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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Indians"
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American Indians: Health Disparities Research - American Indians have had health disparities as result of unmet needs and historical traumatic experiences that have lasted over 500 hundred years.1(p99) Since first contact American Indians have been exposed to infectious disease and death2(p19), more importantly, a legacy of genocide, legislated forcible removal, reservation, termination, allotment, and assimilation3. This catastrophic history had led to generational historical traumas and contributes to the worst health in the United States.2 American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) represent 0.9 percent of the United States population4(p3) or 1.9 million AI/AN of 566 federally recognized tribes/nations.5 American Indians/Alaska Native...   [tags: alaska natives, american indians, health] 1153 words
(3.3 pages)
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Ten Little Indians (And Then There Were None) by Agatha Christie - Ten Little Indians, published as And Then There Were None when it débuted in America brought a wonderful sense of mystery into the life of the American. Written by Agatha Christie, it was published in 1939 as a fiction murder mystery. The story is set on the coast of Devon, England during the thirties. Ten Little Indians is a classic murder mystery, which involves ten unsuspecting average people. While it seems that one of these people would be the main character, everyone is equally important in shaping the story....   [tags: Ten Little Indians]
:: 1 Works Cited
688 words
(2 pages)
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Navajo Indians See the Importance of Supporting their Families and Communities - The Navajo nation is the largest U.S Indian tribe. It has more than 250,000 people. They are located in Northern New Mexico, a portion of southern Utah, and part of northern Arizona. They first descended from the Apaches, who came from the Pueblos. Their native language is Athapaskan. “Navajo” came from the word navahu’u meaning “farm fields in the valley.” The Spanish chroniclers first referred to the Navajos as Apaches de Nabajo’ meaning Apaches who farm in the valley. Then the name was eventually shortened to the Navajo....   [tags: Native Americans, American Indians,] 609 words
(1.7 pages)
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Lasting Effects of European Colonization on Native American Indians. - Effects of Colonisation on North American Indians Since the Europeans set foot on North American soil in 1620,they have had a devastating effect on the native population. I will be discussing the long term effect of North American colonisation on the Native Americans, focusing on such issues as employment opportunities, the environment, culture and traditions, health, as well as social justice. I will begin with the important issue of employment opportunities. The unemployment rate for Native Americans is a staggering 49%....   [tags: native americans, indians, colonial america] 1035 words
(3 pages)
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Collision between the Authorities of the General and State Governments on Account of the Indians - It gives me pleasure to announce to Congress that the benevolent policy of the Government, steadily pursued for nearly thirty years, in relation to the removal of the Indians beyond the white settlements is approaching to a happy consummation. Two important tribes have accepted the provision made for their removal at the last session of Congress, and it is believed that their example will induce the remaining tribes also to seek the same obvious advantages. The consequences of a speedy removal will be important to the United States, to individual States, and to the Indians themselves....   [tags: tribes, indians, indian community] 686 words
(2 pages)
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The History of the Wisconsin Indians - The 1989-1991 Biennial Budget established a program that would support school districts’ efforts to give information about Wisconsin Indian history, culture, and tribal sovereignty. The exact year Act 31 took place was 1989 (information from Act 31 handout/lecture). I would like to teach at the high school level which is the grades nine through twelve. One course would be history. History is a very delicate topic when dealing with Wisconsin Native Americans. I would talk to the Native American students in my class, and I would ask them what they would be comfortable with me teaching....   [tags: Wisconsin Indians, Native Americans, USA, history,] 830 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Saga of the Tigua Indians - The Saga of the Tigua Indians The Saga of the Tigua Indians is an amazing one. By all reasoning they should have been wiped out long ago. There quiet defiance to change, however, has carried them through. From the height of civilization to near extinction the Tigua have remained. They endure imprisonment by the Spanish, oppression and manipulation by everyone that followed. This is the story of a people thought to extinct, that are once again learning to survive. Early histories of the Tigua Indians are conflicting and largely untrue....   [tags: Tigua Indians Native Americans Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
5041 words
(14.4 pages)
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Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians - Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians - Algonkian lived in Quebec and Ontario; starting from the Ottawa valley, beneath Hudson Bay and above lower Ontario - the areas in which they lived in were dense woodlands with trees, such as, birch and evergreen; and snow covered the land most of the year. Adaptation to the physical Environment Home - Algonkian homes were called Wigwam, there frames were built out of saplings of tall, young tree trunks which were tied together with narrow strips of bark or root fibers, to form a dome shape - the frame was covered with woven mats or barks, then was firmly tied to the frames - light birch bark were used as covers in the summer and heavy e...   [tags: Algonkians Indians Native Americans Essays] 1219 words
(3.5 pages)
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How American Indians Have Adapted their Culture Since Colonization - My essay will have an outlook of the history of the first Americans “Indians” and how they’ve adapted with their religion, subsistence strategy, social organization, and material culture. Over the years things have change in the history of Native Americans, prior to the reconstruction period, Native Americans knew who they were and what they lived for. Before the Europeans came and changed their living they one with nature and the land they’ve came to know. They believe that America was there’s and they lived free....   [tags: American Indians, Native Americans, Colonies] 964 words
(2.8 pages)
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Yanomamo Indians - This paper looks on Yanomamo Indians traits and describes their actual way of life; the basic question that might be asked will be answered: who they are, where do they live, how do they gather food to survive and what are their skills in this domain; also how these Indians are organized politically and how are the social relations among the families and between neighboring tribes. Then, how the devastation of the scientists and journalists have changed the Yanomamo Indians way of life in the current and past century, and if they kept the same aspects of their current religion of they ancestors even thought modern world have reached them....   [tags: Yanomamo Indians Culture] 883 words
(2.5 pages)
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Review For The Woodlands Indians In The Western Great Lakes - The Woodlands Indians in the Western Great Lakes. Robert E. Ritzenthaler and Pat Ritzenthaler. Prosper Heights, IL: Waveland Press, Inc. 1993. 154 pp. In each of the ten chapters that comprise this book, the authors address important features of the Woodlands Indians’ way of life that ensure their survival. They address such important issues as how they are able to find enough food to subsist and what exactly they do eat to subsist; as well as going into topics such as their religious beliefs, traditional ceremonies, their beliefs regarding shamanism and curative techniques, their material culture, games, music, and folklore that is important to them and influences who they are as a people....   [tags: Indians Book Review] 1520 words
(4.3 pages)
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Cherokee Indians - Cherokee Indians The Cherokee Indians were one of the civilized tribes in the United States. They were located in the southeastern part of the U.S. This includes the western parts of North and South Carolina, The northern parts of Alabama and Georgia, Southwest Virginia and the Cumberland basin of Tennessee. It appears the Cherokee settled in 1000 A.D. to 1500 A.D. Their development took place in two stages or phases. The Pisgah which took place 1300 A.D. to 1540 A.D. and the Qualla which took place 1540 A.D....   [tags: History Indians Native Americans Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2181 words
(6.2 pages)
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Health Care is One Of The Largest Issues Facing American Indians Today - One of the largest issues facing American Indian's today One of the largest issues facing American Indian's today One of the largest issues facing the American Indian's today is that health care. As tribes and urban Indian health centers struggle along with the rest of the country to address the growing numbers of Elders in their communities. There are key issues and special considerations that must be addressed to ensure American Indian Elders are not forgotten in any proposed reform or redesign proposals that the newly formed Medicaid Commission or Congress put forth....   [tags: Native American Indians] 1151 words
(3.3 pages)
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Tepeticpac Indians and the Town of Tlaxcala - Tlaxcala... It has what you like was founded in 1591 by a group of thirty families of tlaxcaltec, originating in the header of Tepeticpac, Indians who – as part of the project of colonization of the frontier chichimeca - months ago had been settled in Mexquitic. At this stage Tlaxcala, or Tlaxcalilla, it received the name of the town of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios, settling in the current founders Plaza. Later, between June and July next year and to facilitate the founding of the people of San Luis, along with the town of Santiago was moved near the Tlaxcala interchangeably known as river or Santiago....   [tags: Mexican Indian History, San Luis Potosi] 976 words
(2.8 pages)
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A Southwestern Indian Culture Among Us Today: The Hopi Indians - A Southwestern Indian Culture Among Us Today: The Hopi Indians Did you know that the Ancient Indian people of the Southwestern United States have dated back to the year 10,000 BC. First appearing toward the end of the last Ice Age, they were the first “Americans.” (Noble, 1998) When Christopher Columbus arrived in the America’s in 1492 and seeing the people of this land for the first time, he thought that he had landed in India, thus giving them the name “Indians.” (Noble, 1998) However, he was nowhere near India, or that region of the world....   [tags: Hopi Indians southwestern united states] 1993 words
(5.7 pages)
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Cultural Aspects of the Navajo Indians - Culture gives definition to a group of people’s way of life. Culture defines people; It is who the people are. The Navajo Indians are a group located in the southwestern part of the United States with a distinct culture. They originated there sometime between the year “1200 and 1500” (Craats 4). Unlike the beginning of their residence in the United States, different aspects of the culture have changed, but the Navajo people still remain a culturally rich group of people. To this day, their political organization, economy, social organization, and religious beliefs are the four major elements that make them who they are as a whole....   [tags: Native American, Culture, Indian tribe]
:: 8 Works Cited
2384 words
(6.8 pages)
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The Otomi Indians and Montecillo - Montecillo... It has what you like a group of Otomi Indians around 1600 and tarascan avecindaron part of the ejidos in the East of the city of San Luis Potosí. The new settlement was small in size: only consisted of two leagues, measured in terms of the city towards the Cerro de San Pedro, and width less than a quarter of a League. The name of Montecillo, adopted from the outset by its inhabitants according to the titles of erection of the village, was derived from the fact that the lands they settled originally were rough, hilly and fruitless....   [tags: Mexican Indian History, San Luis Potosi] 1119 words
(3.2 pages)
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Indians of Native America - The Cheyenne tribe of Native American Indians are what is now the most well known and prominent of Indian tribes that have ever settled in North America. They originally lived in villages, in some of the eastern parts of the country and occupied much of what is today, Minnesota, until they were forced to migrate to the Great Plains around 1800s (Grinnell). From being moved into the plains, the Cheyenne tribe separated into Northern Cheyenne and the Southern Cheyenne and their land ranged from the Missouri River to the Arkansas River....   [tags: indian tribes, the cheyenne, great plains]
:: 4 Works Cited
1126 words
(3.2 pages)
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Laurence M. Hauptman's Between Two Fires: American Indians in the Civil War - The American Civil War tore apart many American lives. These people lost loved ones, had to endure the pains of those who lost limbs, and deal with emotional needs. However American lives were not the only ones that suffered and fought the war. American Indians served for both the North and the South during the Civil War. There reasons was to what they could gain from the side the chose, pride for the land they lived in, and to Indians did not have much going for them at the time. From generals to privets they stood there ground and fought with pride....   [tags: American Citil War Indians Native Americans] 1539 words
(4.4 pages)
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The American Indians - Subculture Assignment The American Indians are also known as Native Americans who are present within the United States and comprise varying ethnic groups and tribes and hold distinctive attributes which makes them different from the white Americans who are present in the society of the United States. The immigration to the US started from the 15th century due to which the society of the United States was seen to be holding distinctive tribes and immigrants who formed groups in the US and started achieving recognition in the US society....   [tags: Native Americans, Ethnic Groups. Tribes]
:: 4 Works Cited
1151 words
(3.3 pages)
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The Tapirapé Indians - In South America, there are many indigenous groups that have been studied and analyzed by anthropologists. The Tapirapé Indians is an indigenous Brazilian tribe that has a very interesting culture that has been influenced by other indigenous groups in Brazil, while being preserved from Europeans influences. Most ethnographic research about the Tapirapé Indians has been performed by Herbert Baldus and Charles Wagley from the early 1900’s to the 1970’s. In this paper, I will analyze the language, power, social relations, material practices, belief system and institutions and rituals of the Tapirapé Indians and discuss how each category plays a role in their culture....   [tags: Culture]
:: 3 Works Cited
1942 words
(5.5 pages)
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The Ojibway Indians - ... The Ojibway language is from the Algonquian language family. Ojibway words are very long and hard to pronounce. Here is a few of the Ojibway words translated into English. Mee-gwetch means thank you, Muckadaymashkeekiwabu is the word coffee, and Ahnimooshug is the Ojibway word for dogs. Weapons, Hunting, and Tools Ojibway warriors use bows, arrows, clubs, axes, and flails. A flail is a handle connected to a spiky ball with a chain. It was very hard to control. If they swung the chain the wrong way, the spiky ball could hit them and cause injury or death....   [tags: chippewa, ojibway, settlers] 861 words
(2.5 pages)
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The History of the Navajo Indians - The Navajo Indians used to live in northwestern Canada and Alaska. 1,000 years ago the Navajo Indians traveled south, because there was more qualities they had seeked there. When the Navajo Indians traveled south there was a lot of oil in the 1940’s. Today the Navajo Indians are located in the Four Corners. The marriage practices for the Navajo Indians are very unique. The bride must be bought with horses, sheep, or other valuable items. What many Navajo Indians used to use in the 40’s were love potions....   [tags: Native Americans, informative] 575 words
(1.6 pages)
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Deontology in Jim and the Indians - Jim has found himself in a quandary. When arriving in a South American town he has happened upon a captain and his army about to assassinate twenty Indians in order to deter other Indians protesting against the government. Jim is treated as a guest to the town and offered the privilege of shooting one of the Indians in which case the captain will let the other nineteen go, however declining this offer will mean the captain will carry on as planned and kill all twenty. Consequentialism is ordinarily distinct from deontology, as deontology offers rightness or wrongness of an act, rather than the outcome of the action....   [tags: rules, consequentialism, good will] 891 words
(2.5 pages)
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Being the Best Missionary to the Indians - ... The fact of their skills not up to par with ours is mainly because as a Jesuit we have been trained for tough situations and for the purpose of communicating with new people who others may not want to converse with. This brings up the next quality to which is cultural sensitivity. Cultural sensitivity means one must be wanting and willing to set aside their own cultural ideas, beliefs, and patterns for the native culture. The reason for one having to set aside their culture is to learn the new views, values, language, beliefs, and patterns in communication of the natives....   [tags: teamwork, respect, culture] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Conquering of the Karankawa Indians - The Karankawa Indians lived along the Gulf of Mexico in the coastal bend. Their territory ranged from the west end of Galveston bay southwestward to Corpus Christi bay. Contrary to popular belief the Karankawa were not cannibals. They did like many other Texas Indian tribes eat their captured enemy warriors and leaders to gain their strength or courage but never for food. The name Karankawa was given to many bands of Indians in the area including the Cocos, Copanes, Cujanes, Guapites, Carancaguases (the source of the name Karankawa)....   [tags: Gulf of Mexico Naive-Americans] 1115 words
(3.2 pages)
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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians - History of Cherokee Indians in the United States In the early nineteenth century, while the United States expanded into the lower south, white settlers faced a difficulty. That colony was already home for the Indians, and most Americans thought Cherokees were getting into their way of development. Even though the land was the Indian’s way of life, Americans decided to evacuate them. When Andrew Jackson took office, he pursued the Indian removal policy. Under his administration no less than ninety four treaties were made with the Indians, but the United States began moving them westward....   [tags: Native American history in the US] 1473 words
(4.2 pages)
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Conflicts Between Colonists and Indians - In many situations, introducing a new party into a land that was formerly inhabited and assimilated by another party with completely different societal, political and cultural values results in a lengthy period of transition and conflict due to misunderstanding. Colonization and the interactions between colonists and Indians during the early stages of settlement in the New World was certainly no exception. Although European societies and political structures were hierarchical and left less to the impoverished members of society, Indian societies and political structures were not as patriarchal and featured communal cooperation....   [tags: Communication, Cooperation, Disease] 1394 words
(4 pages)
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American Indians and Alaska Natives - The United States population growth rate continues to increase gradually by less than 1% per year. Over the past decade, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) population increased by 26.7%.1 According to 2010 census, there are approximately 5.2 million AIANs living in the United States representing 1.7% of the U.S. population.2 By 2050, the projected population of AIANs will reach an estimated 8.6 million.2 Alaska Natives (AN) comprise of the second largest population group in Alaska. They make up a bigger percentage of Alaska’s population than Native Americans in any other state....   [tags: population growth, alaska, natives]
:: 11 Works Cited
927 words
(2.6 pages)
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Apache Indians - Apache Prisoners of War The Chiricahuas, who were once one of the most feared Native American tribes of the southwest, became prisoners of war by the United States for a period of twenty seven years. This period of time was the longest captivity a Native American tribe had ever been imprisoned. The Chiricahuas imprisonment began in 1886, when the United States Army transported four hundred Native Americans from San Carlos and Fort Apache reservations to army posts in Florida (Davis). By 1887, the bulk of the Chiricahuas had been transported to the Mount Vernon barracks in Alabama, and the rest of the dislocated band of Chiricahuas, including the now famous Geronimo were reunited by 1888 (Da...   [tags: Native American Indians] 1423 words
(4.1 pages)
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Lakota (Sioux) Indians and Creation - ... Finally a young man decided to see what Iktomi was about, and came up. His name was Tokahe, and is now called the First. Tokahe was shown the wonders of the top soil by Iktomi and he then decided to bring his people up with him. He was telling them of the great things he had seen, but an Elder warned him of the danger. Tokahe was still determined to bring his people up, and so the Elder went out of the hole before the others and became the Buffalo Nation, to protect the people when danger arose....   [tags: Native American beliefs]
:: 6 Works Cited
1543 words
(4.4 pages)
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Mongols and Plains Indians - Two cultures, thousands of miles apart, show similarities that would be expected of neighboring civilizations. Both cultures arose on similar terrain. This terrain was a luscious grassland. One civilization grew up in Midwest North America, the other in Central Asia. The first civilization was the Plains Indians. The second was the Mongols. Each culture had a common form of religion. This religion was shamanism. Wordiq defines it as "a range of traditional beliefs and practices that involve the ability to diagnose, cure, and sometimes cause human suffering because of a special relationship with, or control over, spirits." The cultures were also affected by the horse....   [tags: Comparative, Cultures] 1809 words
(5.2 pages)
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Indians in Unexpected Places - Deloria, with his analytical survey, Indians in Unexpected Places, recounts the synthesis of western white expectations, and American Indians. The book takes its title from the general thesis, which explores not only the relationship between Indians and their introduction into an alien culture, but also the expectations that we have of Indians and how they “should” interact with our white western culture. According to Deloria, the common notion is that, “Indian people, corralled on isolated and impoverished reservations, missed out on modernity- indeed, almost missed out of history itself.” (Deloria p....   [tags: Non-Fiction Literature, persuasive] 893 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Semi-Nomadic Chickasaw Indians - ... Chickasaw Indians were semi nomadic, people who moved according to season in search for food, water, shelter, and land. Families lived in villages made up of small houses with more than one house per family. Throughout the family, tasks were established separately; one category for the women and one for the men. Women were introduced at an early age how maintain their own land and raise their own crops. They accommodated in looking after their children, cooking, and cleaning. They also tended to the slaves which were often given through war with other tribes....   [tags: faith healing, religious, captives] 605 words
(1.7 pages)
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Western Indians - In the late nineteenth century the expansion to the west increased the American culture. Since population was growing they needed to satisfy demands equally for every person. The idea of Manifest Destiny was used as a justification for the expansion and westward movement. Natives Americans were against the thought Americans had about the West. As a result Americans put a number of policies that helped remove the Natives Americans of the West. Americans were trying to destroy the culture Natives had....   [tags: Native American Indian History] 913 words
(2.6 pages)
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American Indians - American Indians form one of the minorities groups in America. Yet their native soil has the leading population in the world. America was inclined by their viewpoint before the first settler. Many of the Indians came to America as early as the turn of the century, in which they were deprived of residency until a congressional act was approved in 1946(Lee 106). Most Indians have supplied abundant assistance to the culture and flawless being of US; majorities of these donations regulate to the science field....   [tags: Native Americans, American History] 895 words
(2.6 pages)
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Indians and the Frontier - Indians and the Frontier The frontier after the Civil War was changed just like the rest of America. Immigrants flocked here from all over the globe. This led to huge population increases, which meant that more land was to be used. The frontier was slowly divided among the masses, and people began claiming their stakes. With the land being devoured, the Indians felt that they were being denied the rights to what was theirs. The Indians were greatly outnumbered, and out skilled. In one of the last deciding battles, Wounded Knee, the Indians lost one-hundred and forty-six dead, and fifty-one injured, where as the U.S....   [tags: Papers] 482 words
(1.4 pages)
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American Indians - The American Indians Between 1609 To 1865 The Native Americans or American Indians, once occupied all of the entire region of the United States. They were composed of many different groups, who speaked hundreds of languages and dialects. The Indians from the Southwest used to live in large built terraced communities and their way of sustain was from the agriculture where they planted squash, pumpkins, beans and corn crops. Trades between neighboring tribes were common, this brought in additional goods and also some raw materials such as gems, cooper....   [tags: essays research papers Native American Indian] 1645 words
(4.7 pages)
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Lakota Indians - Lakota History Throughout North American expansion the Lakota people have suffered some of the worst and straight forward persecutions against Native American Indians, and live in some of the poorest if not the poorest conditions in the United States. This is sad for a people who use to be one of the strongest nations in the Central Plains, feared by white men and other Indian nations alike for their ferocity and warrior abilities in the heat of battle. The Lakota arrived at positions of dominance because of their success in controlling live¬stock, land, trading rights, and people....   [tags: Native American Indian History] 1587 words
(4.5 pages)
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North American Indians - As the first ethnographer of Indian culture, George Catlin plays a vital role by offering the western eye a glimpse into the “uncivilized” North American Indian culture—both pictorially and textually. Following the Lewis and Clark expedition, Catlin took it upon himself to set out and paint prominent Indian leaders in their traditional attire, as well as to document his experiences through a series of letters. Catlin’s work, North American Indians, stands out as a valuable time capsule for the modern reader....   [tags: Ethnology, Catlin] 633 words
(1.8 pages)
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American Indians and World War II - By 1940, Native Americans had experienced many changes and counter-changes in their legal status in the United States. Over the course of the nineteenth century, most tribes lost part or all of their ancestral lands and were forced to live on reservations. Following the American Civil War, the federal government abrogated most of the tribes’ remaining sovereignty and required communal lands to be allotted to individuals. The twentieth century also saw great changes for Native Americans, such as the Citizenship Act and the Indian New Deal....   [tags: American History, World History]
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1338 words
(3.8 pages)
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Attempts to Spread Christianity to the Pueblo Indians - ... They were not a closed minded people, saying my way or no way, instead they were open to listening to the views of others. They would attend the Spanish masses and other church services; as a result the Spanish took it as a sign of their willing acceptance to Catholicism. However they had no intention of letting Christianity completely take the place of their own traditional religion. They we’re willing to add Christian components to their own religion, but not replace theirs with Christianity....   [tags: religion, covert, spanish] 554 words
(1.6 pages)
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Ysleta Mission for Christianizing the Tigua Indians - ... Bishop Salpointe, of Tucson, dedicated the building on October 19, 1682. During the next 50 years The Spaniards and Native Americans who came from the north established four new communities in the El Paso/Socorro area: San Antonio de Senecú del Sur, San Lorenzo, Nuestra Señora de la Limpia Concepción de Los Piros de Socorro del Sur; and Santa María de las Caldas. In the process of construction of a federal building in the 1990s, archeologists uncovered the remains of Ysleta Jacal, the Tigua settlement associated with the nearby Mission Ysleta....   [tags: texas, ritual, archeologists] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
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Tapestry of a Tribe: The Story of the Ute Indians - “You think you own whatever land you land on The earth is just a dead thing you can claim But I know every rock and tree and creature Has a life, has a spirit, has a name.” ~Disney's Pocohontas And so it is with the Ute Indians, a people whose great respect and admiration for the land and its inhabitants weaves in and out of their culturally rich heritage like threads in a tapestry. Not unlike other Native American tribes, the Utes feel a deep connection to the land that is their home. Everything they believe and all they do is a direct result of this connection....   [tags: Native American History ]
:: 5 Works Cited
1654 words
(4.7 pages)
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Social History of the Africans and Indians In Florida - African slaves and the Indigenous people of the Southern United States and Northern Mexico were targets of harsh and racist treatment by both the European and American white colonizers. Due to the marginalization of African slaves and Native American peoples the question of how they responded to this oppression has hardly been explored by historians. Scholars have written extensively about the separate lives of both these groups of people, including their interactions with white Europeans, but less is known about how these two groups interacted with one another....   [tags: interactions in Florida, American history] 2863 words
(8.2 pages)
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The Passamaquoddy Indians - The Passamaquoddy Indians For several hundred years people have sought answers to the Indian problems, who are the Indians, and what rights do they have. These questions may seem simple, but the answers themselves present a difficult number of further questions and answers. State and Federal governments have tried to provide some order with a number of laws and policies, sometimes resulting in state and federal conflicts. The Federal Government's attempt to deal with Indian tribes can be easily understood by following the history of Federal Indian Policy....   [tags: Papers] 1933 words
(5.5 pages)
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The Anasazi Indians - The Anasazi Indians From the scattered references made about the ancient Anasazi Indians in Tony Hillerman's A Thief of Time, one can identify several cultural characteristics of this mysterious tribe. One can discover how they lived, where they lived, their religion, simple day to day activities, and mysteries about their culture. Even though many references are made about this tribe, people will never know the truth, for there is an unsolved mystery to why the Anasazi disappeared. Even to this day no one knows what happened to them....   [tags: essays research papers] 527 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Apache Indians - The Apaches, like most Native Americans, have no written history other than that written by white men. But the story of the Apaches did not begin in the American Southwest but in the northwestern corner of North America, the western Subarctic region of Alaska and Canada. The Apache Indians belong to the southern branch of the Athabascan group, whose languages constitute a large family, with speakers in Alaska, western Canada, and American Southwest. The fact that the Apaches originated in the western mountainous Subarctic region makes their nomadic behavior after the arrival in the American Southwest more comprehensible; the tribes of the Southwest were highly mobile and moved from place to...   [tags: essays research papers] 1104 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Comanche Indians - The Comanche Indians The Comanche have most recently been found in the Southern Plains, which stretches from Nebraska to the northern part of Texas. They were fully in Texas by the 1700’s. It is believed that the Comanche derived from the Shoshone Indians, found in Wyoming. The language spoken by the Comanche is actually a form of Uto-Aztecan language that when compared to the Shoshone language, the two are very similar. The Comanche’s were great warriors and did not really indulge in religious practices too much nor did they use folktales or legends very often....   [tags: Papers] 567 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Blackfoot Indians - The Blackfoot Indians The wind blows across the lone prairie, causing the golden heads of grass to sway in a synchronized motion. On the horizon stands a herd of buffalo with bowed heads silhouetted by the slowly sinking sun. In the east stands an Indian war party mounted on horseback, each individual in different multicolored attire, all with either bows or spears in hand. As they move in for the attack, the mystical scene slowly fades from vision.... This dreamlike scene was once everyday life to the American Indian before they were robbed of all that made their life real....   [tags: essays research papers] 2345 words
(6.7 pages)
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The Hopi Indians - The Hopi Indians In the southwestern United States, above northern Arizona, are three mesas. The mesas create the home for the Hopi Indians. The Hopi have a deeply religious, isolated, tribal culture with a unique history. The Hopi stress group cooperation. The tribe is organized around a clan system. In a clan system, all the members consider themselves relatives. The clans form a social glue that has held the Hopi villages together. Clan membership provides a singular Hopi identity. The Hopi have a highly developed belief system which contains many gods and spirits....   [tags: American America History] 766 words
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The Mandan Indians - The Mandan Indians were a small, peaceful tribe located at the mouth of the Knife River on the Missouri near present day Bismarck, North Dakota. The Mandan were most known for their friendliness and their homes, called earth lodges. The women of the Mandan tribe tended their gardens, prepared food, and maintained lodges while the men spent their time hunting or seeking spiritual knowledge. The Mandan Indians performed many ceremonies such as the Buffalo Dance and the Okipa Ceremony that have been the center of great interest to many historians....   [tags: American America History] 1955 words
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The Cherokee Indians - The Cherokee Indians The American Indian History in the Eastern part of the country is always associated with the Cherokee Indian nation. The Cherokee's were by far the largest and most advanced of the tribes when Europeans first arrived and came in contact with Native Americans. There are too many tribes to go over background on every one of them, so I'm going to focus on the Cherokee's since many of their ways and customs are so similar to all the other tribes in the East. When Europeans first arrived in North America, the Cherokees occupied a large expanse of territory in the Southeast....   [tags: essays research papers] 974 words
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The Creek Indians - The Creek Indians Location and Background The early English traders gave the Creek native Americans their name because they usually built their villages on or near creeks or rivers. If they were to still have their villages it would include areas of Northern Florida and Eastern Louisiana and Southern Tennessee. The majority of the villages were located along the banks of the Coosa, Tallaposa, Flint, Ocmulgee, and Chattachoochee rivers. The native word for the most powerful band of Creeks was the "Muskogees"....   [tags: American America History] 752 words
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The Pueblo Indians -  The Pueblo Indians are the historic descendants of the Anasazi peoples, also known as the “Basket Makers”. The Pueblo people live in several locations in northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico in compact, permanent settlements known as pueblos. Pueblo means village or town in Spanish. The Pueblos were first encountered by the Spanish in 1539, by the Spanish Franciscan missionary Marcos de Niza. A year later the Spanish explorer Francisco Vaasquez de Coronado, searching for the legendary Seven Cities of Ciibola, led an expedition among the Hopi people....   [tags: essays research papers] 600 words
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Cherokee Indian Marriages - Although there are several beliefs on how the Cherokee first arrived historical evidence shows they inhabited southeastern North American between A.D. 1000 and 1500 (Boudinot, 1829). Elias (1829) found The Trail of Tears to be “the best known episode in history as well as the worst,” for this devastating event forced relocation of the Indians from their home land in the southeast to a new unfamiliar land in Oklahoma. Thousands of Indians were forced from their homes with no warning and directed to march in the middle of winter to Oklahoma (Boudinot, 1829)....   [tags: American Indians]
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Influence of Settlers on the Indians - In the 1830's the Plains Indians were sent to the Great American Deserts in the west because the white men did not think they deserved the land. Afterwards, they were able to live peacefully, and to follow their traditions and customs, but when the white men found out the land they were on were still good for agricultural, or even for railroad land they took it back. Thus, the white man movement westward quickly begun. This prospect to expand westward caused the government to become thoroughly involved in the lives of the Plains Indians....   [tags: History AP US] 905 words
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On How the American Indians Were Removed from Their Land - "One by one Indian peoples were removed to the West. The Delaware, the Ottawa, Shawnee, Pawnee and Potawatomi, the Sauk and Fox, Miami and Kickapoo, the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole. In all some 90 thousand Indians were relocated. The Cherokee were among the last to go. Some reluctantly agreed to move. Others were driven from their homes at bayonet point. Almost two thousands of them died along the route they remembered as the Trail of Tears." For decades, the state of Georgia sought to enforce its authority over the Cherokee Nation, but its efforts had little effect until the election of President Andrew Jackson, a longtime supporter of Indian removal....   [tags: Native American history]
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The United States And The Cherokee Indians - The United States and the Cherokee Indians The debate over the legality of sovereignty and acquired lands from the native Americans, specifically the Cherokee, has long been debated. The issues involved have included treaties, land sold, and the right of the Government to physically enforce their rules on Indian land "sovereignty". This paper will examine the strategy used by the Federal Governments, the State Governments as well as those of the Cherokee Indians. The three-way relationship as well as the issues will examine how the interpretation of the Constitution changed society prior to the year of 1840....   [tags: essays research papers] 2392 words
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indians - “James Luna, A Native American Man,” is an insightful, cut the bullshit, view of the modern Indian culture. I identify with Luna’s viewpoints as I have seen many of the situations he describes with his art to be true to life. I have spent a lot of time in Northern Canada fishing with my brother and father. The areas we visit are predominantly Indian reservations. Having spent quite a bit of time getting to know these types of towns and people, I have grown aware of some of the many problems that surround the modern day reservation lifestyle....   [tags: essays research papers] 437 words
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Indians - Mohegans and Comanches Different or Similar Long ago, the Earth was formed atop the back of a giant turtle. From the earth the Great Spirit put life into all things: trees, plants, animals and people. An Indian was created named Gunche Mundo who developed a Mother Tribe, and divided it into three clans--Turtles, Turkeys and Wolves. The Wolf People, known as Mohegans, separated from the Turtles and Turkeys, and headed east toward the rising sun. While the Mohegans headed east to find land, a tribe called the Comanches headed south....   [tags: essays research papers] 642 words
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History Of The Cherokee Indians - History of the Cherokee Indians: Growth to Reduction of the tribes I would like to provide you with some information regarding the Cherokee Indians. I am one quarter Cherokee Indian. My grandmother is full blooded Cherokee and may mother is one half Cherokee. Cherokee comes from a creek word "Cherokee" meaning "people of a different speech" (Cherokee history 1996). There are 561 officially recognized Indian tribes in the United States. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is the largest database of records and histories of Native American tribes in the country....   [tags: Native American History] 810 words
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indians - the native american indians are very spiritula people. They hunt bison and buffalo In Indian Blood II, I incorrectly stated that Allan W. Eckert started "the Blue Jacket War."  He did not.  It seems clear now that Robert Van Trees did.  In fact, to call it a war is to mischaracterize this mindless tirade by Van Trees and some of his ardent supporters over a simple academic question:  Was Blue Jacket white.      Blue Jacket was a Shawnee chief and it is not really important whether he was adopted or native--any more than it makes a difference whether one of his wives was white, which Van Trees does not dispute....   [tags: essays research papers] 990 words
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Past, Present, Future: American Indians and Latino Americans - Ethnicity is likely to always play a role in how people interact in this country, how they build their unique sense of identity, how they perceive themselves and the world around them. Ethnic groups will always act differently especially in this country with such a diverse history, and plethora of people of different backgrounds. American Indians are a group that will has an interesting set of challenges because they are a minority in the United States that did not emigrate from another country, but were essentially victims of American Manifest Destiny....   [tags: ethnicity, community interaction]
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Two Different Perspectives of Life Experiences with Indians - Mary Rowlandson’s “A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson” and Benjamin Franklin’s “Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America” are two different perspectives based on unique experiences the narrators had with “savages.” Benjamin Franklin’s “Remarks Concerning the Savages…” is a comparison between the ways of the Indians and the ways of the Englishmen along with Franklin’s reason why the Indians should not be defined as savages. “A Narrative of the Captivity…” is a written test of faith about a brutally traumatic experience that a woman faced alone while being held captive by Indians....   [tags: God, benjamin franklin, mary rowlandson]
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Analysis of the Relationship Between the American Indians and European Settlers - The story of the early interactions between European settlers in America with its native populations is often times a skewed history. As children, we grow up and learn in schools about the first Thanksgiving and how the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony made peace with the Wampanoag Indians. As an educator myself, there is a portion of our common formative assessment that pertains to the Wampanoag Indian Squanto and how he aided the Pilgrims by teaching them how to plant corn and capture eels in the nearby rivers....   [tags: U.S. History]
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Ongoing Injustice: The American Indians - In the modern world we are bombarded by others’ teachings. Being constantly surrounded by the ideas of computers, televisions and books we are influenced, we are shaped. We accept what we’ve been told and avoid discovering the truth because we know no better, and it’s safer. Too often “We fail to step outside of that safe sanctuary defined by what other’s wish us to know.”1 If the general population of the United States of America were asked what they knew of the Indians, common replies would be of romantic visions of the once free roaming, free spirited peoples of the nine-teenth century, the melodrama of the conflicts between the pioneers and the Indians, the scalpings, painted bodie...   [tags: essays research papers] 3242 words
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Held Captive by Indians in The Unredeemed Captive by John Demos - ... From this vantage point, they observed the villagers as they prepared for the night. There were rumors accumulating but by 1704 there were so many over a long period of time that everybody just ignored but still took precaution. Since they had been alerted to the possibility of a raid, they all took refuge within the palisade, and a guard was posted. The raid occurred in winter which was atypical. There was a couple feet of snow on the ground. The Indians would have to walk nearly 300 miles to get to Deerfield and return back with captives....   [tags: raid, journey, interpretation] 1022 words
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In defense of the Indians by Las Casas and On the Cannibals by Montaigne - Acceptance and understanding are major factors that must be met in order for people to come together. In many circumstances, it is up to the minority whom are joining the majority to adopt and change its customs and practices in order to assimilate into the majority. However, there are some circumstances in which the minority somehow becomes able to overpower majority and take control. This is the situation which occurred between the Natives and the Europeans during the 1513 conquest. The Spanish Conquest of Central and South America and the voyage to the New World by Christopher Columbus in 1492 brought the Spanish crown a great amount of wealth....   [tags: Conquest of New World]
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Explaination of Horse Culture in Plains Indians Summaries by Hämäläinen - ... Deeming the Plains as large area of grassland that lacked resources, and established the New Mexico colony. Despite the fact that the Spanish stopped before entering the Plains, equestrianism did not stop spreading into the Great American Desert. Through contact with the Spanish, several Plains tribes managed to obtain horses and develop unique horse cultures. The Jumanos, for example, gained horses through trading with settlers in the north of Mexico, long before the Spanish settled in New Mexico....   [tags: equestrianism, expansion, competition] 1461 words
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Eastern Woodland Indians and the Seven Years' War - War is always destructive and devastating for those involved leaving behind a trail of death and barren landscape leading to heartbreak and shattered lives. War has its subjugators and its defeated. One enjoys complete freedom and rights while the other has neither freedom nor rights. Defeated and broken is where the Eastern Woodland Indians found themselves after both the Seven Years' war and the American Revolution. The Europeans in their campaigns to garner control of the land used the native peoples to gain control and ultimately stripped the rightful owners of their land and freedoms....   [tags: american revolution, native americans]
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Seneca Indians: Allies And Enemies - Seneca Indians: Allies and Enemies Seneca are among the most respected and feared. The Seneca are culturally similar to their Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, an Mohawk confederates. The five tribes were known as the Five Nations or the League of Five Nations. Sometime between 1715 and 1722 the Tuscaroras from North Carolina joined the confederacy and changed the name to the Six Nations. In their relations with white settlers the Seneca played the role of an independent power and were this way from the very start....   [tags: essays research papers] 1177 words
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Kachinas and Art is Important to Everyday Life of Hopi Indians - The Hopi Indians use art in their everyday life from woven rugs to clay pots. Art is a very important aspect of the tribe’s life and each piece is said to have a story behind it. The Hopi tribe even has dances said to bring luck and prosper to the community. They also have a very unique piece of art that ties directly to their religion, kachinas mask and dolls. Kachinas are spirits and gods of the Hopi tribes. During the winter solstice until the ripening of corn these spirits are said to reside within the tribe....   [tags: gods, culture, religion] 546 words
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Native Indians: The Captivity and Restoration by Mary Rowlandson - As Her Role in the Society The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration, written by Mary Rowlandson describes the events that she was taken captive alongside a number of people by Native Indians. The story is written in first person; therefore, it has details on the happenings during and after the captives. Mary narrates her experiences and highlights her views of her captors and the Native Indian community at large. The narratives indicate Mary Rowlandson's position as a female in her society during her time....   [tags: marriage, faith in god, strong will]
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Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears - Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears What made the Cherokee culture distinctive towards others in the Trail of Tears time period was that they had a more peaceful, harmless outlook on the situation. In 1814, Andrew Jackson who would eventually become the President of the United States, had his and his whole army’s lives on the line in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend to the British forces when the Cherokee allied with them to win the battle. Surprisingly, 16 years later when Jackson was President of the United States, he made the deciding decision on the controversy of whether or not the Cherokee deserved their land....   [tags: the trail of loss and adversity]
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Rituals and Drama of the Apache Indians of North America - RITUALS AND DRAMA (Sunrise Ceremony) Rituals are represented in our lives through weddings, funerals, ceremonies and repetitive actions that we use on a daily basis. The Apache Indians of North America have had many traditions and rituals that were practiced religiously. Amongst them is the Initiation service or commonly identified as the Sunrise Ceremony for women. The ceremony originates from the White Painted Woman who was the ‘Changing Woman’ and is held a season after a girl’s first menstrual cycle....   [tags: Tradition, Symbolism, Mood]
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Ancient Civilization: Mayans, Cro-Magnons, Paleo-Indians - ... The Paleo-Indians were constantly moving from the climate change in small bands where people married outside each band. In act three, the glaciers were never still causing the North Atlantic climate to never be still. From the ice sheets melting and shrinking, the Paleo-Indians from the north began to move south as an annual round and the Paleo-Indians from the south grew rapidly because of breeding the populations that went by. It is to be believed that maybe the Paleo-Indians took the ocean and paddled their way south but all we know is their tool kits (Fagan 50)....   [tags: celts, diseases, natural disasters, environment] 1623 words
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Indians And Colonists Relations - Reflecting on the colonization of North America is an uneasy topic for most Americans. The thought of war between the Indians and the early settlers creates an image of clashing cultures between the well-armed Europeans and the hand-crafted weaponry of the native Indians. We tend to have the perception that the early colonists came and quickly took away the land from the Indians but, in reality, the Europeans did not have this power. Though French explorers and English settlers had a different perception of land ownership than that of the Native Americans, the fate of the Europeans rested in the hands of the Indians....   [tags: American History] 1223 words
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Indians Vs. The Constitution - They are Native Americans who are trying to build better lives for themselves but are stopped in there tracks by the state supreme court. Proposition 5 passed in November of 98, which would allow more gambling in the Indian reservations. The proposition was ruled to be unconstitutional. Now the Indians are rebutting the fact that they are sovereign and the ballot was passed. Under existing law, Indian tribes operate as semi-sovereign nations, and are liable under federal law only. Recently, the long-standing political and legal tension between the Indians and the government, which has characterized the relationship since colonization, has entered into the debate over tribal gaming....   [tags: essays research papers] 2852 words
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Dallas Cowboys and Indians - Dallas Cowboys and Indians Culture or Civilization taken in its wide ethnographic sense is that complex whole which includes knowledge, belief, art, morals, law, custom, and any other capabilities and habits required by man as a member of a society. -E.B. Tylor In America, there are two cultural traditions that have blended together to form the alloy that is American culture or the American system of "knowledge, belief, art, morals, law, custom..." The first cultural tradition, European, is widely thought to have been the dominant culture in influencing American culture....   [tags: Native Americans Culture Papers]
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