther King Jr. - Writers attempt to leave out the parts that readers tend to skip. Martin Luther King in his letter, “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, uses this technique. In Mr. King’s letter his creativity and intricate usage of diction creates a meaningful letter. Not only does he illustrate picturesque ideas, but also, he uses rhetorical appeal and specific language and style to portray his message. His purpose is to inform the clergyman about Negros patiently waiting for the abolition of segregation and resentment toward the African American people....   [tags: Ending Segregation] 780 words
(2.2 pages)
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Antigone, Hairspray, The Boy Without a Flag, and Letter From A Birmingham Jail - Martin Luther King Jr. speaks of “the appalling silence of the good people” and how the silence of the “good people” encourages the current situation and their good intentions don’t press for change or social justice. In Antigone, Hairspray, “The Boy Without a Flag”, and “Letter From A Birmingham Jail”, examples of social injustice and racial segregation issues can be observed and the influence and actions of the silent bystanders. The silent but well intentioned people in each piece of literature has the opportunity to support change and influence others but they don’t out of fear....   [tags: D. Martin Luther King Jr.]
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Letter from a Birmingham Jail by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - In his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke of the “appalling silence” of those who are innately good, yet refuse to take any action, expressing that nonexpression is a greater evil than any radical viewpoint. To this group, you, who may not vote, who may not speak out against injustice, who may not express any opinions, I ask of you: does this silent portion of the population still exist, quietly living its lives and creating minimal impact on the world around it, or are King’s messages antiquated and outdated in modern society....   [tags: the silent majority] 895 words
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Letter from a Birmingham Jail by Dr. Martin Luther King - In his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke of the “appalling silence” of those who are innately good, yet refuse to take any action, expressing that nonexpression is a greater evil than any radical viewpoint. To this group, you, who may not vote, who may not speak out against injustice, who may not express any opinions, I ask of you: does this silent portion of the population still exist, quietly living its lives and creating minimal impact on the world around it, or are King’s messages antiquated and outdated in modern society....   [tags: African American, civil rights movement] 791 words
(2.3 pages)
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Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail - Rhetorical Analysis of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail" In his essay "Letter from Birmingham Jail", Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. disproves the assumptions of people that believe racism is acceptable when he compares the maltreatment of blacks to the inhumane treatment of the Jews by Hitler. King establishes a relationship with his audience by connecting on a level that is larger than the exploitation of African American's rights. He forces his readers to think about the execution of millions of Jews that was ordered by Hitler....   [tags: Martin Luther King Jr]
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Martin Luther King Jr. - Broadcaster Edward R. Murrow once said, “To be persuasive we must be believable; to be believable we must be credible; credible we must be truthful.” Those words apply to any form of communication but are substantially potent when considering ones written endorsements. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter From Birmingham Jail” was written as a peaceful rhetorical rebuttal intended to appeal to its eight authoring clergymen; whom expressed their disapproval of Dr. King’s actions and their timing....   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail]
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Rhetorical Appeal Usage in Martin Luther King Jr.’s letter, Birmingham City Jail - The mighty river flows through the mountains with liquidity and nurture providing life for all those who wish to take a sip from it. Yet the river is powerful in its own force destroying even the largest rocks, crumbling them into small pieces. People may be able to stop the river for a short time or even dry it up but the water always comes back in one form or another, every dam is bound to fail. Some people have been able to harness the power of the river, redirecting the mighty water making it flow in constructive ways....   [tags: Discrimination, Logic, Emotion ]
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654 words
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Comparison of Martin Luther King Jr.s' Letter from Birmingham Jail and I Have a Dream - One of the greatest speakers for the black civil rights movement was Martin Luther King, Jr. Two of his pieces that stand out the most, was the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and “I Have a Dream”. The Letter From Birmingham Jail is exactly that, it’s a letter that King had wrote while he was in jail, to a group of clergy members who disapproved of his action in Birmingham City. I Have a Dream was speech that was delivered in Washington, DC at Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. This speech was written to inspire people to look beyond themselves and also demanded the country unity focusing on equality for all without focusing on the color of their skin; King also wanted the people to take a s...   [tags: rhetoric, pathos, tone] 780 words
(2.2 pages)
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Civil Disobedience, by Henry David Thoreau and Letter From Birmingham Jail, by Martin Luther King Jr. - The essays, "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, and "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," by Martin Luther King, Jr., incorporate the authors’ opinions of justice. Each author efficiently shows their main point; Thoreau deals with justice as it relates to government, he asks for,”not at one no government, but at once a better government.”(Paragraph 3). King believed,” injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." (Paragraph 4). Each essay shows a valid argument for justice, but King's philosophy is more effective, because it has more logical points of views....   [tags: Comparative Analysis] 894 words
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Similarities between Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail and Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal - Even the most cursory analysis of "Letter From Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr. and "A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift reveals glaring differences between the two essays. Surprisingly, a side-by-side comparison also yields many similarities between the two works. The most obvious similarity between the two essays is the overarching theme of the subject matter. In both essays, the writers address deeply-entrenched social injustices. For example, in "Letter From Birmingham Jail", King, in his highly-impassioned and evocative style, submits a powerful essay that addresses racial segregation in the American South during the 1950s and 1960s....   [tags: comparative literary analysis]
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1347 words
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Argumentation Teqniques Used in Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham Jail - ... He begins his letter with “My Dear Fellow Clergymen”. By saying this, he establishes himself as being on the same “level” of competence as them, also sharing similar value systems. He proceeds on to defend his credibility against their view which argues against “outsiders coming in” and states “I have the honor of serving as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference... So I, along with several members of my staff, am here because I was invited here. I am here because I have organizational ties here (pg....   [tags: credibility, logos, equality ]
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691 words
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Prejudice and Discrimination Depicted in "Graduation", "Myth of a Latin Woman", and "Letter from Birmingham Jail" - Not everyone will like you in fact many will hate you for no reason because they don’t know anything about you other than what you look like. This is the case in many stories like Graduation by Maya Angelou, Myth of a Latin Woman by Judith Cofer and Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther king Jr. To any reasonable person these stories would seem very depressing because of the way these people are treated and most of the time they get this treatment because they are too afraid to speak up. Although some people are wrongfully treated as inferior knowing it doesn’t help stop it, only action can take away the prejudice and discrimination suffered by these people....   [tags: Literature Analysis] 684 words
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Research on Martin Luther King Jr And The Letter from the Birmingham Jail - Research on Martin Luther King Jr And The Letter from the Birmingham Jail To me, Martin Luther King, Jr. is not an unfamiliar name. His famous speech I have a dream is partly selected as our English text in China. Although I know he is well known for the strong and affective words, "Letter from Birmingham Jail" still gave me a very deep impression. It is perfectly organized in a logical and thoughtful arrangement. On the other hand, the words are strong and full of real, impressive emotion. To fully understand this letter, having a basic background of Martin Luther King and the social environment at that time is necessary....   [tags: Papers] 3404 words
(9.7 pages)
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Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King Jr. - Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail," was very persuasive to a wide variety of audiences. Not only did he directly address the writers of the newspaper article, but included fellow African Americans with their struggle to gain acceptance. What makes this letter persuasive, is the amount of examples and situations described by Martin Luther King Jr. King also gains credibility by citing these sources without a history book, using only his own intellect that shows that he is not just your average man....   [tags: Papers] 454 words
(1.3 pages)
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Comparing Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience and King's Letter From a Birmingham Jail - Comparing Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience and Martin Luther King's Letter From a Birmingham Jail The two essays, "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, and "Letter From a Birmingham Jail," by Martin Luther King, Jr., effectively illustrate the authors' opinions of justice. Each author has his main point; Thoreau, in dealing with justice as it relates to government, asks for "not at once no government, but at once a better government. King contends that "injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." Both essays offer a complete argument for justice, but, given the conditions, King's essay remains more effective, in that its persuasive techniques have more practical applicat...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 1049 words
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Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King, Jr. - Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King, Jr. “Hence, segregation is not only politically, economically, and sociologically unsound, it is morally wrong and sinful.”… Martin Luther King, Jr., one of the greatest speakers in all of history wrote these words in his letter from Birmingham Jail (King 48). His great use of rhetoric affected largely the freeing of an entire race. During his work in the Civil Rights Movement, he visited a small town called Birmingham in Alabama, and wrote one of his most rhetorically compelling letters there....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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Know Thy Reader - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a defense of the kind of non-violent direct action that King promoted and used during the civil rights movement of the 1950s and '60s. It is a response to statements of disapproval made by the clergymen of Birmingham, Alabama, and is obviously written in a way that appeals directly to this audience. King uses his knowledge of this audience's identity to design highly targeted arguments and to choose relevant historical examples for citation, and uses his personal experience in writing sermons and speeches to construct moving sermon-like passages that complement and reinforce his arguments....   [tags: Analysis, Letter from Birmingham Jail] 1373 words
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Martin Luther King - Paragraph fourteen of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is the paragraph that makes the strongest appeal to the reader’s emotions by providing vivid examples of how hatred, racism, and discrimination negatively affected the lives of African Americans. These vivid examples range from stories of him explaining segregation to his children to the police brutality that was taking place throughout the south. Dr. King expresses himself in a way that forces the reader to visualize and deeply feel these events....   [tags: Letter from Birmingham Jail, America]
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Martin Luther King - The Prophetic Minister of the South - Walter Brueggemann writes, “Prophecy is born precisely in that moment when the emergence of social political reality is so radical and inexplicable that it has nothing less than a theological cause,” (B, 6). Not only do prophetic ministers grab hold of communities stuck in despair, but they also rally communities to keep reaching for a better future. Jeremiah, a prophetic minister of the Old Testament, delivered a message from the Lord to the Hebrew people who were struck with despair after their community had been split and one half destroyed....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Letter from Birmingham Jail] 2134 words
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All It Takes For Change Is Action - In his essay, “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” Martin Luther King Jr. comments on the moral issue of slavery. Martin Luther king Jr. believes that all men should be born with equal rights regardless of their race and color. He strongly asserts to his reading audience that people must not continue to follow laws that discriminate against and hurt one race and keep a group of people oppressed. He also asserts that one group should not be fighting by itself. He believes that the oppressed have to rise up because they will not be handed equal rights voluntarily and moderate whites should also protest inequality because when they do nothing in fear of rapid and radical change they prevent social pr...   [tags: Letter From Birmingham Jail, Martin Luther King]
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A Comparison of Letter From Birmingham City Jail and I Have a Dream by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. - Martin Luther King Jr., one of the greatest speakers for the Black civil rights movement, had written many great works in his time. Two of his pieces stand out as his greatest works, Letter from Birmingham City Jail; a letter written from a jail in Birmingham where he was arrested for demonstrating peacefully, to clergymen who didn't agree with his views, and I Have a Dream; a speech given by King in front of the Washington Memorial at a huge civil rights tea party. Both works convey the same message: the time has come where Black Americans will not stand for civil injustices any longer....   [tags: comparison compare contrast] 1914 words
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Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience and Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail - Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience and Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, in “Civil Disobedience” and “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” respectively, both conjure a definitive argument on the rights of insubordination during specified epochs of societal injustice. Thoreau, in his enduring contemplation of life and its purpose, insightfully analyzes the conflicting relationship between the government and the people it governs. He considerately evokes the notion that the majority of people are restrained by the government and society from making decisions with consideration of their conscience and that people need to overcome the...   [tags: Compare Contrast Essays] 817 words
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Comparing Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail - "...A little rebellion now and then is a good thing...It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government." Thomas JeffersonThoreau, a transcendentalist from the mid 19th century and Martin Luther King Jr., the Civil Rights movement leader of a century later both believed the necessity of medicine for government. Although they showed disagreement of opinion on issues regarding voting, both writers agreed on the necessity to reform the government and the means of accomplishing it....   [tags: Compare Contrast Comparison] 724 words
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Letters from a Birmingham Jail - Letters from a Birmingham Jail Aristotle is a very citable man when it comes to the way we think today. His rhetoric techniques are still being used in today's society. The Neo-Aristotelian Criticism is three different appeals of persuasion. This is ethos, pathos and logos, which makes one heck of a convincing argument. Ethos gives credibility, pathos shows emotion and logos uses words. In the text, Letter from Birmingham Jail, we find many examples of the criticism. Martin Luther King Jr. is writing a letter from inside the jail of Birmingham in April of 1963....   [tags: American Literature] 1524 words
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Letter From a Birminham Jail - Summary of “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr. In Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, he responds to a letter entitled Statement by Alabama Clergymen. In King’s letter, he makes it clear that he does not usually answer letters of criticism, but because this one came from educated men he felt the need to clarify his purposes, actions, and goals of this civil rights campaign. King first states he is in Birmingham because he has affiliates there who asked him to come....   [tags: essays research papers] 411 words
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King’s Letter Considered a Classic Argument - King’s Letter Considered a Classic Argument After being jailed in the Birmingham city jail, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a Baptist minister who preached nonviolence, wrote this response to a published statement by eight fellow clergymen from Alabama. This letter was not only composed under somewhat constricting circumstances but was written in a way that can be analyzed to be considered as a classic argument. Not only does it contain the five elements needed in a rhetorical situation, but the letter includes the six parts of an argument, the five types of claims, and even the three types of proofs....   [tags: Martin King Analysis Letter Birmingham] 1268 words
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The Birmingham Campaign - Ever since the African American race was brought over to the United States they have been mistreated. Upon their arrival, Americans instantly enslaved them and used them for work, not even considering them as people. With the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865, slavery was finally outlawed; however, “colored” people were still treated unequally through segregation. Segregation was legalized by the Court decision in the case Plessy v. Ferguson. But, in 1952, the case Brown v....   [tags: Civil Rights]
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The Success of the Birmingham Movement - In a letter written from the Birmingham City Jail in 1960, Martin Luther King Jr. made the proclamation that Birmingham, Alabama was, “Probably the most segregated city in the United States”. Martin Luther King’s, Why We Can’t Wait, initially provides the argument for why African Americans were ready to seek equality in a part of the country whose roots were planted deeply into segregation. King stated in his introduction that “The war had been won but not at just peace. Equality had never arrived....   [tags: segregation, Martin Luther King] 529 words
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Social Stratification in MLK’s “Letters from Birmingham Jail” - Martin Luther King Jr. was an eloquent speaker and a powerful figure during the Civil Rights Movement. In “Letters from Birmingham Jail”, his use of the classical rhetoric engaged his audience and presented his thoughts/ideas clearly. Moreover, this particular text was initiated due to the non-violent demonstrations in Birmingham, AL, that lead to the arrest of many African-Americans. Although this was not a spoken document, the letter was targeted for several audiences; first, the clergymen who wrote “A Call for Unity”, secondly, the average white American, who was on neither extreme, but merely kept life the way that it was, and finally, to black men and women across the nation to stand up...   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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Redefining Structure: Social Stratification in MLK’s “Letters from Birmingham Jail” - Martin Luther King, Jr. was an eloquent speaker and a powerful figure during the Civil Rights Movement. In “Letters from Birmingham Jail,” he uses the classical rhetoric to engage his audience and present his ideas clearly. This particular text was initiated due to the non-violent demonstrations in Birmingham, Alabama, which led to the arrest of many African-Americans, including King himself. Although this was not a spoken document, the letter was directed to several targeted audiences: first, the clergymen who wrote “A Call for Unity,” secondly, the “white moderate” (47), and finally, to black men and women across the nation who lacked the initial courage to fight for their rights....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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Birmingham Bigots Busted - Sending a letter to Martin Luther King Jr. was potentially the largest mistake the Eight White Clergymen could have made if they wanted to sustain segregation. They probably did not expect such an eloquent response from an African-American. The letter to King asks him to give up his demonstrations because it only hurts his cause by instigating further hatred and violence. The letter continues on and asks for “...our own Negro community to withdraw support from these demonstrations...” and to instead keep the fight for their rights to the court system and out of the streets....   [tags: Martin Luther King Jr, Segregation] 739 words
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The Effects of the Birmingham Campaign on Segregation in America - Even the largest political movements when stripped to their bare fundamentals reveal a simple idea, image, or action. Likewise, the Civil Rights Movement began with an idea. An idea of an improved future; a future in which colored people could walk the streets of America beside people of other races without scorn and contempt. This future was realized by the city of Birmingham, Alabama. At the end of the 20th century, Birmingham was populated to such an extent with hatred and spite, Dr. Martin Luther King referred to it as “probably the most thoroughly segregated city in the United States” (King 2)....   [tags: Racism ]
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Injustice Anywhere in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.´s Letter from Brimingham Jail - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s, “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” while most appropriately described as a response to criticism, is not written from a defensive position. While his letter more than aptly provides a functional defense of his actions at Birmingham, it serves more so as a counter-critical rebuttal that both repudiates criticisms of his deeds, and criticizes the reasoning behind said criticisms. Dr. King uses the very denunciative tools used against him, such as assertions of premature action and aggressiveness, as both defense and offense, effectively dismissing any wrong on his part, and elucidating the myopic nature of the white moderates’ reticence....   [tags: civil, disobedience, extremisms, logic] 2066 words
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Analysis of Letter from Birmingham by Martin Luther King Jr. - Analysis of Letter from Birmingham by Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr., is one of the most recognized, if not the greatest civil rights activist in this century. He has written papers and given speeches on the civil rights movement, but one piece stands out as one of his best writings. “Letter from Birmingham” was an intriguing letter written by King in jail in the city of Birmingham, Alabama. He was responding to a letter written by eight Alabama Clergyman that was published in a Birmingham Alabama newspaper in 1963 regarding the demonstrations that were occurring to stop segregation....   [tags: Martin Luther King Jr. Civil Rights Racism Essays] 938 words
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Letters from Birmingham Jail and Keynote Address at the First Woman's Rights Convention - "Letters from Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King and "Keynote Address at the First Woman's Rights Convention" by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony It was Thomas Jefferson who uttered the words "That all men are created equal...." However, over one hundred years would pass before these words would mean anything. Equality among all Americans would come with the adoption of the fifteenth, nineteenth, and twenty-fourth Amendments....   [tags: Susan B. Anthony, Martin Luther King] 720 words
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Birmingham 1963 - In April and May of 1963, Birmingham, Alabama was a focal point for the civil rights movement. Birmingham was home to one of the most violent cells of the KKK and violence against black people was so commonplace (especially in the form of explosives) that it was referred to as “Bombingham.” It was these conditions that lead Martin Luther King to arrive and organize a series of non-violent protests in the city. These protests were relatively low key and weren’t very well attended. This was due to the fact that political rivalries between King’s organization, the SCLC, and other civil right’s organizations like CORE and the NAACP....   [tags: Civil Rights Movement] 1335 words
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Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Nobel Peace Prize Winner, a Civil Rights Activist, a Worldwide Figure - A Nobel Peace Prize Winner, a Civil Rights Activist, a Worldwide Figure Being assassinated for doing something to try and make the world a better place seems extreme and not many people would do it with those risks. However, there are people in this world that will sacrifice everything for what they believe in. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the few people in the world willing enough to put himself in danger for a cause he believed in. Martin Luther King, Jr. overcame the segregated world by being a leading figure in the civil rights movement, preaching of nonviolent protests and winning the Nobel Peace Prize....   [tags: protest in Birmingham, civil rights movement] 990 words
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The Birmingham Bombings: Views of Martin Luther King and Jessie Jackson - The Birmingham Bombings: Views of Martin Luther King and Jessie Jackson The bombings and marches in Birmingham Alabama were major concerns for all civil rights leaders. During the 50’s and 60’s, civil rights leaders fought against injustice in different ways. Some civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King and Jessie Jackson fought against injustice with a pen. In 1963 Martin Luther King wrote a letter titled, “Letter From a Birmingham Jail”, and Jessie Jackson wrote, “Jets of Water Blast Civil Rights Demonstrators, Birmingham, 1963.” Martin Luther King and Jessie Jackson are two civil rights leaders of different generations, but with similar views concerning the Birmingham bombin...   [tags: Racism] 609 words
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Martin Luther King Jr.'s States Segregation Not Only Hurts Blacks but also Whites - ... Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust.” (King Letter from Birmingham). King used St. Thomas Aquinas expertise on unjust and just laws to appeal to the clergyman. St. Thomas Aquinas says that any law that is harmful emotionally or physically to a person is considered an unjust law. “All segregation statutes are unjust because segregation distorts the soul and damages the personality. It gives the segregator a false sense of superiority and the segregated a false sense of inferiority.” (King Letter from Birmingham)....   [tags: superiority, letter, violence] 599 words
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Dudley Randall's Poem Ballad of Birmingham - Dudley Randall's Poem Ballad of Birmingham The poem 'The Ballad of Birmingham', by Dudley Randall, is based on the historical event of the bombing in 1963 of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s church by white terrorists. It is a poem in which a daughter expresses her interest in attending a civil rights rally and the mother fearful for her daughter's safety refuses to let her go. In the poem the daughter in fighting for the course of the operessed people of her time/generation instead of going out to play....   [tags: Dudley Randall Ballad Birmingham Essays] 585 words
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The Mentally Ill Locked Up In Jail? - Since the mid 1900s, individuals with mental illness have been sent to jail rather than to receive proper treatment. These patients should be able to receive treatment and care because it will be increasing the safety of not only the person themselves but also others surrounding them. Every year, nonviolent people are incarcerated for crimes that do not threaten the safety of others only because they have a mental illness. Because of this, 25-30% of inmates are mentally ill (McClealland 16). To prevent this, most jurisdictions have at least one criterion that is reflected on whether or not a person is posing a danger to themselves or others....   [tags: mental illnesses, mental health, jail]
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The Symbol of Guilt in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter - The scarlet letter is a symbol of guilt with the power to transform not only its wearer, but everyone involved in its inaugural scandal. Pearl and the letter share a certain relationship, and at times seem to mirror each other, as they exhibit similar tendencies. As children of indignity alike, they unconsciously serve as emotional grim reapers, and together, they unwillingly carry out the supernatural mandate of punishment rationed to them through sadistic and demoniac means. Because the two chosen are but unwilling situational puppets strewn by fate, it is impossible for self proclaimed vigilantes of the paranormal to come out unscathed....   [tags: the scarlet letter]
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Ballad of Birmingham by Dudley Randall - Ballad of Birmingham by Dudley Randall In 'Ballad of Birmingham,' Dudley Randall illustrates a conflict between a child who wishes to march for civil rights and a mother who wishes only to protect her child. Much of this poem is read as dialogue between a mother and a child, a style which gives it an intimate tone and provides insight to the feelings of the characters. Throughout the poem the child is eager to go into Birmingham and march for freedom with the people there. The mother, on the other hand, is very adamant that the child should not go because it is dangerous....   [tags: Analysis Ballad Birmingham Dudley Randall Essays] 822 words
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The Scarlett Letter - The Scarlett Letter The story opens with Hester Prynne standing silently on the scaffold in the middle of a town square in 18th century Boston. Hester, holding her small child in her arms, is publicly on trial for adultery. The town people, especially the women, are not happy that Hester has been sentenced only to wear a scarlet letter and to stand on a public platform for a few hours of public humiliation. However, the judge has decided to be merciful to her because, over all, she has been a good citizen up to this point....   [tags: The Scarlett Letter] 3043 words
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Feminism in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter - Written in 1850, The Scarlet Letter stood as a very progressive book. With new ideas about women, main characters’ stories intertwined, and many different themes, The Scarlet Letter remains today as a extremely popular novel about 17th century Boston, Massachusetts. Not only was the 19th century a time for the abolition of slavery movement but it was also the beginning of the first wave of feminism. Women such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott catalyzed the women’s rights movement....   [tags: the scarlet letter] 550 words
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Treatment is More Effective Than Jail for Drug Offenders - One of the most profound problems that plagues our society is drug addiction. With drug addiction comes those who offend and have run-ins with the law. Our country deals with these drug-addicted offenders by placing them in jails for a year or longer, only to have them come back out to society when their sentence is over. They are still drug-addicts and so they return to the street only to commit yet another crime. From here the cycle of crime, arrest, jail, and return to society continues, solving absolutely nothing....   [tags: Don't Jail Illegal Drug Users]
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