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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Jean Jaques Rousseau"
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The Freedom of Men in Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Work - Out of the many philosophers of his time, Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s ideas were the most enlightened. His ideas were extremely controversial and he has influenced political and social change for over two hundred years. His ideas were enlightened by thinking ahead of the people of his time by talking about general will, liberty and the corruption of society, and how freedom was essential to being human. We find the Rousseau argued about the freedoms of men quite a bit in his work The Social Contract....   [tags: Jean-Jacques Rousseau, philosophy, freedom,] 511 words
(1.5 pages)
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Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Moliere - Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Moliere, Enlightenment author and greatest comic dramatist of all times Jean-Jaques Rousseau, philosopher, novelist, composer, language and music theorist, and single most important Enlightenment writer Act I SCENE 1. Moliere and Rousseau are up in heaven R: Hey Moliere is that you. M: Yes, may I ask your name again. R: Yeah it’s Rousseau. M: Ah, it’s been a long time since I’ve seen you. Sorry, my memory doesn’t always serve me right anymore. R: No, you’ve never met me before....   [tags: essays research papers] 1612 words
(4.6 pages)
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau and The Essence of Human Nature - Rousseau starts his discourse with the quote, “What is natural has to be investigated not in beings that are depraved, but in those that are good according to nature” (Aristotle. Politics. II). It is this idea that Rousseau uses to define his second discourse. Rousseau begins his story of human nature by “setting aside all the facts” (132). Rousseau believes the facts of the natural state of humanity are not necessary to determine the natural essence of human nature, and adding facts based on man’s condition in society does not show man’s natural condition....   [tags: Jean-Jacques Rousseau]
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1435 words
(4.1 pages)
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Sir Isaac Newton, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Thomas Hobbes - Isaac Newton Isaac Newton was born in 1642, the same year Galileo died, in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, England on Christmas Day. He is considered one of the greatest scientists in history. As an English mathematician and physicist, Newton made important contributions to many fields of science. His discoveries and theories laid the foundation for much of the progress in science since his time. The three most important offerings of Newton are solving the mystifications of light and optics, formulating his three laws of motion, and deriving from them the law of universal gravitation....   [tags: Jean-Jacques Rousseau Essays] 1833 words
(5.2 pages)
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Jean-Jacques Rousseau      “I was born to a family whose morals distinguished them from the people.” (Josephson 9) Jean-Jacques Rousseau was born in Geneva, Switzerland on June 28, 1712. He became the son of Isaac Rousseau, a plebian class watchmaker, and Suzanne Bernard, the daughter of a minister who died shortly after giving birth to him. Rousseau’s baptism ceremony was a traditional one held at St. Peter’s Cathedral on July 4, 1712 by the reverend senebies. He had an elder brother who had a “loose character”, but Rousseau loved him anyway....   [tags: Jean Jacques Rousseau Biographies Essays] 1343 words
(3.8 pages)
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Force, Right, and Freedom in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Philosophy - In the Social Contract Rousseau discusses the best way to run a state and uses philosophical arguments to argue his case. He also uses the ideas of force, right and freedom to support his argument. He feels we require a civil state, as opposed to living in the state of nature, as ‘it substitutes justice for instinct….and gives his actions a moral quality’ and describes the civil state as having ‘transformed him from a stupid, limited animal into an intelligent being and a man’ (Unit, p109)....   [tags: Jean-Jacques Rousseau] 986 words
(2.8 pages)
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Comparison of Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Human nature and its relevance in determining behaviors, predictions, and conclusions has caused dispute among philosophers throughout the ages. Political philosophy with its emphasis on government legitimacy, justice, laws, and rights guided the works of the 17th and 18th century philosophical writings of Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Through Thomas Hobbes world-renowned publication Leviathan and Rousseau’s discourses on basic political principals and concepts, each man validated their thoughts on human nature and what is required for a successful society within their respective government confines....   [tags: Hobbes vs Rousseau]
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1096 words
(3.1 pages)
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau's The State of War - Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "The State of War" Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "The State of War" elegantly raises a model for confederative peace among the states of Europe, and then succinctly explains its impossibility. Rousseau very systematically lays out the benefits of such a "perpetual peace" through arguments based only in a realism of pure self-interest, and then very elegantly and powerfully turns the inertia of the self-interest machinery against the same to explain why it can never come to be....   [tags: Rousseau The State of War] 1087 words
(3.1 pages)
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Jean Jacques Rousseau on Liberalism - Rousseau had many ideas about how society as a whole should work. His main ideas involve man requiring freedom. With this freedom we theoretically will not compare ourselves to one another, or strive towards being better than others. His other main ideas include the general will and the idea of a collective sovereignty. These suggest that society and government should please the general will and work together as a cohesive unit. Rousseau has several famous books, one of which is The Social Contract....   [tags: The Social Contract, philosophical analysis]
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630 words
(1.8 pages)
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Comparing Locke´s Natural Law with Rousseau´s Discourse on Inequality -   The relationship between nature, the state and individuals is a complex one; political philosophers have been studying these relationships ever since the dawn of time, with the goal being to determine the best way in which the people relate to nature. Based on the ideas of philosopher John Locke, the state does not have the ability to infringe upon the right of people to determine their own destiny; he believes that mankind’s best state is to bring the best parts of their natural instincts into society, collecting together into a “state of perfect freedom.” Conversely, philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau believed that mankind was at its best in its natural state, behaving like an animal and...   [tags: John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau]
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2789 words
(8 pages)
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A Phenomenal Figure: Jean-Jacques Rousseau - A Phenomenal Figure: Jean-Jacques Rousseau The enlightenment era was a time where many philosophers lived. Their works helped benefit society and the bewilderment the state lived in. In this era, enlightenment thinkers were identified to give basis to philosophy that was independent from tradition, culture and religion. These philosophers were known to have written theories on politics, education, society, nature, nurture, etc. A critical philosopher from that era who attacked all these ideas and many more was Jean Jacques Rousseau....   [tags: Philosohpy]
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1189 words
(3.4 pages)
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William Golding and Jean Jacques Rousseau - ... Rousseau believes that man is tainted in society because when put in society, he desires so much more than what is needed and becomes greedy, thus corrupting the untainted mind. Rousseau believes that society is the cause of all of our problems, the reason for humans to not live in peace. With all the things that society come with (money, greed, lust, arguments etc.), these are the reasons we become tainted in society, because we are introduced with more items then what is needed and that causes the problem....   [tags: human nature, comparison] 581 words
(1.7 pages)
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau's The Social Contract - The problem is to find a form of association … in which each, while uniting himself with all, may still obey himself alone, and remain as free as before.’ Does Rousseau have a convincing solution to the problem he poses. The opening line of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's influential work 'The Social Contract' (1762), is 'man is born free, and he is everywhere in chains. Those who think themselves masters of others are indeed greater slaves than they'. These are not physical chains, but psychological and means that all men are constraints of the laws they are subjected to, and that they are forced into a false liberty, irrespective of class....   [tags: Sociology Essays]
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1773 words
(5.1 pages)
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Comparison of Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau - While Hobbes and Rousseau address many of the same issues and topics in both The Leviathan as well as The Discourses, the way that Hobbes and Rousseau look at these issues such as, human nature, the state, and inequality are extremely different from each other. In some cases Hobbes and Rousseau’s opinions on these certain ideas are completely contradicting and opposite of each other. While it is tough to say which viewpoint, Hobbes’ or Rousseau’s is correct, one or the other can be considered sounder by their logic and reasoning....   [tags: Hobbes vs Rousseau] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Political Powers - The proper use and limits of governmental power have different implications for each theorist that we have studied. Some see its power as all-encompassing, while others see it as more narrow, controlled and regulated. For this essay, I chose to examine the philosophies of the theorists with whom I disagree with the least: Rousseau, Locke, and Rawls. One can always recall Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s famous line: “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains.” This sentence expressed his opposition to the idea that individual should be forced to give up their natural rights to a king....   [tags: natural rights, democracy] 834 words
(2.4 pages)
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Letter from Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Letter to the Editor Assignment Letter From Jean-Jacques Rousseau After reading an article written in The Globe and Mail describing Toronto’s current Mayor, Rob Ford’s latest scandal, there were various statements that caught my attention. It shocks me that such behaviour is tolerated by the community after receiving what I believe to be a disingenuous apology. I believe that Mayor Ford encapsulates everything that is wrong with our political system. His actions prove that he believes to be above the will of the people, taking advantage of his freedom when he should be putting the needs of the community first....   [tags: letter to the editor assignment] 1238 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Influence of Jean Jacques Rousseau - Eighteenth-century philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau influenced many French revolutionaries with his ideas. In the time of the Enlightenment, people believed that humankind could progress and improve through the use of reason and science. One of them was French artist Jacques-Louis David, who was official artist to the French revolution (p158, Blk 3). Just as Rousseau had used his publications to reflect on his ideas, David had used art as a media to reflect the ideas and values of the society in the eighteenth century....   [tags: essays research papers] 1253 words
(3.6 pages)
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Jean Jacques Rousseau's Influence on Mary Shelley's Creature - Manufactured Monster® Who or what decides what makes one person better than another. Why should anyone or anything decide in the first place. The only thing that differentiates people is society. Whether it’s sports, school, or even getting hired for a job, someone is always the best. The most athletic, the smartest, the most qualified. Society puts these classifications on people. Things were not always this way though. Before humans were so “advanced” and before any society, there was a time when nothing mattered except self preservation....   [tags: Frankestein, literature, novel]
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1097 words
(3.1 pages)
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Questionaire: Jean- Jacques Rousseau and The Social Contract - Ques: “The problem is to find a form of association… in which each, while uniting himself with all, may still obey himself alone, and remain as free as before.” Does Rousseau have a convincing solution to the problem he poses. In the 1700’s Jean- Jacques Rousseau wrote The Social Contract. During this time, the social contract was fairly new theory. It stated in order to have a democracy laws were needed which caused everyone to give up some rights in order to do so. Rousseau makes a convincing solution to the problem of being able to be free while united with everyone else through his philosophy on how the social contract works....   [tags: equality, power, association]
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1046 words
(3 pages)
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Biography of Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Biography of Jean-Jacques Rousseau MAN is born free; and everywhere he is in chains. One thinks himself the master of others, and still remains a greater slave then they. How did this change come about. I do not know. How can it be legitimate. That question I think I can answer. (Rousseau, Jean-Jacques 1997) Jean- Jacques Rousseau was born on the 25th of June 1712 in Geneva, Switzerland....   [tags: Papers] 1352 words
(3.9 pages)
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9/11 and Jean-Jacques Rousseau - 9/11 and Jean-Jacques Rousseau L'Etat C'est Moi : Absolutism in the Age of Reason By analyzing the Taliban regime and their motives, Jean-Jacques Rousseau's ideas, and by comparing the two, it will be made evident that Jean-Jacques Rousseau's ideas of government rule over people's lives is true in this specific case. On September 11, 2001 the heart of the United States of America was ripped out in a matter of 10 minutes by Islamic extremists who follow the Taliban Regime. The first attack was at 8:45 am when two planes were hijacked and crashed into the twin towers of the World Trade Centre in New York City....   [tags: American America History] 490 words
(1.4 pages)
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The concepts of liberty and individuality experienced a critical change in meaning and understanding as Europe shifted from the 18th century Enlightenment era to the age of political economy and utilitarianism of the 19th century. This clear distinction can be seen when comparing the works of enlightenment thinker Jean-Jacques Rousseau to authors of the 19th century, including utilitarian John Stuart Mill and communist Karl Marx. The fundamental differences in the ideas of liberty and individuality between the two centuries can be attributed to the political, economic, and social climates of each author’s time....   [tags: Philosophy, Political Science] 1678 words
(4.8 pages)
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Jean Jacques Rousseau - Jean Jacques Rousseau Throughout his life, Rousseau suffered from severe emotional distress, and feelings of deep inferiority and guilt. Rousseau's actions and writings reflect his attempts to overcome this sense of inadequacy and to find a place in world that only seemed to reject him. His political philosophy influenced the development of the French Revolution, and his theories have had a great impact on education and literature. Jean Jacques Rousseau was born in Geneva, Switzerland on June 28, 1712 and later died on July 2, 1778....   [tags: Papers] 929 words
(2.7 pages)
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Jean-Louis David and Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Jean-Louis David + Jean-Jacques Rousseau Question : In what ways and to what extent is an understanding of historical context important in approaching the works of (a) David and (b) Rousseau. "The Lictors Returning to Brutus the Bodies of his Sons", is a painting by the French artist Jean-Louis David in 1789. Having led the fight which overthrew the monarchy and established the Roman Republic. Brutus tragically saw his sons participate in a plot to restore the monarchy. As a judge, he was called upon to render the verdict, and without hesitation condemned his two sons to death....   [tags: History Art Artwork Painting] 1385 words
(4 pages)
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Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau developed theories on human nature and how men govern themselves. With the passing of time, political views on the philosophy of government gradually changed. Despite their differences, Hobbes and Rousseau, both became two of the most influential political theorists in the world. Their ideas and philosophies spread all over the world influencing the creation of many new governments. These theorists all recognize that people develop a social contract within their society, but have differing views on what exactly the social contract is and how it is established....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 2134 words
(6.1 pages)
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Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau have very different views on the social contract largely based on their fundamental views of the state of nature in humanity. These basic views of natural human nature cause Hobbes and Rousseau to have views on opposite sides of the spectrum, based on two controversial speculations, that human is inherently good or that human is inherently inclined towards egotism and perpetual insecurity. Due to his belief that they are of this nature, Hobbes viewed an all-powerful sovereign of a rather totalarianistic nature to be necessary....   [tags: The Social Contract 2014]
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2170 words
(6.2 pages)
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Freedom for Rousseau and Individual Liberties - Freedom for Rousseau and Individual Liberties The purpose which Rousseau ostensibly gives his social contract is to free man from the illegitimate chains to which existing governments have shackled him. If this is his aim, then it follows that he should be most concerned with the preservation of freedom in political society, initially so that savage man might be lured out of nature and into society in the first place, and afterwards so that Rousseau’s framework for this society will prevent the present tyranny from reasserting itself....   [tags: Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Essays] 2355 words
(6.7 pages)
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Jean Jacques Rousseau - Philosophy 4: Paper Two (Prompt #2) Rousseau believes that even when one votes in the minority they can obey the law and still be free. But, “how can the opposing minority be both free and subject to laws to which they have not consented?” (Rousseau, pg. 153) Rousseau’s response is that citizens must consent to all the laws because “ to inhabit the territory is to submit to the sovereign.”(Rousseau, p.153) In accordance with the social contract, when a citizen votes they should completely surrender their personal interest and vote for what they believe to be the general will....   [tags: sociopolitical phylosophy]
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1234 words
(3.5 pages)
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Jean Jacques Rousseau, Hobbes And American Democracy - Author: Sean Dwyer Freedom, Democracy, and Liberty are essential rights to the self-determination that all people inherently have. But, when those rights are trampled upon by individuals that seek to enslave and perpetrate countless crimes against the sovereignty of a man’s spirit, then freedom needs to be defended. Men are determined to rule themselves, free from the oppressive fists of a tyrant. It is during this grave hour where we are called upon to protect freedom. The baton of freedom has been passed to us, a new generation....   [tags: William Julius Wilson 2014]
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1200 words
(3.4 pages)
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Jean-Jacques Rousseau had a theory of human nature that differed from all others. The way we started, grew as a society, and live now, are totally different than what we have already learned this semester. He thought of what is called a Social Contract Theory. This theory will be discussed in this paper, especially in the aspects of personal freedom, the role of the intellect, human social and/or spiritual relations, and the nature of the self. How much personal freedom does a person have. Well, Rousseau would say that humans do have personal freedom, but that freedom is hard to keep....   [tags: Social Contract Theory] 950 words
(2.7 pages)
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An Illustration of Monastic Life in the 14th Century: Jean-Jacques Annaud's The Name of the Rose - Jean-Jacques Annaud, The Name of the Rose historical fiction murder mystery illustrates monastic life in the 14th century. This medieval film takes place in a remote Benedictine abbey in Northern Italy. Annaud is historically successful in recounting monastic life during the Middle Ages. The enriching backdrop of this film presents the culture of monastic life. The setting is beautifully examined and replicated to show the distinct and complicated architecture of the times. The characterization of the monks is distinct in their appearance common to medieval times....   [tags: Jean-Jacques Annaud, Name of the Rose, mystery, fi] 1136 words
(3.2 pages)
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John Locke: Founding Father of Modern Era Liberalism - Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and John Locke are all great thinkers who were greatly influential in forming philosophies that would affect the future of politics. By analyzing each philosopher’s ideology, we can identify which thinker’s theory reflected modern era liberalism the most. For this paper I will be arguing that, John Locke provides a more compelling framework of modern era liberalism because of his perception of the state of nature, the social contract and the function of government....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Jean Jacques Rousseau]
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1432 words
(4.1 pages)
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Rousseau, Hobbes, and Locke : Interpretations of Human Nature - Through time people have always wondered what it is that makes us who we are. It has been our human nature that has kept us intrigued with ourselves, and our relationships with others. With this curiosity came various interpretations as to our human nature, each changing the way we see the societal world we live in. With each interpretation came a new understanding of people and the relationship they hold with each other. Human nature has been one of the most studied elements of the world we live in....   [tags: Rousseau, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke]
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1594 words
(4.6 pages)
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John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government and Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract - The Enlightenment was an astonishing time of transformation in Europe. During this time in the eighteenth century there was a progressive movement that was labeled by its criticism of the normal religious, social, and political perceptions. A number of significant philosophers, with new philosophies, had inspired creativeness and change. These thinkers had many different thoughts and views on people and the way they act, and views on the government. Two well-known and most influential thinkers of this time were the English political philosopher John Locke and the French political philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau....   [tags: Two Treatises of Government]
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1348 words
(3.9 pages)
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John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government and Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract - The Enlightenment was an astonishing time of transformation in Europe. During this time in the eighteenth century there was a progressive movement that was labeled by its criticism of the normal religious, social, and political perceptions. A number of significant thinkers, with new philosophies, had inspired creativeness and change. These thinkers had many different thoughts and views on people and the way they act, and views on the government. Two well-known and most influential thinkers of this time were the English political philosopher John Locke and the French political philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau....   [tags: The Enlightenment, Political Philosophy] 1125 words
(3.2 pages)
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Differing Views on Humans as Portrayed by William Golding in Lord of the Flies and Jean Jacques Rousseau - In the book “Lord of the Flies” written by William Golding, Golding has a certain type of philosophy that he applies throughout the book. The main idea of Golding’s philosophy is that people were naturally cruel and that if there were no rules people would fight, rob, and kill. A little later on there was another philosopher named Jean Jacques Rousseau. Rousseau’s philosophy opposed Golding’s philosophy by believing that humans in their normal state are at the most part good. I believe that some of Golding’s philosophy is correct and that some of it is wrong....   [tags: philosophy, society, belief]
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566 words
(1.6 pages)
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General Will and Rousseau's Social Contract - When Jean Jacques Rousseau wrote the Social Contract, the concepts of liberty and freedom were not new ideas. Many political theorists such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke had already developed their own interpretations of liberty, and in fact Locke had already published his views on the social contract. What Rousseau did was to revolutionize the concepts encompassed by such weighty words, and introduce us to another approach to the social contract dilemma. What would bring man to leave the state of nature, and enter into an organized society....   [tags: Papers Politics Rousseau] 1787 words
(5.1 pages)
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John Lock´s Theories of Human Nature vs. Jean-Jacques Rousseau´s Theories - My Superior Theory Every day I come across other individuals who believe their opinions are superior to mine. It is petty to see the minds of hundreds of individuals trying to prove me wrong, when all they do is misrepresent the current facts of nature. Jean-Jacques Rousseau believes his theories on human nature and social contract are superior to mine, however through years of analyzing human nature I can conclude my theories are superior. First of all, let it be known that my theories are based upon years of witnessing and investigating the true nature of humans and the social contract, so it is unthinkable to believe Rousseau’s unjust theories....   [tags: Philosophy, Humanity, Morals]
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1256 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Expulsion of Freedom - According to Jean Jacques Rousseau, human beings are bestowed with the blessings of freedom during their individual genesis on this fruitful planet, but this natural freedom is immensely circumscribed as it’s exchanged for the civil liberties of the State. He indicated that the supplanting of natural freedom is necessary for the obtainment of greater power for the greater collective community, but the prospect of obtaining superlative capabilities comes with the price of constraints. Yet this notion of natural freedom conflicts with Thomas Hobbes rendition on the state of nature because he illustrates that nature, interface through savagery....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Jean Jacques Rousseau]
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1396 words
(4 pages)
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Exploring Karl Marx and Jean-Jacque Rousseau's Views on Freedom - While the writings of Karl Marx and Jean-Jacque Rousseau occasionally seem at odds with one another both philosophers needs to be read as an extension of each other to completely understand what human freedom is. The fundamental difference between the two philosophers lies within the way which they determine why humans are not free creatures in modern society but once were. Rousseau draws on the genealogical as well as the societal aspects of human nature that, in its development, has stripped humankind of its intrinsic freedom....   [tags: philosophy] 1544 words
(4.4 pages)
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Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau all dealt with the issue of political freedom within a society. John Locke's “The Second Treatise of Government”, Mill's “On Liberty”, and Rousseau’s “Discourse On The Origins of Inequality” are influential and compelling literary works which while outlining the conceptual framework of each thinker’s ideal state present divergent visions of the very nature of man and his freedom....   [tags: Politics Political Freedom Papers]
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2030 words
(5.8 pages)
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On the Virtues of Private Property in Locke and Rousseau - On the Virtues of Private Property in Locke and Rousseau John Locke and Jean Jacques Rousseau, following their predecessor Thomas Hobbes, both attempt to explain the development and dissolution of society and government. They begin, as Hobbes did, by defining the “state of nature”—a time before man found rational thought. In the Second Treatise[1] and the Discourse on Inequality[2], Locke and Rousseau, respectively, put forward very interesting and different accounts of the state of nature and the evolution of man, but the most astonishing difference between the two is their conceptions of property....   [tags: Locke Rousseau Philosophical Essays]
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2220 words
(6.3 pages)
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Origins of Morality - The moral philosophy that we know and recognize today in the Western world is slave morality, a morality which puts forward ideals of fairness, equality, and democracy. However, many centuries ago during the medieval times, master morality was the norm; a morality that favors those superior in strength, beauty, intelligence, and status. Master morality preceded slave morality. Friedrich Nietzsche was a philologist, who used his knowledge of words to trace the origins of morality from their ancient definitions....   [tags: Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean Jacques Rousseau] 1399 words
(4 pages)
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Modern Liberalism and Political Policies - Modern Liberalism Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s political philosophies and theories each differ from one another’s, but these three philosophers have all staked their claims as to what man would be like, prior to the formation of the state. This is the State of Nature. Their notions on the social contract reflect their position on the political spectrum. These three philosophers also examine the purpose and function of the government to individuals of the state. Modern liberalism is the philosophical standpoint for an increase in social progress....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Jean Jacques Rousseau]
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1345 words
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Politics and Jean Rousseau - Politics and Jean Rousseau I think that the social theorist, Jean Rousseau, would have been the strongest supporter of equal rights. In the "The Social Contract," wrote that man was naturally good but becomes corrupted by the pernicious influence of human society and institutions. He preached a mankind improved by returning to nature and living a natural life at peace with his neighbors and himself. He claims to be in favor of democracy, but what he really favors is social equality. In a civil society there is an agreement among such men in the state of nature which sets the conditions for doing so, an agreement which every man must enter into before becoming a member of society thereafte...   [tags: Papers] 338 words
(1 pages)
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Jean Jacques Rousseau - He draws the line between their abilities to perform acts, whether general or particular, concluding that the sovereign may create general rules, but that the government must create the particular rules. By definition, the sovereign is "The person, body, or state in which independent and supreme authority is vested; especially, in a monarchy, a king, queen, or emperor" (Dictionary.com), therefore it possesses the ability to create rules and laws, as it is the authoritative body of a land. However, being that the sovereign's power comes from the people that it rules over, it should act for the general good of them....   [tags: Philosophy] 979 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jaques Speech Act in As You Like It - Jaques Speech Act in As You Like It In William Shakespeare’s As You Like It the speech act is introduced and helps to create a unique insight into the play and its events. Shakespeare integrates a speech act by Jaques to deliver a deeper meaning and lesson to the audience or reader of the work. Jaques in his speech act conveys a message with a much deeper meaning and teaching to society in general. The speech act rendered by Jaques addresses the themes of satire, philosophy, and the ages of man....   [tags: William Shakespeare Jaques Essays] 939 words
(2.7 pages)
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Rousseau's Critique on Natural Man vs. Modern Man - Rousseau's Critique on Natural Man vs. Modern Man in Second Discourses Rousseau, in the Second Discourses, examines the differences between natural and modern man. As used in his writing, natural man refers to mankind unfettered by social norms, morals, obligations, and duties. Modern man, however, is bound by these factors. Conformity with these factors allows modern man to experience virtue, whereas non-conformity results in vices. In the passage in question, Rousseau explores how natural man is better for himself and society because natural man has no moral relationship or obligations to other men and no subjugated inequality....   [tags: Philosophy Rousseau Philosophical Essays]
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889 words
(2.5 pages)
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Conforming to Invisibility - In his Discourse on the Arts and Sciences, philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau addresses a possibility seldom discussed by neither his predecessors nor contemporaries; the idea that arts and sciences have corrupted man. Prior to the introduction of the arts and sciences, man, in the State of Nature, was natural and easily identifiable. While human nature was still flawed, as has always been the case, there was a degree of security in knowing that a person’s character could be immediately seen and interpreted....   [tags: Philosophy, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Arts, Sciences]
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923 words
(2.6 pages)
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Socrates and Jean-Jacque Rousseau's Views on the Place of Law and Role of Society - The place of law and the role of society are complex issues with which philosophers have grappled with for hundreds of years. Two notable individuals who contributed to this ongoing discourse are Socrates and Jean-Jacque Rousseau. This paper will be broken up into sections to examine the views of these two men and to conclude which man has a better grasp of the material. First the views of Socrates will be commented upon, with reference to “Crito”. Afterwards, Rousseau’s arguments in his “Discourse on the Inequality of Men” will be explored....   [tags: philosophers, human nature, inequality] 909 words
(2.6 pages)
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Rousseau and Marx: Property and Inequality - Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Karl Marx both had the similar notion that property was the root of inequality, even though they both lived in different eras. Rousseau, who lived during the 18th century, was a staunch proponent of the idea that property gave rise to inequality, due to its unequal distribution. Similarly, Marx, who lived during the 19th century, contended that property gave rise to inequality because it created a class conflict between that of the upper class bourgeoisie, and the working class proletariat....   [tags: amour propre, private property, bourgeoisie]
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1831 words
(5.2 pages)
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Marx (The Communist Manifesto) and Rousseau - The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Karl Marx examined the role that the state played and its relationship to its citizen’s participation and access to the political economy during different struggles and tumultuous times. Rousseau was a believer of the concept of social contract with limits established by the good will and community participation of citizens while government receives its powers given to it. Karl Marx believed that power was to be taken by the people through the elimination of the upper class bourgeois’ personal property and capital....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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2059 words
(5.9 pages)
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Aristotle, Rousseau and Descartes on Technology - While it is relatively easy to confuse the ideas of Aristotle, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and René Descartes, ancient philosophy, eighteenth century politics, and mathematics all appear to be considerably disconnected subjects. Associated with these divisions are three different opinions on a common subject matter: technology. It appears that Rousseau directly opposes technology, Aristotle’s opinion rests in the middle but also shares similarities with Rousseau, and Descartes favors technology. After reading Rousseau’s Discourse On the Origin of Inequality, Aristotle’s The Nicomachean Ethics and Descartes’s The Discourse on Method, one can draw these conclusions....   [tags: phylosophical ideas]
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1337 words
(3.8 pages)
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Rousseau's Concept of Democracy - Rousseau describes democracy as a form of government that “has never existed and never will” ; yet twenty-six countries in the world are considered to be full democracies. How can this be possible. Rousseau’s concept of democracy supports the most fundamental and basic premise of democracy – one in which all citizens directly participate. While his idea of democracy cannot be considered an effective indictment of what passes for democracy today, it is not Rousseau’s account which is flawed but that in modern society is would be practically impossible to achieve this idea of democracy....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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996 words
(2.8 pages)
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Differentiating Marx and Rousseau - Political philosophers Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Karl Marx dreamt up and developed unique theories of total revolution. Although similar in their intention to dissolve dividing institutions such as religion and class structure, as well as their shared reluctance to accept the rather less hopeful conclusions of government and man that had been drawn by their predecessors Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, the blueprints Rousseau and Marx had printed were cited to two very different sources. Rousseau approached the problem of oppression from a political standpoint, focusing on the flawed foundation of liberal individualism that has been continually adopted by democracies....   [tags: Philosophy] 2202 words
(6.3 pages)
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Modern Western Political Thought - “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains.” with this now famous quotation Jean- Jacque Rousseau begins his work The Social Contract. The purpose of The Social Contract was to establish how people could enter into civil societies without sacrificing their individual freedom. Rousseau envisions a social contract that would bind people together. To analyze The Social Contract we must examine how Rousseau addresses the four problems of political philosophy order, freedom, justice, and history....   [tags: The Social Contract, Jean Jaque Rousseau] 1161 words
(3.3 pages)
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Comparing Rousseau And Mill On Liberty - The term “civil or social liberties” is one that garners a lot of attention and focus from both Rousseau and Mill, although they tackle the subject from slightly different angles. Rousseau believes that the fundamental problem facing people’s capacity to leave the state of nature and enter a society in which their liberty is protected is the ability to “find a form of association that defends and protects the person and goods of each associate with all the common force, and by means of which each one, uniting with all, nevertheless obeys only himself and remains as free as before” (Rousseau 53)....   [tags: Rousseau vs Mill] 1828 words
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Golding vs. Rousseau - There has been a long lasting argument about the two views on life of two men, Golding, and Rousseau. Golding’s view on life is that man is naturally evil at any age. He also believes that civilization makes man good due to the excessive amount of rules that makes man enter a state in which they are no longer in their natural states. Rousseau has an opinion in which man is naturally pure but instead of civilization making man good, it makes man bad due to all of the schemes involved in civilization....   [tags: Lord of the Flies, philosophy] 1085 words
(3.1 pages)
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Machiavelli and Rousseau's Views on Human Nature and Government - Machiavelli and Rousseau, both significant philosophers, had distinctive views on human nature and the relationship between the government and the governed. Their ideas were radical at the time and remain influential in government today. Their views on human nature and government had some common points and some ideas that differed. Machiavelli’s views were drastically different from other humanists at his time. He strongly promoted a secular society and felt morality was not necessary but stood in the way of a successfully governed state....   [tags: Machiavelli, Rousseau, Human Nature, Government, p] 558 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Natural Ways of Locke, Hobbes, and Rousseau - In today’s society, human nature is a commonly used term. On the other hand, there is not just one concept of human nature, but rather a plethora of concepts surrounding the idea. With the rise of capitalism, social structure is reformed; it is during this rise in the early seventeenth and eighteenth century, that John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau introduce their varying opinions surrounding man in nature. The western philosophers mainly concern themselves with the concept of the social contract....   [tags: philosophy, discourses]
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1208 words
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The Construction of Morality: Philosophers - Many political philosophers use the theme of morality to introduce their theories of civilization. Human morals are intertwined with the political system and are presented in human nature. By definition, morality is the distinction between right and wrong. Thus, philosophers use the concept of morality in the same distinction, but understand and apply them in different context depending on their theories. The interpretations vary between political thinkers.; One particular pair of theorists believe morals are presented in the lives of humans, but created in a different manner....   [tags: Jacques Rousseau, morality, thinkers]
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979 words
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Creole as a Third Space in Jean Rhys’ Novel - Jean Rhys writes Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) as a prequel to Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre (1847) in order to give life to Bertha Mason, a Jamaican creole who is locked in the attic as a madwoman by her English husband, Rochester. Rhys thinks that Bertha is completely undermined and negated in Bronte’s novel. Bronte’s silences over Bertha’s identity and history enforce Rhys to break the unspoken and deliberately neglected white creole’s identity; and give her a voice that humanizes this supposedly inferior creole, and validates her quest for identity and belonging while also challenging Western hegemonic expectations and conditions....   [tags: jean rhys, jean eyre, wide sargasso sea]
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1988 words
(5.7 pages)
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How Rococo and Neoclassicism Illustrate the Process of Deciding in their Paintings - How Rococo and Neoclassicism Illustrate the Process of Deciding in their Paintings The artists Jean-Honore Fragonard and Jaques-Louis David both successfully embody their respective stylistic differences. Fragonard’s style of painting is Rococo, which is characterized by its softness, asymmetry and curviness. Contrasting these ideals is David’s style of painting, Neo-Classicism. Neo-Classicism is synonymous with strong gestures, symmetry, and solidness. Two works that best exemplify the ideals of each style of painting are Fragonard’s The Swing, 1767 and David’s The Death of Socrates, 1787....   [tags: Jean-Honore Fragonard Jaques-Louis David Essays] 1418 words
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Jean Paul Marat: Target and Martyr of Liberty - Jean Paul Marat: Target and Martyr of Liberty The French Revolution produced countless influential politicians throughout its tumultuous course. As a political figure in the French Revolution, Jean Paul Marat began as a nonentity and became a martyr to the revolutionary patriots of France. His influence is often misconstrued, and sometimes overlooked. Although he was not a political leader like Robespierre, his influence was substantial in that he motivated many people through his writings and powerful personality....   [tags: Jean Paul Marat Politics Essays]
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3987 words
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Rousseau's Discourse on the Arts and Sciences - Rousseau's Discourse on the Arts and Sciences Jean-Jacques Rousseau has been called both the father of the French Revolution and a rascal deserving to hunted down by society (Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, p. 462). His works, controversial in his lifetime, have lost little of their ability to inspire debate in the seceding two hundred years. Although much of this debate has focused on Rousseau's political theories, his works on morality have not been exempted from the controversy. Much of the controversy surrounding his Discourse on the Arts and Sciences relates to Rousseau's self-proclaimed role of societal critic....   [tags: Papers] 1464 words
(4.2 pages)
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Rousseau’s Natural Man Favors his Sustenance - ... For as prey is almost the unique subject of fighting among carnivorous animals, and as frugivorous ones live among themselves in continual peace, if the human race were of this latter genus it clearly would have had much greater ease subsisting in the state of nature, and less need and occasion to leave it. (Rousseau 188) Had man been a true part of the frugivorous genus, they would not have had to leave the state of nature, since they would have had no complications in sustaining life. Whether or not man was compelled to leave his original state of nature for a variety of alternate reasons holds little validity, because of such evidence mentioned previously....   [tags: vegetarianism, environment, animals]
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698 words
(2 pages)
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Rousseau and The Republican Party - Rousseau and The Republican Party     The Republican Party, since its first convention in Michigan in 1854, has had a philosophy that has remained relatively unchanged. Its oath entices Americans to believe that "good government is based on the individual and that each person's ability, dignity, freedom and responsibility must be honored and recognized"   In this essay, I will examine the Republican's main philosophies and will describe how Rousseau would agree or disagree with their position....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Topics]
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1405 words
(4 pages)
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Impact of Rousseau and Smith on The Declaration of the Rights of Man - The philosophy of both Rousseau and Smith highly influenced the French document The Declaration of the Rights of Man. Rousseau's theory on the natural rights of man – freedom and equality – comprises the basis of the document. His concepts of the general will to decide law and the intrinsic sovereignty of the people, as well as Smith's stress that government need not play a large role in order for the nation to thrive, also lie at the essence of the Declaration. The emphasis of Smith's The Wealth of Nations on progress and productivity also played a large role in shaping the document....   [tags: The Wealth of Nations, freedom and equality] 2017 words
(5.8 pages)
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A Discourse on Inequality - A Discourse on Inequality In Rousseau’s book “A Discourse On Inequality”, he looks into the question of where the general inequality amongst men came from. Inequality exists economically, structurally, amongst different generations, genders, races, and in almost all other areas of society. However, Rousseau considers that there are really two categories of inequality. The first is called Natural/Physical, it occurs as an affect of nature. It includes inequalities of age,, health, bodily strength, and the qualities of the mind and soul....   [tags: Jean Jacques Rousseau Inequality Essays] 1445 words
(4.1 pages)
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Analysis of Differnt Forms of Liberty - The concept of liberty is important to this very day. Liberty initially means to be fundamentally free within ones society from any types of oppression, either from higher authority or from having different form ideologies that can be political or social. Liberty is a form of power that lets one act on their sets and values. In this paper, concept of liberty will be discussed on behalf of two philosophers, John Locke and Jean- Jacques Rousseau. Although liberty provides one to act as they please, there can be different forms of liberty, which are developed naturally by the state of nature and socially through development of human reasoning; state of nature is based on absolute freedom, while...   [tags: john locke, jacques rousseau, freedom]
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1716 words
(4.9 pages)
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Rousseau and Duty to the State - It is generally agreed that the great philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the artist Jacques-Louis David had played a great role in serving and supporting the French Revolution, in addition to, showing their devotion to their state and explore the notion of duty to the state each one by his own special way. The great philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau had inspired the revolution by his argument and ideas that was based on Reason. He played a great role in exploring the notion of duty to the state by providing the public with his argument in the social contract,which was frequently quoted and referred to during the early stages of the Revolution....   [tags: Philosophy] 1325 words
(3.8 pages)
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Rousseau Social Contract - Rousseau Social Contract The social pact comes down to this; “Each one of us puts into the community his person and all his powers under the supreme direction of the general will; and as a body, we incorporate every member as an indivisible part of the whole (Rousseau: 61)”. The general will can itself direct the forces of the state with the intention of the whole’s primary goal - which is the common good. The general will does not allow private opinions to prevail. The union of the people, in its passive role is known as the State and is referred to as the Sovereign in its active state....   [tags: Natural Rights Equality Rousseau Essays] 1543 words
(4.4 pages)
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Rousseau's View of Humanity - Jean Jacques Rousseau in On Education writes about how to properly raise and educate a child. Rousseau's opinion is based on his own upbringing and lack of formal education at a young age. Rousseau depicts humanity as naturally good and becomes evil because humans tamper with nature, their greatest deficiency, but also possess the ability to transform into self-reliant individuals. Because of the context of the time, it can be seen that Rousseau was influenced by the idea of self-preservation, individual freedom, and the Enlightenment, which concerned the operation of reason, and the idea of human progress....   [tags: European History] 1102 words
(3.1 pages)
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Rousseau and the Positive Theory of Liberty - Liberty impacts two main areas of political thought; the state of nature and the social contract. This essay will examine wither or not it is proper to characterize Jean Jacque Rousseau as holding a positive theory of liberty. To determine to what extends this is true the following areas must be taken into account and explored; the definitions of liberty and freedom, Isaiah Berlin’s concept of positive and negative liberty, Rousseau understands of Liberty and also why Rousseau’s theory can be characterised as positive liberty....   [tags: Philosophy]
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2262 words
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The Social Contract Theory: Hobbes, Locke & Rousseau - The Social Contract is an attempt to explain the reason why individuals agree to form organized governments. The idea that a person is willing to abandon the freedoms previously enjoyed under the State of Nature in which no government interfered with their pursuits, are believed to correspond to the individual’s attempt to protect what is on their best interest. Under this condition, moral and political obligations are dependent upon a contract or agreement among the people to form the society in which they live. Philosophers who advocated the Social Contract Theory believed that because individuals existed before the government did, governments arose exclusively to meet and satisfy the s...   [tags: Political Philosophy Sociology]
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1286 words
(3.7 pages)
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Jean Piaget - Jean Piaget was a major contributor to the world of psychology and sociology that we know today. His works and discoveries still help sociologist determine and figure out ways people in society interact and develop throughout time. Piaget was born on August 9, 1896 and was raised in Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Boeree n.d.). His family was very influential to his success. His father was a historian that authored many writings on the medieval times, and his mother was very intellectual and kind, however, she had a mental health problem that pushed Piaget to become interested in psychology (Presnell 1999)....   [tags: Psychologyy]
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1606 words
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Rousseau on Civil Religion - Rousseau on Civil Religion Religion is a component of almost every society. Knowing this, one might look at the function it serves. For Jean-Jacques Rousseau, religion, specifically a civil religion established by the Sovereign, is an instrument of politics that serves a motivating function. In a new society people are unable to understand the purpose of the law. Therefore, civil religion motivates people to obey the law because they fear some divine being. For a developed society, civil religion motivates people to maintain the habit of obedience because they grow to understand and love the law....   [tags: social issues]
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1725 words
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Theories on the State of Human Nature and Civilization - The debate on whether humans are good or bad has been one that continues to fascinate philosophers. Two philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries are taken by spotlight on this topic of human nature because of their similar, yet opposing theories on it. One of the philosophers was Thomas Hobbes, whose theory was based on a pessimistic view on the natural man where life was self-interested and vicious. The opposing philosopher was Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who believed that humans were naturally good and thought the situation of the natural human was a better one than that of what he saw throughout his life in Europe....   [tags: Hobbes and Rousseau] 592 words
(1.7 pages)
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Jean Piaget's Contribution to Psychology - Throughout history, many people have made amazing contributions to the school of psychology. One of these was Jean Piaget and his theories on the cognitive development stages. Jean Piaget was born in Neuchatel, Switzerland. Here he studied at the university and received a doctorate in biology at the age of 22. Following his schooling he became increasingly interested in psychology and began much research and studying of the subject. From this research Piaget created a broad theoretical system for the development of cognitive abilities....   [tags: Jean Piaget Papers] 1186 words
(3.4 pages)
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The History of "America’s Musical Landscape" by Jean Ferris - In the text book America’s Musical Landscape by Jean Ferris, the book takes us through the history of the evolution of American music. The book delves into the different time periods of America’s music beginning with early North American music all the way to today’s modern music. Additionally, the book also explains how music, theater and film intertwine to provide some spectacular art. Jean Ferris finishes the book by exploring America’s concert music. Let us now take a closer look into the different time periods brought out in the book....   [tags: America’s Musical Landscape, Jean Ferris, ] 650 words
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