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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Jack London"
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To Build a Fire, by Jack London - No one plans on or even wants to lose their life due to an unfortunate mishap. Isn’t it better to check twice and thoroughly plan ahead as opposed to finding oneself in an unfortunate situation. No wonder mothers ask so many questions; they leave no scope for misunderstanding. Jack London’s “To Build A Fire,” both 1902 and 1908 versions, cause distress in readers’ minds and make them wonder how a simple topic of surviving in the cold can turn out so horrific. A handful of alterations were made to the original version of the story; some add a completely new meaning, while others only provide slight nuances....   [tags: To Build a Fire, Jack London]
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887 words
(2.5 pages)
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Jack London's Life and Accomplishments - Jack London was born in the late 19th century, near San Francisco. Jack’s Parent’s divorced when he was young; when his mother remarried they travelled around California looking for work. Although London and his family were poor, he didn’t let that stop him from being one of the most well-known authors in American history. Jack London threw ought his life wroth many books the most notable was Call of the wild. Call of the Wild Was set mostly in the Alaska gold rush of 1898, where over 100,000 people attempted to go to the Klondike Region to find gold(Klondike 1), of that 60,000 died on their way and only 30,000 actually made it (1)....   [tags: call of the wild, alaska, jack london]
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876 words
(2.5 pages)
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Man vs. Environment in To Build a Fire by Jack London - One can express many different types of themes in Jack London’s, “To Build a Fire”. Though I feel strongly that London’s theme in the story is about that the environment shapes who we are because it shows that the man is not strong enough to live up to his environment. Allowing the environment to kill the man indicates that he is weak both mentally and biologically, while on the other hand the dog is stronger by surviving the same harsh environment. Instinct superior to reason is another theme that is highly portrayal able in London’s story....   [tags: To Build a Fire, Jack London]
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943 words
(2.7 pages)
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Jack London: To Build A Fire - Introduction Jack London had already established himself as a popular writer when his story "To Build a Fire" appeared in the Century Magazine in 1908. This tale of an unnamed man's disastrous trek across the Yukon Territory near Alaska was well received at the time by readers and literary critics alike. While other works by London have since been faulted as overly sensational or hastily written, "To Build a Fire" is still regarded by many as an American classic. London based the story on his own travels across the harsh, frozen terrain of Alaska and Canada in 1897-98 during the Klondike gold rush; he is also said to have relied on information from a book by Jeremiah Lynch entitled Three Ye...   [tags: Jack London] 880 words
(2.5 pages)
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Gold in the Yukon and Naturalism: Jack London’s Novella "The Call of the Wild" - Imagine this: Gold was just discovered in the Yukon Territory of Canada, and many gold miners rush to the North to see if they can strike rich. However, in order to do so, they need big, strong dogs with warm coats to protect them from the biting cold. As a result, a dog from the sunny state of California is dog napped and taken to be sold to anyone who is willing to buy him. When the dog is sold, he is shipped to the cold North. As he gets out of the boat, a chilling wind runs past him and, he realizes that he isn’t in California anymore....   [tags: Jack London, Call of the Wild, Canada, ] 1237 words
(3.5 pages)
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - To Build a Fire by Jack London The short story "To build a Fire" by Jack London, tells about the relationship between man and nature. The story takes place in the Yukon during one of the long night. The main character who is unnamed travels with a dog along a small trail to a mining camp. The man leaves against the advice of a local and after a short time realizes that he should have waited. The temperature is extremely cold because the mans spit freezes before it hits the ground. The main obstacle of his journey is the many covered springs that mean death to whoever falls into them....   [tags: Jack London Build Fire Essays Papers] 972 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jack London's To Build A Fire - There are many authors in this world today. Some are known for classical writings of poetry, or hundreds and hundreds of books written by them. This author though was one who portrayed himself through dozens of short stories. His name is Jack London. Jack London is a writer who shows the conflict between Nature versus Man in his writings and supports this theme through his work, “To Build a Fire.” Jack was born on January 12, 1876 and died on November 22, 1916. He is best known for his nature novels depicting how nature can sometimes be so powerful that it overcomes man....   [tags: Writer Author Jack London Build Fire] 1022 words
(2.9 pages)
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Naturalism in Jack London's To Build a Fire - Naturalism in Jack London's "To Build a Fire" This essay has problems with format When Jack London wrote "To Build a Fire" he embraced the idea of naturalism because it mirrored the events of daily life. Naturalism showed how humans had to be wary at every corner because at anytime death could be there, waiting for them to make a mistake and forfeit their lives. He used naturalism, the most realistic literary movement, to show how violent and uncaring nature really is and how no matter what you do nature will always be there....   [tags: Jack London To Build a Fire Essays]
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1273 words
(3.6 pages)
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Analysis of South of the Slot by Jack London - Analysis of South of the Slot by Jack London The slot is a metaphor of the “class cleavage of society”. There was a contrast between the North and South of the Slot in terms of building types: in the North were the higher-class centers of diversion, lodging, and business; and in the South were the lower-class centers of lodging, unskilled work/business. The buildings are figures of two contrasting classes that were segregated (?). In order to study the southern people (the working class) a sociology professor of the University of CA, Freddie Drummond (FD), decides to work temporarily as an unskilled laborer....   [tags: South of the Slot Jack London Essays] 582 words
(1.7 pages)
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My Personal Response to The Call of the Wild by Jack London - My Personal Response to The Call of the Wild by Jack London The novel The Call of the Wild tells a story about how Buck, a domesdicated dog in the "sun-kissed" Santa Clara, managed to survive in the wilds of Klondike. Jack London conveyed many of his own ideas about living in this novel by telling readers what Buck went through to adjust to the harsh realities of life in the frosty North, where survival was the only imprerative. Throughout Buck's adjustment there were several turning-points which forced him to understand better of the rules of the wild world....   [tags: Jack London Call Wild] 1160 words
(3.3 pages)
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Jack London's To Build a Fire - Jack London's To Build a Fire Nature is always pushing man to his limits. When man heeds the warning signs that nature has to offer and those warnings of other men, he is most likely to conquer nature. When he ignores these warnings, nature is sure to defeat man. To build a fire is a prime example of this scenario. In the short story, “To Build a Fire” by Jack London, an inexperienced traveler in the Yukon travels alone with his dog, even though it is ill advised to do so. The man is strong and smart but nature humbled him during his quest to reach his friends....   [tags: London Jack Build Fire Essays]
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989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jack London - Jack London, an American author known for his thrilling adventure stories, showed the world that even an exciting story that takes place in exotic settings can include all the intricacies of great literature. This is seen in many of his stories with the implementation of symbolism, many times a recurring theme in his work. Also, London used many ideas of the day such as Darwinism and Spencerism in his writings in order to better portray his views. However, perhaps one of the most telling signs that London wrote good literature was through London's mastery of a rising literary movement known as naturalism....   [tags: Jack London Author Writer] 1253 words
(3.6 pages)
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Jack London's To Build a Fire - Jack London's To Build a Fire In his short story entitled "To Build a Fire," Jack London portrays a bitter conflict between man and nature. The nature in this story is the harsh environment of the Yukon Trail. London chose to use nature as the antagonist, almost as a force working against the main character in his struggle for survival. London accomplished this personification of nature by giving the environment many human characteristics, by creating numerous things going wrong that really should not have happened, and by foreshadowing the protagonist's fate all throughout the story....   [tags: Papers London Jack Build Fire Essays]
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1091 words
(3.1 pages)
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Thematic Analysis of Jack London's White Fang - Thematic Analysis of Jack London's White Fang White Fang, written by Jack London, is a wonderful adventure novel that vividly depicts the life of a wolf by the name of White Fang. Throughout the course of the novel, White Fang goes through numerous learning experiences as he interacts with humans and other wolves from Alaska around the turn of the century. Jack London uses the events that transpire during White Fang's life to illustrate that only the cunning, intelligent, and strong will be able to survive....   [tags: Jack London White Fang Essays] 935 words
(2.7 pages)
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Jack London's Attitude Towards Life in the Short Story, The Law of Life - Jack London's Attitude Towards Life in the Short Story, "The Law of Life" Jack London, real name John Griffith Chaney, is well known "American novelist and short story writer, born in California" (Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature 629). London's short story "The Law of Life" was first published in Mc Clure's Magazine in 1901. "It was one of his first stories written around the time at which London had just discovered that this way of writing made the biggest impression on the reader."(Tenant 1) One of the most effective elements is that the main character of the story is an old Indian, named Koskoosh....   [tags: The Law of Life Jack London]
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1099 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Importance of Setting in Jack London's To Build A Fire - The Importance of Setting in Jack London's To Build A Fire       In "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, the setting plays a significant role throughout the entire short story.  Jack London uses certain techniques to establish the atmosphere of the story.  By introducing his readers to the setting, prepares them for a tone that is depressed and  frightening.    Isolated by an environment of frigid weather and doom, the author shows us how the main character of the story is completely unaware of his surroundings.  The only world the man is truly accustomed to, is his own.  Never being exposed to such a harsh climate, draws us to the conclusion that the environment is the...   [tags: London Build Fire Essays Jack London Poem]
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1451 words
(4.1 pages)
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Overconfidence and Arrogance in To Build a Fire by Jack London - Overconfidence and Arrogance in To Build a Fire by Jack London Overconfidence and arrogance led to the death of the man in Jack London's "To Build a Fire." This overconfidence in his own abilities led to him making poor decisions and scorning the advice of those who know what they are talking about. Instead, he laughs at the old man after he tells him "a man should travel with a partner" (1769) and goes out into the frigid weather anyway. He knew that it was 75 degrees below zero and that his body was numb but he didn't care because he thought he could handle it....   [tags: Build Fire Jack London Arrogance Essays]
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721 words
(2.1 pages)
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Jack London's Sea Wolf, The Call of the Wild, and White Fang - Jack London's Sea Wolf, The Call of the Wild, and White Fang      Jack London lived a full life, even though he died at the young age of forty. In his life time he experienced many things, and I believe that these experiences were the catalyst of his novels. Jack London was an oyster pirate, a government patrolman in San Francisco Bay, a sailor and an agrarian reformer, a seal hunter in the North Pacific and a gold prospector in the frozen Klondike, a war correspondent and a prizefighting reporter, a socialist soapbox orator who later became a lecturer at universities, a family man and landowner, and of course a true American writer....   [tags: Jack London Wolf Wild Fang Essays]
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2880 words
(8.2 pages)
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The Life and Writings of Jack London - It appears that many famous people lived through a poor childhood. Jack London had an immensely rough childhood stricken with poverty and uncertainty, yet he is one of the most famous writers of the twentieth century. London’s lack of stability in his life and the various stages he lived through such as being a sailor, hobo, Klondike Argonaut, and self-made millionaire colored the pages of his writing. Lack of stability in a child’s life can be a detrimental factor in a youth’s ability to succeed....   [tags: Biography]
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861 words
(2.5 pages)
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - “To Build a Fire” written by Jack London in 1908, is a story of a man, who, left unnamed, sets out to traverse a dangerous trail in the Yukon territory near the end of nineteenth century. Accompanied only by a dog, t¬¬he man travels across the trail, risking his life with every step on the snow-laden path full of frozen ice-water traps. He falls into a trap and wets his feet, incurring the possibility of frostbite. The man manages to build a fire, but it is shortly extinguished by snow that falls from a tree....   [tags: yukon, gold rush]
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1205 words
(3.4 pages)
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Jack London: The Call Of The Wild - ... He knew that he would be beaten. Not only did he have to worry about his owners beating him but the other dogs. They kept each other in line and moving while in the traces. His first to owners ran him over 2500 miles. Then the third owner ran him more. The next owners had no idea what they were doing. The dogs would not work for them inspite of severe beatings. Finally john Thornton stepped in and threatened the mans life if he laid another hand on the dog. He then took the dog from him; the rest of the team was drove on by the men just to fall threw a river and die....   [tags: social activist, ranch in mexico] 537 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Law of Life, by Jack London - What lengths should one go to in order to survive. This is a question which has challenged the human race for generations and to which no satisfactory answer exists. In the modern world, this issue is examined theoretically, but rarely confronts individuals, with the exception of the most destitute. However, in harsh environments and forbidding territories, this matter becomes very real and pressing. Nature pays no attention to the arbitrary emotions of man, demanding only the forfeiture of the sorrowfully short life granted to him....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Nature, Man]
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1309 words
(3.7 pages)
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - “To Build a Fire” written by Jack London can truly be considered as a work of art. With themes anyone can relate to, such as survival and man versus nature, it is a great short story for anyone looking for something to read. Everyone knows a dog is a man’s best friend, but what happens when it is man versus dog. When survival of the fittest kicks in, the fittest truly shows. In “To Build a Fire”, Jack London expresses various elements of literature to really get the reader involved in the story....   [tags: To Build a Fire ]
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1805 words
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The Naturalistic Ideals of Jack London - ... “Yet, by following his instincts, Buck takes his readers to the deepest reaches of the mind…” (“London, Jack”). He cannot control his fate; the forces of nature do and in order to survive, he must recall his ancestral natural instincts “that have been dormant for generations…” (Napierkowski and Stanley). The resurfacing of these hidden instincts not only aids to Buck’s adaptation but also applies London’s lifelong beliefs of Darwinism. London incorporates the Darwinian belief of survival of the fittest in Buck’s difficult journey transforming him to the dominant alpha dog....   [tags: darwin, philosophy, animals] 818 words
(2.3 pages)
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To Build a Fire by Jack London - What would you do if the only thing separating you from death was starting a fire. Most people would obviously start a fire because they do not want to die. This is exactly the same situation that a man falls into in To Build A Fire. In this story a man is setting across the Yukon in order to get to a camp where his friends are at. This is a trip that he has made many times and he can even predict what time he will arrive in that camp. He is traveling with a dog as his companion. As he goes along the trail that he has picked out he notes many things about his surroundings and the temperature is a constant figure in his mind because if it drops too rapidly that would mean death for him....   [tags: short story review and analysis] 995 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Sea Wolf by Jack London - ... is it any wonder that he saw life in terms of 2 man's unending struggle against a ruthless nature. Is it any wonder that he saw in socialism a chance for the salvation of others as lost as he had once been. Is it any wonder that he hungered for knowledge and success that would lift him above the degrading plain of poverty?” http://www.jacklondons.net/shortbio.html His writing career essentially began in 1893. At the time London was 17, and he had just returned from a sealing voyage. He explained to his mother how a storm nearly killed him and the entire crew....   [tags: controversial books, story analysis] 1234 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Build a Fire by Jack London - The short story “To Build a Fire” written by Jack London tells the tale of one mans journey to find his fellow hikers campsite in dangerously cold temperatures. The man’s journey ends when Mother Nature gets the best of him and he perishes in the cold. While it may seem as though the main conflict, man against nature, is what killed the man, the man’s internal conflict, his pride and masculinity versus his humility is what actually kills him. Nature, in reality, just finished the blow while the man’s internal conflict is what really weakened him to that point of death....   [tags: nature, conflict, cold]
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1195 words
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Jack London's The Call of the Wild - As Buck watched the other dogs chow down on their food, his breath warmed his chest as he let out a low growl to Spitz. The sly Spitz had taken Buck’s food and outsmarted him. Buck soon learned that living in this condition would require new knowledge and a quick thinking mind. Even though other dogs are almost as wild as he is, Buck possesses the quality of intelligence. In Jack London’s The Call of the Wild, his intelligence allows him to become the only member of his pack to survive because of his shrewd hasty actions, his ability to weigh out consequences, and his flexibility in adapting to his new environment....   [tags: dogs, intellignece, instinct]
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793 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Sea Wolf, by Jack London - “It’s a unique phenomenon when a male becomes a man so late in life–probably because if he never truly became a man when most do, he likely never will. He certainly won’t seek out someone to father him like his own father failed to do, and if one such person appears on the scene he will likely avoid the man in a mechanism of defense.” (Christine Weber) When readers first encounter Humphrey Van Weyden, he measures up to almost no man. Throughout the novel The Sea Wolf, “Hump” as he’s nicknamed by Wolf Larsen transforms into much more than a man, Hump becomes his own Superman....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Plot]
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1214 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Life of Jack London - The Life of Jack London Jack London was an American writer and journalist and a huge supporter and activist for socialism. London had several widely popular novels including The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and The Sea Wolf. London’s writing career was not just given to him, he faced many hardships, but worked hard to become a successful writer. On January 12, 1876 Flora Wellman gave birth to John Griffith Chaney, Better know as Jack London, in San Francisco California, she was not married at the time (“Jack London Biography” 1)....   [tags: writer, alcoholism, poverty] 921 words
(2.6 pages)
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Martin Eden by Jack London - Jack London is among the many prolific writers from the United States of America who possess great artistic works ranging from great time novels ,short stories to plays just but to mention a few. He is fondly remembered for his great novel, ‘Martin Eden’ published in 1909. In the novel he tries to express the challenges faced by young writers who try to exploit their talent and passion in an area where little opportunities present themselves. This novel has stood the test of time with its relevance evident to date....   [tags: Autobiography, American Writer] 839 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Life of Jack London - Jack London was a standout amongst the most renowned American novelists of the twentieth century, and he remains universally prevalent even today. As a celebrity writer whose exercises were accounted for in the standard press, he showed an open persona that urged booklovers to see his acts as an expansion of his life, in which movement, enterprise, and composing appeared to be blended into equivalent extents. The various stories about which London composed guaranteed a feeling of realness for the perusing open in which they could accept what London said in regards to the solidified northern badlands of the Yukon Domain or the lives of mariners trapped on a fixing ship under a fierce captain...   [tags: american novelists, celebrity writer] 1244 words
(3.6 pages)
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Jack London's Life and Accomplishments - Jack London is a very creative and intelligent writer. His writing has a positive effect on many people. Jack London was born on January 12, 1876, in California. He was born to Flora Wellman and William Channey, but his father wanted nothing to do with him. So, his stepfather John London was his father figure. London had a lonely childhood because of his parents that paid little to no attention to him. Also, because he moved so much so he could never keep a friend. The only one who was actually there for him as a child was his pet that he loved and adored....   [tags: naturalism, dog napped, white fang]
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1158 words
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Love Portrayal of Jack London - Love Portrayal Of Jack London Throughout the novel The Call of the Wild Buck is thrown into a vast amount of obstacles. Buck is a half Saint Bernard and Half Sheepdog who is stolen from a home in California. He was then sold as a sled dog in the arctic where he would begin his adventure. Buck undergoes many challenges that can be related to human beings. The two experiences that everyone goes through are love and death. According to Jack London in The Call of the Wild, love and death are portrayed as bitter, sweet, and deadly....   [tags: death, love, obstacles, adventure]
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847 words
(2.4 pages)
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White Fang by Jack London - Realism is an attention to detail and a replicated version of the true nature of reality. A realistic novel is when it focuses on the strengths of the character rather than the plot. The characters are complicated and their movements are very realistic to what a character of the same would do in life. Realism covers up nothing; it leaves no details to be imagined. Instead of major events it just steadily moves along not disturbed by other circumstances that might happen (Rahn). The novel White Fang, in my opinion, is a realistic novel....   [tags: realism, bill, henry]
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1010 words
(2.9 pages)
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Aloha Oe by Jack London - ... He disregards the young man saying good bye to his daughter. Dorothy, a tender young girl of fifteen, is saying goodbye to the young man and to the place where she has found adventure and a break away from her usual life as a schoolgirl for the first time. In her departing moments, she reflects on her time spent on this trip, not with her father, but with a young man. Stephen Knight, a youth of twenty, is provided to her as entertainment while her father is wined and dined and attends to his business....   [tags: hawaii, racial bias]
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710 words
(2 pages)
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Jack London's Literary Success - Jack London was actually born as John Griffith Chaney, in San Francisco, on January 12, 1876. His books, including White Fang, The Call of the Wild, and Martin Eden, positioned Lon-don as one of the most well-known American authors of his era. Believing that “You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club,” London was renowned for his adventures, plots, and exotic settings; additionally, he developed exciting characters through his use of Symbolism, Social Darwinism, and most notably the use of the Naturalism movement....   [tags: contest, short stories, naturalism ] 969 words
(2.8 pages)
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Jack London - During the turn of the 19th century, a grandiose shift occurred in literature from realism to naturalism form of writing. One of the many authors involved in this movement included Jack London. London developed his short stories collection, Son of the Wolf, around this theme. In a Far Country is a short story in Son of the Wolf collection in which London talks about two lethargy men, Cater Weatherbee and Percy Cuthfert, who come from different realms of life. They are on a journey to the North near the Yukon River in Alaska searching for gold....   [tags: Realism, Naturalism, Writing]
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468 words
(1.3 pages)
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A Critique of Jack London's To Build a Fire - A Critique of Jack London's To Build a Fire Karen Rhodes analyzed to build a fire in a cultural context. He believed "London's works were written so that he could survive in a world he increasingly came to see as "red in tooth and claw""(1). It is obviously the story of a man fighting the stresses of Nature. According to Rhodes, to build a fire was drawn from the year London spent in Canada's Yukon Territory. London depicted arctic and very cold conditions throughout the story. Rhodes believed to build a fire represented London's Naturalistic Flavor....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 513 words
(1.5 pages)
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An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire - An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire In her cultural criticism of Jack London's "To Build a Fire", Jill Widdicombe explores the question of whether the story's protagonist might have perished from the extreme cold of the Klondike winter even if with a traveling companion. She describes the brutality of the winter weather and, alluding to the man's confidence in his ability to survive the weather, describes it as "behavior most of us can understand" - especially if we are accustomed to warmer surroundings....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 474 words
(1.4 pages)
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An Analysis of Jack London's To Build A Fire - An Analysis of Jack London's To Build A Fire Charles E. May, Author of the article "To Build A Fire': Physical Fiction and Metaphysical Critics" was giving his psychological criticism on the Jack London short story. May was elaborating on the naturalistic behavior of man versus nature when it comes to survival. May's article suggests that the protagonist in the story did not only have a psychological discovery but a "simple physical discovery that self is body only"(23). In the story, "To Build A Fire", the protagonist has to accept that he was not invincible, but a human with a weakness....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 456 words
(1.3 pages)
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An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire - An Analysis of Jack London's To Build a Fire In his article "To Build a Fire" a Physical Fiction and Metaphysical Critics Charles E. May comments and disagrees with a statement that "To Build a Fire" is "a masterpiece of a short fiction"(20). Literary critics claimed that London used many metaphors in this work such as "sun-fire-life" or "cold-darkness-depression-death"(20), but May argues that this story should be read and interpreted literally and does not contain deep, dual or metaphorical meaning....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 542 words
(1.5 pages)
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No Accidents in Jack London's To Build a Fire - As the title implies, Jack London's 1908 short story contains within its narrative a literal set of sequential directions on how "To Build a Fire." London extends this sequential conceit to his fatidic vision of the universe. Unlike the dog in the story, who can rely on its pure-bred arctic instinct as it navigates through the dangerous tundra, the anonymous man possesses a duller, myopic instinct which is unable foresee the consequentiality of the environment. This instinctual flaw in mankind (relative to that of a husky) is a given, but the man fails to compensate by integrating intellectuality into his journey....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays]
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2560 words
(7.3 pages)
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Criticism of Jack London's To Build a Fire - Criticism of Jack London's To Build a Fire In her critique of "To Build a Fire" Jill Widdecombe assesses the personality and motivation of the unnamed man in the story. Widdecombe suggests a story of mystery, intrigue, and rationalization. I see it as a story about inner conflict and submit the mans inner conflict parallels Widdecombe's analogy of imagination versus rationalization. The conflict in the story is two-fold; the man struggles between his will and reasoning and second with the man's desires and abilities....   [tags: London To Build a Fire Essays] 472 words
(1.3 pages)
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Wilderness in Call of the Wild by Jack London - ... He believes that he can push people around and get away with it. Curly died early on in the book. She symbolizes naivety. She represents naivety because of her over-kindness. When Curly died, she tried to be friends with a husky. The husky then “ripped [Curly’s face] from eye to jaw” (19). Curly brought her fate onto herself. The next character is John Thornton. John Thornton represents the small bits of happiness and love in The Call of The Wild. Buck and John have a perfect relationship together....   [tags: Klondike gold rush, journey, instincts] 576 words
(1.6 pages)
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Jack London's Impact in the Writing World - Jack London was an American man of many talents, which included being an author, journalist and a social activist, despite being minimally educated. Nonetheless, he was undoubtedly most recognized for his short stories and novels that fixated on the harsh, cold climates that Mother Nature crafted. London focused on a deeper level of the wild and the literary devices in his work are littered throughout every one of his novels and short stories, including The Call of the Wild, White Fang, as well as “To Build a Fire.” London’s actual name was John Griffith Chaney and he was born on January 12, 1876 in San Francisco, California....   [tags: Author, Journalist, Social Activist]
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1427 words
(4.1 pages)
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Summary of Aloha Oe by Jack London - The Summary This is a short story written by an American writer named Jack London who is revered in Oakland as a hero and there are many places which are named after him. There is another village named Glen Ellen in Sonoma where there is a park which is named after him. He was born on January 12, 1876 in Alaska and later moved to Oakland. He was borne to an unmarried mother. He lived under very difficult circumstances by working hard in factories. These circumstances lead him to write about the low class societies and hardships faced by them....   [tags: hawaiian island, love, dorothy]
:: 2 Works Cited
562 words
(1.6 pages)
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Conflicts of "To Build a Fire" by Jack London - Literature focuses on many aspects to form a coherent and captivating story, mainly those aspects retaining to characters and conflict. Within any story, a conflict arises for a character to overcome which drives the whole story. Conflict, the struggle against many forces of multiple varieties, creates the obstacle or issue a character must face to advance past the problem. In "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, conflict plays a major role in the story. The conflicts of man fighting against nature and man against himself present the struggles the unidentified man from "To Build a Fire" faces and attempts to overcome....   [tags: struggle, nature, resolve]
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701 words
(2 pages)
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Analysis of the Call of the Wild by Jack London - ... Instead of caring for their animals, the two owners mistreat the dogs, beating them and malnourishing them. This depicts the unfavorable form of relationship between man and dog, but in turn teaches Buck how to survive in the wilderness by scrapping for food and taking up for himself. This contrasts to Buck’s life at Miller’s estate. This idea of the differences of morality between civilization and the wilderness recurs frequently throughout the story and is one of the principal motifs in the story....   [tags: classic, heroic, dog, devices, tone] 682 words
(1.9 pages)
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To Build A Fire, Written, by Jack London - ... Roberta is desperate for Clyde to marry her, eventually threatening to expose their relationship. He then takes Roberta out on a row boat in upstate New York.When Roberta moves toward him, he strikes her in the Ropp #2 face causing the boat to flip. Roberta is unable to swim and Clyde, unable to save her, swims to shore. In the midst of his trial, Clyde incriminates himself with a confusing and contradictory testimony. Clyde is then sentenced to death. Theodore Dreiser depicts naturalism in An American Tragedy in many ways....   [tags: naturalism, social conditions] 1683 words
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Jack London: A Very Brief Biography - Jack London once said, “I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.” (Jack NP) This represents how London went about his life; he refused to be average and traveled the world in adventure and curiosity. London lived in the realistic time period and his writings reflect that. Realists attempt to portray life as it is and describe events as accurately as possible (Lipking NP). Another indication that London was a realist is the fact that realists do not distort events to agree with their views; he was an active socialist, but by reading any of London’s work, one could not tell (Lipking NP)....   [tags: realist movement, American authors]
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1008 words
(2.9 pages)
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Jack London's Novels Impacted Many - Jack London was an American author, born in 1876 and died at the early age of forty from uremia poisoning, in 1916. Throughout London’s life his novels and short stories impacted American authors and their literature. London began one of his many careers, writing, at twenty-one years old with his first short story, Two Gold Bricks, published in Owl Magazine. Some of the novels and short stories he is recognized for include: The Call of the Wild, White Fang, To build a Fire and Sea-Wolf. Jack London’s most frequently read short story, To Build a Fire, is the best example of London’s use of man vs....   [tags: naturalist, marx, author]
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846 words
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Jack London: America's Greatest Author - Jack London (1876-1916) was a heavy influence to the naturalism movement that occurred in the United States from the 1890's to the 1920's. The naturalistic movement combined realism's emphasis on depicting surface reality with a philosophy of determinism, which holds that humans have little ability to impose their will upon their own destinies (Matterson). In To Build a Fire, London quotes that, "It was a clear day, and yet there seemed an intangible pall over the face of things, a subtle gloom that mate the day dark, and that was due to the absence of the sun" (Kinsella 608), in order to emphasize how vulnerable man is to his environment....   [tags: naturalist movement, realism, criticism]
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1141 words
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The Call of the Wild by Jack London - The novella The Call of the Wild is a story of Buck overcoming challenges while being thrown into the real world and learning new traits like persistence and resilience. Protagonist Buck is a colossal St Bernards cross Scotch shepherd dog, transforms from a humble house dog and then eventually returns to a primordial state as a best of the wild. Along the way he is faced with an endless array of challenges. London achieves this by portraying Buck’s change in character in a manner that explores and incorporates diverse motifs....   [tags: buck, environment] 530 words
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The Call of the Wild, by Jack London - ... The dog followed its instincts to avoid danger; even when “[the man compelled the dog to go on in front . . . It hung back until the man shoved it forward” (631). The dog isn’t seeking any reward from going through the cold Yukon trail and solely seeks ways to ensure its survival. Because of the man’s self-reliance and abundance of indifference to his situation we are then drawn into story’s underlying message of the story, which represents the flaws of the American dream. His struggle to succeed in a different environment by his own ability is in vain, because he has no control over the outside forces....   [tags: Book Review, Humanity] 991 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Call of the Wild by Jack London - The Call of the Wild by Jack London The title of the book is 'The Call of the Wild' and was written by Jack London in 1903. He was the son of an Irish-American astrologer and his mother was Flora Wellman, the odd one out of a well to do family. They lived a life of poverty in Pennsylvania. Jack read a lot and at the age of fifteen left home and travelled around North America as a tramp. On charges of vagrancy, he spent 30 days in prison. After educating himself he managed to gain entry to a university, before being caught up in the Klondike River Gold Rush in North Canada, 1896....   [tags: Papers] 1159 words
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Jack London's The Call of the Wild - Call of the Wild Where did man come from?   Scientists thought they had answered this simple yet complex question through Charles Darwin's theory of evolution.   According to him, living organisms evolved due to constant changing.   Organisms which gained an edge would reign, while those without would die.   Jack London's books during the late 1800's animated this theory through the use of wild animals in a struggle for survival.   In fact, many prove that to survive a species "must" have an edge.   In London's book the Call of the Wild, the harsh depiction of the Klondike wilderness proves that to survive life must adapt....   [tags: Call of the Wild Essays] 879 words
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The Life of Jack London - The Life of Jack London John Griffith London, who is considered by many to be America’s finest author, was born January 12, 1876 in San Francisco, California to an unmarried mother of a wealthy background, Flora Wellman. His father is thought to have been William Chaney, a Journalist, lawyer and major figure in the development of American Astrology. Because Flora was ill, an ex-slave, Virginia Prentiss, who would remain a major maternal influence during the boy’s childhood, raised Jack through infancy....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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766 words
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The Call Of Jack London - The Call Of Jack London During a time when man had gold fever, and philosophical views plagued the minds of many, one man took these views and turned them into great outdoor adventures. John “Jack” Griffith London, a twentieth century author, wrote The Call of the Wild, other novels, and short stories that depict the philosophical views of the time and added adventure to them by using his own life experiences that carried thousands of men including himself to the Klondike in search of gold....   [tags: essays research papers] 2184 words
(6.2 pages)
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The Role of Setting in To Build a Fire by Jack London - In “To Build a Fire” by Jack London, the setting plays a significant role throughout the entire story. The chosen setting by London creates a specific and idealistic mood for his depressing story. It forces, as well as prepares, it’s audience to what the story holds. The amount of constant detail the story holds allows the reader to anticipate the ending that is inevitable to happen. Jack London creates a setting that is hostile and “cold”. The story is set in the wilderness of the frozen Yukon, during the harsh winter months, when “there was no sun nor hint of sun” in the sky....   [tags: isolated, mood, stubbornness] 577 words
(1.6 pages)
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Nature in Jack London´s To Build a Fire - People always tell you to listen to your gut. However, all goes wrong for the poor character in Jack London’s (1876-1916) To Build a Fire when he wants to trust his gut. In the story, a mountain man explains to him how dangerous it is to venture out alone in incredibly freezing circumstances. Being the confident man that he is, he did not listen to the advice. It soon turns into a story of a man’s lonely road to try to survive. He finds a silent companion that cannot seem to help him. He then falls into a soft spot and gets wet to the knees....   [tags: gut, trust, advice, survive, fire, cold] 669 words
(1.9 pages)
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Analysis of Jack London´s To Build a Fire - Jack London was a prominent Bay Area author and he, himself, had a heuristic experience with the Alaskan wilderness, much like the main character in his short story “To Build a Fire”. The aforesaid main character, simply referred to as “the man” endured the harshness of Nature in the Yukon, firsthand, and is accurately told due to London’s past experience with similar settings. The man and his companion, the dog, were unnamed and this, therein, implies that they are symbols representing the aggregation of humanity and instinctual, animalistic thought....   [tags: humanity, thought, natural, mindset] 562 words
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To Build a Fire a Short Story by Jack London - ... The protagonist failed to see the danger that was ahead of him, and disregarded all the numbness he felt in his body, and continued with the journey. The man was so ignorant because, in a man who is not self-centred, and thinks logically is to halt his journey, and go back to where he came from for the fear of his life. However, this did not happen with our protagonist. In the short story To Build a Fire, the protagonist lacks the understanding of reality. He was short sighted because, he sees danger ahead of him, but assumes that there is nothing wrong....   [tags: individual´s choice, judgement]
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Jack London’s Use of Repetition in “To Build a Fire” - Jack London’s To Build a Fire follows an unnamed protagonist, who’s only referred to as “the man”, as he travels the Yukon Trail during a severe snow storm. Along with his husky wolf-dog, he determined to meet friends at an old junction by six o’clock. The man, who was warned not travel in the Klondike alone, presses forward through the terrain’s harsh weather. He later falls through the snow in what looked to be a secure spot. With his feet and fingers soaked, he starts a fire and begins drying himself....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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1230 words
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Two Versions of To Build a Fire by Jack London - ... First of all, the title is well-chosen, for it gives the readers an overview of the story and supports the plot effectively. Detailed descriptions of how to set up a fire and the man’s continuous attempts to do so reflect that the story evolves around the phrase “to build a fire”. Throughout his journey, if the man succeeds in making a fire, it brings warmth, hope, and life; on the other hand, if he fails, it means coldness and death. The seemingly ordinary flame is vital and powerful, because “it meant life, and it must not perish”....   [tags: travel, hypothermia, death]
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734 words
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Naturalism in Stephan Crane and Jack London's Works - ... Maggie represents an individual unmarked by their physical surroundings. The author stereotypes and characterizes the persona of Maggie to demonstrate the overall influence of our environment and the unpleasant conditions within the inner-city. Stephan Crane illustrates Maggie and Jimmy as opposites and the parents are portrayed as drunken, unsuccessful hypocrites and unfit role models. Although Maggie is repeatedly abused mentally and physically, she continuously assembles the bits and pieces of her existence regardless of being “in a worn and sorry state.” Crane utilizes several different manners to identify the evils that persisted in city slums....   [tags: Maggie, Law of LIfe, Open Boat] 1274 words
(3.6 pages)
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To Build a Fire by Jack London and Into The Wild, by Jon Krakauer - Imagine you were someone who could do whatever thing for his own personal gain. How could the feeling of taking over a certain part of the world be like. Wouldn’t it be nice to realize that you have the supremacy to do everything. All of this is generally considered a fantasy of mankind. There is no man or women that can do all. There was one fellow, who had this feeling, of conquering a certain space from which not many people attempt to do. This man, Chris McCandless, had been filled with hubris in his mind to conquer the outside part of society, the wild....   [tags: Into the Wild Essays] 1012 words
(2.9 pages)
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Into the Wild, by John Karkauer and Jack London's To Build a Fire - John Karkauer novel, Into the Wild displays a true life story about a young man by the name of Christopher McCandless, who creates a new life for himself by leaving civilization to live in the wilderness. The story displays how Christopher develops and matures throughout the story by prevailing harsh predicaments and learning valuable lessons on the way. Christopher’s character evolves by comprehending several new lessons and such as finding true pleasure, disregarding other people’s judgments, as well as realizing that material things are just material things and nothing else....   [tags: Into the Wild Essays] 565 words
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The Cost of Pride in Jack London’s To Build a Fire - ... 129). He eventually makes a fire to thaw out his “ice muzzle” to eat but leaves the warmth of the fire soon afterward, and he continues to chew tobacco, once again, turning his eye muzzle. His hand and toes began to go numb, and only his reaction is to strike his hand against his body, in order to regain feeling in his extremities. He is reckless and takes for granted the only form of mobility he has, his body (pg.130) In the perilous journey, he demonstrates signs of careless planning. He was not able to make compatible intelligent choices, equal to the opposing factors against him....   [tags: overconfident, reality, careless] 591 words
(1.7 pages)
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Naturalism in Literature: Jack London and Thomas Hardy - ... He says, “And with the coming of her offspring her looks left her. Her limbs dragged and shuffled, her eyes dimmed and bleared, and only the little children found joy against the withered cheek of the old squaw by the fire. Her task was done” (CP107). Nature, and man it appears, was done with her once she had been used for what was required of her; the continuation of the species. And as the old protagonist was left to die in the snow, so would she. Nature was cruel. Koskoosh also remembered famines and deaths he had seen at the hands of nature....   [tags: Nature, Elements, Suffering] 931 words
(2.7 pages)
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Analysis of Jack London’s The Sea-Wolf - ... Astronomy and physics…”(43). Larsen’s intelligence leads to his creation of a navigation tool that tells your location using stars, which helps Van Weyden and Maud, a wash up who Van Weyden starts to like, track there way to help. Van Weyden’s intelligence is what allows for his movement in ranks from a wash up to an assistant of Larsen, which in his mind is the highest position possible on the ship. Van Weyden’s nautical knowledge increases from the time he sets foot on the Ghost because of his intelligence allowing him to learn faster than normal....   [tags: Shipwreck, Captain, Sailor]
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Jack London: A Biography - Jack London: A Biography        John Griffith London, better known to us as Jack London, was born to Flora Wellman January 12, 1876, in San Francisco. (Ranch Album)  His father was presumably W.H. Chaney, who left Flora after finding out she was pregnant. (Stasz, 9)  Flora met and eventually married John London on September 7, 1876 bringing John's two other children, Ida and Eliza, into the family. (Ranch Album) Flora enlisted the help of a wet nurse and, with the help her and Eliza, Jack London was raised.  For the next ten years, John and his family relocated several times within California, moving from farm to farm trying to become financially successful....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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(2 pages)
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Critical Response: Jack London - Critical Response: Jack London Jack London, a well known American author, has written a fair share of truly classic works.  The Call of the Wild and White Fang are staples of middle and high school reading requirements.  His other novels, such as The People of the Abyss and Sea Wolf are not as well known, but are still regarded as brilliant pieces of literature by many scholars.  Lesser known are his many volumes of short stories; "To Build a Fire" being the most popular.  I cannot say that I have read even a small percentage of London's works, but from what I have read, I noticed some recurring similarities.              During the semester in class, we have learn...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays] 3494 words
(10 pages)
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Jack London - "I wrote a thousand words every day" Jack London is the name you can hear everywhere, his writing appealed to millions of people all around the world. London was an American novelist and short-story writer, who wrote passionately about questions of life and death, surviving. The writer had a lot of adventures, experienced the life at sea, or in Alaska, or in the fields and factories of California, all of these influenced his writing style. Jack London descended from the family of his mother Flora and astrologer and journalist William Chaney....   [tags: Biography] 1388 words
(4 pages)
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Jack London - Jack London A Study of Jack London’s Belief in Darwinism Jack London has a strong belief in Darwinism, survival of the fittest, during the late 1800’s through the early 1900’s, when he wrote. Throughout his writings, many characters display London’s belief in Darwinism. In the novel, The Call of the Wild, Jack London’s belief in social darwinism is portrayed by animals interacting with humans, each other, and the environment. This can be shown through Buck, a house dog turned sled dog, interacting with his masters, other dogs, and the Yukon wilderness....   [tags: essays papers] 626 words
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Jack London - Jack London was a prolific writer, one of the most widely read American writers of the early 20th century. During his short life, he wrote fifty books, plus many articles and short stories. Besides being one of the most widely read authors, he was also the highest-paid. However, Jack London did not spend all of his time writing. Besides being an author, he also was a gold prospector, a homeless, a pirate, a sailor, and a factory worker. London was determined to live an adventurous life: I would rather be ashes than dust....   [tags: essays research papers] 623 words
(1.8 pages)
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Jack London - Jack London The story of Jack London's life really is one of rags to riches. He was born in San Francisco on January 12, 1876 as John Griffith Chaney. I'd like to take you through the story of his life and examine a few of his significant literary works along the way. The Dictionary of Literary Biography Volume 78 says that "the biographical consensus is that his father was William Henry Chaney, a "Professor of Astrology" with whom his mother, Flora Wellman, was living as a fellow spiritualist and common-law wife in 1875." (DOLB 78)....   [tags: Biography] 1080 words
(3.1 pages)
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Jack London - Jack London fought his way up out of the factories and waterfront dives of West Oakland to become the highest paid, most popular novelist and short story writer of his day. He wrote passionately and prolifically about the great questions of life and death, the struggle to survive with dignity and integrity, and he wove these elemental ideas into stories of high adventure based on his own firsthand experiences at sea, or in Alaska, or in the fields and factories of California. As a result, his writing appealed not to the few, but to millions of people all around the world....   [tags: essays research papers] 1745 words
(5 pages)
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Jack London Square - Jack London Square The Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, the Gothic architecture of the University of Chicago, Mardi gras, the Great Wall of China--all are highly visible landmarks, characteristics, or events that are emblematic of a particular place. In a more subtle way, there are other "landmarks" that are less recognizable but nonetheless suggest a specific place. Perhaps it is the local mall, or spring tulips in your garden, or abandoned warehouses, or an annual Fourth of July parade or October pumpkin festival....   [tags: Personal Narrative Oakland Essays] 1110 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Setting of To Build a Fire by Jack London - The Setting of To Build a Fire by Jack London No matter what type of story you are reading, setting always plays a key element in producing the desired effect. Jack London's short story To Build A Fire provides an excellent example of this. In this story, a man hikes across a snow and ice covered plane towards the encampment where he is supposed to meet up with more travelers like himself. The setting of this story is one of the northernmost most areas of the earth, the Yukon. The man must hike across this area for approximately thirty-six miles before he reaches the camp at which he is expected....   [tags: Papers] 468 words
(1.3 pages)
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