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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Inclusion"
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Inclusion of Students - The data presented in this study show that students with disabilities are making academic achievements in the inclusion classroom. This study also suggests that the negative social interactions between the general education students and special education students are minimal, and does not have a significant effect on the academic achievements of the target population. Findings in the literature review by Salend and Garrick (1999) concluded students with disabilities gain academic achievements in the inclusion classroom....   [tags: Special Education, inclusion classroom] 745 words
(2.1 pages)
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Inclusion in the Classroom - Inclusion in the Classroom Inclusion is one of the very controversial topics concerning the education of students in today's society. It is the effort to put children with disabilities into the general education classes. The main purpose is to ensure that every child receives the best education possible by placing them in the best learning environment possible. Inclusion is a very beneficial idea, supported by law that promotes a well-rounded education while also teaching acceptance of others....   [tags: Inclusion Classroom Education Learning Essays]
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2430 words
(6.9 pages)
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The Positive Effects of Inclusion of Special Education Students - Missing Works Cited Introduction Special education has undergone immense changes through the years. Research and studies on the debate of whether or not inclusion is appropriate for special education students is just beginning to cultivate. The question has always been, what is best for these students. Schools and teachers are becoming leaders in the exploration of new paths, in search of new teaching styles and techniques....   [tags: Special Education, Inclusion Policy] 2372 words
(6.8 pages)
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Inclusion - ... Working as a team is an attribute which as a professional, you would already hold, however you would shape the previous experience which you already have around your role as a Community Education Officer. The ability to use communication within and outside of the workforce is also an attribute which you would already hold and can improve upon through your job role, using different aspects of communication in order to suit the service users’ needs, in connection with this idea, Ambalu (1997) stated that, “Human communication extends beyond the simple signalling of basic needs to the powerful and sophisticated use of language…” Meaning that basic use of language can be altered and used in a unique way in order to cater for individual needs....   [tags: education, learning, Community Education Officer ]
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1925 words
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Inclusion - Although no consensus exists about the definition of inclusion, it can usually be agreed upon that inclusion is a movement to merge regular and special education so that all students can be educated together in a general education classroom. Because of the lack of consensus, inclusion is a hotly debated topic in education today. Mainstreaming and Inclusion are used interchangably for many people. This is where the confusion may lie. For the purpose of this paper I will be using the term inclusion....   [tags: essays research papers] 1632 words
(4.7 pages)
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Inclusion - Within the past decades and a big discussion has occurred regarding the most appropriate setting within which to provide education for students in special education. Although the change in the educational environment is significant for handicapped student the concepts of inclusion also bring up new issues for the regular education classroom teachers. The movement toward full inclusion of special education students in general education setting has brought special education to a crossroad and stirred considerable debate on its future direction....   [tags: essays research papers] 1042 words
(3 pages)
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Inclusion - Inclusion in Class Inclusion “mainstreams” physically, mentally, and multiply disabled children into regular classrooms. Back in the sixties and the seventies, disabled children were excluded all together from regular classrooms. Currently, the federal inclusion law, I.D.E.A. (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), addresses children whose handicaps range from autistic and very severe to mild (I.D.E.A. Law Page). From state to state the laws of inclusion vary. The laws may permit the special needs children to be in regular classrooms all day and for all subjects or for just one or two subjects (Vann 31)....   [tags: essays research papers] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Inclusion - Educational Psychology Inclusion What a society feels about it’s diverse membership, particularly about citizens who are different, is expressed in the institutions of that society. A close look at the major institutions of our society the schools, the legislatures, and the courts should tell us a lot about the place of exceptional children in our society. In the category of exceptional children one would find a list of any and every child that requires education in academic matters as well as life skills....   [tags: essays research papers] 1633 words
(4.7 pages)
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Making a Less Restrictive Environment Through Inclusion - Making a Less Restrictive Environment Through Inclusion Inclusion can be an excellent opportunity for many students with special needs when the classroom situation appropriately fits the needs of the students with special needs, the needs of the rest of the students in the classroom, and the teacher. It allows special needs children the ability to defy stigmas, a deficit of resources, and unrealistically low expectations. Social atmospheres enable both the special needs and non-special needs children necessary potential bonding opportunities for proper development....   [tags: Inclusion Education School Classroom Essays]
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3284 words
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Diversity and Inclusion - ... 2009, p. 49). In reviewing text book Racial and Ethnic Groups put forth the notion that socialites are made-up by a number of different groups and subgroups. The two main groups are the dominant or the majority, and the other is subordinate or the minority. It is also purposed as highlighted by Schaefer (2011) that “There are four types of minority or subordinate groups. All four, except where noted, have the five properties previously outlined. The four criteria for classifying minority groups are race, ethnicity, religion, and gender.” (Schaefer, R....   [tags: Informative Essay] 1109 words
(3.2 pages)
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Topic: Inclusion - Topic: Inclusion Inclusion is a topic that is still at the forefront of educational controversy, in the classroom and also in Congress. According to The Cyclopedic Education Dictionary, inclusion can be defined in two ways: one, inclusion can be defined as the placement of disabled children in a general classroom setting for the entire school day and two, inclusion can be defined as the placement of disabled students into a general classroom setting for part of the day while they are placed in a special setting during the other part of the day (Spafford and Grosser, 1998)....   [tags: essays papers]
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1620 words
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Inclusion in the Classroom - Inclusion in the Classroom Inclusion can be defined as the act of being present at regular education classes with the support and services needed to successfully achieve educational goals. Inclusion in the scholastic environment benefits both the disabled student and the non-disabled student in obtaining better life skills. By including all students as much as possible in general or regular education classes all students can learn to work cooperatively, learn to work with different kinds of people, and learn how to help people in tasks....   [tags: essays papers Education Special Needs School]
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Inclusion in the Classroom - Inclusion in the Classroom Inclusion in classrooms is defined as combining students with disabilities and students without disabilities together in an educational environment. It provides all students with a better sense of belonging. They will enable friendships and evolve feelings of being a member of a diverse community (Bronson, 1999). Inclusion benefits students without disabilities by developing a sense of helping others and respecting other diverse people. By this, the students will build up an appreciation that everyone has unique yet wonderful abilities and personalities (Bronson, 1999)....   [tags: Education Teaching School Essays Disability]
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Inclusion and Autistic Spectrum - ... Children with autism are given more opportunities to communicate and interact when with typical peers. Inclusion, furthermore, allows for the student with autism to observe positive role models for multiple aspects of success. Children with autism tend to be accepted at an elevated level by non-disabled peers then other disabled peers. Non-disabled peers are much more aware, observant and willing to help the student with autism then other disabled peers would be. Teachers have reported that inclusion allows for positive relationships and enhanced personal growth in children with disabilities (Lynch &Irvine, 2009)....   [tags: autism, children, disorder, behavior, involvement]
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Inclusion in the Public School Classroom - Inclusion in the Public School Classroom What do we do with children with disabilities in the public school. Do we include them in the general education class with the “regular” learning population or do we separate them to learn in a special environment more suited to their needs. The problem is many people have argued what is most effective, full inclusion where students with all ranges of disabilities are included in regular education classes for the entire day, or partial inclusion where children spend part of their day in a regular education setting and the rest of the day in a special education or resource class for the opportunity to work in a smaller group setting on specific needs....   [tags: Special Education, mainstreaming, special needs]
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Teachers' Attitudes Toward Inclusion - The study by Burke and Sutherland (2004) was conducted to ascertain if experiences with disabled students determine a teachers’ attitude toward inclusion. The attitude of teachers involved in classes that include special needs students may determine the success or failure of any inclusion program. The teacher who will adapt the curriculum and his/her own teaching style to meet the needs of all students in the class, will have a better chance of utilizing techniques that create a successful inclusion environment....   [tags: Special Eduation, Teaching, philosophy of educati]
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594 words
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The Full Inclusion Classroom - Definition of Trend/Issue Inclusion is the combining both general education classrooms and special education classrooms into one. Full inclusion combines everyone regardless of the severity of his/her disability; whereas partial inclusion leaves those with severe and profound disabilities and/or intellectual disabilities in self-contained special education classrooms. In an inclusive classroom setting, special services are brought into the classroom instead of students being pulled out of the classroom for those special services (Henson, 2006, p.366)....   [tags: Special Education ]
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Special Education Inclusion - ... “Such attitudes may be found among the parents who express concerns regarding the lack of individual attention or mistreatment that may result from inclusion” (Palmer, Fuller, Arora, & Nelson, 2001, para.2). Approximately half of the parent population of students with disabilities had negative thoughts about inclusive programs when it first began (Palmer, Fuller, Arora, & Nelson, 2001). Present Day Inclusion As there were negatives with the newly created mandates and laws in the past, this has brought about time and experience to try and fix those imperfections....   [tags: education, children, learning disabilities]
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Teacher Attitudes Towards Inclusion - In summary, research indicates positive shift in attitudes toward inclusion and can be fostered by teacher education in a variety of aspects pertaining to inclusion including increased administrative support, co-teaching, support from special education teachers and paraprofessionals, adequate resources to meet the needs of a wide variety of learners, and time for making accommodations, modifications, and planning (DeSimone and Parmar, 2006; Daane et al., 2008; Elliot, 2008; Gurgur & Uzuner, 2010; Jung, 2007)....   [tags: education, teaching]
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Inclusion: Beyond Special Needs - Inclusion in education is an approach to educating students with special educational needs; under this model students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-disabled students. Evidence from the last decade reveals that segregation of special needs students, as opposed to spending time with non-disabled students, is actually damaging to them both academically and socially. Segregating students placed in the special education category is a trend that has been vastly common in public schools, but in the last few years inclusion in general education settings is becoming a more credible option....   [tags: Educational Issues]
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Leaning Towards Mainstreaming & Inclusion - ... Americans were forming a voice as the Civil Rights movement helped pave the way. This movement called for the monumental event, the Public Law 94-142 on December 29, 1975 (Education for All Handicapped Children Act). The congressionally approved act established a “free appropriate public education” (FAPE) to students with a wide range of disabilities, including physical handicaps, mental retardation, speech, vision and language problems, emotional and behavioral problems, and other learning disorders (Ryan & Cooper)....   [tags: Teaching, Education, History] 1054 words
(3 pages)
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Segregation: The Processes of Inclusion and Exclusion - Race is an ambiguous concept possessed by individuals, and according to sociologists Michael Omi and Howard Winant, it is socially constructed; it also signifies differences and structure inequalities. Race divides people through categories which led to cultural and social tensions. It also determined inclusion, exclusion, and segregation in U.S society. Both inclusion and exclusion tie together to create the overall process of segregation — one notion cannot occur without resulting in the others....   [tags: Sociology, Race, Segregation] 1553 words
(4.4 pages)
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Diversity and Inclusion at Dell, Inc. -   Diversity and Inclusion at Dell, Inc. Differences are an undeniable common thread in American culture and the global community at large. It should be expected that every individual is unique in his or her own experiences, views, beliefs philosophies and ideologies. Fortunately, these distinctive differences that have become a driving force for change and acceptance in the workplace environment. “Workforce diversity acknowledges the reality that people differ in many ways, visible or invisible, [by] age, gender, marital status, social status, disability, sexual orientation, religion, personality, ethnicity and culture (Shen, Chanda, D’Netto, & Monga, 2009, p....   [tags: Business]
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From Inclusion to Friendship - “The 1% of US students with labels of severe disabilities including mental retardation have been historically excluded from ‘inclusive’ education” (Bentley, 2008, p. 543). Laws such as PL 94-142 and “No Child Left Behind” (as cited in Bentley), say that ‘public school students with all types of disabilities be educated in the least restrictive environment—‘to the maximum extent possible…with children who do not have disabilities’ the majority of these students with special education labels, such as, mental retardation and multiple disabilities are still isolated in special education classrooms (Bentley, 2008, p....   [tags: Special Education ]
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The Effects of Inclusion on Mainstream Education - In 1993 a woman by the name of Dee Begg filed a lawsuit against the school district office of Baltimore County, Maryland. She wanted her son Sean, a developmentally challenged eight-year-old boy suffering from Trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, to be able to attend a public school with normal children. Down Syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person is born with forty-seven chromosomes instead of the usual forty-six causing both physical and mental handicaps. Children suffering from Down syndrome will often have a smaller than usual and abnormally shaped head....   [tags: informative, down syndrome] 1330 words
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Inclusion - I believe that the way society views difference is shaped by political acts that mandate the provision of a high quality of life for all citizens, regardless of background or circumstance. Public institutions in Australia such as schools, law enforcement agencies and government service providers have obligations to enforce the rights for fair and equitable treatment for all citizens that reflect broader global human right policies (Elkins, 2008). Worldwide human rights statements deem it unacceptable to discriminate against people because of race, age, gender, cultural or social background or disability, and this forms the basis for Australia’s standards in human rights law (Ashman, 2008; Australian Human Rights Commission, 2008; Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education, 2008)....   [tags: special Education, mainstreaming]
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Does Inclusion Result In Favorable Effects? - One of the most important and disputed trends in education today is the inclusive of children and youth with handicaps into regular learning classrooms. Inclusion refers to the practice of instructing all students regardless of disability. Although the term is new, the basic law is not, and reflects the belief that students with a disability should be taught in the least restrictive environment, or as close to the mainstream of regular learning as possible. The least restrictive environment doctrine is one key element of federal special education law....   [tags: Special Education, disabilities, mainstreaming] 706 words
(2 pages)
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Inclusion: What is Best For Students With Disabilities - Are all children created equal. Are they all the same. Do they all need the same things. Can they all excel at the same pace. These and many more questions come up when we discuss the topic of inclusion. Inclusion is the term many educational professionals use to explain the integration of students with special needs into regular education classes. The terms mainstreaming, deinstitutionized, normalization, as well as the least restrictive environment all have been used to in the past to refer to inclusion....   [tags: Special Education] 2433 words
(7 pages)
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Segregation vs. Inclusion: Moving Education Forward From Segregation to Inclusion - If every child has special needs, what are special needs children. Cade is a special needs child. Cade is also an energetic, loving, friendly, and helpful to his fellow students. The school that he attends has a program called “Getting Caught in the Act” whereby students are rewarded if they are caught in the act of doing something good. Cade plays with Legos, licks the frosting off of the cupcake, can beat just about any video game and regularly “gets caught in the act” at his school. He is like any other child except that Cade has Williams Syndrome (Gorton)....   [tags: Special Education ]
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Towards Effective Inclusion in Higher Education - Changes in Society The discussion in the preceding section elucidated that efforts at the government level towards inclusion of students with disabilities in higher education need to be complemented by favourable attitudes towards them in the society. Given this, a positive, empathetic approach towards them by the wider society can be the first step towards ensuring that issues faced by persons with disabilities are approached from the perspective of human rights instead of charity. As Maya Kalyanpur, recalling Seamus Hegarty, puts it, ‘attitudes to people with disabilities are centrally important in any effort to reform education provision’ (2008: 248)....   [tags: Education, Disabilities, college]
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Inclusion of Children with Disabilities - Inclusion of Children with Disabilities Along with many other topics of special education, the topic of inclusion has been surrounded by uncertainty and controversy for as long as the concept has been around. This controversy may stem from the fact that inclusion is expensive and experts disagree about how much time disabled students should spend in regular classrooms (Cambanis, 2001). Although this topic is controversial, it cannot be ignored. Inclusion will, at some point, affect 1% of all children born each year, who will have disabilities and the families and educators they will come in contact with (Stainback, 1985)....   [tags: Education School Special Disability Essays]
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Advantages of Inclusion for Disabled Children - Advantages of Inclusion for Disabled Children There are many advantages for children with disabilities, to be placed in a regular classroom setting. First of all, children are spared the effects of being separate and segregated. Sometimes, segregated education can provide negative effects, such as labeling (Wolery, M. and Wilbers, J., 1994). Labeling of a disabled child can be held over their head throughout their education. Also, being separated can make other children have negative attitudes towards them due to them being separated so drastically....   [tags: essays papers] 1837 words
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Special Education and Inclusion - Special Education and Inclusion Many people seem to look past how learning-disabled students would feel to be placed in a mainstream classroom which includes students without disabilities rather than go to class in a segregated/special education classroom with only other students who also have learning disabilities. There are many researches constantly going on studying the effects of inclusion in classrooms to see if learning-disabled students achieve better in mainstream classes. Students with learning disabilities feel better about themselves when they are included in classes with their peers who don’t have learning disabilities....   [tags: essays papers]
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Inclusion Effective or Ineffective - Inclusion Effective or Ineffective Since the 1980's more and more school have began to practice the technique of inclusion in their classrooms. Inclusion is a term which expresses commitment to educate each child to the maximum extent appropriate, in the classroom he or she would otherwise attend.( Education Resources. "Special Education" Inclusion. "www.weac.org/resource/june96/speced.htm. Nov 15, 1998).Most schools began this process by main streaming. Main streaming is usually refers to the selective placement of special education students in one or more "regular" education classes.(Education Resources...)For example a student with a learning disabilities would have some classes in the "regular"classroom and other classes would be segregated....   [tags: Teaching Public Education] 795 words
(2.3 pages)
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Inclusion in Schools is Extremely Beneficial - Inclusion in schools is extremely beneficial to exceptional students in that it helps to develop successful social skills. Although exceptional students are without a doubt different, the process of inclusion can give students feelings of self worth and allows them to feel included in the education process. Thanks to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act, a free and appropriate public education is mandated for students with disabilities (Peter, 1994)....   [tags: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act]
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Inclusion of Children with Autism - Inclusion of Children with Autism The inclusion of children with learning disabilities into normal classrooms has proved to exhibit both positive and negative effects on children with and without disabilities. However, the negative aspects of inclusion have not proven a strong enough point in that the good, which comes from this experience, severely outweighs any doubt of its success. Inclusion of autistic children has shown to be beneficial due to the notion that these 'disabled kids' can attend 'normal' classes with their non-learning disabled peers....   [tags: Teaching Education Schools Essays Papers]
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Inclusion in Our Public Schools - Retard, mentally handicapped, mentally disabled, special, mentally challenged, these are just a few of the names we have all heard in reference to individuals who have disabilities. Despite the ongoing war against what to call these people, an even bigger war wages upon the notion of letting these children into normal classes or not. The war over total inclusion has been on the front line for well over forty years, and no end is in sight. The definition of inclusion is stated by Robert Fieldman and Pearson Education as the integration of all students, even those with the most severe disabilities, into regular classrooms and all other aspects of school and community life....   [tags: Current Events] 632 words
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How Inclusion Came to Be - How Inclusion Came to Be When children have a learning disability there are two different ways for them to be taught. One is an out of the classroom approach where children with disabilities receive extra help with a specialist separate from the regular classroom. There are also schools that only have children that are disabled and cater to only the different needs of a child with a disability. In the approach where children with disabilities are separated from non-disabled children, the child spends half the day in the mainstream classroom and half of the day separated and excluded from the mainstream classroom (Odom 2002)....   [tags: essays papers]
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Pros and Cons of Inclusion - Pros and Cons of Inclusion Inclusion 'mainstreams' physically, mentally, and multiply disabled children into regular classrooms. In the fifties and sixties, disabled children were not allowed in regular classrooms. In 1975 Congress passed the Education of all Handicapped Students Act, now called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA mandates that all children, regardless of disability, had the right to free, appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. Different states have different variations of the law....   [tags: Education Disabled Children Schools Essays]
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Mainstreaming and Inclusion of Exceptional Children? - Mainstreaming and Inclusion of Exceptional Children. In an ever-changing world, the context of education continues to grow. The demand for higher, more diverse education often leaves teachers battling to acquire skills for improved classroom performance. It is crucial to recognize that the need for higher education is implied for all students, including those with special needs. “ The term mainstreaming was first used in the 1970’s and describes classrooms where students with disabilities and students who do not have disabilities are together (Mainstreaming in Classrooms, 2002....   [tags: essays papers]
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Inclusion Special Ed - Inclusion Special Ed INCLUSION OF SPECIAL ED STUDENTS Inclusive education means that all students in a school, despite their strengths or weaknesses in any area, become part of the school community. They are included in the feeling of belonging among other students, teachers, and support staff. The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its 1997 amendments make it clear that schools have a duty to educate children with disabilities in general education classrooms. These federal regulations include rulings that guide the regulation....   [tags: essays papers]
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670 words
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Attitudes Toward Teaching Disabled Students in Inclusive Classes - Purpose and Hypotheses of the Study The purpose of the study by DeSimone & Parmar (2006) was to scrutinize the beliefs and knowledge of general education teachers of mathematics at the middle school level concerning teaching learning disabled students in inclusive classes. The study explored the following four questions: 1. What are the generally held beliefs of general education teachers of mathematics in the middle school toward including learning disabled students in the general education classroom....   [tags: education, inclusion]
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Special Education Needs Policy - Introduction Early years providers regardless of type, size or funding must comply with the legal requirements set out within the Early Years Foundation Stage ( EYFS) so as to meet the needs of all children within the setting (DCSF 2008a, p11). The objective of this report is to critically evaluate the Special Educational Needs Policy used in a setting which support anti discriminatory practice and promote inclusion (appendix 2). Within the context of a faith based early years setting in Dewsbury....   [tags: Education, inclusion] 1947 words
(5.6 pages)
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Special Education: Examining the Pros and Cons of Inclusion in Education - If one looks at the word “Inclusion”, its definition states that the word means being a part of something or the feeling of being part of a whole. By looking at this term, one gets a sense about what inclusion education is all about (Karten p. 2). Inclusion education is the mainstreaming of Special Education students into a regular classroom (Harchik). A school that involves inclusive education makes a commitment to educate each and every student to their highest potential by whatever means necessary (Stout)....   [tags: mainstreaming, learning disabilities]
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Examining the Social Interactions of the Inclusion Classroom: A Grounded Theory - Examining the Social Interactions of the Inclusion Classroom: A Grounded Theory HIED 595 Texas A&M University-Commerce Examining the Social Interactions of the Elementary Inclusion Classroom: A Grounded Theory Inclusion has been one of the main focuses in the field of special education for the past two decades. Students with disabilities are being integrated in the general education classrooms at a steady pace. With the focus being on inclusion, educators are increasingly concerned with the social difficulties of students with disabilities (Lewis, Chard, & Scott, 1994)....   [tags: Education ] 1422 words
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Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attitudes About Inclusion Teaching - Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a range of neurological disorders that usually affect the normal functioning of the brain. They are characterized by highly repetitive behavior, extensive impairment in communication and social interactions as well as severely restricted interests. The spectrum encompasses Autism, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, Rett Disorder, Pervasive Development Disorder, and Asperger’s Disorder. Prevalence statistics The prevalence of ASD ranges between 3.3 and 10.6 for every 1000 children with a general mean prevalence of 6.6 per 1000 children....   [tags: Special Education, mainstreaming, disabilities] 2120 words
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Argument for Sonja Livingston’s Inclusion in the Literary Canon - The literary canon is those works considered by scholars, critics, and teachers to be the most important to read and study, which collectively constitute the “masterpieces” of literature. (Meyer 2175) In the past there has been much debate on whether non-fiction should be considered for inclusion in the canon, but non-fiction writers being considered part of the canon is not unheard of, and is already a reality – George Orwell, Henry David Thoreau, Ernest Hemingway- all had a significant body of non-fictional work and are well respected, well established members....   [tags: Literature ]
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Social Inclusion through Recreation for the Disabled - Social Inclusion through Recreation There are many social impacts that are affiliated with recreation. These social impacts can change the lives of people who interact and take part in leisure activities in the outside world. Even though people who are disabled work with non disabled people, there is a lack of social connection between them. Recreation is one thing that can build a stronger connection. My paper focuses primarily on social inclusion for disabled people through recreation. Experiencing a sense of belonging entails individuals having a valued set of social relationships....   [tags: Disability Handicap Handicapped]
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Benefits of Inclusion for Students with Learning Disabilities - Benefits of Inclusion for Students with Learning Disabilities There are many benefits for learning disabled students when placed in an inclusive classroom. Research has shown that students with learning disabilities can be supported in a general education classroom setting for the entire day with academic achievement as high as or higher than those in a separate setting (McLeskey & Waldron, 1998). There are many positive benefits which include improved social skills, stronger peer relationships, enhanced academic performance, and positive feeling about one self....   [tags: Learning Disabilities Education Classroom Essays]
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Inclusion of Games in National Education Curriculum - Inclusion of Games in National Education Curriculum The inclusion of games in the national curriculum for physical education, provide children with a wide range of benefits, which can lead to increased physical and mental development through sport. Team games have recently been emphasised in the national curriculum, with a privileged status for games establishing within the activity based framework of the national curriculum (Williams, 2000). It is a common fact that sport can provide children with positive and enjoyable experiences, and through the appropriate teaching and learning of games, these experiences can be developed to provide children with the ability to realise his/her physical and mental potential....   [tags: Papers] 1675 words
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Do Special Education Children Benefit From Inclusion? - Do Special Education Children Benefit From Inclusion. Many children have had learning disabilities for many years. Each year more and more of these children are being helped. Schools are working to improve their special education programs and to have all kinds of students work together in the same classroom. The practice of inclusion was started because educators felt that special needs students would achieve more in traditional classrooms with non-learning disabled students than they would in special education classes....   [tags: Education Teaching]
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Making Decisions: A Case Study - ... The introduction of Marjorie and her family to the idea of Arnstein’s ‘a ladder of participation’ (Arnstein, 1969) has encouraged them to become engaged in ways that participate in positive care planning. This is central to a concept of person-centred care and the role of personhood. Kitwood (1997) says the principles of good dementia care are applied to the understanding of social and emotional needs of people with dementia. It was agreed that Marjorie would stay with us and we agreed to focus on issues surrounding her communication and participation....   [tags: Inclusion, Communication, Well Being]
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How is Technology Enabling Banks to Implement Financial Inclusion in India? - India is the second most populous country in the world with over 1.21 billion people, a staggering number that constitutes over 1/6th of the words populations. India is projected to surpass China by the year of 2050 with a population estimated to be 1.6 billion. A dominating proportion of India’s population constitutes of more than 700 million people who live in the rural areas of India far from the glamour of the city lights. These people are the hardworking farmers, the backbone of India who are ironically, underserviced and ignored....   [tags: Finance] 1722 words
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Creating An Inclusive Classroom - As a new teacher preparing to embark upon what I hope will be a long-lasting, rewarding career in education, I want to create an inclusive, stimulating and collegial climate in my classroom. I plan to make sure that all my students feel valued, and contribute actively to the knowledge, interactions, learning and interests shared by the class. However, I appreciate that as a new, inexperienced teacher I could encounter or unintentionally create barriers that undermine my vision of an inclusive classroom....   [tags: Special Education, mainstreaming, inclusion]
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Effective Instruction for Inclusive Education - In recent years, several events have contributed to the increased participation of students with disabilities in regular classroom setting. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) stipulated that no more than 2% of the population be excluded from federal or state mandated testing. This means that all but the most severely disabled students will be held responsible for the material on yearly achievement tests and high stakes tests at the high school level. NCLB also requires that the teacher of record in a classroom be highly qualified in the subject area that they are teaching....   [tags: inclusion, mainstreaming, special education]
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Inclusive Education in Australia - The implementation of policy and legislation related to inclusive education, thus being a focus on the diversity and difference in our society (Ashman & Elkins, 2009), would have vast implications on the way society views that which is different to the accepted “norm”. The education system and the peer group within the school system are important socialisation agents in an individual’s life. Children from an early age absorb the values, attitudes and beliefs of the society in which they participate (Ashman & Elkins, 2009)....   [tags: Education for inclusion and diversity ]
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The Inclusion of the Notwithstanding Clause in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms - The Inclusion of the Notwithstanding Clause in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms The inclusion of the Notwithstanding Clause in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was an invaluable contribution in the evolution of the liberal democratic state. Not an endpoint, to be sure, but a significant progression in the rights protection dynamic. Subsequent to its passage in 1982 it became the primary rights protecting mechanism, however, its raison d`etre was as a neccessary concession, the pivotal factor allowing the patriation of the constitution....   [tags: Papers] 1293 words
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Master Harold and the boys - Inclusion in the Curriculum Essay - Master Harold and the boys - Inclusion in the Curriculum Essay In his masterpiece "Master Harold" and the boys, Athol Fugard has journeyed deep into sensitive issues including racism and growing up, without sacrificing the high technical standard that often distinguishes great theatre. The poignant and enlightening journey that is Fugard's piece undoubtedly deserves inclusion in any English curriculum, with the work's characterization, themes, conflicts and motifs all earning this distinction. With only three characters sharing dialogue and one of these playing a minor role, detailed characterization is a highlight of "Master Harold and the boys....   [tags: Drama] 1476 words
(4.2 pages)
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From Pullout to Inclusion in a Service-Learning Project - From Pullout to Inclusion in a Service-Learning Project Introduction Service-learning is no mystery to those who have been working with English Language Learners in the United States, who are often marginalized immigrants and refugees, and who for linguistic and cultural reasons are misunderstood. TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) professionals are frequently their mouthpiece, if not their advocates. As advocates of these “other” cultures and languages (who generally support bilingual education), we are seen as a kind of pariah perpetuating the immigration and “illegal alien problem.” Not surprisingly, given the increase of immigrants and refugees in the U.S....   [tags: Teaching Education Research]
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Leaning Towards Mainstreaming - Mainstreaming and inclusion are very controversial subjects in the world of education, yet both are a milestone which we have reached for all special needs children. After researching the history of handicapped and special needs children, I have a stronger outlook on the subject matter. As a teacher in training, I feel that all children must feel comfortable, safe, and free in order to grow and to discover. Mainstreaming or inclusion can achieve such a feat for most special needs children today....   [tags: Special Education, inclusion, special needs]
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The Pros and Cons of Mainstreaming - Mainstreaming is a very controversial subject in world of education, yet it is such a milestone event for all special needs children. After researching the history of handicapped and special needs children, I have a stronger outlook on the subject matter. As a teacher in training I feel that all children must feel comfortable, safe, and free in order to grow and to discover. Mainstreaming can achieve such a goal for most special needs children today. Yet, as always, there are some exceptions. First of all, I must explain the history of mainstreaming, and the leaps and bounds our nation has over come to arrive to a place of understanding our future citizen’s needs....   [tags: Special Education, inclusion, special needs]
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Multiculturalism in the 21st Century - ... Institutions must address diversity from every single angle to achieve a true multicultural campus. Worthington (2013) defines 10 core areas to focus diversity efforts: “ (a) recruitment and retention of students, faculty, staff, and administrators; (b) campus climate; (c) curriculum and instruction; (d) research and inquiry; (e) intergroup relations and discourse; (f) student/faculty/staff/leadership development and success; (g) nondiscrimination; (h) institutional advancement; (i) external relations; and (j) strategic planning and accountability.” The framework of the multiculturalism emerges with Human Resources....   [tags: culture, diversity, education, inclusion, college]
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Inclusive School Communities - Inclusive School Communities One of the most significant and controversial trends in education today is the inclusion of children and youth with disabilities into general education classrooms. Inclusion refers to the practice of educating all students regardless of disability in the same classroom as students without disabilities. Though the term is relatively new, the underlying principle is not, and reflects the belief that students with disabilities should be educated in the least restrictive environment (LRE), or as close to the mainstream of general education as possible....   [tags: Inclusion Education Classroom Essays]
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Mainstreaming Disabled Students - Mainstreaming Disabled Students According to the Curry School of Education, approximately 80% of students with learning disabilities receive the majority of their instruction in the general classroom (“Inclusion.” http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/curry/dept/cise/ose.html. 10 Oct. 1999). That number is expected to rise as teachers and parents become aware of the benefits of inclusion. Because there are so many disabled students in regular schools, it is important to look at whether or not mainstreaming is necessary for their education....   [tags: Teaching Education Inclusion]
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Duffy Published Mrs Midas Several Years Before Its Inclusion in The - Duffy Published Mrs Midas Several Years Before Its Inclusion in The Worlds Wife To What Extent do you agree With the View That, In Terms of Subject Matter and Style, This poem is Key to the Whole Collection. As ‘Mrs Midas’ was published several years before ‘The Worlds Wife’ was you may think that this poem may be the key to all the others within the collection as Duffy would have been able to build the collection on the base that ‘Mrs Midas’ set with its views on male weakness and female superiority....   [tags: English Literature] 1259 words
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Fostering Acceptance of Needs-Based Fairness for Inclusion Students in Future Classrooms of Teacher Education Students - Purpose and Hypotheses of Study The study by Berry (2008) had a purpose of fostering acceptance of needs-based fairness for inclusion students in future classrooms of teacher education students. An open-ended question guiding the study sought to find out novice teachers views about fairness (Berry, 2008). The goal of the study involved seeking understanding of a situation and examining the teachers’ views regarding fairness. Fairness is investigated because it holds implications for teachers’ ideals and pedagogy of inclusion....   [tags: Education, philosophy of education]
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“Inclusion in Today’s Literary Canon” - Stephen King is a creative and massively popular author of horror fiction with the ability to make his readers squirm. Rated one of the best writers since early 1970s due to his prolific work, which is immensely intriguing. Stephen King is acknowledged for producing a novel each year or more. Some of his best sellers comprise the “The Shinning” (1977), “Salem Lost” (1975), “Carrie” (1974), and “Dead Zone” (1979). Even though, Stephen King’s writing style is bizarre and bloodcurdling, his characters have become iconic, because he has acquired a technique that makes him masterful....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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From Institutions to Inclusions - From Institutions to Inclusions During my Research on Special Education and how far it has come I found that Prior to the Eighteenth Century Children with Disabilities were often outcast from society, in fact they were often institutionalized in asylums away from the society. According to an article from about.com, the action of physically, mentally, and physiologically mistreating a student with a disability became illegal when Congress enacted what was then the "Education for All Handicapped Children Act" (Public Law 94-142) on Nov....   [tags: Special Education, Section 504] 1424 words
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Germany’s Inclusion as a Permanent Member of the UN Security Council: Breaking Free from its Historic Subservience - Germany’s Inclusion as a Permanent Member of the UN Security Council: Breaking Free from its Historic Subservience The Federal Republic of Germany, once a menacing dictatorship on a path of world domination, is currently the leading nation in the European Union and the third-leading contributor to the United Nations. Germany has come a long way since its reunification in 1990. It is now fully committed to a foreign policy based around peace, stability, and development, Germany is entirely committed to protecting the future of the global community....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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Inclusion or Exclusion in The Crucible - Much of The Crucible by Arthur Miller was about being part of a group. What is it to belong to a group. Is it really that simple when someone says, "Either you're with us or you're not". Yes, it is that simple. Belonging and exclusion in any situation are two sides of the same coin - you can't have one without the other. In any organization or group, people are bound together by a community of interest, purpose or function and if you do not believe in these same things, then you are not a part of that group....   [tags: Essay on The Crucible] 2355 words
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Reviewing Research on Bullying Among Students with Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Mainstream Schools - Perceptions of social support and experience of bullying among pupils with autistic spectrum (ASD) disorders in mainstream schools Conceptual Framework The purpose of the study is to examine the level of social support received and the frequency of bullying experienced by adolescents with ASD. The author has defined bullying as ‘the systematic abuse of power’ (Smith 2004, 98) which can be seen as a key indicator of social exclusion in school. Children and young people with ASD may be particularly at a ‘risk’ of bullying because of their impaired social skills....   [tags: Special Education, inclusion, mainstreaming] 1346 words
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Teaching Strategies for Inclusive Education - Policies and legislation have set the standard for an inclusive education system that values all students, regardless of difference. As a preservice teacher about to enter into the teaching profession it will be my responsibility to cultivate optimum teaching and learning experiences that will support all students’ social, emotional and academic development. Whilst this task does seem daunting and challenging, it is also exciting to be one of the many pioneers who will contribute to an educational reform, resulting in the ideal of inclusive education....   [tags: Special Education, mainstreaming, inclusion] 1337 words
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Regular vs. Special Education Classes - I posed this question prior to my research; do special education students receive the same attention and level of education as students in regular education. Through investigation and observation, I explored the differences between regular education classrooms and special education classrooms to see if there were in fact inequalities between the two. Prior to doing research, I assumed that all education was alike, and that regardless of special needs, the educational institution provided an equal opportunity for all students to learn....   [tags: learning disabilities, inclusion, mainstreaming] 1569 words
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Research Paper - Research Paper Inclusion is a type of teaching that is being researched by many school districts across the country. It is the act of combining special education students in a regular classroom environment. Inclusion is a very controversial topic when it comes to the education of children, both regular and special education students. There are many beliefs in the welfare of all students and their ability to learn and function together. This belief has put a damper on school districts adopting the program of full inclusion....   [tags: essays papers]
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Research Report - Research Report In the past, disabled students—students with physical and emotional/behavioral problems—were often segregated from the “normal classroom environments.” The segregation of students, either through special schools or home-based tutoring, was justified for various reasons. Separate schools provided specialized services, tailored to meet the educational needs of children with a specific type of handicap. Moreover, this freed the regular public schools of having to provide services and infrastructure needs of the disabled student population (Circle of Inclusion Project, 2003)....   [tags: essays papers]
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Special Needs Education - One of the most controversial issues facing educators today is the topic of educating students with disabilities, specifically through the concept of inclusion. Inclusion is defined as having every student be a part of the classroom all working together no matter if the child has a learning disability or not (Farmer) (Inclusion: Where We’ve Been.., 2005, para. 5). The mentally retarded population has both a low IQ and the inability to perform everyday functions. Activities such as eating, dressing, walking, and in some cases, talking can be hopeless for a child with mental retardation....   [tags: Special Education, mentally retarded ]
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Inclusive Education - Personally I feel, that before attempting to find out whether our country understands and applies the concept of inclusion to its educational system, it is more adequate to try and understand the meaning of Inclusion, a complex issue which creates continuous debates. In the book Creating Inclusive Classrooms, J. Spencer Salend defines inclusion as : “[…] a philosophy that brings diverse students, families, educators and community members together to create schools and other social institutions based on acceptance, belonging and community […] (Creating inclusive Classrooms, 2005, p.6) As a result, inclusive education considers as from a young age, all students as full members of the school community including students with different needs....   [tags: Education ]
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Research Paper - Research Paper Inclusive education means that all students in a school, regardless of their strengths or weaknesses in any area, become part of the school community. They are included in the feeling of belonging among other students, teachers, and support staff. The educational practice known as, full inclusion may have negative effects on the self-esteem of a special needs child. In 1975, Congress passed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, also known as Public Law94-142. Before this law came into effect many children with disabilities were routinely excluded from public schools....   [tags: essays papers]
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Inclusive Education - What is inclusive education. Inclusive education is concerned with the education and accommodation of ALL children in society, regardless of their physical, intellectual, social, or linguistic deficits. Inclusion should also include children from disadvantaged groups, of all races and cultures as well as the gifted and the disabled (UNESCO, 2003). Inclusion tries to reduce exclusion within the education system by tackling, responding to and meeting the different needs of all learners (Booth, 1996)....   [tags: Education]
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Inclusive Instructional Practices - ... This form of communication also allows for children to see that parents and teachers are working together to create the best environment for them. This tool has also been effective as a form of self-reflection. The 17 year old in question has kept all her home-school notebooks since they began during early childhood, and often spends time reading them, noticing how far she has come since she first started kindergarten. Early Intervention Early intervention is a term that refers to assistance provided to children with additional needs, to attempt to lessen the effects of the additional needs on developmental milestones during the developmental years (Liberty, 2000)....   [tags: Meaningful Special Education]
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