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Jazz - Jazz Jazz music of the 1940’s and 1950’s was defined by a history of change since its beginning at the dawn of the 20th century. Almost every decade brought a new flavor to the movement, and by the 1940’s jazz had developed into a mature, complex form of music, with many nuances and avenues for continued change. It is important to trace the early movements in jazz to better understand the innovations of the Bebop and Cool jazz eras of the 40’s and 50’s. The first appearance of jazz was at the turn of the century in New Orleans and is called “Dixieland Jazz,” or “Classic Jazz.” It developed out of music for street parades in the black community....   [tags: American History Music Jazz Essays]
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1828 words
(5.2 pages)
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The History and Influence of Jazz in America - Jazz is consider one of the most influential types of music an America History. Some of the greatest artist in the world have contribute to the success jazz have had not only on America History but throughout the world. This paper will explain the history of jazz, where it all came from and the effect it has had on the America Culture. Meltingpot.fortuecity.com states the in the 1930’s and 1940’s jazz was at it all time highest. Although it is unclear when jazz first started some believe jazz started in New Orleans....   [tags: Jazz, music, USA, ]
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Jazz and It's History - Jazz and It's History Jazz started when World War I had just ended and a social revolution was on it's way. Customs and values of previous were rejected. Life was to be lived to the fullest. This was also known as the era of the "lost generations," and the "flapper" with her rolled stockings, short skirts, and straight up-and-down look. They disturbed their elders in the casino, night clubs, and speakeasies that replaced the ballrooms of prewar days. Dancing became more informal - close of the nineteenth century in the unpleasant dance halls and whorehouses of the South and Midwest where the word Jazz commonly meant sexual intercourse....   [tags: Music Art Jazz History] 1259 words
(3.6 pages)
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Social Injustice for African Americans in Toni Morrison's Novel, Jazz - Social Injustice for African Americans in Toni Morrison's Novel, Jazz Jazz, a novel by Toni Morrison, explores many different aspects of African American life in the early part of the twentieth century. This novel tells a story of the difficulties faced by black families living in the United States. Toni Morrison describes in detail a few of the upsetting situations they had to face. She also subtly throughout the book places one or two lines that tell a tale of injustice. Jazz is a novel filled with many stories of inequality affecting the black community....   [tags: Jazz] 678 words
(1.9 pages)
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A History of Jazz and Classical Music - Upon entering a modern record store, one is confronted with a wide variety of choices in recorded music. These choices not only include a multitude of artists, but also a wide diversity of music categories. These categories run the gamut from easy listening dance music to more complex art music. On the complex side of the scale are the categories known as Jazz and Classical music. Some of the most accomplished musicians of our time have devoted themselves to a lifelong study of Jazz or Classical music, and a few exceptional musicians have actually mastered both....   [tags: Jazz Classical Music] 1739 words
(5 pages)
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Jazz Concert Review - Jazz Concert Review I enjoy and listen to variety of music from classical music to rap music. I have attended many concerts, mostly symphony bands concerts. However, interestingly, through whole my life, I have never experienced jazz music and I have never been to jazz concert. Therefore, it was hard for me to decide which jazz concerts would give me most pleasure and exciting experience. I researched for jazz concerts listing and I have decided to go to the Ron Eschete Trio Concerts because it was held closed to my house and was free....   [tags: Music Jazz Musical Review Essays] 1100 words
(3.1 pages)
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Black Music in Toni Morrison's Jazz - “With the writing of Jazz, Morrison takes on new tasks and new risks. Jazz, for example, doesn’t fit the classic novel format in terms of design, sentence structure, or narration. Just like the music this novel is named after, the work is improvisational.” -www.enotes.com/jazz/ “As rich in themes and poetic images as her Pulitzer Prize- winning Beloved…. Morrison conjures up hand of slavery on Harlem’s jazz generation. The more you listen, the more you crave to hear.”-Glamour Toni Morrison’s Jazz is an eclectic reading based on elements of African American culture that produce, surround, and are an integral part of literary text....   [tags: Toni Morrison, Jazz 2014]
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1730 words
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The Omniscient Narrator in Toni Morrison's Jazz - The Omniscient Narrator in Toni Morrison's Jazz     In her sixth novel Jazz, Toni Morrison "makes use of an unusual storytelling device: an unnamed, intrusive, and unreliable narrator" ("Toni Morrison" 13).  From the onset of the novel, many readers question the reliability of the narrator due to the fact that this "person" seems to know too many intimate personal details, inner thoughts, and the history of so many characters.  Although as readers we understand an omniscient narrator to be someone intimately close with the character(s), the narrator of Jazz is intrusive, moving in and out of far too many of the characters' lives to be reliable.  No one person could possibly know and give as much information as this narrator does.  But, as readers of Morrison novels, we must remember that Morrison is a gifted and talented writer whose style of writing, as Village Voice essayist Susan Lydon observes, "carries you like a river, sweeping doubt and disbelief away, and it is only gradually that one realizes her deadly serious intent" ("Toni Morrison" 6).  Therefore, when we consider the narration of the novel, we must examine every possibility of Morrison's intent.  One possibility appears with the novel's title-Jazz.  The title, which encompasses the pervasive sound, its musical timbre of the decade in which the story is set, resonates throughout the novel as a character in its own right.  Just as "New York is presented as the City throughout the novel to designate it as an active character" (Kubitschek 143), so is jazz.  Like the improvisation of jazz, the storytelling technique of the narrator "improvises" as it moves in and out of the characters' lives where it would be least expected.  Therefore, jazz must be considered an active participant, a character, who, because of its non-entity existence, would spiritually be able to surround and enter characters lives at will and, as a result, narrate the story.          The structure of the novel mirrors the characteristics of a jazz music piece.  Although exceptions occur, "most jazz is based on the principle that an infinite number of melodies can fit the chord progressions of any song.  The musician improvises new melodies that fit the chord progression [....   [tags: Toni Morrison Jazz Essays]
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2133 words
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Racism Related to Toni Morrison's Jazz - Racism Related to the Novel Jazz       In the novel Jazz, written by Toni Morrison, racism was a strong issue that was presented in the novel.  The novel relayed the issue of racism to its beginnings and to how it is today.  Although, at that time black males regaurded jazz as the essence of the Harlem Renaissance, the age of the New Negro, for many black women it represented the disenchantment of urban life.  The age that emphasized reacial pride and equality but often overshadowed black women’s equality.  In the novel, examples from Joe and Violet’s encounters with racism can be compared to Toni Morrison’s dealings, how and when racism got its start, and how it is today....   [tags: Toni Morrison Jazz Essays] 386 words
(1.1 pages)
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Kansas City Jazz: Influential Persons - Kansas City Jazz: Influential Persons What is jazz music. A single definition cannot be found. Many writers have attempted to define jazz music only to regress to trying to define what it does. Even this approach is difficult. Writers have only been able to find broad areas to agree up, such as agreeing that jazz is music. But alas, even this is a shortcoming in the eyes of some. Jazz has been so many things throughout it long and illustrious history that it's even hard to point out its origins, which stem from many places, many styles of music, and many people....   [tags: Jazz Influence Kansas City] 1711 words
(4.9 pages)
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Deceptive First Impressions in Morrison's Jazz - Deceptive First Impressions in Morrison's Jazz         The novel Jazz by Toni Morrison is an extremely well written account of black life during the mid 1850's to the late 1920's. Morrison manipulates the three main character's personas while analyzing their lives to show the effect that a person's history has on their present day life. The most interesting thing I found concerning this novel has the way in which Toni Morrison was able to  present you with a first impression of the characters, then proceed through history, to give you a new conception of their character....   [tags: Toni Morrison Jazz Essays]
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1758 words
(5 pages)
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Louis Armstrong: The King of JAzz - Louis Armstrong: The King of JAzz Known as the King of Jazz, Louis “Stachmo” Armstrong was one of the most important figures in early jazz. He was said to have defined jazz music. Only Charlie Parker comes close to having as much influence on jazz as Louis Armstrong. Armstrong was born on July 4, 1900 in New Orleans. He grew up singing on the streets of New Orleans at a young age and had a troubled childhood. At the age of twelve he was placed in the Waif’s Home For Boys for firing a gun into the air....   [tags: Louis Stachmo Armstrong Jazz Music Essays] 922 words
(2.6 pages)
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Jazz - Jazz John F. Szwed resides in Connecticut, and he is currently a professor of anthropology, African-American studies, music, and American studies at Yale University. He has written seven books on music and African-American culture and numerous articles and reviews on similar subjects. Szwed has received honors including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowship. Knowledge of jazz has fallen far behind its development. Most people do not know the facts on jazz, only some generalities and stereotypes....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1041 words
(3 pages)
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Jazz - Missing Works Cited When it comes to music, most people don't say they like it. People say they like heavy metal, pop, rhythm and blues, or any other type of music, since they have their own preference to what type of music they like, not just enjoying the broad area of music. One of those types of music which many enjoy is jazz. Actually right now jazz is really big and popular in Europe, and is rising in its popularity in the USA through its many forms. Jazz does have many forms, so many that some people wouldn't consider just saying they like jazz, they would say they enjoyed bebop, ragtime, blues, or other types of jazz....   [tags: Music essays research papers] 2794 words
(8 pages)
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Jazz - Jazz Jazz is a very intriguing musical style. Jazz music gives the musician space to improve his/her ideas to the world by using their knowledge of swinging rhythms, scales and chords. I believe that musicians only play jazz for the love of it. Not all jazz musicians become millionaires. Listening to the radio today makes me feel sick to my stomach because I can never hear any new rock band or rap group come up with new and original songs. They either sing about their girlfriend dumping them or they sing about life in the ghetto....   [tags: Music Musical Papers]
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2028 words
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Jazz - Jazz Jazz is a type of music developed by black Americans about 1900 and possessing an identifiable history and describable stylistic evolution. It is rooted in the mingled musical traditions of American blacks. More black musicians saw jazz for the first time a profession. Since its beginnings jazz has branched out into so many styles that no single description fits all of them with total accuracy. Performers of jazz improvise within the conventions of their chosen style. Improvisation gave jazz a personalized, individualized, and distinct feel....   [tags: essays research papers] 1413 words
(4 pages)
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Jazz - Jazz has been an influence in many artist's work, from painting to other forms of music. Jazz is an American music form that was developed from African-American work songs. The white man began to imitate them in the 1920's and the music form caught on and became very popular. Two artists that were influenced by jazz were Jean-Michel Basquiat and Stuart Davis. The influence is quite evident in many of their works, such as Horn Players, by Basquiat, and Swing Landscape, by Davis.Stuart Davis was born in Philadelphia in 1894....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Jazz - Early Jazz The earliest easily available jazz recordings are from the 1920's and early 1930's. Trumpet player and vocalist Louis Armstrong ("Pops", "Satchmo") was by far the most important figure of this period. He played with groups called the Hot Five and the Hot Seven; any recordings you can find of these groups are recommended. The style of these groups, and many others of the period, is often referred to as New Orleans jazz or Dixieland. It is characterized by collective improvisation, in which all performers simultaneously play improvised melodic lines within the harmonic structure of the tune....   [tags: essays research papers] 3018 words
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jazz - Jazz is the kind of music that makes me want to do one of two things. Depending on the mood of the jazz, sometimes I feel like relaxing and just listening to the music and letting it run through me. Other times I feel like getting up and dancing as if I have not a care in the world. The jazz concert I attended on at SLO Brewing Company on October 6, 2001 inspired me to do both of these due to the variety used by the musicians in dynamic, rhythm, tempo, and many other aspects of music. The group consisted of three individuals called the Anthony Wilson Trio....   [tags: essays research papers] 575 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Similarities Between Classical Music and Ellington's Jazz - The Similarities Between Classical Music and Ellington's Jazz Missing Works Cited One of the greatest tragedies in the 20th century can be seen in the debasing of the Jazz genre as a unworthy equal to it’s predecessor, European Classical music. This can be seen in various statements about Jazz, such as Boris Gibalin commit, “The “Jazz Mania” has taken on the character of a lingering illness and must be cured by means of forceful intervention.”1 This conflict can be traced through out the history of Jazz, as Classical composers have relatively disregarded this new type of music....   [tags: Classical Music Duke Ellington Jazz] 2404 words
(6.9 pages)
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Toni Morrison’s Jazz: Joe Trace and The Oedipus Complex - In his psychoanalytic excerpt, “The Oedipus Complex”, Sigmund Freud ruminates on how children develop bonds with their parents. According to Freud, children develop intimate bonds with parents by adopting the roles and values of the parent whose sex they share. Conversely, the parent of the opposite sex becomes a cherished object of affection. The Oedipus Complex implies that a boy adopts his father’s identity (and roles) in the hope of gaining the affection of his mother. Inevitably, the boy’s attempts to become his father and live out the role of husband/wife between himself and his mother is bound to fail....   [tags: Toni Morrison, Jazz 2014]
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Jazz historiography - ... Whiteman’s concert was invested in representing jazz to white Americans, showing how it had progressed from its primitive black beginnings to a more sophisticated style rooted in the fundamentals of European practice. Indeed, ideas of creation and control in jazz have usually been drawn along racial lines: black as creator, white as curator. In this mode of racial understanding in jazz, white jazz fans and musicians supposedly lack an essential “something” that makes them unable to innovate in jazz....   [tags: American Culture, Music] 788 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Jazz Age - ... The flapper represented the changing role of women in the post war society. Women during this time wanted greater independence. They entered the workforce in an attempt to break away from parental authority and establish a personal identity (American Republic). Many women began to pursue educations and were able to make significant contributions in the fields of science and law. Often represented as shallow and not very smart, flappers were usually well educated young women who only wanted to break free from the restraints of a Victorian minded society....   [tags: Music History ]
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Jazz Age - ... From the beginning, Armstrong’s interest in singing and songs equaled his enthusiasm for the cornet and instrumental jazz (Friedwald 343). “Little Louis” sung in a vocal quartet in his early teens. His rise to the top, though not overnight, occurred quickly, he played with mostly all the major bands in New Orleans over the next few years (Friedwald 350). In 1922, his mentor, King Oliver, invited him to work his Creole Jazz Band in Chicago. After recording with Oliver for over a year, Armstrong moved into what would become the most important early-jazz big band, Fletcher Henderson’s Orchestra (Shipton 201)....   [tags: Music, Armstrong, Ellington] 1225 words
(3.5 pages)
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Jazz: A History - Jazz: The History The music called Jazz was born sometime around 1895 in New Orleans. It combined elements of Ragtime, marching band music and Blues. What made Jazz such a different perspective of traditional music was its act of improvising. There was a widespread use of improvisation often by more than one player at a time. Songwriters would write the music down on a piece of paper, and then the Jazz musicians would try their best to play the music. Usually in a Jazz piece, musicians would use the song as a starting point to improvise around....   [tags: essays research papers] 730 words
(2.1 pages)
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Jazz Music - Jazz Music What is Jazz. According to the dictionary, jazz is defined as, "A kind of syncopated, highly rhythmic music originated by Southern blacks in the late 19th century" ("Jazz" 232). But, everyone should at least agree that jazz is the mother of all music, and is referred to as the only art form originating in the United States ("History 101" 2). America was home to immigrants from all over Europe and beyond who wished to build a new life, or just needed to escape from the old. These people, often thought of as second-class, brought their culture with them to America, expressed it musically, and changed the music world as we know it today....   [tags: Papers] 546 words
(1.6 pages)
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Latin Jazz - Latin Jazz Last Sunday I went to jazz bar in Manhattan and I listened “Latin Jazz?E Latin jazz is “a fusion of African and indigenous rhythms from the entire Latin American Diaspora with the language of jazz?E It was first known as coop, but you are now familiar with it as afro-Cuban. When talking about afro-Cuban jazz, it is difficult to not mention certain turning points in history that made this music possible. The roots of much, of the music might be traced back to African Cuban slaves....   [tags: essays research papers] 715 words
(2 pages)
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Early Jazz - Early History of Jazz Jazz is a style of music that began and has been revolutionized within the United States. Jazz music first appeared in the city of New Orleans and eventually moved onto Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, and New York City. Jazz unites different elements of African, African- American, religious, brass brand, and blues style of music. The music of Jazz, and its changes through the years, is now a form of music that is known and respected throughout this nation and the world....   [tags: essays research papers] 1144 words
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History of Jazz - Jazz is a music of improvisation and expression of true feelings. It's style has two very different origins: African and European. Once brought to America, jazz has been every changing reflecting what was happening in society at the time. Jazz is something that has been in America for many years and effected society in a way no other music of African and European roots ever has. African music concentrated a lot on rhythm while Western European liked to hear harmonic sounds. The dissonant sounds and polyrhythms of African music was not understood by the Europeans, but jazz musicians took a great liking to it....   [tags: Music] 425 words
(1.2 pages)
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Jazz and Culture - Jazz and Culture Never is the inadequacy of language more apparent than when trying to discuss or describe music. There is a colloquial axiom that suggests that talking about music is like dancing about literature. What words are sufficient to explain your favorite album to a person who cannot hear. There are none. James Baldwin, in his story “Sonny’s Blues,” does as well as anyone can: “Creole began to tell us what the blues were all about. They were not about anything very new. He and his boys up there were keeping it new, at the risk of ruin, destruction, madness, and death, in order to find new ways to make us listen....   [tags: American History Music Cultural Essays]
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The Jazz Age - The Jazz music of the Big Band Era was the peak of over thirty years of musical development. Jazz was so innovative and different that it could literally sweep the world, changing the musical styles of nearly every country. Big band Jazz that makes the feet tap and the heart race with excitement that it is recognized with nearly every type of music. The musical and cultural revolution that brought about Jazz was a direct result of African-Americans pursuing careers in the arts following the United States civil war....   [tags: essays research papers] 1583 words
(4.5 pages)
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Jazz Dance - Afterreading the article on jazz dance, I had found out a number of interestingthings that I hadnt known before. I thought it was a dance form that wasfairly new, starting in the early 1900s. I then found out that it actually pre-dates all the way back to theseventeenth century. I also thought itcame from the United States, when it really originated in Africa and wasbrought here by the slaves. The dancingand drumming was such a part of their lives; it was eventually continued by theslaves on the plantations with dancing and the clapping of their hands forrhythm....   [tags: essays research papers] 706 words
(2 pages)
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investigation into jazz - Written investigation into the contexts and musical influences on the jazz style. Summary of HND seminar on History of Jazz. On the 10th March, we were given a seminar by the HND students on ‘The Development of Jazz Music and Dance. My aim in this written investigation is to summarise the information given to me. Development through African music The earliest form of Jazz, began in African music. While most West African culture was erased when people were transported into slavery, some core possession and spirit based beliefs remained....   [tags: essays research papers] 823 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Jazz Age - The Jazz Age The Jazz Age was more than merely a musical revolution—“The Jazz Age denotes not only a period of early big band, but also the events and fashions of an era”. During this decade a number of modern developments were invented, which included an expanded telephone service, network radio, electric inventions, and records set in aviation. These modern developments had a profound effect on American culture, creating a rise in leisure, specifically mass leisure. Automobiles, movies, and the radio overtook the lives of Americans, becoming necessities and part of everyday routines....   [tags: History Culture Cultural Essays]
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Jazz paper - Born in New York City, Artie Shaw would become one of the top bandleaders in the swing era. He began his musical career as a highly sought-after alto saxophone player in the New York area, and was able to benefit from the growth of radio and studio recordings. As he perfected his technical ability with various dance bands, he was still relatively unknown in the early 30’s when he began to focus exclusively on the Clarinet while Swing music began to grow in popularity. While we may carefully analyze the two pieces to satisfy our curiosity regarding musical evolution in Jazz, we should also not lose sight of the fact that these are two very enjoyable styles of music....   [tags: essays research papers] 1081 words
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All That Jazz - All That Jazz The 1920's were an era of jazz, drugs, and booze. Many youths were caught in the embellished lifestyle that these societal sins promised, yet disappointed in its inability to fill their emptiness. The theme of "Sonny's Blues", by James Baldwin, is the emotional darkness that fills the narrators family not only from Sonny's drug use, but also from the unfortunate events that plague the family. Baldwin uses strong imagery to depict the darkness in the family's lives. Baldwin consistently uses images of shadows to show the despair the narrator is in over Sonny's ruin....   [tags: American Literature] 502 words
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Jazz Showcase - Jazz Showcase The concert I attended was the Jazz Showcase in Rudder Theatre on Monday June21, 2004 at 7:30 p.m. Surroundings Rudder Theatre is a large venue for this Jazz Showcase. There are five sections with fifteen rows deep in each section. The theatre is decorated modestly with solid colors and nothing too spectacular or eye catching. The chairs were covered in a yellowish fabric. The initial backdrop behind the stage was a white backdrop with red and blue lighting. This backdrop would change colors throughout the concert....   [tags: essays research papers] 1023 words
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The Jazz Age - The Jazz Age Many of the influential artists of the past came from the jazz age such as Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday, Basie and Crosby, Sarah Vaughan, Cab Calloway, Coleman Hawkins, Dizzy Gillespie, and many others. Frank Sinatra was dominating the scene in 1947. He had a voice that was carefully articulated, and had meaningful quality that could make everyone feel that he was sending a private message in his songs to everyone in the audience. It was not however a happy scene. This was widely known as Sinatra’s career skidding down....   [tags: essays research papers] 529 words
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The Influence of Jazz Around the World - ... Spirituals were known as explicit wedding black songs, and swing was black inspired by white music. Both symbolized “freedom” throughout the nation. Louis Armstrong created a cosmopolitan diaphonic network through transatlantic touring during the interwar years. Louis Armstrong also sang and played music with an expressive force The “jazz migration” was known as an important. He often performed in international cities in nightclubs. This was also taking place during the “jazz migration”. political and cultural phenomenon for the larger black American community....   [tags: Music]
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Jazz Music: Bebop - ... There aren’t many musical pieces of Bebop on YouTube but the few that they have are indescribable. The melodies are so fast you really have to develop an ear for it. I personally love it. Three important composers that used Bebop during this time included Charlie Parker, John Birks, and Thelonious Monk. Charlie Parker, an alto saxophonist, was one of the greatest jazz musicians. His lifestyle can be easily compared to the style of Bebop music. Parker produced a sound that was hard and dry which perfectly matched the “nervous intensity of his melodic lines (484),” his life....   [tags: Music ]
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The Historical Genesis of Jazz - When tracing the sources of any artform it is easy to get lost. Sure, one can connect the dots from one milestone to another before finally arriving at a defining moment in said artform's history, yet sometimes the dots don't line up that easily. In the case of jazz there are too many factors from too many cultures to make the case for a straight timeline to its beginnings; in fact its history plays more like two or three parallel timelines which finally come to a head to create a new artform. Yet confusing as this may seem it is only fitting that a form of music known mostly for its sense of improvisation should enjoy such a varied, piecemeal background....   [tags: Music ]
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Franco and TPOK Jazz - Congolese guitarist, singer, bandleader and composer Francois Luambo Makiadi (Franco) “the sorcerer of the guitar” was 20th century Africa’s most important musician; he was the greatest. My opinion is amply supported by the recent release of two double CD retrospectives Francophonic Volume 1(1953-1979) & 2 (1980-1989). The sets demonstrate Franco’s amazing longevity, prolificacy, and innovation. From 1950 until his death in 1989, he record over a thousand songs, created a dominate style of African guitar playing, trained generations of musicians, and attained a status equivalent in Africa to Elvis or the Beatles in the West....   [tags: Music Review] 1244 words
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The Influence of Jazz in Romare Bearden's work - The Influence of Jazz in Romare Bearden's work Romare Bearden was one of the most influential African American artists of the twentieth century. He grew up in New York and contributed largely to the progressive art of the Harlem Renaissance. He captured lively scenes of everyday life in his former hometowns of North Carolina, Pittsburgh and Harlem. Some of his most highly regarded works take on the subject of music, jazz and blues in particular. He even composed music and played in various jazz bands....   [tags: Art] 1431 words
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Breakthroughs in American Jazz - Breakthroughs in American Jazz The backdrop was New Orleans in the late 19th century, a growing port city with a diverse population of African Americans, whites, displaced French settlers, and immigrants from the West Indies and South America. This hodgepodge of cultures mixed European influenced popular music, such as ragtime, with tradition African music creating the hybrid musical style known as jazz. Jazz, bold and beautiful, in its purest sense demands high instrumentation mastery, creativity, and improvisation combined with low rehearsal and repetition....   [tags: Papers] 485 words
(1.4 pages)
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The History of Jazz Music - The History of Jazz Music If you truly want to appreciate the music you listen to, I would recommend that you study about it's Roots. It was a life changing experience for me to study about the music of the United States. I studied about Jazz, Blues, Ragtime, Spirituals and Gospel. It was Rather astonishing to see how this music is inter- related. It is said that American music is Jazz. My studies revealed to me that Jazz is an African American creation which started in the south of the United States....   [tags: Papers] 954 words
(2.7 pages)
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Jazz: Still Got the Blues? - The interaction between Blues and Jazz can be discerned when the origins of both music are scrutinized. The development of one is hidden in the roots of one another and both use similar sound patterns for instance. In this paper the readers will be presented a brief history of Blues & Jazz within the similarities of the two. If we trace back to the history of Blues music, the impact of African-American tradition is seen quite apparently. Blues music evolved from the songs sung by West African griots, the southern Black American songs of sadness and despair, and more hopeful Christian spirituals....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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789 words
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Jazz Styles in America - Jazz Styles in America Jazz music has been a part of America for many centuries. It has influenced many time periods and ways of life in America. "'Tin Pan Alley was a real alley on East Fourteenth Street near Third (in New York), but it was never just a place. Tin Pan Alley has come to be known for an era of songwriting when many musical ideas mixed together to form American popular music. Tin Pan Alley brought together many styles: blues, jazz, musical scores, and ragtime"' (Burton Lane qtd....   [tags: Papers] 1914 words
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Jazz History In 1920 - Jazz Poetry in the 1920's Jazz Poetry can be defined as poetry that demonstrates jazz-like rhythm or the feeling of improvisation. During the 1920's many poets began to experiment with the conventional forms of writing with rhythm which led to the invention of Jazz Poetry. Poetry and Jazz seemed to both evolve into each other which led to the merge that became known as "Jazz Poetry". Jazz poetry has been an unorthodox style of writing since it was invented in the 1920's. The reason it has been considered out of the mainstream is that it was invented by African American artists in the 1920's when segregation had not ended long ago....   [tags: Music History] 1717 words
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Jazz in the 19th Century - Jazz in the 19th Century As the United States entered the 1920's it was not as unified as one might think. Not one, but two societies existed. The Black society, whose ancestors had been oppressed throughout the ages, and the White society, the oppressors of these men and women. After emancipation the Whites no longer needed the Blacks, but were forced to live with them. The Blacks despised the Whites, but even so they became more like them in every way. Even though these two races had grown so similar over the past century and a half, they were still greatly diversified....   [tags: Papers] 539 words
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Clark Terry Jazz - When looking at jazz throughout all of its years, there is always one name that comes to mind; Louis Armstrong. For every jazz musician that came after him, Louis Armstrong can be considered a influence. No matter what instrument a person played or even how long they played that instrument for Louis Armstrong has influenced them on one way or another. "Louis Armstrong’s trumpet speaks to the possibilities available to the individual in a democracy." This quote, though untrue, still has a way of saying that Louis Armstrong was an influential artist....   [tags: Music] 1634 words
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Jazz Albums as Art - Jazz Albums as Art In the Process of Completing Research for This Issue, I Realized That What I Want to Say May Be Divided into Two Sections. Part One Surveys the General Topic of Album Art; Part Two (Outlined in the Accompanying Sidebar) Considers the Conspicuous Absence of Black Artists from the Process of Designing Jazz Packages: Covers, Liner Notes Etc. This Second Part Will Be Published in an Upcoming Issue.--R.G.O'M. The enclosed portfolio of album cover art springs from my ongoing concern with the emergence in the United States of a jazz culture that has affected not only virtually all other music, here and elsewhere, but other forms of expression as well....   [tags: Papers] 4656 words
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jazz concert review - The first question I asked myself at the beginning of the quarter was how much do I actually know about jazz. I have always characterized jazz music as a rhythmic and instrumental form of music. My impression on the basis of the jazz has always been portrayed with the African-American race. I think this was build up from the rhythm ‘n’ blues era and meaning according to the dictionary (“style of music that was invented by African American musicians in the early part of the twentieth century and has very strong rhythms and often involves improvisation”)....   [tags: essays research papers] 549 words
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Black Jazz Musicians - The popularity of jazz musicians by black artists has experienced particularly high levels of advancement in Kansas City throughout history. "For a brief period from the late 1920s through the late 1930s, Kansas City was a mecca for Midwestern and southwestern black jazz musicians. Some extraorginary music resulted from the healthy competition and collegiality that grew among musicians of significantly different backgrounds and styles. Among the musicians who marked the sound of Kansas City then were Bill "Count" Basie, Bennie Moten, Lester Young, Eddie Durham, Jesse Stone, Walter Page, Oran "Hot Lips" Page, Mary Lou Williams, Eddie Barefield, Henry "Buster" Smith, Ed Lewis, Jimmy Rushing, Joe Turner, Pete Johnson, Jay McShann, Claude "Fiddler" Williams, Dick Wilson, and Charlie Parker....   [tags: Music] 947 words
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Comparing Jazz and Hip-hop - Comparing Jazz and Hip-hop Throughout the history of this country, the music of African-Americans has remained a strong influence upon our society and culture. Beginning with the music carried over from Africa with the slaves, up until now, with the new styles created by urban youth today, African-Americans have retained certain elements within their music which makes it unique from any other musical form. Some of the musical forms which were created from, and/or were strongly influenced by afro-centric musical characteristics are: Hymnals, Gospel, Spirituals, Ragtime, the blues, and R&B....   [tags: Papers] 1469 words
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Attending a Jazz Concert - Attending a Jazz Concert The latest concert that I attended was the NEIU Jazz Ensemble. It was held in the NEIU auditorium. This was my first time attending a Jazz concert. Therefore, I didn’t know what kind of music to expect or any music that I was familiar to. This concert was a new experience for me. It was far different from a rock concert held in some big venue. The purpose of this concert was to give people a taste of the NEIU Jazz Ensemble. The heritage or the background of this concert was strictly Jazz music....   [tags: Papers Music Description Essays] 1229 words
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A Critique of a Jazz Concert - The jazz band I observed played a series of six different songs. Although all the songs were categorized as jazz, each song had its own special style and sound to it. The band consisted of three different players. Paul Meyers, the guitarist and composer, Andy Eulau, the bassist, and Dave Rataczak, on drums. The songs performed were entitled “Love for Sale” by Cole Porter, “Once I Loved” by Antonio Carlos Jobim, “Stars” by Paul Meyers, “Blues for Mel” also by Paul Meyers, “Last Night When We Were Young” by Harold Arlen, and “Samba Novo” by Luis Eca....   [tags: Music] 265 words
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Jazz and Blues Feedback to Jamaica - Jazz and Blues Feedback to Jamaica Music seems to mimic time in a way. As the human race passes through history, the music and its language acts in essence as a speculum of human culture and its path, lavish with its longings, its grief, but always stirring (Santoro, 2). In this paper, I will walk down this path, and show the significance music has played on the Jamaican and American cultures. This paper will illustrate the profound influence that American music, primarily jazz and blues, had on Jamaican reggae, and by breaking down each type of music to a simple rhythm, I will show the relationships between them....   [tags: essays papers]
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The Art of Jazz and Life - The Art of Jazz and Life It’s 10:30 p.m. and I smell smoke. Instead of jumping out of bed and yelling "fire!" like most fifth graders would have, I snuggle deeper into my pillow with a smile. I can feel the thrum of the bass like a slow pulse coursing through the floor beneath my bed. The dark warm air around me vibrates each time the drumstick strikes the trap, quivering just above the cool raspy slide of the steel brush caressing the snare. A saxophone lowly moans. Its melody creeps around the edges of my door, floating along with the cigarette smoke like a miasma across the moonbeams coming in through my window....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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Latin jazz orchestra - If I were to use one word to describe the “Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra” that word would be astonishing. At first, hearing that I was required to attend a Jazz concert I was completely turned off. I am very closed minded and automatically thought to myself that the kind of music would be dreadful. That is not the case anymore. This genre of music is amusing and very pleasing to the ears. The band members are some of the most talented musicians that I ever saw or heard. Standing room tickets were sold out when we arrived at Mc Carter Theater....   [tags: essays research papers] 942 words
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Hidden Text In Morrison's Jazz - In an essay that discusses Toni Morrison's authorial voice and her deconstruction of Western realist epistemology Susan Sniader Lanser focuses on the two areas that Morrison highlights in her depiction of human life and behaviour - the inexplicable, and the unknowable. The first revolves around the idea that characters and events cannot be explained with certainty because it is "impossible to assign causes to effects or to delineate clear boundaries of responsibility" (Lanser 131); besides, human behaviour "remains only partially amenable to explanatory forms" (Lanser 132)....   [tags: Toni Morrison] 1131 words
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Jazz - The conceptual idea of humanism has existed since before the years of Christ. Biblical records state that when man was created he was made in the image of God. This image has been passed down throughout the civilizations of Greece ,Egypt, and Roman times and it has been passed down to our civilization of today. The evidence of this is in the art of yesterday and the way we view art of today. The way we view art today is in such a way that we feel and conceptualize what we create. We create things in the image of how we view our life, our civilization, and our status in this civilization....   [tags: essays research papers] 737 words
(2.1 pages)
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Strategies and Structures - ... Words and Figures of Speech 1. The connotation of the word “mongrel” in paragraph three is “animal-istic and inhuman”. Henthoff writes “In Nazi Germany, jazz was forbidden as a mongrel black-and-Jewish music” (3). The Nazis believed that the Jewish people weren't human and the planet would better without out them; they believed this about blacks as well and therefore they didn't like jazz because it had black origins. The Nazis would use the term “mongrel music” because they thought the people involved with it and who created it were animals, not human....   [tags: Music, Jazz] 2722 words
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Louis Armstrong - ... Lastly, through his contribution to early Jazz, he had a direct hand in developing the new field of academic jazz scholarship, although it had been extensively debatable on his contribution. (Teachout, 351) None the less, his talent formed a popularity that was surpassed by none even to the point that once in his career; he was more popular than the Beatles. (Teachout, 351) Undoubtedly, he was the first, if not the only to present Jazz to the public as a form of art. This changed the direction of Jazz to not just leaser listening music, but teachable and complicated talent....   [tags: Music, Jazz] 627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Sonny's Blues - The story “Sonny’s Blues” By James Baldwin is about a jazz musician and his brother in 1950’s Harlem. The story centers on Sonny who uses jazz music as an escape from his depression. James Baldwin captures the art of jazz during this time period. The themes in this short story are perhaps varied, but all of them revolve around some form of suffering. One theme shows how music can promote change and understanding within relationships. A second theme reveals suffering caused by guilt. Yet another theme references the results of suffering brought about by searching for ones’ identity and how that leads to misunderstanding....   [tags: Jazz Music]
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Billie Holiday - ... Billie went on to perform in other clubs in Manhattan. (www.numberonestars.com, 2010) Later in her career Billie Holiday became one of the first black performers to work with white performers of her time. She was still subjected to the racial barriers of her time like waiting in a dark room until it was time for her to perform and using the back entrances to perform. Billie was quoted once for having been said, “I’ve lived songs like that.” (www.numberonestars.com, 2010) Billie had a lot of soul and gut wrenching emotion in both her songs and performances....   [tags: Music, Jazz] 1114 words
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The Harlem Renaissance, Jazz and Billie Holiday - The Harlem Renaissance, Jazz and Billie Holiday In Harlem, the people sit on their front porches in protest of the summer Sunday sun, fanning themselves with the morning paper as the day slides away. Out on the streets, neighbors call to each other. A woman’s voice is audible from an open window, singing nonsensically as she scrubs. Her melodies tumble out the window and intertwine with the trembling harmonica rising from the heat of the pavement and venture into the store on the corner. The boisterous laughter of men on the porch mixes with the skip of the jump rope slapping the sidewalk and the shrieking of children....   [tags: Billie Holiday Harlem Renaissance Essays] 3499 words
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Miles Davis And The Development Of Improvisation In Jazz Music - Abstract This essay is a discussion of how the way jazz trumpeter Miles Davis changes his way of improvising, looking at two pieces from different times. The solos in the pieces were transcribed by myself and then analysed in detail. From these analyses, several conclusions on the style of improvising were drawn, and then the conclusions from the two pieces were compared. The piece ‘New Rhumba’, showed how Davis was using his technical ability to create an impressive solo, but was also leaning towards a more sparse and spacious form of improvising, where the times he doesn’t play are just important as when he does play, and the solo in ‘So What’, showed this new style in full....   [tags: Music, Research Papers, Biography]
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Similarities in Culture of Jazz and Hip Hop Music - Jazz and Hip Hop: The Ghetto and Music as Language African-American cultural forms and developments are as vast as they are diverse. However, because of white America's consistently racist and oppressive treatment of black peoples in this country there exist certain commonalities between African-American cultures as a result of this continuous subordination. In this paper I will attempt to present some of these existing similarities within hip hop and jazz cultures. Although they are both musically and culturally quite different, each arising out of a particular historical moment with its own distinct musical and cultural practices, there exists enough similarities between that two that it seems a comparison is indeed beneficial in understanding and examining American society in general....   [tags: Music Culture]
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3032 words
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Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient and Toni Morrison's Jazz - Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient and Toni Morrison's Jazz      Textual, mnemonic, and physical gaps leave room in which identity is found through body and environment in Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient and Toni Morrison's Jazz. Ondaatje's characters retrieve their absent personas by mutually colonizing lovers' bodies, thus developing a metaphor for the body as topography. Morrison spins this in reverse, personifying and merging the City's infrastructure with human structure as the characters synergistically carve out their selves through the City's spaces....   [tags: Ondaatje English Patient Essays]
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The Jazz Age - ... The fiction that the film inserted between harsh facts and dates tended to make gangsterism as integral a part of the American experience as the World War. The breathless pace of Raoul Walsh’s directing style, cramming twenty years into ninety minutes, could well afford to retain only the most significant detail, and the picture became a distillation of a hundred other gangster movies, including Walsh’s own handful since Regeneration (Clarens, Hirsch, 1997). Clarens and Hirsch’s (1997) analysis of how gangster movies affected the public can be described in a way that the movies were a secondary source compared to real-life gangsters....   [tags: History, The Roaring Twenties] 1605 words
(4.6 pages)
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Discontent Expressed through Blues, Jazz, Reggae, and Hip-hop - Discontent Expressed through Blues, Jazz, Reggae, and Hip-hop In cultures all over the world, music can be seen encompassing many aspects of life for many individuals. It is a form of mass communication that"speaks directly to society as a cultural form", and often reflects a collection and pattern of personal experiences (King 19). Music is so influential because it communicates on three different levels: the physical, emotional, and cognitive. Not only does it operate in a nondiscursive way, by affecting the physiological mode of the body, causing one to move and dance, but it also encourages one to think....   [tags: essays papers]
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F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and the Jazz Age - The Great Gatsby The Jazz Age In 1920, F. Scott Fitzgerald said that “An author ought to write for the youth of his generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmasters of ever afterwards.” Fitzgerald wrote about what he saw during the 1920’s, which he dubbed “The Jazz Age,” and The Great Gatsby is considered a correct depiction of that era. After World War I, many Americans felt a distrust toward foreigners and radicals because they held them responsible for the war. These beliefs led to a revival of the Ku Klux Klan, a racist, anti-Catholic, and anti-Semitic group....   [tags: Great Gatsby Essays] 428 words
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Stan Kenton - Stan Kenton: Progressive Concepts in Jazz Stanley Newcomb Kenton is one of the most influential figures to be found in all of jazz history, even being called "the most significant figure of the Modern Jazz age" by Frank Sinatra (Agostinelli, 6). Kenton's progressive concepts of how music is written and performed greatly affected the genre of jazz, and created something new and unique. Always under controversy, Kenton and his band always strove to do something different, never settling into a niche for long periods of time....   [tags: Jazz Music Biography Bio]
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The Problem with Jazz Analysis Discussed in Robert Walser's Article "Out of Notes: Signification, Interpretation, and the Problem of Miles Davis" - Missed notes, unfamiliar formal structures, and technical intricacies have plagued musicologist’s understanding of Miles Davis’s performances and why he is considered “someone who is indisputably one of the most important musicians in the history of jazz.” However, as Robert Walser discusses in his article, “Out of Notes: Signification, Interpretation, and the Problem of Miles Davis,” part of the problem is the approach taken by musicology for analyzing jazz music itself, attempting classicism of jazz to legitimize it as part of the European classical music tradition....   [tags: music]
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(3 pages)
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Biography Of Miles Davis - Biography of Miles Davis Born on May 26, 1926, Miles Davis is considered to be one of the most influential jazz musicians in history. Being a trumpeter, keyboardist, composer, and band-leader, Miles is responsible for the popularization of many styles of jazz throughout his long and prolific career. Miles Dewey Davis was born into a well-to-do family in the town of Alton, Illinois. The family owned a large portion of a farm where Miles learned to ride horses as a young boy. In 1927 the family moved to East St....   [tags: Jazz, Biographical, Music] 1092 words
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Charles Mingus in the 1950s - Charles Mingus in the 1950s Charles Mingus is one of the most original and influential jazz composers of the twentieth century. He created the second-largest volume of jazz work after Duke Ellington (McDonough 20), and is the first African-American composer to have his work acquired by the Library of Congress (Harrington B1). Mingus is known for his unusual style of composing and playing, which attempted to reconcile jazz improvisation with orchestration, in order for the final composition to conform most closely to his vision....   [tags: Biography Bio Jazz]
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The History of Country Music - The History of Country Music The hillbilly music of the south is a genre of music that is beginning to grow at an immense rate throughout the United States. Originating in Bristol Tennessee, country music is a type of music that integrates the blues, jazz and originally some "hillbilly folk" with a bit of swing, and just recently some pop has been added to the sound. The lyrics represent the "faithfully charted vicissitudes of the working-class life; as Charlie Rich put it, "life's little ups and downs"" (Scherman, 1994)....   [tags: Music, Blues, Jazz] 322 words
(0.9 pages)
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Louis Armstrong - Louis Armstrong I choose to discuss Louis Daniel Armstrong, one of America's most influential singers and trumpeter. He had a rough/rasping, trademark "gravelly" voice, which you can still recognize till this day. Armstrong was given the nickname "Satchmo" (which is short for "Satchelmouth" referring to the size of his mouth) on one of his first visit's to London. He had a rough childhood and had to start working at an early age to support his family. Singing on street corners for mere pennies, was just one of the numerous jobs he held, to survive....   [tags: Jazz, Dixieland, Music] 317 words
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Biography of Wayne Shorter - Biography of Wayne Shorter Wayne Shorter was born on August 25th, 1933 in Newark, New Jersey. His musical introduction came through the clarinet at the age of 16. Shorter attended Arts High School and later graduated from New York University with a major in music education in 1956. It was while in New York that Shorter started to play the saxophone and gained exposure to some of Jazz’s most influential artists. After a two year interruption in the military, Shorter kickstarted his professional career in 1958 with a band led by pianist Horace Silver....   [tags: Musicians Music Jazz Saxophonists Essays] 359 words
(1 pages)
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Langston Hughes' The Weary Blues - Langston Hughes' The Weary Blues      Jazz music is often associated with long, lazy melodies and ornate rhythmical patterns. The Blues, a type of jazz, also follows this similar style. Langston Hughes' poem, "The Weary Blues," is no exception. The sound qualities that make up Hughes' work are intricate, yet quite apparent. Hughes' use of consonance, assonance, onomatopoeia, and rhyme in "The Weary Blues" gives the poem a deep feeling of sorrow while, at the same time, allows the reader to feel as if he or she is actually listening to the blues sung by the poem's character....   [tags: Music Blues Jazz Musicals Essays] 1434 words
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