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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Joyce Two Gallants"
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James Joyce's Dubliners: Two Gallants -   In "Two Gallants," the sixth short story in the Dubliners collection, James Joyce is especially careful and crafty in his opening paragraph. Even the most cursory of readings exposes repetition, alliteration, and a clear structure within just these nine lines. The question remains, though, as to what the beginning of "Two Gallants" contributes to the meaning and impact of Joyce's work, both for the isolated story itself and for Dubliners as a whole. The construction, style, and word choice of this opening, in the context of the story and the collection, all point to one of Joyce's most prevalent implicit judgments: that the people of Ireland refuse to make any effort toward positive cha...   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners]
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2399 words
(6.9 pages)
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James Joyce and the Dead - ... During his dance with Miss Ivors, he faces a barrage of questions about his non-existent nationalist sympathies, which he does not know how to answer appropriately. Unable to compose a full response, Gabriel blurts out that he is sick of his own country, surprising Miss Ivors and himself with his unmeasured response and his loss of control. Love seems impossible in “The Dead.” Lily is tired of the men who are “only all palaver and want they can get out of you,” and Gabriel’s aunts Julia and Kate and his cousin Mary Jane are all unmarried....   [tags: biographical and character analysis]
:: 4 Works Cited
891 words
(2.5 pages)
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James Joyce's Dubliners - Dubliners Between 1903 and 1907, James Joyce wrote a collection of stories in which he embodied into a book called Dubliners. Joyce wrote Dubliners amist the conditions in Ireland to reach Ireland citizens with a sense of nationalism. These stories depict many different aspects of Irish culture. Joyce uses many different themes to exhibit his message within these short stories. "Two Gallants," "In The Clouds," and "The Dead" express the theme of each character trying to escape the community through imagination and journey....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1142 words
(3.3 pages)
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Sexual Expression: Defining Joyce’s Characters - Sexual Expression: Defining Joyce’s Characters James Joyce uses sexuality throughout his works to establish an intimate and relatable bond between the reader and the characters in his works. All of Joyce’s works address issues in sexuality, which presents the idea that sexuality was of upmost importance to him. Given that sex is a large part of human existence, it is a good way to get the attention of the reader. A substantial amount of characters throughout Ulysses and A Portrait of the Artist as A Young Man are driven by sexual desire....   [tags: James Joyce, Writer, Sexuality]
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2205 words
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James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Flann O'Brien's At Swim-Two-Birds and Modernist Writing - James Joyce's 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man' and Flann O'Brien's 'At Swim-Two-Birds' and Modernist Writing The Twentieth Century found literature with a considerably different attitude and frame-of-mind than had the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Two hundred years is, of course, a long time to allow change within genres, but after the fairly gradual progression of the novel as a form, its change in the hands of modernism happened rapidly in comparison. Explaining how texts within the framework of modernist writing are “different” require laying out from what they are different, how, and why....   [tags: Joyce Portrait O'Brien Modernist Essays]
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2433 words
(7 pages)
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James Joyce's Dubliners - Analysis of Joyce's Araby - An Analysis of James Joyce's Araby James Joyce's "Araby" may seem at first glance to be only a story about a young boy's first love. However, there is an underlying theme of his effort to escape an inimical reality by transforming a neighbor girl into something larger than life, a spot of light in an otherwise dark and somber environment. Joyce's description of North Richmond Street evokes images of a vacuous, joyless, and stagnant environment. The house in which the young boy lives seems equally cold and gray....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
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An Irish Quandary in James Joyce's Dubliners - An Irish Quandary in James Joyce's Dubliners James Joyce's "Eveline" is one of fifteen short stories in her novel, Dubliners. It was written during the British oppression of Ireland and therefore was not published until nine years after its completion. "Eveline" tells the story of a young adult named Eveline, who is having difficulty choosing between: leaving her family for a new life and staying, to protect her younger siblings and keep the household together. This story depicts the inner turmoil felt by anyone making a similar decision....   [tags: Dubliners Joyce] 1427 words
(4.1 pages)
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Mavis Gallants Bernadette - Mavis Gallant's Bernadette Fear, it has a way of controlling everything that it comes in contact with. As young children we are introduced to this intimidating desire with intrigue and suspicion. As we age, the thoughts of fears become more like realities, ideas of loneliness and death enter the picture as comprehensible thoughts and views of the future. These issues make up the foundation of the Mavis Gallant story "Bernadette". In this story we are presented with the image of a young French Canadian girl, who finds herself pregnant and without a husband....   [tags: essays research papers] 1009 words
(2.9 pages)
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Eveline, Dubliners and James Joyce - Eveline, Dubliners and James Joyce   "Eveline" is the story of a young teenager facing a dilemma where she has to choose between living with her father or escaping with Frank, a sailor which she has been courting for some time. The story is one of fifteen stories written by James Joyce in a collection called "Dubliners". These stories follow a certain pattern that Joyce uses to express his ideas: "Joyce's focus in Dubliners is almost exclusively on the middle-class Catholics known to himself and his family"(the Gale Group)....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Essays] 1498 words
(4.3 pages)
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The Nature of Thought in Joyce - The Nature of Thought in Joyce Thought is a problem in Joyce's work. His characters' obscure trains of thought and remembrance constantly challenge the reader to keep up. I will argue that the depths of this obscurity are not, in fact, murky; they are a response to his introspection about the nature of thought, and reflect a coherent theory. Joyce often repeats phrases, and he makes such repetitions noticeable in order to direct the reader to the questions: What is thought. And what are the unconscious processes of the mind....   [tags: Joyce Thought Psychology Essays]
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2207 words
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James Joyce's Life and Accomplishments - James Joyce was a renowned Irish author and poet, most known for writing the book Ulysses, which parallels the events of The Odyssey in a variety of writing styles. Although Ulysses is considered his magnum opus, his other works including Dubliners, A portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Finnegans Wake are held in high esteem by many. Joyce was born in the Irish city of Dublin on the second of February, 1882 and was baptized by the order of his catholic mother and father three days later. By the age of five he had moved to the town of Bray, 12 miles outside of Dublin, there he was attacked by a dog and this sparked his lifelong cynophobia which may be suggested in Ulysses in episode 12...   [tags: ulysses, the odyssey, james joyce]
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2828 words
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Religion in James Joyce's Dubliners - Religion in James Joyce's Dubliners Religion was an integral part of Ireland during the modernist period, tightly woven into the social fabric of its citizens. The Catholic Church was a longstanding tradition of Ireland....   [tags: Catholic Ireland Dubliners Joyce] 1449 words
(4.1 pages)
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James Joyce’s Dubliners - James Joyce’s Dubliners is a collection of short stories that aims to portray middle class life in Dublin, Ireland in the early twentieth century. Most of the stories are written with themes such as entrapment, paralysis, and epiphany, which are central to the flow of the collection of stories as a whole. Characters are usually limited financially, socially, and/or by their environment; they realize near the end of each story that they cannot escape their unfortunate situation in Dublin. These stories show Joyce’s negative opinion of the ancient Irish city .The final story, “The Dead,” was added later than the others; consequently, “The Dead” has a more positive tone and is often an exceptio...   [tags: James Joyce]
:: 5 Works Cited
1506 words
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James Joyce's Araby - An Analysis of Araby - An Analysis of Joyce's Araby "Araby" is a short complex story by Joyce that I believe is a reflection of his own life as a boy growing up in Dublin. Joyce uses the voice of a young boy as a narrator; however the narrator seems much more mature then the boy in the story. The story focuses on escape and fantasy; about darkness, despair, and enlightenment: and I believe it is a retrospective of Joyce's look back at life and the constant struggle between ideals and reality. I believe Araby employs many themes; the two most apparent to me are escape and fantasy though I see signs of religion and a boy's first love....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 528 words
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Simply Accept the Changes of Life and Move on: Joyce Cary's "Growing Up" - Joyce Cary was a famous Irish novelist and he studied in Oxford. The short story Growing up is part of his collection ‘Spring Song and other Short Stories ’.The short story ‘Growing Up’ deals with the idea that how time brings about many changes and how one has to consequently move on and grow up by simply accepting the changes time had heralded and ushered along ; This idea is clearly seen all through the story and is reflected in the characters of Mr. Quick and his daughters. This short story is about a father coming home from a business trip to his family....   [tags: Joyce Cary, Growing Up, change, ] 966 words
(2.8 pages)
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Joyce’s portrayal of thought in Eveline - Joyce’s portrayal of thought in “Eveline” Among the short stories in the collection Dubliners by James Joyce, “Eveline” is a story wherein the reader views the world through the eyes of the eponymous heroine. In delineating her contemplations, Joyce mainly uses the third person narrative with traces of free indirect discourse. The narration sequence at first glance appears to be highly disconnected. However, it is through the judicious use of both these devices that Joyce succeeds in portraying – with a great deal of realism – the progression of thought in the human mind....   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners] 1053 words
(3 pages)
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Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist by James Joyce - Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist by James Joyce Stephen Dedalus, the main character in most of James Joyce's writings, is said to be a reflection of Joyce himself. In A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, the reader follows Stephen as he develops from a young child into a young artist, overcoming many conflicts both internally and externally, and narrowly escaping a life long commitment to the clergy. Through Joyce's use of free indirect style, all of Stephen's speech, actions, and thoughts are filtered through the narrator of the story....   [tags: James Joyce Papers]
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2478 words
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Obsession in Araby of James Joyce's Dubliners - Obsession in Araby   In James Joyce’s short story "Araby," the main character is a young boy who confuses obsession with love. This boy thinks he is in love with a young girl, but all of his thoughts, ideas, and actions show that he is merely obsessed. Throughout this short story, there are many examples that show the boy’s obsession for the girl. There is also evidence that shows the boy does not really understand love or all of the feelings that go along with it. When the boy first describes the girl, you can see his obsession for her....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 1104 words
(3.2 pages)
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Vitality and Death in James Joyce's The Dead - Vitality and Death in The Dead         In his short story The Dead, James Joyce creates a strong contrast between Gabriel, who is emotionally lifeless, and the other guests, who are physically aging and near death. Though physical mortality is inevitable, Joyce shows that emotional sterility is not, and Gabriel ultimately realizes this and decides that he must follow his passions. Throughout the story, a strong focus on death and mortality, a focus that serves as a constant reminder of our inevitable end of physical life, is prevalent in Joyce's selection of details....   [tags: Joyce Dead Essays]
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2249 words
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Reader Response to James Joyce's The Dead - Reader Response to Joyce's The Dead     James Joyce's story "The Dead" has a tremendous impact on the readers, especially those who are familiar with the political situation in Ireland at the time about which the Joyce wrote the final story in Dubliners.  In exploring the meaning of James Joyce's long short-story, "The Dead", there are many critical approaches to take.  Each approach gives readers a lens, a set of guidelines through which to examine and express ideas of the meaning of "The Dead."  Joyce himself said that the idea of paralysis was the intended theme of all the stories in The Dubliners of which "The Dead" is the final story....   [tags: Joyce Dead Essays]
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1068 words
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Sensory Overload in James Joyce's Ulysses - Sensory Overload in James Joyce's Ulysses     In writing about the experience of reading Ulysses, one critic has commented that "it's rather like wearing earphones plugged into someone's brain, and monitoring an endless tape-recording of the subject's impressions, reflections, questions, memories and fantasies, as they are triggered either by physical sensations or the association of ideas" (Lodge 47). Indeed, the aural sense plays a crucial role throughout much of the novel. But in the "Wandering Rocks" section especially, one experiences a sort of sensory overload as one is presented with nineteen vignettes of one hour in the life of Dublin's denizens which, while seemingly disparate, ar...   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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1190 words
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Theme of Motherhood in James Joyce's Ulysses - James Joyce structured Ulysses to correspond with events in Homer's Odyssey. The relationship between two principle characters in Ulysses, Leopold Bloom as a sonless father and Stephen Dedalus as a fatherless son parallels the circumstances of Odysseus and Telemachus. This interpretation of the relationship between Bloom and Stephen, however, does not account for a significant theme of Ulysses, that of motherhood. Despite the idea that Bloom is a father looking for a son and that Stephen is a son looking for a father, the desires of both of these characters go beyond that of a father and son relationship....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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3579 words
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Joyce's Araby versus Updike's A & P - Joyce's "Araby" and Updike's "A & P": A Culture Hostile to Romance "Araby" by James Joyce and "A & P" by John Updike are two stories which, in spite of their many differences, have much in common. In both of these initiation stories, the protagonists move from one stage of life to another and encounter disillusionment along the way. Looking back upon his boyhood in Irish Catholic Dublin in the early 1900's, the narrator of "Araby"gives an account of his first failed love. Captivated by Mangan's older sister, the boy promises to bring her a gift from a bazaar that wears the mystical name of Araby....   [tags: James Joyce John Updike]
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2602 words
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The Role of Loneliness in James Joyce's Ulysses - The Role of Loneliness in James Joyce's Ulysses Have you ever had one of those days when the world seems cold and unfeeling. Where the people that surround you are far away and uncaring. Ulysses is about one of those days, and two people who are stuck within it, searching desperately for a way out. Loneliness runs like a thread through Ulysses, a novel by James Joyce. It constantly tugs at the character's minds, and drives their lives in subtle ways. Joyce drives the point home by giving a drab, grey description of the character's lives....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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989 words
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Theme of Epiphany in James Joyce's Ulysses - The Theme of Epiphany in Ulysses             James Joyce's Ulysses is a novel of epic proportions that has been proclaimed the greatest piece of literature of the twentieth century. Ulysses takes place in Dublin, Ireland on June 16, 1904. The book is full of parallels, metaphors, and experimental literary techniques. However, a dominant theme is that of epiphany. Not necessarily religious in meaning, the Joycean idea of epiphany is a sudden discovery of the essential nature or meaning of something....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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1290 words
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Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners - Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners Within the body of literary criticism that surrounds James Joyce's Dubliners is a tendency to preclude analysis beyond an Irish level, beyond Joyce's own intent to "create the uncreated conscience of [his] race." However, in order to place the text within an appropriately expansive context, it seems necessary to examine the implications of the volume's predominant thematic elements within the broader scope of human nature. The "psychic drama" which places Dubliners within a three-tiered psychological framework ² desire, repression, agression ² lies at the root of a larger triangular structure that pervades many of our most fundamental belief...   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners Essays] 1963 words
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Epiphany in Araby of James Joyce's Dubliners - Araby: An Epiphany         The story, "Araby" in James Joyce's Dubliners presents a flat, rather spatial portrait. The visual and symbolic details embedded in the story, are highly concentrated, and the story culminates in an epiphany. An epiphany is a moment when the essence of a character is revealed , when all the forces that bear on his life converge, and the reader can, in that instant, understand him. "Araby" is centered on an epiphany, and is concerned with a failure or deception, which results in realization and disillusionment....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 850 words
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Human Identity in James Joyce's The Dead - Human Identity in The Dead The short story, "The Dead," is the final story in Dubliners, but it is characteristic of a number of previous stories. In the first story, "The Sisters," a young boy is confronted with the death of an influencing figure in his life. The women in "Eveline" and "Clay" are haunted by death: Eveline, by the memory of her mother, and Maria, by the omen of her own death. "A Painful Case" is the story of the tragic death of a rejected woman. A dead political figure is the basis of "Ivy Day in the Committee Room." All these stories revolve around characters' pains and experiences with death....   [tags: Joyce Dead Essays] 927 words
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Analysis of The Novel Dubliners by James Joyce - In response to his publisher's suggested revisions to Dubliners, James Joyce "elevated his rhetoric to the nearly Evangelical [and wrote]: 'I seriously believe that you will retard the course of civilization in Ireland by preventing the Irish people from having one good look in my nicely polished looking-glass'"1. A pivotal part of this "looking-glass" is Joyce's representation of Dublin, which functions akin to an external unconsciousness in that a series of unrelated characters experience similar problems by virtue of their common connection to the city....   [tags: dublin, ireland, james joyce]
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1603 words
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Gabriel's Epiphany in The Dead by James Joyce - Gabriel's Epiphany in The Dead by James Joyce     Many people in society feel alienated from the world and separated from their fellow man while others may try to find meaning where none exists.  In James Joyce's "The Dead," Gabriel Conroy faces these problems and questions his own identity due to a series of internal attacks and external factors that lead him to an epiphany about his relation to the world; this epiphany grants him a new beginning.  The progression in Gabriel from one who feels disconnected to one who has hope parallels Joyce's changing view of Ireland from finding it to be a place of inaction to one where again hope and beauty thrive....   [tags: Joyce Dead Essays Gabriel Essays]
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Two Themes in James Joyce's Dubliners - Escape Countered by Responsibility: A Comparative Analysis of the Two Themes in Dubliners James Joyce’s Dubliners is a compilation of many short stories put together to convey the problems in Ireland during that time. Many of his characters are searching for some kind of escape from Dublin, and this is a reoccurring theme throughout the stories. In the story “Little Cloud,” the main character, Little Chandler, feels the need for both an escape from Dublin and also from his normal everyday life....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1176 words
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Eveline's Decision in James Joyce's Dubliners - Eveline's Decision in James Joyce's Dubliners           In the short story, 'Eveline,' James Joyce introduces us to the life of a young woman named Eveline. She has the opportunity to escape with Frank, the man she thinks she loves, to a faraway country in search of a new life.  Instead, she decides to stay in the dreary and gloomy life she already knows.  To understand Eveline's final decision to stay we have to analyze the reasons that prevent Eveline from pursuing a better life. Her fear of the unknown; the fact that she does not know Frank well enough; and the many attachments she has to her home, prompt Eveline to make her decision....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Essays Papers Eveline]
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794 words
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Personal Paralysis in Dubliners by James Joyce - Personal Paralysis in Dubliners by James Joyce Imagine being paralyzed; unable to move freely. Most people when they think of paralization, it is connected to the physical. However, paralysis takes on more than one meaning and goes way beyond physicality. There are three definitions from Webster online: 1. Complete or partial loss of function especially when involving the motion or sensation in a part of the body 2. Loss of the ability to move 3. A state of powerlessness or incapacity to act The first and second definitions are primarily about physical paralysis, however in the first one, “loss of function,” could be any kind of function....   [tags: Dubliners James Joyce Paralysis Essays] 1842 words
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Importance of the Journey in James Joyce’s Dubliners - Importance of the Journey in James Joyce’s Dubliners "In Ireland the inevitable never happens and the unexpected constantly occurs." Sir John Pentland Mahaffy describes Ireland in a way comparable to James Joyce’s depiction of Ireland in his book Dubliners. Joyce wrote his book of short stories to show how he viewed Dublin and its inhabitants. Joyce did not have positive memories of Dublin and his book casts a negative image upon almost all of Dublin. In Dubliners, James Joyce uses characters and their journeys through society to give his perception of Dublin....   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners] 1364 words
(3.9 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Araby as Epiphany for the Common Man - James Joyce's Dubliners - Araby as Epiphany for the Common Man Joseph Campbell was one of many theorists who have seen basic common denominators in the myths of the world's great religions, Christianity among them, and have demonstrated how elements of myth have found their way into "non-religious" stories. Action heroes, in this respect, are not unlike saints. Biblical stories are, quite simply, the mythos of the Catholic religion, with saints being the heroes in such stories. The Star Wars film saga is, according to Campbell, an example of the hero's maturation via the undertaking of a great quest....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
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James Joyce's Ulysses - Balancing Information in Ithaca - James Joyce's Ulysses - Balancing Information in Ithaca "I hold this book [Ulysses] to be the most important expression which the present age has found; it is a book to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape. " T.S. Elliot In the midst of 'Ithaca,' the climactic second to last episode of Ulysses, James Joyce provides the necessary information for calculating how much excrement, in pounds, is produced annually by the entire population of Ireland (p. 718). The type of information offered is not, however, the most shocking quality of the narrative....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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The Character of Molly Bloom in James Joyce's Ulysses - The Character of Molly Bloom in Ulysses   In James Joyce's Ulysses, the character of Molly Bloom appears significantly only twice in the entire span of the novel. She appears for the first time in the episode "Calypso," then we do not hear from her again until the very end, in her own words, in "Penelope." Yet in these two instances, Joyce paints a very affectionate, lighthearted and humorous portrait of Molly Bloom -- perhaps not a complete rendition, but a substantial one, with enough colors and lines to sketch the person adequately....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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1883 words
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James Joyce's Araby - Loss of Innocence in Araby - Loss of Innocence in Araby In her story, "Araby," James Joyce concentrates on character rather than on plot to reveal the ironies inherent in self-deception. On one level "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy’s quest for the ideal. The quest ends in failure but results in an inner awareness and a first step into manhood. On another level the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for the story is told in retrospect by a man who looks back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 874 words
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James Joyce's Araby - The Symbol of the Church in Araby - James Joyce's Dubliners - The Symbol of the Church in Araby Joyce's short story "Araby" is filled with symbolic images of a church. It opens and closes with strong symbols, and in the body of the story, the images are shaped by the young), Irish narrator's impressions of the effect the Church of Ireland has upon the people of Ire-land. The boy is fiercely determined to invest in someone within this Church the holiness he feels should be the natural state of all within it, but a succession of experiences forces him to see that his determination is in vain....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 1200 words
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The Forlorn Loves in James Joyce's novel, Ulysses - The Forlorn Loves in Joyce's novel, Ulysses Greek has words for four kinds of love: agape, or spiritual love; storge, or familial love; the love between friends, or philia; and sexual love, the familiar eros. All four figure in Joyce's novel Ulysses, yet all eventually evade the two male protagonists, Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom: Ulysses proves ultimately to be a love-less work.             Agape -- spiritual love, the charitable love among coreligionists or between Man and God -- seems sure to appear, given Ulysses' protagonists' backgrounds and the host of Christian symbols that flock about them....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays] 2177 words
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Loneliness and Unrequited Love in James Joyce's Dubliners - Repetitive routines, and mundane details of everyday life characterize the lives of Joyce’s Dubliners and trap them with frustration, restraint, and violence. Routines affect the characters who face difficult predicaments, but it also affects characters who have little open conflict in their lives. The most consistent consequences of following mundane routines are loneliness and unrequited love. The consistency of these Dubliners’ lives through the stories, effectively traps them, preventing them from being receptive to new experiences and happiness....   [tags: Dubliners, James Joyce] 912 words
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James Joyce's "Dubliners" - James Joyce's "Dubliners" Throughout James Joyce’s “Dubliners” there are four major themes that are all very connected these are regret, realization, self hatred and Moral paralysis, witch is represented with the actual physical paralysis of Father Flynn in “The Sisters”. In this paper I intend to explore the different paths and contours of these themes in the four stories where I think they are most prevalent ,and which I most enjoyed “Araby”, “Eveline”, “The Boarding House”, and “A Little Cloud”....   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners Themes Essays] 1131 words
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Being Covered from the Truth in Araby by James Joyce - Being Covered from the Truth in Araby by James Joyce “Araby” by James Joyce, is a short story about a young boy trying to find and his search for inner happiness. The main setting takes place in the boy’s neighborhood where he lives with his aunt and uncle. The sub setting takes place in an Araby or English bazaar, a carnival if you will. In the neighborhood we find that there is; an uninhabited house that has not been occupied for some time, a girl, who’s referred to as ‘Mangan’s sister’, whom the boy has a lustful crush on, and a story of a deceased priest....   [tags: Araby james joyce Essays] 1106 words
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James Joyce's Araby - The Ironic Narrator of Araby - The Ironic Narrator of "Araby" Although James Joyce's story "Araby" is told from the first per-son viewpoint of its young protagonist, we do not receive the impression that a boy tells the story. Instead, the narrator seems to be a man matured well beyond the experience of the story. The mature man reminisces about his youthful hopes, desires, and frustrations. More than if a boy's mind had reconstructed the events of the story for us, this particular way of telling the story enables us to perceive clearly the torment youth experiences when ideals, concerning both sacred and earthly love, are destroyed by a suddenly unclouded view of the actual world....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 882 words
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Symbolism and Style in Yeats' Byzantium and Joyce's The Dead - Symbolism and Style in Yeats' “Byzantium” and Joyce's “The Dead” James Joyce and William Butler Yeats are perhaps the two most prominent modernist writers of the twentieth century, and both have left their unique stylistic legacies to English literature. Though these fellow Irishmen wrote at the same time, their drastically different styles reveal distinctions in their characters and standpoints, and comparing them provides intriguing glimpses into two deeply individual minds. One area in which an obvious difference in approach exists is the way each uses symbolism; whereas Yeats often uses a heavy symbolism placed in the foreground of his works to reveal broader truths and ideological bel...   [tags: Yeats Byzantium Joyce Dead Essays] 2468 words
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Attempts to Connect in Joyce Carol Oates' Shopping - Attempts to Connect in Shopping Although Shopping, written by Joyce Carol Oates, is fiction, the story portrays a relationship that represents many parents and children have in real life.  The child is growing up and wants to spread her wings.  However, the parent usually does not want to let go.  Arguments and the awkward silences are frequent. The seemingly useless attempts to connect with the son or daughter are also frequent.  Yet, what the child does not realize is that no matter how old she may get, she is still the parent s child.  The mother is not going to forget how precious her little baby is, yet that is what the mother does in this story.  Oates uses references to pregnancy t...   [tags: Joyce Carol Oates Shopping Essays] 848 words
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From James Joyce's Stephen Hero to "After The Race" - Blending Narrator and Character - From James Joyce's Stephen Hero to "After The Race" - Blending Narrator and Character James Joyce's fragment of a novel, Stephen Hero, leaves the reader little room to interpret the text for themselves. The work lacks the narrative distance that Joyce achieves in his later works. Dubliners, a work Joyce was writing concurrently, seemingly employs a drastically different voice. A voice which leaves the reader room to make judgments of their own. Yet it is curious that Joyce could produce these two works at the same time, one that controls the reader so directly, telling not showing , while the other, Dubliners, seems to give the reader the power of final interpretation over the characters...   [tags: James Joyce Stephen Hero] 1399 words
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Ulysses Essay: William Blake’s Influence on Joyce’s Ulysses - William Blake’s Influence on Joyce’s Ulysses        Stephen Dedalus is a poor schoolteacher.  Poor in the sense that he lives in a one-room tower and eats nothing all day, sure, but poor mainly in the sense that he is a rotten instructor. You, Cochrane, what city sent for him. Tarentum, sir. Very good.  Well. There was a battle, sir. Very good.  Where. The boy's blank face asked the blank window. [1]    He grills his students in much the same way his first teachers drilled him; stands before them inspiring fear and boredom.  He understands the schoolroom and its small miseries.  The form is tried and true: the catechism, call and response.  Cochrane replies automatically to Stephen's...   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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1849 words
(5.3 pages)
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James Joyce's The Dead - Failure to Create Wholeness from Gnomon - The Failure to Create Wholeness from Gnomon in The Dead      There is little doubt in anyone's mind that Gabriel's speech in "The Dead" is a failure. It is harder to understand what exactly he was trying to accomplish. The almost archaic style contradicts the lighthearted content, and what we are left with is a rambling oration which seems to produce nothing. Reading through the speech, one can not help but be struck by its wondrously odd and seemingly antiquated phraseology:   [Let us] still cherish in our hearts the memory of those dead....   [tags: Joyce Dead Essays]
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2331 words
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Two Languages and Two Cultures - Two Languages and Two Cultures United States was built on immigrants and some of the immigrants were pushed from their homeland because of some reasons while other reasons such as America dream pulled them to the United States. Most of these immigrants came from China in 1949, when the communist party took over. These immigrants came with their cultures and languages which are significant in everyone's lives because they play a major role in the development of individual’s characteristics....   [tags: immigration, China, Two Kinds, Amy Tan, US]
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1023 words
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James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man James Joyce's novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) is entirely concerned with the development of its main character, Stephen Dedalus. By comparison with Joyce's earlier version, Stephen Hero [1], we see that he has cut out all extraneous material concerning other characters, and presented a close and detailed account of the development of Stephen's character from infancy to young manhood, the ground previously covered in Stephen Hero being compressed into Chapter 5 of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man....   [tags: James Joyce Portrait Artist Young Man Papers]
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7241 words
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James Joyce's Eveline and Araby - James Joyce's Eveline and Araby James Joyce uses similar themes and language devices in both 'Araby' and 'Eveline.' Although this is so, there are also important differences to be noted. Joyce wrote these stories over one hundred years ago but yet we can still relate to the issues covered in the modern world today. James Joyce could have written these short stories as an inspiration from his own background or based them on the events happening in Dublin at that time. These stories were written as a new century was beginning....   [tags: Papers James Joyce] 1630 words
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James Joyce's The Dead - James Joyce's The Dead In The Dead, James Joyce lets symbolism flow freely throughout his short story. James Joyce utilizes his main characters and objects in The Dead to impress upon his readers his view of Dublin’s crippled condition. Not only does this apply to just The Dead, Joyce’s symbolic themes also exude from his fourteen other short stories that make up the rest of Joyce’s book, Dubliners, to describe his hometown’s other issues of corruption and death that fuel Dublin’s paralysis. After painting this grim picture of Dublin, James Joyce uses it to express his frustration and to explain his realistic view that the only solution to the issues with Dublin depends on a move to the W...   [tags: James Joyce Dead Essays]
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3151 words
(9 pages)
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Unconscious in James Joyce's ‘Dubliners and Charlotte Bronte's ‘Jane Eyre - Unconscious in James Joyce's ‘Dubliners and Charlotte Bronte's ‘Jane Eyre Although the notion of a human unconscious preceded Freud, his work is certainly most useful for explaining what it actually is. With an understanding of a human unconscious we can apply some of its characteristics to the literature studied thus far. Much of Freud's work on the unconscious is contained within his book ‘The Interpretation of Dreams' but a concise definition is hard to come by. Essentially Freud believes that the unconscious is the ‘part of the mind that is beyond consciousness which nevertheless has a strong influence on our actions' ....   [tags: Dubliners Jane Eyre Joyce Bronte] 1927 words
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Analysis of The Dead by James Joyce - Analysis of The Dead by James Joyce James Joyce's significantly titled story “The Dead” is about a dead generation and society of people. Joyce’s decision to add Gretta’s reminiscing with the dead Michael Furey in “The Dead” is extremely important. Perhaps if Joyce decided to end the story after Gabriel’s speech or the setting up of the dinner party, we would still be left with a very pleasant short story. However, Joyce continues on with a significant encounter of the dead Michael Furey that uncovers a side Gabriel has never recognized of himself....   [tags: The Dead James Joyce Literature Essays] 482 words
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Mother and Daughter Relationship Exposed in Joyce Carol Oates Short Story, Shopping - Mother and Daughter Relationship Exposed in Joyce Carol Oates' Short Story, Shopping The relationship between a mother and a daughter is one of complications, heartaches, and sweet rewards.  This is no exception between Nola and Mrs. Dietrich, characters in "Shopping" by Joyce Carol Oates.  The tribulations of their relationship are shown during their annual shopping trip.  In the time spent together, Nola is obviously trying to break free from her mother and become her own woman.  This coming-of-age path is expressed by her "private thoughts" and  "answers in monosyllables" (Oates 834).  As Nola desperately tries to acquire her own self, her Mrs....   [tags: Joyce Carol Oates Shopping Essays] 1021 words
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Joyce Carol Oates' Where Are You Going? Where Have You Been? - Connie, the main character in Joyce Carol Oates' "Where Are You Going. Where Have You Been" is a fifteen-year-old girl, just realizing her beauty. It is summer vacation, and she is spending her time either with boys or daydreaming about them. Connie is a typical teenage girl with a desperate need for independence. She does not get along with her mother, and her father is seldom around. He works a great deal of the time, and when he comes home, he likes to eat and go to bed. Connie has a girlfriend who she enjoys going to the mall with....   [tags: Joyce Oates Literature Novel Analysis] 1214 words
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Search for Meaning in James Joyce's Dubliners - Search for Meaning in James Joyce's Dubliners Throughout Dubliners James Joyce deliberately effaces the traditional markers of the short story: causality, closure, etc. In doing so, "the novel continually offers up texts which mark their own complexity by highlighting the very thing which traditional realism seeks to conceal: the artifice and insufficiency inherent in a writer's attempt to represent reality.(Seidel 31)" By refusing to take a reductive approach towards the world(s) he presents on the page - to offer up "meaning" or "ending" - Joyce moves the reader into complex and unsettling epistemological and ontological realms....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Essays]
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James Joyce's Araby - Setting in Araby - Setting in James Joyce's Araby   In the opening paragraphs of James Joyce's short story, "Araby," the setting takes center stage to the narrator. Joyce tends carefully to the exquisite detail of personifying his setting, so that the narrator's emotions may be enhanced. To create a genuine sense of mood, and reality, Joyce uses many techniques such as first person narration, style of prose, imagery, and most of all setting. The setting of a short story is vital to the development of character....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
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1591 words
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Portrayal of Women in James Joyce's Ulysses - Portrayal of Women in James Joyce's Ulysses The novel, "Ulysses", by James Joyce shows the reader hour by hour a single day in the life of one man.  But this epic which specifically deals with Leopold Bloom and has reference to Stephen Dedalus, holds so much more appendage to other areas of life.  One, is the portrayal of women in Ulysses. A common speculation is that men seem to have a more dominating status over women.  However, in Ulysses that theory dwindles due to the women who  play significant roles in the story.  Although the women in the novel all use various tactics to entice the men to succumb and cower to them, it all ends up that the men do heed to the qualifying factors....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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1125 words
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Barren Lives in James Joyce's The Dead - The Barren Lives of The Dead "One day he caught a fish, a beautiful big big fish, and the man in the hotel boiled it for their dinner" (p.191). Little did Mrs. Malins know that those words issued from her feeble old lips so poignantly described the insensibility of the characters in James Joyce's The Dead toward their barren lives. The people portrayed in this novelette represented a wealthy Irish class in the early twentieth century, gathered at the house of the Morkan sisters for an annual tradition of feast and dance....   [tags: Joyce Dead Essays] 806 words
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A Comparison of the Alternative Realities in James Joyce’s The Dead and Juan Rulfo’s Pedro Paramo - The arts, as interpretations of reality or even the creation of new ones, constantly inform a society’s perceptions of what is real or plausible and what the experience of the individual entails. This is done through a series of perceptions that begins with an artist’s perception of reality. In literature, the author translates this perception into a text that can be as whimsical as Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, as outwardly observant and insightful as Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, or as straightforward as Nathaniel Hawthrone’s The Scarlet Letter....   [tags: Juan Rulfo James Joyce]
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The Chapter of Circe in James Joyce's Ulysses - The Chapter of Circe in James Joyce's Ulysses              Chapter Circe of Ulysses is said to be the "most confessional chapter of       the novel" (Schechner 100). In this way, the themes and underlying meaning       present throughout the chapter are more pertinent to the novel as a whole       than any other aspect of this particular section. Specifically, themes of       love, power, masochism, and consciousness watermark the literature       throughout the chapter....   [tags: Joyce Ulysses Essays]
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Youthful Experience in James Joyce's Araby - Youthful Experience in James Joyce's Araby James Joyce's, "Araby" is a simple tale of youthful passion set in the midst of a harsh economic era. The main character of the story is a young boy living in a bleak environment who becomes entangled in the passions, frustrations, and realizations of youth. The bleak setting of the era is enhanced by the narrator's descriptions of the young boy's surroundings. "Araby" is a story of the loneliness of youth, the joy of youthful passion, and the realization of lost dreams....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
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Effects of Religious Education on Theme and Style of James Joyce's The Portrait of the Artist as a - Effects of Religious Education on Theme and Style of James Joyce's The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Although Joyce rejected Catholic beliefs, the influence of his early training and education is pervasive in his work. The parallels between Biblical text and The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man are abundant. As Cranly says to Stephen, "It is a curious thing, do you know, how your mind is supersaturated with the religion in which you say you disbelieve" (232). The novel progresses in a way that seems Biblical in nature; thematically it compares with the creation and fall of man and/or Lucifer....   [tags: James Joyce Portrait Artist Young Man Essays]
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3473 words
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Love and Marriage in Gallant's The Other Paris - The Other Paris Love waxes timeless. It is passionate and forbidden and a true head rush. Marriage, on the other hand, is practical, safe, a ride up the socioeconomic ladder. In "The Other Paris," Mavis Gallant weaves the tale of Carol and Howard, a fictional couple who stand on the verge of a loveless marriage, to symbolize the misguided actions of the men and women in the reality of the 1950s, the story's setting. By employing stereotypical, ignorant, and altogether uninteresting characters, Gallant highlights the distinction between reality and imagination and through the mishaps and lack of passion in their courtship mockingly comments on society?s views of love and marriage....   [tags: Mavis Gallant] 921 words
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Stephen Dedalus in James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - Stephen Dedalus in James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man When the soul of a man is born in this country there are nets flung at it to hold it back from flight. You talk to me of nationality, language, religion. I shall try to fly by those nets The spirit of Ireland is embodied in young Stephen Dedalus, the central character of James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Like the Dedalus of Greek myth, Stephen must grow wings so that he may fly above the tribulations of his life....   [tags: James Joyce Portrait Artist Young Man Essays]
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Joyce Carol Oates' Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? - Joyce Carol Oates' "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" Every person comes face to face at some point in life with vital decisions. Some of the decisions are minor ones, while others can bring turning points in life. In Joyce Carol Oates' "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?' she displays a particular instant in the main character's life. This character, Connie was caught in the difficult transition from her youth and innocence to a doubtful future. Throughout the story Connie alternates between two very different sides of her personality, one side where she is innocent and young, and the other where she is mature....   [tags: Where Going Been Oates Joyce Essays]
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The Tell Tale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe and Eveline by James Joyce - The Tell Tale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe and Eveline by James Joyce 'The Tell Tale Heart' and 'Eveline' are stories based around the circumstances, which surround a central character. Both protagonists are portrayed in totally different ways. The characters in both stories are quite different. Eveline is the image of a girl's failure to become a woman. She tells herself that "she would not be treated as her mother had been," but she isn't aware that "such treatment offers her the only kind of security she knows"....   [tags: Poe Tell Tale Heart Eveline Joyce Essays] 1521 words
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Eveline by James Joyce - What is happiness. Does it have anything to do with freedom. Everyone would like to live, think, and act freely. Whenever we make our own decisions, we learn and experience something new whether it is good or bad, we are still happy with it because it is our free choice. We all learn about life by living it. If we are too afraid to take a step we cannot go anywhere. Every other decision is another risk, and every other risk makes our heart beat faster which makes life more desirable. We always need to look forward in life because we cannot go back in time, and change things that are already happened....   [tags: James Joyce Literature Analysis, ontology] 1584 words
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Use of Language in James Joyce's Ulysses - Use of Language in James Joyce's Ulysses In his essay “The Decomposing Form of Joyce’s Ulysses,” Henry Staten has argued “that Ulysses achieves some of its most characteristic effects by pressing the internal logic of mimesis to the limit, above all through onomatopoeia, which manifests in a peculiarly condensed way the self-contradictory character of the realist project” (Staten 174-5). Mimetic narrative and method are undone by an onomatopoeiac mode, which is conceived by Stephen “as the pure self-expression or self-annunciation of reality” (175): “Signatures of all things I am here to read, seaspawn and seawrack, the nearing tide…” (Ulysses 3.2-3, emphasis added)....   [tags: James Joyce Ulysses Decomposition Essays]
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2460 words
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Friendship and Love in The Two Gentlemen of Verona - Throughout The Two Gentlemen of Verona, scenes featuring Lance and his dog, Crab are juxtaposed with (and perhaps reference) interactions between the friends and lovers central to the plot. The primarily comic scenes in which Lance and Crab are present often illuminate problems in the relationships between the other characters in the play. Although Crab never speaks and is in fact a dog, his interactions with Lance as Lance explains them, mock the celebrated love between male friends and the much afflicting Petrarchan love that threatens it....   [tags: The Two Gentlemen of Verona] 896 words
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Human Oppressiveness in Two Kinds and A&P - It was Emerson who said it best, “For nonconformity, the world whips you with its displeasure” (Porter 1155). With a detailed look of Amy Tan’s “Two Kinds” and John Updike’s “A&P,” you will find that this quote is entirely applicable in the context of oppressiveness and in the likeness of “coming of age.” These two stories document the different perspectives of two characters’ growing up and how the role of the invisible hand of oppression guides developing adolescents into mature adults; without prejudice or even forethought....   [tags: Two Kinds, Amy Tan]
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2353 words
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James Joyce's Trieste - "And trieste ah trieste ate I my liver" -- Finnegan's Wake "The average traveler would not make a point of staying long in Trieste" -- Cook's Handbook The idea was born underground, one February morning in the Paris Metro. Weaving through tunnels the color of fluorescent light, we halted, stumbling over ourselves, before a yellowing tourism poster that was strangely symbolic amongst perfume advertisements and scrawled graffiti: a photograph of a violent fairy-tale, a photograph of a castle white and turreted, balanced upon a jagged cliff and reaching sharply towards the limits of a fierce, dark body of water, at the depths of which was inscribed once simple and mysterious word: Trieste....   [tags: James Joyce Trieste Essays] 3004 words
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James Joyce's Araby - James Joyce's "Araby"      Passion, adolescence, foolishness, and maturity are the first words that come to one’s mind to describe James Joyce’s short story, “Araby.” In it, he writes about a boy who falls deeply in love with his best friend’s sister, who through the story, doesn’t seem to notice him or care about him. The boy, who has yet to be named, lives in a poor and run-down town. During the story, certain characters contribute to the boy’s developing sense of maturity, and eventually, lead him into adulthood....   [tags: James Joyce Araby Essays] 1142 words
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James Joyce's Dubliners - James Joyce's Dubliners The struggle that the Irish people must face with the problems of their society can be seen clearly in the book Dubliners, by James Joyce. This book portrays a unique image of what the Irish people are experiencing during the time. However, this book gives a deeper view of what really is occurring because it gives us the themes of the problems that are happening in a peculiar way. In fact, one can see throughout the stories the humanities theme of individual and society, and the literary theme of journey and escape....   [tags: Dubliners James Joyce Essays] 2308 words
(6.6 pages)
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James Joyce's Araby - Character, Structure and Style in Araby - Character, Structure and Style in Araby         According to Hazel Edwards, “A good story writer needs to be a craftsman, for the construction is tighter than that required for most novels. Usually a short story concentrates on a few characters- rarely more than three major ones. The story revolves around a single, dramatic incident which typifies the characters’ reactions. Length varies from 1,000 to about 5,000 words.” With these characteristics in mind, then we are going to examine James Joyce’s short story Araby  in terms of depiction of character, the story structure and the style....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
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2408 words
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James Joyce's Araby - The Lonely Quest in Araby - The Lonely Quest in "Araby"           Universality of experience makes James Joyce's "Araby" interesting, readers respond instinctively to an experience that could have been their own. It is part of the instinctual nature of man to long for what he feels is the lost spirituality of his world. In all ages man has believed that it is possible to search for and find a talisman, which, if brought back, will return this lost spirituality. The development of theme in "Araby" resembles the myth of the quest for a holy talisman....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
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1298 words
(3.7 pages)
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Epiphanies in Joyce's Dubliners and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - James Joyce’s Dubliners is a compilation of stories that all rely on character epiphanies in order to develop each story. These epiphanies change the tone of each story because each yields a negative change or reaction. In both “Araby” and “The Dead”, the characters realize or learn something about the world around them, which makes them second guess either themselves or the reason behind their actions. Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales contains at least one tale that relies on an epiphany to help develop theme but it doesn’t change the tone or course of the story, it just helps to portray the true meaning of the character....   [tags: James Joyce Geoffrey Chaucer] 1192 words
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James Joyce's The Dead - Gabriel's Search for Self - Gabriel's Search for Self in The Dead     The study of Gabriel's character is probably one of the most important aims in James Joyce's The Dead1. What shall we think of him. Is the reader supposed to think little of Gabriel or should he/she even feel sorry for him. This insecurity already implies that the reader gets more and more aware that he/she develops ambivalent feeling towards Gabriel and that his character is presented from various perspectives. Gabriel's conduct appears to be split and seems to represent different red threads in The Dead; it leads the reader through the whole story....   [tags: Joyce Dead Essays]
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