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Your search returned over 400 essays for "John Locke"
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Career Biography of John Locke - English philosopher, who founded the school of empiricism. Locke was born in the village of Wrington, Somerset, on August 29, 1632. He was educated at the University of Oxford and lectured on Greek, rhetoric, and moral philosophy at Oxford from 1661 to 1664. In 1667 Locke began his association with the English statesman Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st earl of Shaftesbury, to whom Locke was friend, adviser, and physician. Shaftesbury secured for Locke a series of minor government appointments. In 1669, in one of his official capacities, In 1675, after the liberal Shaftesbury lost is power, Locke went to France....   [tags: John Locke Philosophers Ethics Religion Essays] 602 words
(1.7 pages)
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John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding - John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding In John Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding", he makes a distinction between the sorts of ideas we can conceive of in the perception of objects. Locke separates these perceptions into primary and secondary qualities. Regardless of any criticism of such a distinction, it is a necessary one in that, without it, perception would be a haphazard affair. To illustrate this, an examination of Locke's definition of primary and secondary qualities is necessary....   [tags: Reality John Locke Philosophy essays]
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1412 words
(4 pages)
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John Locke and Thomas Hobbes - John Locke and Thomas Hobbes both believe that men are equal in the state of nature, but their individual opinions about equality lead them to propose fundamentally different methods of proper civil governance. Locke argues that the correct form of civil government should be concerned with the common good of the people, and defend the citizenry’s rights to life, health, liberty, and personal possessions. Hobbes argues that the proper form of civil government must have an overarching ruler governing the people in order to avoid the state of war....   [tags: Hobbes vs Locke]
:: 5 Works Cited
1073 words
(3.1 pages)
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Comparison of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke: Human Nature - Amidst the bloodshed of the English Civil War, Thomas Hobbes realizes the chaotic state of humanity, which gravitates towards the greatest evil. Hobbes’ underlying premises of human nature–equality, egotism, and competition–result in a universal war among men in their natural state. In order to escape anarchy, Hobbes employs an absolute sovereignty. The people willingly enter a social contract with one another, relinquishing their rights to the sovereign. For Hobbes, only the omnipotent sovereign or “Leviathan” will ensure mankind’s safety and security....   [tags: Hobbes vs Locke]
:: 1 Works Cited
1373 words
(3.9 pages)
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The Blocks of Humanity of John Locke - According to Steven Pinker, “The strongest argument against totalitarianism may be a recognition of a universal human nature; that all humans have innate desires for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The doctrine of the blank slate...is a totalitarian dream” (Brainyquotes). John Locke who was a political writer, an Oxford scholar, medical researcher, and physican. He was widley known as the philospher that challanged the flaws of humanity. Being so widely known as an excellent writer in the 17th century, in his piece An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke confronts the flaws of humanity....   [tags: An Essay Concerning Human Undestanding]
:: 10 Works Cited
1265 words
(3.6 pages)
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A Brief Biography of John Locke - John Locke a famous political philosopher left his mark in history through his writings, his political philosophy, and his studies of knowledge, understanding and education. Locke well educated received some of his education at Westminster in London, moving onto earn his Masters of Arts in 1658. Locke studied logic, metaphysics and old languages. (Biography Channel, 2013) Locke’s studies in logic and understanding apparent in his writings throughout his lifetime. Locke’s political philosophy took root in Europe....   [tags: political philosophers]
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685 words
(2 pages)
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John Locke and The Egalitarian Principle - Considered to be the ‘Father of classical liberalism,’ John Locke established the core values of classical liberalism, which included liberty, individualism, protection of natural rights, consent and constitutionalism. Classical liberalism that developed in the United States focused on a ‘minimal state’ in terms of government restriction while John Locke centralized his focus on the social and political means of the individual. Generally, egalitarianism is defined as “a belief in human equality in terms of social political and economic affairs.” Under this standard, John Locke cannot be labeled an egalitarian in all terms since he does not believe in equality of persons in all aspects....   [tags: classical liberalism, indivualism]
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792 words
(2.3 pages)
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John Locke and His Philosophies - John Locke, one of the most influential philosophers of his time, was born on August 29, 1632 in Wrington, a small village in England. His father, also named John, had been a lawyer as well as a military man who once served as a captain in the parliamentary army during the English civil war. Locke’s parents were both very devout Puritans and so to no surprise, Locke himself was raised with heavily Puritan beliefs. Because Locke’s father had many connections to the English government at the time of his growing up, John was given a rare gift at that time, an outstanding education....   [tags: Education, Politics, Religion] 1323 words
(3.8 pages)
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The Philosophy of John Locke - Johnathan Robert’s life has been characterized by a keen ability to self teach. At two years old, he suffered an accident that broke his femur. Within weeks of his caste being removed, he relearned the skill of walking. At no older than six years old Johnathan had received numerous ear surgeries yet refused to allow his speech to reflect any of his hearing loss. By the age of seven, he had effectively taught himself how to read and write. According to the philosophy of John Locke, Johnathan’s knowledge did not come from innate ideas or principles, but rather from experiences and sensations....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1230 words
(3.5 pages)
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John Locke and the Enlightenment - This paper is about John Locke who was a philosopher in the 17-century. He was an Englishmen and his ideas formed the basic concept for the government and laws, which later allowed colonist to justify revolution. I agree with what Locke is saying because everybody should be able to have their own freedom and still respect the freedom of other people. John said, “Individuals have rights, and their duties are defined in terms of protecting their own rights and respecting those of others”. This paper will present to you information about his enlightenment, personal information, and how we as people feel about his decisions. The Enlightenment is a time in history when there was a want in great...   [tags: philosophy, biography, european history]
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575 words
(1.6 pages)
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John Locke's Theory of Knowledge - John Locke (1632-1704) was the first of the classical British empiricists. (Empiricists believed that all knowledge derives from experience. These philosophers were hostile to rationalistic metaphysics, particularly to its unbridled use of speculation, its grandiose claims, and its epistemology grounded in innate ideas) If Locke could account of all human knowledge without making reference to innate ideas, then his theory would be simpler, hence better, than that of Descartes. He wrote, “Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas: How comes it to be furnished....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 1557 words
(4.4 pages)
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Democratic Ideals of John Locke - In Second Treatise of Government John Locke characterizes the state of nature as one’s ability to live freely and abide solely to the laws of nature. Therefore, there is no such thing as private property, manmade laws, or a monarch. Locke continues to say that property is a communal commodity; where all humans have the right to own and work considering they consume in moderation without being wasteful. Civil and Political Societies are non-existent until one consents to the notion that they will adhere to the laws made by man, abide by the rules within the community, allow the ability to appoint men of power, and interact in the commerce circle for the sake of the populace....   [tags: Influence, History, Government]
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737 words
(2.1 pages)
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John Locke and Government's Purpose - In my high school government class senior year, my teacher made the class recite and repeat the rights that are clearly stated in the first amendment of the Constitution of the United States. “The right of speech, the right of the press, the right to petition, the right to religion, and the right to assemble…” we rattled off the list, then started again. When I stepped out of high school and into the real world, I realized just how grateful I was for the rights that I had and the fact that I had a government that allowed me to live in liberty and observe these rights....   [tags: Second Treatise on Civil Government]
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905 words
(2.6 pages)
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Self Reflection and John Locke - John Locke talks of the gradual opening of conscious mind which according to him is initially empty (a tabula rasa). This empty mind, a tabula rasa, is shaped by sensations and reflections or experiences in general. In some thoughts concerning education, Locke expressed his belief on the importance of education in development of man. He says that the extent of their goodness and usefulness boils down to their education (Piel, 2002). The impressions that the mind gets in childhood are lasting and form the basis of self....   [tags: philosophy]
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1217 words
(3.5 pages)
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John Locke's Theories of Labor - During 1632 in Somerset, England John Locke, one of history’s most prominent philosophical and political thinkers, entered this world. It was the seventeenth century and the time of both Age of Enlightenment and the Scientific Revolution. As he grew up he soaked in the world around him. When ready, Locke chose to study philosophy and medicine at Oxford University in 1652. This was probably his initial start into theorizing how we as people interact and function with one another as well as in the world we reside in....   [tags: land, surplus, wealth]
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818 words
(2.3 pages)
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Rousseau, Hobbes, and Locke : Interpretations of Human Nature - Through time people have always wondered what it is that makes us who we are. It has been our human nature that has kept us intrigued with ourselves, and our relationships with others. With this curiosity came various interpretations as to our human nature, each changing the way we see the societal world we live in. With each interpretation came a new understanding of people and the relationship they hold with each other. Human nature has been one of the most studied elements of the world we live in....   [tags: Rousseau, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke]
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1594 words
(4.6 pages)
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English Philosopher: John Locke - ... John Locke is widely known as the “Father of Liberalism” because his political works have served as the groundwork for many democratic states. Locke’s liberal philosophy speaks of man as free, equal, and independent. He believed that none –not even the government- had the right to harm another person’s life, liberty, or possessions. Life, liberty, and property, were three rights that Locke believed could not be taken from a person because GOD Gives them those rights. John Locke believed that every person should have the freedom to choose their own actions and only be reprimanded by the government if he hurts another’s life, liberty or property....   [tags: father of liberalism, power] 654 words
(1.9 pages)
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Biography of John Locke - John Locke was a British born philosopher, physician, and writer that played a significant role in the framework of The United States. He was born in Wrington, England on August 29th, 1632. A father, also named John, who was a country lawyer, and his mother Anges Keene, raised Locke. Both his parents were Puritans, which influenced his later work immensely ("John Locke"). Locke’s parents sent him to the famous Westminister School in London where he was led by Alexander Popham, a member of Parliament....   [tags: psychology, religion, toleration]
:: 4 Works Cited
891 words
(2.5 pages)
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Business Ethics: John Locke - ... Having studied medicine during his time at Oxford, Locke worked with noted scientists and thinkers such as Robert Boyle, Thomas Willis, Robert Hooke, and Richard Lower. In 1666, Locke met Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, who had come to Oxford seeking treatment for a liver infection. Being very impressed by Locke, Cooper persuaded him to be part of his retinue. At that time Locke had been actively looking for a career and in 1667 he decided to move to Shaftesbury’s home at Exeter House in London....   [tags: systematic, corporate, individual]
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1693 words
(4.8 pages)
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John Locke and Metaphysics - ... The distinction between primary and secondary qualities. Locke argues the crucial difference between two kinds of simple ideas we receive from sensation. Some of the ideas we receive resemble their causes out in the world, while others do not. The ideas which resemble their causes are the ideas of primary qualities: solidity, extension, figure, motion, and number. The ideas which do not resemble their causes are the ideas of secondary qualities: color, sound, taste, texture, and odor. Locke than states there is a real world out there beyond our comprehension....   [tags: philosophy, ideas, blank, slate, realism] 584 words
(1.7 pages)
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Comparing John Locke and Thomas Hobbes - Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two political philosophers who are famous for their theories about the formation of the society and discussing man in his natural state. Their theories are both psychologically insightful, but in nature, they are drastically different. Although they lived in the same timeframe, their ideas were derived from different events happening during this time. Hobbes drew his ideas on man from observation, during a time of civil strife in Europe during the 1640's and 1650's....   [tags: Hobbes vs Locke]
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1242 words
(3.5 pages)
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John Locke's Second Treatise - “And thus came in the use of Money, some lasting thing that Men might keep without spoiling, and that by mutual consent Men would take in exchange for the truly useful, but perishable Supports of Life.” (Chapter V: 47). In Chapter V of his Second Treatise, John Locke defines the legitimate appropriation of property as a process dependent on the use of personal labor by individuals. He explains that God has given the World to all of mankind so that they might use its resources to their advantages....   [tags: chapter V analysis] 968 words
(2.8 pages)
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Comparing Locke´s Natural Law with Rousseau´s Discourse on Inequality -   The relationship between nature, the state and individuals is a complex one; political philosophers have been studying these relationships ever since the dawn of time, with the goal being to determine the best way in which the people relate to nature. Based on the ideas of philosopher John Locke, the state does not have the ability to infringe upon the right of people to determine their own destiny; he believes that mankind’s best state is to bring the best parts of their natural instincts into society, collecting together into a “state of perfect freedom.” Conversely, philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau believed that mankind was at its best in its natural state, behaving like an animal and...   [tags: John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau]
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2789 words
(8 pages)
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John Locke - John Locke was born on August 29, 1632 the son of a country attorney and. Locke grew up in and during the civil war. In 1652, he entered the Christ Church (Oxford) where he remained as a student and teacher for many years. Locke taught and lectured in Greek, rhetoric, and Moral philosophy. Locke, after reading works of Descartes, developed a strong interest in contemporary philosophical and scientific questions and theories. In 1666, Locke met Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, and from then on, this lifelong relationship and association helped to change the course of Locke’s career....   [tags: legislative, judicial, executive, property rights]
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1107 words
(3.2 pages)
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John Locke - John Locke was very influential during the age of the Enlightenment. His writings challenged the philosophies of thinkers of the time, including both Scots and Americans. He was the first person to identify himself through his consciousness. He began to believe that there were endless possibilities of the human mind. John Locke was born in Wrington, England on August 29th, 1632. He grew up in a Puritan household, and he was baptized the day he was born. His family was moved to Pensford shortly after he was born, growing up in a Tudor house....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]
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847 words
(2.4 pages)
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John Locke - John Locke was born in Wrington, Somerset, England in 1632. His father was a barrister and a justice of the peace who fought on behalf of the Parliamentary side against Charles I. Locke had a good education, he learned Hebrew and Arabic from Westminster school, then went on to Oxford University where he began to not only question but disagree strongly with the scholastic philosophy being taught. Upon receiving his master’s degree, he began to lecture at Oxford in Greek and Latin. From there, he eventually was offered the position of Censor of Moral Philosophy in 1664....   [tags: philosophy, medicine, political services] 968 words
(2.8 pages)
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John Locke's Philosophy - John Locke was born in 1632. He earned his bachelor’s Degree in 1656 and a master's degree in 1658. In 1690 Locke’s An Essay Concerning Human Understanding appeared. From this came Tabula rasa. This then laid the foundation for environmentalism. Locke was an English philosopher who was regarded as one of the “most influential of enlightenment thinkers” and “important to social contract social” (Wikipedia). Locke died in 1704 never being married or having children. His theories are a part of what we practice today....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]
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737 words
(2.1 pages)
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John Locke Enlightenment - The Enlightenment was a time of discovery and innovation, for political and personal philosophy. The main purpose of the enlightenment was to understand the world through different approaches this was a time where knowledge was learned and gained throughout this time especially through a philosopher called John Locke who had ideas on freedom of religion and the rights of citizens and also wrote two books in order to show his points those books are called “Two Treatises of Civil Government” and “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding” where he starts to discuss political power, state of nature, difference between state of nature, and state of war, functioning of property and the way the gov...   [tags: father of liberalism, notorious philosophers] 1197 words
(3.4 pages)
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John Locke: Empiricism and Influencing Government - The English philosopher and physician John Locke was an immensely important and influential figure during the enlightenment period. Perhaps his most important and revolutionary work was An Essay Concerning Human Understanding; written in 4 separate books; each pertaining to a section of his explanation. Its purpose was to “to enquire into the original, certainty and extant of human knowledge, together with the grounds and degrees of belief, opinion and assent.” However, John Locke influenced more than just the philosophy of human understanding; he also greatly influenced the way we think of government and religious toleration....   [tags: Human Nature, Philosophies] 1247 words
(3.6 pages)
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Charles Darwin and John Locke on Slavery - When the analysis of slavery by Charles Darwin and John Locke are brought forth, both share a common stance excluding one solitary indisposition. For John Locke’s view, though similar in nature, portrays from a hypocritical perspective. Although both exemplify their views on equality, Charles Darwin observes slaveries position in nature, while John Locke observes its position as a mean of punishment. Charles Darwin is a devout abolitionist, such views may have portrayed his writings of evolution....   [tags: racism, discrimination, prejudice]
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1282 words
(3.7 pages)
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John Locke's Influence on the Founding Fathers - The Founding Fathers of the United States relied heavily on many of the principles taught by John Locke. Many of the principles of Locke’s Second Treatise of Government may easily be discovered in the Declaration of Independence with some minor differences in wording and order. Many of the ideas of the proper role of government, as found in the Constitution of the United States, may be discovered in the study of Locke. In order to understand the foundation of the United States, it is vital that one studies Locke....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]
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1463 words
(4.2 pages)
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John Locke's Concept of a Persistant Self - In this essay I will first explain John Locke’s statement, “whatever has the consciousness of present and past actions is the same person to whom they both belong” (278). Then I will elaborate on the criteria outlined by Locke to describe the concept of a persistent self. Following the flushing out of Locke’s reasoning, I will delve into David Hume’s concept of the Self as a bundle of perceptions. The juxtaposition of these two propositions of the nature of self will show that John Locke’s idea of persistent self is flawed when examined against David Hume’s concept of self as a bundle of perceptions....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 1045 words
(3 pages)
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John Locke's Lasting Impact on Society - Providing the 17th century world with an alternative, innovative view on philosophy, politics, economics, and education among other interrelated and important aspects of life, John Locke proved to be a person of immense impact. Born in 1632, in Wrington, England, Locke was the author of many known writings which include the Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689), The Two Treaties of Government (1698), A Letter Concerning Toleration (1689), and Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693) (Goldie 32)....   [tags: Government, Social Theory]
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1826 words
(5.2 pages)
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The Proper Role of a Ruler and the Government - Over the centuries, many political philosophers, historians, and thinkers have ventured to identify the ideal form of government: a theory which truly takes into account human nature as a whole and applies it accordingly. Human nature, when looked at holistically, is essentially good - men will not annihilate each other if left without a ruler, but motivation, protection, and some degree of rights must be accommodated in order to allow a state to thrive to its greatest capacity. Thus a ruler should be judged by his ability to protect the people and secure their rights, and he should come to power by the collective consent of the people....   [tags: John Locke] 1496 words
(4.3 pages)
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John Locke versus Karl Marx - ... Marx firmly believed that ownership of private property was a way in which the social classes became more divided, and in turn, a way to oppress the poor. His opinion largely stems from the time period in which he lived (1818-1883), where factory owners infamously underpaid employees for dangerous work in treacherous conditions. However, Marx idea of private property was a bit different from Locke and did not mean things like land ownership or personal items, but the relation of individuals used for the means of production in a privately owned enterprise....   [tags: influential, celebrated modern political thinkers]
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1243 words
(3.6 pages)
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Philosophy: John Locke, David Hume - This is a philosophical question that has been proven ultimately difficult to answer. I believe it is as a result of the complexity of the consent theory. For a theory that places high emphasis on autonomy and freedom, the most obvious basis for legitimate political authority should be some form of voluntary, self-assumed obligation. However, some philosophers such as John Locke and Charles Beitz argue that tacit consent can ground obligation to obey the state’s law while others such as Hanna Pitkin and David Hume counter this argument with the opinion that tacit consent is not sufficient to ground political obligation....   [tags: political theory essay ] 1130 words
(3.2 pages)
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John Locke´s Flawless Government - ... So the law of nature governs the state of nature, and protects our fundamental rights. Furthermore, the execution of the law of nature is placed into the hands of every man. Under the law of nature every man has the right to punish another for any evil they commit against the law of nature. Despite man having the ability to freely do what they please while under the law of nature, their rights would unfortunately not be protected. To gain protection and escape from the confusion and disorder that will ultimately emerge from living in the state of nature, John Locke believes that we must give up some of our freedoms....   [tags: people, will, rights, protect] 856 words
(2.4 pages)
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John Locke is Focused on Epistemoloy - Locke is most interested in what we really know. He is focused on epistemology. He wants to find out about the origin of our ideas, the level of certainty we can have of our ideas and what we are capable of truly understanding. His main stand-point is that we don’t have innate ideas and he aims to get rid of the sceptical doubt about what we know. He has two types of argument against innate ideas; direct and indirect. The indirect argument can be seen as the more positive of the two, and the idea of it is that we are able to explain all knowledge we have without innate ideas but from other sources....   [tags: innate, sensation, perception] 721 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Philosophy of John Locke - In his Second Treatise of Government, Locke proposes an idealized state of nature in which men are self-sufficient and content. The implications of his idealized population lead him to derive the existence of government from its own theoretical roots: Locke proposes government as a naturally occurring consequence of his state of nature. This derivation is founded on the injustice of man in his natural state: it is the imperfections found in the state of nature that necessitate government. This paper aims to show why the inequality caused by the existence of a market economy is an intentional and necessary path from Locke’s state of nature to the existence of the commonwealth....   [tags: Philosophy ] 1503 words
(4.3 pages)
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John Locke and Political Authority - In this paper I will look at how Locke uses of the idea of private property to justify coercive political authority, by using concepts such as the state of nature to frame the argument. I will also look at the strengths and weaknesses with Locke’s position, namely weaknesses relating to the lack of consideration given to the poor, and strengths relating to the rationality of his state of nature, his advocacy for democracy and his distinction between property establishing set boundaries. Finally I will suggest that his theory of government while providing a solid framework, does not account for everyone within society, and as a result lacks persuasiveness....   [tags: Private Property, State of Nature, Strengths]
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1547 words
(4.4 pages)
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John Locke on Personal Identity - I will argue that Locke believed that if you remain the same person, there are various entities contained in my body and soul composite that do not remain the same over time, or that we can conceive them changing. These entities are matter, organism (human), person (rational consciousness and memory), and the soul (immaterial thinking substance). This is a intuitive interpretation that creates many questions and problems. I will evaluate Locke's view by explaining what is and what forms personal identity, and then explaining how these changes do conceivably occur while a human remains the same person....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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John Locke: Human Understanding - When considering knowledge, Locke is interested in the ability for us to know something, the capacity of gathering and using information and understanding the limits of what we know. He believes this also leads him to realise what we perhaps, cannot know. [1] He wants to find out about the origin of our ideas. His main stand-point is that we don’t have innate ideas and he aims to get rid of the sceptical doubt about what we know. The innate ideas which Locke sets out to argue against are those which “the soul receives in its very first being, and brings into the world with it”....   [tags: philosophy, knowledge]
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1806 words
(5.2 pages)
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John Locke - In this essay I argue that the late philosopher Locke has the most compelling theory of metaphysics. First, I explain Locke’s point that all humans are born as Tabula Rasa, in order to gain basic understanding of where Locke begins his theory. Second, I discuss how Locke argues how we obtain knowledge, empiricism and representationalism, and knowledge about the work varies between strong and weak inferences. Third, I will provide counter examples to Locke’s ideas, and will explain why these counter examples work for Locke’s theories provided....   [tags: metaphysics, Tabula Rasa, empiricism, knowledge]
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954 words
(2.7 pages)
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John Locke: Illuminating Path to Life, Liberty, and Property - ... Due to the fact that he was a member of the Shaftesbury household, he was enriched by the ideas of government and politics, which lead him to develop his ideas on freedom and the power of the people (Uzgalis). Locke portrayed these ideas when writing Two Treatises of Civil Government and An Essay Concerning Human Understanding in the early 1680s; however, it was not published until 1690 due to the political unrest that England was facing at the time. During his final years, he worked as the chief of trade and plantations, while still writing countless numbers of works that were directed to answering the difficulties faced by the government....   [tags: notorious philosphers]
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646 words
(1.8 pages)
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John Locke: Illuminating Path to Life, Liberty, and Property - I. Introduction “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” (“Declaration”). These words, spoken by a wise and prominent man by the name of Thomas Jefferson, were greatly influenced by the Enlightenment’s most profound philosopher, John Locke. Since the beginning of Enlightenment to the 21st century, Locke’s ideas have been behind countless innovators, philosophers, and politicians; including our very own Founding Fathers....   [tags: Enlightenment, Philospher, Biography]
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1052 words
(3 pages)
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The Influence of John Locke - John Locke was someone more than just an ordinary man. He was the son of a country attorney and born on August 29, 1632. He grew up during the civil war and later entered the Church of Christ, Oxford, where he remained as a student and teacher for many years. (Rivitch 23) With a wide variety of political and religious views, he expressed most of his personnel views on education and social and political philosophies. Once he noted the five lasting pleasures throughout his career were health, good news, knowledge, doing good, and eternal paradise....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]
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961 words
(2.7 pages)
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John Locke and Human Nature - In The Second Treatise of Government, Locke defines political power, discusses the inalienable birth-rights of man, and the need for both in the formation of a legitimate government. John Locke’s The Second Treatise of Government defines a legitimate government in relation to the protection of inalienable rights. He views a valid government as one which upholds his three main natural laws of life, liberty and property. In defining political power, Locke insists that it is proper to make laws “for the regulating and preserving of property,” and adds, that if necessary, “the execution of such laws, and in the defense of the common-wealth [sic] from foreign injury.” This is needed “for the pub...   [tags: Second Treatise on Civil Government] 372 words
(1.1 pages)
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Political Theory of John Locke - John Locke: Account of Political Society What would the American government be like today if it was not for the mind and political theory of John Locke. Some historians and philosophers believe that without John Locke our government would only be a shadow of what it is today. Arguably, one of his most important political and philosophical works was his Two Treatises of Government. There he argues that the function of the state is to protect the natural rights of its citizens, primarily to protect the right to property....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 1176 words
(3.4 pages)
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The Contributions of Nicolo Machiavelli and John Locke to Political Thought - The Contributions of Nicolo Machiavelli and John Locke to Political Thought In political thought, there have been many people that have progressed political theory. Nicolo Machiavelli and John Locke are two of those famous individuals. The research here will be focused on them. Each Machiavelli and John Locke support a different political theory. At first, the background and relevant contexts will be discussed. Each person has written something that has influenced modern political thought....   [tags: Political Science, Political Theory]
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1755 words
(5 pages)
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Thomas Hobbes and John Locke - Hobbes and Locke both abandoned the thought of the divine right of monarchy. Both did not agree with the fact that the ruler or assembly would have all power over its citizens. So basically they were against Absolutism and their views were that of rebels in their time period. Theses two philosophers both held similar ideas but also have conflicting ideas pertaining to the citizens "social contract" with their rulers, "Natural Condition of Mankind," and sovereignty. John Locke believed that citizens should give power to those who govern them but not absolute power....   [tags: Politics Philosophy Sociology] 706 words
(2 pages)
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John Locke's Theory of Knowledge - I. General Notions Francis Bacon and Thomas Hobbes were not truly conscious of the phenomenalistic consequences of their theory of knowledge, which was based on empiricism. Both considered sensation as phenomenal presentations and also as representations of reality. Thus they still had something upon which to build an absolute metaphysics. With Locke gnosiological phenomenalism enters its critical phase. By considering sensations merely as subjective presentations, Locke gives us a theory of knowledge of subjective data devoid of any relation with external objects....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 1877 words
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Nature vs. Nurture: John Locke on Innate Ideas - In book one of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, John Locke argues against innate ideas using three arguments. The intention of this paper will be to discuss John Locke’s views on ideas while introducing and explaining his three arguments against innate ideas in detail touching on his idea of tabula rasa. Furthermore, it will briefly discuss alternative views on innate ideas as both conflicting and similar. John Locke’s writings came at a time when there was a philosophical debate going on between the empiricists and the rationalists....   [tags: Philosophy, Reason, deduction]
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1345 words
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Thomas Hobbes and John Locke - Hobbes and Locke John Locke and Thomas Hobbes were famous political Theorists among other things in their time. Hobbes who was born 40 years before Locke had a very different perspective to Locke and both will be examined more through this essay. Even though many of there theories were different in the sixteenth century Hobbes and Locke' s theories became closer as the rise of the state and decline of the feudal system brought about the question of authority. John Locke born in 1632 he was influenced political thought immensely....   [tags: Politics Philosophy Sociology] 1018 words
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Why John Locke is the Greatest Philosopher of all Time - Why John Locke is the Greatest Philosopher of all Time John Locke was a British philosopher and physician who lived from 29th August 1632 to 28th October 1704. He is one of the most outstanding of enlightenment thinkers, who explained many of the ideas that affect human life in today’s society. He is widely known as the father of classical liberalism, because of his emphases on liberty of persons by, restricting the authority of the government Jenkins and John (18). He is also regarded as one the first imperialist in Britain because his pioneer work on imperialism theory, a theory in epistemology that asserts that knowledge comes only from sensory experience....   [tags: enlightment thinker, epistemology] 1407 words
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: Filling the Canvas: Tristram Shandy's Portrait of John Locke - Filling the Canvas: Tristram Shandy's Portrait of John Locke The development of thoughts in a human brain are formulated through sparks in the brain; the clashing of cells. The concept of our mind making connections to other connections, was developed by philosopher John Locke in his, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. In this essay Locke discusses the theory that people are born as blank slates, than they slowly pick up concepts from others. People therefore are a product of people. John believed that, “Since it is the understanding that sets man above the rest of sensible beings, and gives him all the advantage and dominion which he has over them; it is certainly a subject, even fo...   [tags: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Laurence]
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2971 words
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John Locke is the Greatest Philosopher of all Time - Why John Locke is the Greatest Philosopher of all Time John Locke was a philosopher and physician who lived from 29th August 1632 to 28th October 1704. He is highly recognized among the enlightenment thinkers, who explained many of the ideas that affect human life in today’s society. He is widely known as the father of classical liberalism, because of his emphases on liberty of persons by, restricting the authority of the state Jenkins and John (18). He is also regarded as one the first imperialist in Britain because his pioneer work on imperialism theory, a theory in epistemology that asserts that knowledge comes only from sensory experience....   [tags: Philosphy, Physician, Biography]
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1441 words
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John Locke: Founding Father of Modern Era Liberalism - Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and John Locke are all great thinkers who were greatly influential in forming philosophies that would affect the future of politics. By analyzing each philosopher’s ideology, we can identify which thinker’s theory reflected modern era liberalism the most. For this paper I will be arguing that, John Locke provides a more compelling framework of modern era liberalism because of his perception of the state of nature, the social contract and the function of government....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Jean Jacques Rousseau]
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Stuart Mill and John Locke Conception of Freedom - Introduction John Locke (1632-1704) and John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) are two important thinkers of liberty in modern political thought. They have revolutionized the idea of human freedom at their time and have influenced many political thinkers afterwards. Although their important book on human freedom, John Locke’s The Second Treatise of Government (1689) and John Mill’s On Liberty (1859), are separated 170 years, some scholars thinks that they are belonging to the same conceptual tradition, English Liberalism....   [tags: Thinkers. Liberty, Modern Political Thought]
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John Locke's Theory of Knowledge - John Locke was an empiricist who believed that people could acquire knowledge from experience. Ideas acted as raw materials and by knowing the relation of the ideas, we got knowledge. All ideas are based on experience but knowledge can also be justified by intuition and demonstration. By sensation and reflection, we get sensitive, intuitive and demonstrative knowledge with different degrees of certainty and ways of evidence. In investigating the two main sources of ideas of Locke, we then will explain the two kinds of knowledge which based on reasoning by using suitable examples....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 1061 words
(3 pages)
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Philosophers: Niccolo Machiavelli, John Locke and Karl Marx - ... The central theme of The Prince was gaining political power and the importance of power in the political arena. The theory is also repeatedly centralized around the state and its importance to the promotion of human welfare. The state is deemed indispensable and necessary to the achievement of the greatest good. Machiavelli is utilitarian in his views of government. Whatever gives the king political power no matter how shrewd and apathetic the actions maybe, is considered upstanding. The state has standards to meet its interests such as peace and order, the protection of its citizens and therefore must have everything in its disposal....   [tags: power, absolutism, government] 893 words
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John Locke and the American Revolution and Glorious Revolution - John Locke, amongst other things, was a 17th century political philosopher who became renowned for his beliefs in the state of nature, natural law and the inalienable rights of man; often being referred to as the ‘Father of Liberalism’. At their time of writing, Locke’s ideas were considered to be revolutionary thoughts in an extremely conservative world; in which absolute power commonly ruled over the masses and where inequality simply went unchallenged. John Locke’s theories were paramount in both the Glorious Revolution and the American Revolution, and there are numerous reasons as to why this is so....   [tags: Essays on American Revolution]
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding by John Locke - In his “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding” John Locke discusses personal identity where he tries to show that personal identity depends on our memories. Locke also discuses some of the changes that are possible in our constitution that still result in the same personal identity. However, I think that Locke fails to account for certain aspects of memory that effect personal identity which leads me to think personal identity may not be what Locke proposes it to be. Locke distinguishes between three types of substances: God, finite intelligences and bodies....   [tags: personal identity, philosophical analysis] 911 words
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Analysis of On Porperty: Second Treatsie by John Locke - “On the Property” “Of Property” is one of the most significant and controversial chapters in the Second Treatise. It contains the same theme of personal liberty found throughout the Second Treatise that I read in another political course. Here Locke makes clear that a man’s individual labor is his own and the laws of nature dictate that he reap the rewards of his hard work. “Every man has a property in his own person” (Locke 134). If an individual picks a strawberry or kills a hare for sustenance, no one else can claim that it does not belong to that individual who did the work....   [tags: Marx, Philosophy,Labor]
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John Locke: Forcing Someone to Become a Christian - In the letter ‘A Letter Concerning Toleration’ John Locke sets out the arguments as to why it is irrational to force someone to become Christian against their will and whilst Locke writes as a Christian it acknowledged that it is true for all religious beliefs. As a whole his letter makes a case for the toleration of other religious beliefs. The main argument within the letter is the irrationality argument but it also included others such as the unchristian argument and the inconsistency argument....   [tags: A Letter Concerning Toleration]
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2135 words
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John Locke and Karl Marx on Social Justice - Social justice is how justice is served throughout a society as a whole or to it's classes. Various unique ideas on creating a just society have been established throughout history. Two of the more well-known concepts are those of Locke and Marx. While both have their ideas for a "Just State", they are both very different within their aspects. John Locke's views on social justice and a just state began with his belief that all humans are governed by what he calls "natural laws" and are protected by their "inalienable personal rights." Our inalienable rights are life, liberty, health, and property....   [tags: philosophical analysis] 803 words
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Classical Liberalism: Two Treatises on Government by John Locke - ... 8). Again, these writings are emphasizing that an absolute monarchy is wrong because no man is more important than another and that no man should have more power over another man than is consented to. This showed people the flaw in the King of Great Britain governing the Americas. The Declaration of Independence argued the inequality of class systems as reasoning for separation from Britain. “Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed” (US 1776....   [tags: enlightenment period, revolutions]
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John Locke's Belief That People Are Born with Rights - The Liberalist View Liberalism is a political ideology that was founded on the basis of equality and liberty. According to Liberalism, life, liberty, and property are rights people are born with and they should not be taken away. In Liberia, the main political party is the Unity Party which is a liberal party that focuses on economic Liberalism. In South Africa, the Democratic Alliance is a liberal party that wants an open opportunity society. Although these two nations are faced with many issues involving the liberty of their citizens, they hope to better their country through the ideology of Liberalism....   [tags: liberalism, equality, slavery] 1159 words
(3.3 pages)
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John Locke: America’s Forgotten Founding Father - John Locke is the most influential character in American history, thought, and practice. Without the influence of his writings, America would not have the same foundation of unalienable Rights, stable governance, and quality of life. However, Locke remains widely unknown and unstudied by the newer generations of Americans. His most influential work, the Second Treatises of Government, laid the ground, both theoretically and institutionally, for the American system of government that has been enjoyed for over two centuries....   [tags: State of Nature, influential characters in history]
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John Locke’s Theory of Personal Identity - John Locke (1632-1704) said ‘To find wherein personal identity consists, we must consider what person stands for …’ (Locke, in set book, p. 275). Therefore, to recapitulate Locke’s philosophy on personal identity it is necessary to clarify how he inimitably used the term ‘person’ and consequently other words, such as ‘substance’ and ‘man’, which he utilized to form his philosophical ideas. Furthermore, his work on personal identity inspired debate amongst many subsequent philosophers and motivated disagreement and as such, it is important to counter Locke’s views with opposing arguments....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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John Locke’s Theory of Personal Identity - The question of personal identity is very intuitive, yet very difficult to define. Essentially, what makes you, you. John Locke was one philosopher who attempted to answer this question. He proposed a psychological theory to define personal identity. His theory does have some merit, but it is not a correct definition of personal identity, since there are some counter-examples that cannot be accounted for. My argument will prove that Locke’s theory of personal identity is false. Locke’s theory states that A is the same as B if and only if B remembers at T2 something done or experienced by A at T1....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 724 words
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Notes on John Locke - Notes on John Locke (1632-1704), selections from The Second Treatise of Government (1690) As we will examine it, a defining theme of the American experience from Thomas Jefferson through Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Martin Luther King, Jr. is democratic revolution: these and other major figures seek to change the existing social structure, in order to expand the circle of democracy - to encompass ever larger groups of people within a democratic framework which recognizes the basic equality and rights of each member....   [tags: Second Treatise on Civil Government] 3129 words
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John Locke: Property Rights - One of most historically influential political thinkers of the western world was John Locke. John Locke, the man who initiated what is now known as British Empiricism, is also considered highly influential in establishing grounds, theoretically at least, for the constitution of the United States of America. The basis for understanding Locke is that he sees all people as having natural God given rights. As God's creations, this denotes a certain equality, at least in an abstract sense. This religious back drop acts as a the foundation for all of Locke's theories, including his theories of individuality, private property, and the state....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]
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John Locke and Terrorism - In 1689, A Letter Concerning Toleration, written by John Locke during his self-imposed exile to his friend Philip von Limborch, was published without the author's knowledge. The Letter concerned religious intolerance. It essentially made the case for religious toleration on the basis of philosophical principles. Locke was concerned with the State's toleration of those not subscribing to the orthodox religion of the day and, by putting a high value on the preservation of negative liberty, he proposed the toleration of a wide range of religious beliefs....   [tags: Philosophy of Terrorism Essays]
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Force, Morality and Rights in Thomas Hobbes and John Locke's Social Contract Theories - Force, Morality and Rights in Thomas Hobbes and John Locke's Social Contract Theories Throughout history, the effects of the unequal distribution of power and justice within societies have become apparent through the failure of governments, resulting in the creation of theories regarding ways to balance the amount of power given and the way in which justice is enforced. Due to this need for change, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke created two separate theories in which the concept of a social contract is used to determine the ways in which a government can govern without forfeiting justice....   [tags: Social Contract Hobbes Locke Essays] 1630 words
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John Locke - John Locke John Locke is considered to be England’s most prominent philosopher. He was born August 29, 1632 in a small town of Somerset, which is south of Bristol, England. Locke was the oldest of three children. His mother died when he was 22 years old and Locke spoke of her very well. Locke’s father was a Puritan attorney and clerk to a justice of the peace in the town where Locke was born. He was very strict with his son when he was younger. which Locke later believed that parents should be stricter and less indulgent towards their children....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 1209 words
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John Locke - John Locke believes that man ought to have more freedom in political society than John Stuart Mill does. John Locke's The Second Treatise of Government and John Stuart Mill's On Liberty are influential and potent literary works which while outlining the conceptual framework of each thinkers ideal state present two divergent visions of the very nature of man and his freedom. John Locke and John Stuart Mill have different views regarding how much freedom man ought to have in political society because they have different views regarding man's basic potential for inherently good or evil behavior, as well as the ends or purpose of political societies....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 1985 words
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John Locke - John Locke's, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), was first criticized by the philosopher and theologian, John Norris of Bemerton, in his "Cursory Reflections upon a Book Call'd, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding," and appended to his Christian Blessedness or Discourses upon the Beatitudes (1690). Norris's criticisms of Locke prompted three replies, which were only posthumously published. Locke has been viewed, historically, as the winner of this debate; however, new evidence has emerged which suggests that Norris's argument against the foundation of knowledge in sense-perception that the Essay advocated was a valid and worthy critique, which Locke did, in fact,...   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]
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John Locke - John Locke John Locke, born on Aug. 29, 1632, in Somerset, England, was an English philosopher and political theorist. Locke was educated at Christ Church, Oxford, where he followed the traditional classical curriculum and then turned to the study of medicine and science, receiving a medical degree, but his interest in philosophy was reawakened by the study of Descartes. He then joined the household of Anthony Ashley Cooper, later the earl of Shaftesbury, as a personal physician at first, becoming a close friend and advisor....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 607 words
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John Locke - There he lay as a normal infant, red and whimpering. How does the mind of a baby grow to become one of the greatest political philosophers the world has known. From his response to the Puritan upbringing by his father, to “The Reasonableness of Christianity”, which John Locke published just five years before his death, John Locke's life demonstrates how God uses a mind dedicated to honest pursuit of ultimate Truth. On August 9, 1632 he was born in the village of Wrington in Somercast. His father was a country solicitor and small landowner who fought in the English Civil War on the Puritan side....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 899 words
(2.6 pages)
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John Locke - John Locke was the son of a country attorney and was born on August 29, 1632 . He grew up in and during the civil war, and later in 1652, entered the Christ Church, Oxford, where he remained as a student and teacher for many years. Locke taught and lectured in subjects such as Greek, rhetoric, and Moral philosophy. Lockedisagreed with many of the topics that were taught at the university. Locke, after reading books by Descartes, acquired a strong interest in contemporary philosophical and scientific questions and theories....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism] 909 words
(2.6 pages)
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