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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Herman Hesse Steppenwolf"
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The Importance of Childhood in Steppenwolf - The Importance of Childhood in Steppenwolf         Upon reading Herman Hesse's Steppenwolf, one cannot help noticing its large number of references to childhood. Youth, or a "childlike" state, is mentioned in the Treatise, in connection with Dionysian pleasures, in reference to Hermine, and in multiple other contexts. The ubiquity of this motif can be explained by the deep symbolic importance of childhood to Steppenwolf's protagonist, Harry Haller. Although his own young life appears to have been rather joyless, Harry holds up in his mind an ideal childhood to which he seeks, in various ways, to return....   [tags: Steppenwolf]
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1206 words
(3.4 pages)
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Steppenwolf's Decision to Live - Steppenwolf's Decision to Live     In the novel, Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse, the main character, the Steppenwolf, considers committing suicide. He tries to justify taking his life with religious and philosophical rationales, but in the argument he finds that his life is worth living and suicide not a logical option. Sadly though, the novel provides little evidence beyond the Steppenwolf's own feelings as to why he cannot commit suicide. It is the intent of this paper, with some religious and philosophical references, to shed light on the reasoning behind the Steppenwolf's decision to live....   [tags: Steppenwolf]
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1238 words
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Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse - The book tells us about Harry Heller, one different guy, with "Wolf nature" as the treat of Steppenwolf says; this treat was received by Harry from an unknown person. Everything begins when Harry Haller arrives to a room he'd rented. Harry leaves the room, gives a walk and discover some ads that he considered interesting, for example the magic theater entrance, with the not for everyone legend. Back to his room, he crosses a street and sees a guy carrying an advertisement of the same theater and a box that Harry wants to buy; the guy gives him a brochure and leaves....   [tags: Steppenwolf Hesse] 841 words
(2.4 pages)
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Siddhartha by Herman Hessee - Siddhartha by Herman Hessee Author Information Born in1877 in Wirtemberg, a town in the Black Forest, Hermann Hesse is ranked among the great masters of contemporary literature. Coming from a family of missionaries on both sides, Hesse was intended to follow in the footsteps of his father, a Protestant pastor and missionary; however, at an early age, he began to rebel against the life proscribed for him and sought a nontraditional path. Even though his father remained an inspiring example of living faith, young Hesse sensed the discrepancy between his father's practices and beliefs....   [tags: Free Essays] 400 words
(1.1 pages)
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Finding Enlightenment in Herman Hesse's Siddhartha - Finding Enlightenment in Herman Hesse's Siddhartha Growing up, children learn most everything from their elders. Yet, an elder nor a book can help a person to enlightenment. Nor can they teach a person to find their soul. The path to a person’s Atman is a personal journey, one to be endured, not taught. The meaning of a person’s life is not a subject to be read in books. The meaning of life is slowly attained through wisdom, enduring life and searching for the right path along the way. In the novel Siddhartha, Gotama cannot teach enlightenment because that wisdom cannot be communicated through words, only through experience....   [tags: Herman Hesse, Siddhartha] 463 words
(1.3 pages)
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River in Siddhartha by Herman Hesse - River in "Siddhartha" by Herman Hesse The river is a source of knowledge. It symbolises a teacher, a guru, one who knows and is aware of this knowledge and who imparts it to those who seek knowledge from it. In Herman Hesse’s novella Siddhartha, the protagonist Siddhartha is deeply mystified by the secrets and puzzles of the river. He seeks to unravel and them and gain knowledge from the river in order to achieve his goal of attaining nirvana, enlightenment. He is helped in his course by a ferryman Vasudeva, who has lived all his life close to the river, transporting people from one side to the other....   [tags: Sidhartha Herman Hesse Essays] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
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Perception Of The Bourgeoisie in Steppenwolf - Perception Of The Bourgeoisie in Steppenwolf        Hermann Hesse's Steppenwolf presents a paradoxical picture of the bourgeoisie. The main character, Harry Haller, acknowledges his bourgeois upbringing and frequently has a bourgeois view about various aspects of society; however, at the same time, he condemns the bourgeois lifestyle and all that it represents because of his perceived alienation from it.   The bourgeoisie itself is represented in many different lights in Steppenwolf. The first representation is through the character of Haller's landlady's nephew....   [tags: Hesse Steppenwolf Essays]
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3436 words
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Jungian Psychology Analyze on Steppenwolf - ... Haller then, recognizing the constellation of the world due to the outcome of the war, synergizes with Gustav in the vicious “jolly hunting” trip and gradually individuate the trickster archetype into his personality through the means of killing and taking joy from the doom of others. Meanwhile, the trickster within the two jolly hunters grows too large and transforms itself into a heinous prank of worldly destruction. Much despising living and the world that has granted him to live, Gustav resolves to bring the world to an end: But granting that the conception of duty is no longer known to me, I still know the conception of guilt – perhaps they are the same thing....   [tags: Hermann Hesse novel analysis] 1205 words
(3.4 pages)
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The Role of Teachers in Herman Hesse's Siddhartha - The Role of Teachers in Herman Hesse's Siddhartha Throughout history there have been countless numbers of teachers: artisans, craftsmen, ideologist, to name a few. They have all master some skill, gained some wisdom, or comprehended an idea. These teachers have achieved knowledge which allows them to excel and to be above and beyond regular people. Knowledge is something everyone strives for, and many desire. To achieve knowledge, one must have an eye-opening experience, and epiphany that leads to the increase of one’s intellect and skill set....   [tags: Hesse Siddhartha] 1371 words
(3.9 pages)
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Man's Struggle with His Identity in Steppenwolf - Man's Struggle with His Identity in Steppenwolf       "The Christian resolve to find the world ugly and bad has made the world ugly and bad." These are the words of Friedrich Nietzsche, among the most influential philosophers of the modern era and one who has exerted an incontrovertible influence on many German authors, including Hermann Hesse. That Hesse should feel drawn to a figure so prominent in the German consciousness is not suprising, that he should do so in spite of the religious zeal of his family seems almost heretical....   [tags: Hesse Steppenwolf Essays]
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The Path to Understanding in Herman Hesse’s Demian - The Path to Understanding in Demian In Hermann Hesse's, "Demian," Emil Sinclair develops into a self-cognizant man after experiencing true friendship and the purity of life. Immaturity and innocence surrounds him as a child until a confidant by the name of Max Demian places him on the path to understanding himself. After opening his eyes to the feebleness of life, the boy realizes his true purpose of existence. Beginning life in the "realm of light," (7) Sinclair passes through life being criticized and labeled an outcast....   [tags: Herman Hesse Demian] 1332 words
(3.8 pages)
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The Psychological Aspect of Demian, by Hermann Hesse - One of the largest goals of modern literature is to explore the psyche; a collection of the conscious and subconscious actions of humans. Generally, the human mind is explored through the use of a character that is subjected to a series of emotional challenges and tests. This character may often reflect on the author himself or simply what the author’s take on psychology and the human mind is. In the novel Demian, by Hermann Hesse, the author invites the reader to explore the mind of the character Emil Sinclair by including forms of stream of consciousness narration and an open-ended ending to the book....   [tags: Hermann Hesse, Demian Essays]
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612 words
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Analysis of Demian by Hermann Hesse - Analysis of Demian by Hermann Hesse Demian is the story of a boy, Emil Sinclair, and his search for himself. Emil was raised in a good traditional home at the turn of the century in the nation of Germany. His family is very wealthy and they have a reputation as a principled, religious family. As a boy, Sinclair views the world within the walls of his home as representing all that is good, pure, and innocent. But starting at a young age, he feels an inner conflict between his own little world, the "world of light," and the outside world, or "forbidden realm" which represents sin and loneliness....   [tags: Demian Herman Hesse Germany Essays] 3508 words
(10 pages)
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The Transformation of Harry Haller in Steppenwolf - The Transformation of Harry Haller in Steppenwolf      A "dazzling" line "flashes" before Harry Haller's eyes (Hesse 194). It says, "Marvelous Taming of the Steppenwolf" (194). By this statement, one must realize Hermann Hesse's final goal for his character of Harry Haller. One also should note that all of this "taming" and these other wild events are taking place in the psyche of Harry Haller, not in reality. Hesse draws on the ideas of his generation's psychologists, such as Carl Jung, to guide Harry Haller's transformation....   [tags: Steppenwolf Essays]
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Diction, Tone and Style Used in Hermann Hesse's Novel Demian - It seems rather obvious, but in order to write a decent piece of literature, an author must be able to write well. The best story in the world can be turned into something unreadable if the language is not expertly crafted into something that will capture the reader’s attention and hold it for a prolonged period of time. In addition, the author must fit his or her language to the story they are telling through the use of tone and mood. In the novel Demian, by Hermann Hesse, the language used conveys the story in a strong manner through the use of diction, tone, and style....   [tags: Hermann Hesse, Demian Essays]
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654 words
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Analysis of Herman Hesse's Siddhartha - Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha describes the journey and maturation of Siddhartha. Siddhartha is a young Indian, whose journey to find internal peace takes him to many different places. One of these is the city, where he soon accumulates a large fortune. Wealth and material possession haunt Siddhartha and hinder him from attaining internal peace. This is also demonstrated Brahmin village where he is unhappy with the rituals, and sees wealth and material goods destroying him Herman Hesse uses Siddhartha demonstrate that success is not derived from material wealth, but from personal successes that may have nothing to do with wealth....   [tags: literary analysis, literary criticism] 1161 words
(3.3 pages)
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Steppenwolf : The Disintegration of Harry Haller as it Relates to Music - Steppenwolf : The Disintegration of Harry Haller as it Relates to Music       Among the many themes present in Hermann Hesse's 1927 novel Steppenwolf, two stand out as basic threads around which the story is constructed: the isolated nature of the artist and the duality of existence (Benét 471). Harry Haller, the protagonist of the novel, is portrayed as an outsider to society and to modern life; he must struggle with his own outmoded ideals and bestiality to embrace humanity and reality....   [tags: Steppenwolf Essays]
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Opposing Perspectives in Hesse’s Siddhartha and Camus’ The Stranger - Hermann Hesse and Albert Camus were both talented authors whose works have greatly influenced the world of literature. Hesse’s Siddhartha and Camus’ The Stranger have impacted readers for decades. These novels centralize around a common principle of finding inner truth. The main characters, Siddhartha and Meursault, have very different ideologies by which they live their lives. These opposing perspectives greatly influence their individual decisions and the people around them. The style in which each of these novels is written exemplifies these differences between Siddhartha and Meursault....   [tags: Hermann Hesse, Albert Camus]
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1014 words
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The Search for Wisdom in Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse - The novel, Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse focuses on a young man named Siddhartha and his lifelong pursuit to attain enlightenment. Throughout his endeavor, Siddhartha follows the way of rejection and doctrines from the Samanas and Gautama the Buddha, respectively. Soon enough, however, Siddhartha realizes that following the path of others is hopeless, and he starts to look within himself to gain wisdom and become enlightened. By looking at and listening to the river, Siddhartha begins to realize who he actually is through the visions and voices that appear from the river....   [tags: buddhism, enlightnement, self] 947 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Importance of Surroundings in Siddhartha by Herman Hesse and The Stranger by Albert Camus - The Importance of Surroundings in Siddhartha by Herman Hesse and The Stranger by Albert Camus According to John Locke, people begin their lives with a clean slate and are nurtured by their surroundings and contact with others, also known as Tabula Rasa (Landry)....   [tags: Camus Siddhartha Hesse] 1725 words
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The Power of the River in Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha -        'For ages, the river has been a sign of eternity and has served as a symbol of spiritual awareness to many people'(Rahula 39). The river in Siddhartha, by Hermann Hesse, is an important symbol. Hesse provides many references to the river throughout his novel, and it serves many purposes in his writing. Siddhartha who is the main character, grows up with his father and mother on a riverbank, in India. He decides to leave the world of the Brahmins to seek his own way. Govinda, Siddhartha's companion, follows him to the world of the Samanas....   [tags: Hesse Siddhartha Essays ]
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Hermann Hesse's Demian - Hermann Hesse's Demian The biblical story of Abel and Cain was deeply rooted in this novel. This theme was used to explore the life of a young man growing up in Germany. Compared to the novel Siddhartha, Demian had a more surrealistic quality to it. Some of the physical events that occurred would not have been possible in reality. In Siddhartha, only the mental events were surreal. The theme of self-discovery was explored with a Jung approach. Hermann Hesse was obviously under the influence of Dr....   [tags: Hesse Demian Essays] 724 words
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Analysis of Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - Hermann Hesse was born in July of 1877 and died at the age of 85 in August of 1962. Hesse is a German poet, novelist, and a painter. His best know works include Siddhartha, Steppenwolf, and many others. Hesse has also won a Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946. Siddhartha is a book by Hermann Hesse. The book was made in 1922 and is 152 pages long. The book was originally wrote in German but it was translated into English. Siddhartha was Hesse’s ninth book. It was published in Germany in 1922 but then published in 1951 in the United States, but it didn’t really become popular and influential until the 1960s....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays] 594 words
(1.7 pages)
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Uniting Mind, Body, and Spirit in Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha - Uniting Mind, Body, and Spirit in Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha Each of us has innate desire to understand the purpose of our existence.  As Hermann Hesse illustrates in his novel Siddhartha, the journey to wisdom may be difficult.  Organized religion helps many to find meaning in life but it does not substitute careful introspection. An important message of Siddhartha is that to achieve enlightenment one must unite the experiences of mind, body, and spirit.             In the first part of the book, Siddhartha is consumed by his thirst for knowledge.  He joined the samanas and listened to the teachings of the Buddha in attempt to discern the true way to Nirvana.  Though he perfe...   [tags: Hesse Siddhartha Essays] 764 words
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The Quest for Self Discovery in Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha - The Quest for Self Discovery in Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha “Then he [Siddhartha] suddenly saw clearly that he was leading a strange life, that he was doing many things that were only a game, that he was quite cheerful and sometimes experienced pleasure, but that real life was flowing past him and did not touch him. Like a player who plays with his ball, he played with his business, with the people around him, watched them, derived amusement from them; but with his heart, with his real nature, he was not there” (Hesse 57-58)....   [tags: Hesse Siddhartha Essays]
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Plot Overview of Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha - In this novel the protagonist of the story, Siddhartha, believes that the teachings of others will not allow you to reach Nirvana. Therefore, he sets out on a journey to experience the world for himself, the good and the bad, in order to become closer to enlightenment and to eventually become an enlightened one himself, a Buddha. After each experience Siddhartha comes to a new conclusion as his outlook on life changes, as he becomes closer to enlightenment. In the beginning of the book Siddhartha is already living in one extreme....   [tags: Siddhartha Hermann Hesse] 1675 words
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Hermann Hesse & Gotama Buddha - Hermann Hesse, was a great and inspirational writer. Gotama Buddha, was a holy man whose teachings changed the lives of many people. What do they have in common. Born almost 1500 years apart Hesse and Buddha lived parallel lives. Both were expected to follow in their father’s footsteps, both left the people they cared for, both were rebels, and both chose to follow their own paths to fulfill their individual destiny. Throughout Hesse’s life he tried many different school subjects and jobs, but could not decide what to do....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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Comparing Steppenwolf and the Teenaged Girl - Parallels Between Steppenwolf and the Teenaged Girl   To be a teenaged girl means many things in this modern society. There are numerous expectations set for the average sixteen year old female: she must be pretty, popular, thin, preferably intelligent, but not too intelligent, and she must subjugate her will to the group. This world has a tendency to shun females who are too independent, who seek too much power, and who attempt to break from the stereotypical female mold. I have personally experienced this spurning, especially from my peers....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 1374 words
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The Development of Characters in Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha - The characters in a novel can make or break a story. In fact, some of the plot details, symbols, or themes will appear confusing or thoughtless solely if the characters are not properly worked into the novel. However, characters, when well thought-out, can also enhance a work of literature, pushing it beyond the realm of generic plots and simple, noncomplex themes and symbols. In the novel Siddhartha, by Hermann Hesse, the development of Characters such as Siddhartha, Govinda, and Vasudeva help the reader to better understand the central message that the author is trying to portray....   [tags: Character Analysis, Siddhartha Essays] 705 words
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Hinduism in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - Hinduism is a religion with no known founder, with its understandings and actions developing over thousands of years. This religion has roots from the Aryan people’s religion, when they invaded India at 1500 BCE. The Aryans created a caste system when they invaded India so their kin would remain in power. Hinduism has absorbed and accepted this caste system as a large part of their religion. They believe in reincarnation, which is being reborn after you die, and Samsara, the endless cycle of birth, death, and rebirth....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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The Search for Enlightenment in Siddhartha, by Hermann Hesse - The story of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse is a story of love , learning and the search of happiness for inner self. The main character Siddhartha has learned all that is needed from the holy books and his teachers but believes none has really helped him reach the enlightment he truly searches for. His only solution was to become free and leave his family and go where life takes him, which starts off by joining the Samanas , a group of priests who go through life by practicing asceticism....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays] 558 words
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The Quest for Peace in Siddhartha, by Hermann Hesse - Siddhartha, an allegorical novel written by Hermann Hesse, primarily tells the tale of an Indian man, Siddhartha, and his quest for peace and totality during the time of the Buddha. The story focuses on him leaving his family home in India to find this peace and totality, but the theme of this story is not just about Siddhartha, there is an underlying theme which demonstrates that Siddhartha is not the only person searching for this peace, and this quest is not solely the theme of the story for Siddhartha, but for many of the characters, Siddhartha included....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays] 683 words
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Daoism in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - Daoism, alternatively known as Taoism, is a religion originating in China, founded by Dao De Jing, that’s goal is to teach its followers to reach contentment by focusing on the “way.” This “way” is known as Dao, or Tao, which focuses on following the chain of events that occur in nature. Others define it as “the basic, eternal principle of the universe that transcends reality and is the source of being, non-being, and change.” Following Dao would bring the Daoist sage to become one with nature through meditation and leading a good, moral life....   [tags: Taoism, Siddhartha Essays]
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Hesse's Siddhartha as it Parallels Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs - Hesse's Siddhartha as it Parallels Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs   Several parallels can be drawn between the psychologist Abraham Maslow's theoretical hierarchy of needs and the spiritual journey of Siddhartha, the eponymous main character in Herman Hesse's novel.  Maslow's hierarchy of needs is somewhat of a pyramid that is divided into eight stages of need through which one progresses throughout one's entire life. During the course of his lifetime, Siddhartha's personality develops in a manner congruent with the stages of Maslow's hierarchy.  Siddhartha's progress from each of the major sections of the hierarchy is marked by a sharp change in his life or behavior....   [tags: Hesse Siddhartha Essays]
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Main Character of Book Siddhartha - Herman Hesse's, Siddhartha, is a story any person of any era, age, sex, or religion can relate to in some respect. It is about a young man wanting more out of life than most are comfortable with. He wants to find himself, find meaning to life, find enlightenment. To achieve his goal, he exposes himself to the extremities of self-denial and self-indulgence, objecting himself to a great ordeal to become a well-rounded individual and find his true self. Siddhartha begins his journey leaving his father, a religious leader, who has taught him the Brahmin way of life and expects his son to walk in his footsteps, "he envisioned him growing up to be a great wise man and priest, a prince among Brahmi...   [tags: Herman Hesse]
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Hermann Hesse’s Disillusionment With Society Revealed in Siddhartha - World War 1 left Europe in a state of chaos, scarring millions mentally and physically. The generation that survived the war would have trouble adjusting to the post war world. Lost generation writers trying to capture the essence of the post world war are disillusioned with tradition and culture. Siddhartha, written by Hermann Hesse in the aftermath of the Great War, reflects a loss in trust of power, society, and tradition (Borbély, Stefan). This is similar to the tradition of the Lost Generation writers such as Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemmingway, and F....   [tags: Lost Generation Writers] 1496 words
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Hermann Hesse: A Classic Take on the Modern Age - Hermann Hesse: A Classic Take on the Modern Age Hermann Hesse, writing in the twentieth century, extolled many of the virtues of the past. His unique style, dependent upon German Romanticism, adapted the issues of the modern age. Using subject matter from various sources, Hesse built fictional worlds that mirrored reality. In the novel Siddhartha, Hesse deals specifically with the spiritual quest. Although writing about the spiritual landscape of India, this work addresses the desire for meaning that the entire world felt after the events of World War I....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Hermann Hesse’s Use of Literary Devices in Siddhartha - Siddhartha is a much respected son of a Brahmin who lives with his father in ancient India. Everyone in their town expects Siddhartha to act like his father and become successful. Although he lives a very high quality life, Siddhartha is dissatisfied and along with his best friend Govinda- wants nothing more than to join the group of wandering ascetics called Samana’s. This group starves themselves, travels almost naked and must beg for the food they survive on. This group of people believes that to achieve enlightenment and self-actualization: body image, health, physical and material desires must be thrown away....   [tags: Enlightenment, Self-actualization]
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The Impact of Choices on Spirituality in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - A person's life choices will affect their spirituality and their inner-being as they continue on through life. Their choices lead them down different paths, which in time will affect their spirituality, positivity, and their happiness. The novel Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse, illustrates Siddhartha's spiritual journey and path to enlightenment. Siddhartha’s journey will bring him closer to his inner spirit. Siddhartha's life clearly displays how a person's daily choices affect their spirituality. “Spirituality: the quality or state of being spiritual", spirit meaning: "a life-giving force" or "a force within a person held to endow the body with life, energy, and power: soul" (Britannica School...   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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Hinduism vs Buddhism in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - ... He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue.” (15). This shows his attempt to find enlightenment, by ignoring his senses. However, at one point he does regret leaving his home to go searching for answers. In the chapter, “By The River,” one sees that Siddhartha is willing to give up his journey. He notices that by following the Samanas, he did not get the answers he was hoping for. But then again he encounters, the Om within himself, who technically saves him for ending his life....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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Internal Conflict in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - The novel Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse is a timeless story about one man’s journey of finding peace in his way of life and thoughts. Siddharta is a young Brahmin’s son, who is dissatisfied with his worship and in turn sets out to find the lifestyle that is right for him. Siddhartha is faced with many external, physical conflicts, yet that is not the most prominent type of conflict in the story. Hesse builds excitement and suspense through Siddhartha’s internal journey to create an emotional response usually associated with external conflict....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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Siddhartha Analysis Paper - Time does not exist; love is eternal; death brings peace. Siddhartha illustrates each of these themes in the novel, Siddhartha. Throughout his life, Siddhartha is very independent. For example, Siddhartha demonstrates self-determination when he leaves his overbearing father “to begin the life of the Samanas” (Hesse 10). There, he escapes from the physical world to soon realize that enlightenment cannot come from ignoring the world around him. He decides to follow the Buddha and learn his teachings; however, he is unsuccessful....   [tags: Herman Hesse novel analysis] 1334 words
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Siddhartha and Kikuji - The novellas, Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse and Thousand Cranes by Yasanari Kawabata both, have protagonists who set out on journeys. In Siddhartha, Siddhartha sets out on a journey to achieve nirvana, whereas, Kikuji in Thousand Cranes, sets out to distance himself from his late father and marry. The protagonists both encounter obstacles and the way they overcome them is different as well due to the way they were brought up and the time period. It is the methods they choose to overcome the obstacles of their paths and whether or not they decide to overcome it that decides if they succeed or fail in their journeys....   [tags: Herman Hesse, Yasanari Kawabata]
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Homeward Bound in Moby Dick, by Herman Melville - Moby Dick, written by Herman Melville, is believed by some to be the greatest literary works of all time. The book takes place in the 1840s and seems greatly advanced for its time. Herman Melville uses many literary techniques that bring about severe imagery as well as insight and education to the readers. One concept that is conveyed in Moby Dick is the journey itself. This is broken into the physical journey, the spiritual journey, and life’s journey. The physical journey of Moby Dick is depicted by the information gained of the labor intensive actions performed on the Pequod as well as other whaling ships....   [tags: Moby Dick, Herman Melville]
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Eco-Spiritual Concerns in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - We currently exist in a world hemmed with electronic media and information technology that affords no queries or space for any quests whatsoever. The world, bereft of any spiritual values, with technological avant-gardism has sped us unconsciously into a world of wares and expenses. The enquiries that met the intellectuals of the past about the problems of the flesh and spirit have been left apart as groundless and inappropriate for the youth of the contemporary world. There is, in such a situation, no space for spiritual experience and satiation....   [tags: spiritual experience, ecological discourse, praxis]
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Gratitude for the Mentors in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - Carl Jung once said, “One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for growing plant and for the soul of the child.” Siddhartha, a novel by Hermann Hesse, follows Siddhartha through his life stages. While Siddhartha searches for enlightenment and Nirvana; going from Brahmin, to the rich, then to having nothing. The audience can read about his struggles and sufferings that guide him to enlightenment....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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Exploring Samsara in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - Samsara is defined as the cycle of death and rebirth to which life in the material world is bound. The narrator of Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha uses the metaphor, “the game was called Samsara, a game for children, a game which was perhaps enjoyable played once, twice, ten times -- but was it worth playing continually?”. Siddhartha, the main character of the book, tries to decide whether this “game” is worth it. Throughout the book he encounters many different walks of life and learns much about the world around him....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays] 1053 words
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The Lawyer and the Pandhandler in "Bartleby the Scrivener" by Herman Melville - In the story of Bartleby the Scrivener by Herman Melville, there is a lawyer who narrates the entire story. He owns his own law practice and also has an assortment of scribes who work for him. The first scrivener, named Turkey, was a hard worker until 12 o’ clock noon daily. Following that time, his work begins to diminish. The second, who they called Nippers, was the complete opposite. He worked best during the afternoon and evening hours. Lastly, Bartleby didn’t do much work at all. He was lazy, he had nothing to lose, and he understood how to take advantage of someone else’s kindness....   [tags: Bartleby the Scrivener. Herman Melville, employees] 528 words
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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johannes Gutenberg, Hermann Hesse and Hildegard von Bingen - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was born in 1749 on August 28 in Frankfurt, Germany, and died in 1832 on March 22 in Weimar, Germany. Goethe was 82 at his time of death and he lived in Modern Times. Goethe was a German poet, writer, scientist, theatre manager, critic, and an amateur artist. He is considered the greatest German literary figure of modern times. Goethe was born in a large house in Frankfurt, Germany. As Goethe was growing up he was home schooled. His father and his private tutors gave him lessons all the common subjects of their time, especially the languages....   [tags: Important Germans] 1212 words
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Herman Melville's Bartleby, the Scrivener - Herman Melville's "Bartleby, the Scrivener" The narrator states fairly early on in Herman Melville's "Bartleby, the Scrivener" that both he and Bartleby are "sons of Adam" (55). The phrase plays on a double entendre, referring to both the Calvinist Biblical Eden and to the view of America as the "new Eden." Many recent critics have traced the biblical aspects of this and other elemen ts of the story, claiming the character of Bartleby as a Christ-figure, and as such carries out the role of a redeemer.1 The story, however, is not Bartleby's, but rather the narrator's....   [tags: Herman Melville Bartleby Scrivener Essays]
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Loneliness in Herman Melville's Writing - Loneliness in Herman Melville's Writing "[Melville read] The Solitude of Nature and of Man, or The Loneliness of Human Life (by Horatio Alger) making particular note of passages linked with solitude to the intellectual life" (528 Lorant). Loneliness is a major theme of the life and work of Herman Melville. What makes one so damnably alone and is there a cure for this. Loneliness was something that Melville suffered with his whole life yet he must have cherished his alone time somewhat since a writer's life is to be alone....   [tags: Herman Meville Lonely Loneliness Essays] 1949 words
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Demian: The Story of Emil Sinclair’s Youth by Hermann Hesse - In the story, Demian, Sinclair states that people help themselves without the help of others in such matters. When a person gets help from teachers, mentors or advisors, this support is not meant to put a person down, but to motivate and help move them along in life. People helped Sinclair get through life in many situations, starting when he was a little boy at the age of ten. There are some who may come through one's life and try to hinder him or her from getting them where it is that they need to be because of jealousy or many other reasons....   [tags: Hesse Demian ] 1526 words
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Siddhartha's Search for Inner Peace - Siddhartha's Conflicts  Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha tells the story of a young man who sets out in search of his true self.  Throughout the novel, Siddhartha continues to search for the true meaning of life.  He sacrifices everything, almost to the point of self-destruction, before finding what he is really looking for.  The element of conflict helps build the plot and leads to the turning point, Siddhartha's discovery.  Siddhartha faces conflicts with his peers, his religion, and himself.          Siddhartha has several conflicts between himself and his peers.  Despite Govinda's love and adoration, Siddhartha knows that he must tell his friend to move on.  Siddhartha also meets Kamala, wh...   [tags: Herman Hesse, Siddhartha Conflicts] 310 words
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Siddhartha's Journey of Self-Actualization in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha - In “Siddhartha” by Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha is put to the test to find inner enlightenment while trying to discover himself. He must work through the hardships and overcome loosing himself along the way. Siddhartha began his adolescence with learning the ways of Brahman in hopes to find enlightenment by following the footsteps of his father. He lived along with his best friend Govinda but slowly grew discontent with his life. He felt empty and was hungry for something new. “that the wise Brahmans already revealed to him the most and the best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the so...   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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The Theme of Identity in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha and Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis - In this paper, I choose to speak about the theme of Identity or The Self occurring in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha and Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis. Hermann Hesse was a german poet, novelist and painter. He was born in 1877 at Cawl, Germany. In most of his works he explores an individual’s search for authenticity, self-knowledge and spirituality. Franz Kafka was a German-language writer of novels and short stories. He was born in 1883 at Prague, Czech Republic. Kafka strongly influenced genres such as existentialism....   [tags: Metamorphosis Essays, Siddhartha Essays]
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Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha: Enlightenment Can Not Exist Without Love - Relationships are composed of multiple manipulating factors: trust, honesty, attraction, passion, compatibleness, and many other emotion rattling components. However, the fundamental ingredient that commences a healthy relationship is love. Love is comparable to the seeking for enlightenment. “Seeking means: to have a goal; but finding means: to be free, to be receptive, to have no goal” (113). Love is natural; it is not sought out or prospective. Love is not tangible. It brings a comfort, protectiveness, disillusion, and the million of nervous butterflies that clutter a stomach....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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The Use of Nature in Siddhartha and A Doll’s House - The Use of Nature in Siddhartha and A Doll’s House Herman Hesse and Henrik Ibsen make extensive references to and use of nature in their respective masterpieces, Siddhartha and A Doll’s House. This includes the use of nature as imagery, symbolism, and to create a motif. While the objects in nature do differ because of the location of the stories, there is also overlap. In Siddhartha Herman Hesse refers to two symbols of nature, birds and water, specifically the river. The first reference to a bird is when Siddhartha decides to leave the Buddha....   [tags: Herman Hesse Henrik Ibsen Essays] 1507 words
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Herman Melville's Moby-Dick - Herman Melville's Moby-Dick      Herman Melville began working on his epic novel Moby-Dick in 1850, writing it primarily as a report on the whaling voyages he undertook in the 1830s and early 1840s. Many critics suppose that his initial book did not contain characters such as Ahab, Starbuck, or even Moby Dick, but the summer of 1850 changed Melville’s writing and his masterpiece. He became friends with author Nathaniel Hawthorne and was greatly influenced by him. He also read Shakespeare and Milton’s Paradise Lost (Murray 41)....   [tags: Herman Melville Moby Dick Essays]
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Cyclical Structure of Narcissus & Goldmund by Herman Hess - Cyclical Structure of Narcissus and Goldmund Narcissus & Goldmund, by Herman Hess, contains a distinct cyclical structure. This structure is contributed to through characters, themes, ideas, times, and places. Each of these elements facilitate the development of an organized, creative work, delving deep into the human psyche to reveal that both Narcissus and Goldmund are players in the same game. There are three separate cycles present in the novel. The first cycle occurs during the first year or two after Goldmund has left Mariabronn....   [tags: Goldmund Herman Hess] 769 words
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Learning From Siddhartha - Siddhartha, written by Herman Hesse, is a novel about a man's progression towards his goal to center his life with a combination of peace and balance. Many of the displayed philosophies can be applied to today's world. Through my reading, I noticed many similarities between my life and Siddhartha's. First, Siddhartha felt a need for independence, that to truly be happy with his success, he must attain his achievements in his own way, and not others. Even though, he feels he must acquire this by himself, he tries to be as removed from his human side as possible....   [tags: Herman Hesse, Siddhartha Essays] 1013 words
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The Importance of Sacrifice in Hesse’s Siddhartha - In Hermann Hesse’s novel, Siddhartha, the main character of the story, Siddhartha, a young Brahman along with his beloved friend, Govinda leaves home to find enlightenment. They join a group of ascetic Samanas and for many years Siddhartha and Govinda deny their body’s pains and senses including the external world. Yet, Siddhartha is not satisfied with the result and fails to find the true path to enlightenment that he is seeking. Furthermore, Siddhartha because of dissatisfaction renounces the life of asceticism and departs with Govinda to visit and hear Gautama Buddha speak and learn from him....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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The Importance of Sacrifice in Hesse’s Siddhartha - Pablo Picasso once said, “Every positive value has its price in negative terms.” When a person is in search of “the good life,” it is inevitable that sacrifices must be made in order to attain that favorable end goal. What these people sacrifice, or their “cost of the good life,” can take many different forms. Contrary to popular belief, a cost could potentially affect one’s emotional and physical status, and not just one’s economic status. A cost could even take a toll on society as a whole....   [tags: Enlightenment, Siddhartha Essays]
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The Stages of Siddharta's Journey to Self Enlightenment - Readers have been fascinated with Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha for decades. Written in 1951, Hesse’s most famous novel provides the reader with a work of literature that, “presents a remarkable exploration of the deepest philosophical and spiritual dimensions of human existence” (Bennett n.p). Siddhartha takes place in India while the Buddha has first began his teachings. The book follows the life of a man by the name of Siddhartha, on his journey to reach enlightenment. The main theme in Siddhartha is reaching enlightenment without the guidance of a teacher or mentor....   [tags: Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha Essays]
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Enlightenment and Siddhartha's Reunion with Vasudeva - Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha discusses the life and spiritual journey of Siddhartha, a Brahmin contemporary of Gautama Buddha. Siddhartha’s name, a portmanteau of the Sanskrit words for “achieved” and “what was searched for,” invites comparison to the Buddha himself, who went by the same name when he was a prince. Unsatisfied with his spiritual state as a Brahmin, Siddhartha immerses himself in various other life philosophies. In his pursuit of enlightenment, he becomes a Samana, meets Buddha, and attempts a citified materialistic lifestyle, but these options all leave him unfulfilled....   [tags: Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha Essays]
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The Four Noble Truths in Siddhartha's Journey to Self-Enlightenment - Is it possible for Shakespeare to connect Othello to the Four Noble Truths. In Shakespeare’s words, “Poor and content is rich, and rich enough.”1 Shakespeare unintentionally connects the concept of his play Othello to the ancient concept of the Four Noble Truths: craving worldly pleasures only leads one to suffer. The Four Noble Truths provide a conceptual framework to Buddhist principles; they contain the essence of Buddhist teachings. Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha deals with Siddhartha’s spiritual journey of self-discovery during the time of Gautama Buddha, the founder of Buddhism....   [tags: Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha Essays]
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Siddhartha: The Journey for Inner Peace and Happiness -        Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse is about a man's journey to find inner peace and happiness.  He first decides to try to seek peace by following the Samanas, holy men.  Then he seeks happiness through material things and pleasures of the body.  After this path fails to provide him with the peace for which he searches, he follows Buddha but soon realizes that Buddha's teaching will not lead him to his goal.  Siddhartha finally finds peace when Vasudeva, the ferryman, teaches him to listen to the river....   [tags: Hermann Hesse]
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Siddharta's Journey to Self Enlightenment - In Siddhartha written by Hermann Hesse the protagonist, Siddhartha, explores different beliefs in order to achieve enlightment with the hardships of losing himself along the way. Siddhartha’s journey for enlightment teaches him a great lesson of being able to identify who he is and discover his own beliefs in order to achieve enlightment. Siddhartha began his youth as a Brahman with potential to be one of the greatest in the community because of how simple it is for him to grasp certain concepts....   [tags: Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha Essays]
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Siddharta's Journey to Self Enlightenment - Siddhartha is a novel about the ultimate quest every man must take in life. The protagonist Siddhartha is on a quest of the self. The ultimate question, why are we here. He is on a quest to lose one self and find Nirvana. Which religion or way of living is the most divine. He is also on a quest to achieve enlightenment. The author of this novel is Hermann Hesse. He was born in the German Empire in the year of 1877. He wrote Siddhartha in 1922. It has similarities to many other works of the same time period and from the same region....   [tags: Self-Actualization, Hermann Hesse] 671 words
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Comparing Self Discovery in American Beauty and Hermann Hesse's Demian - Self Discovery in American Beauty and Hermann Hesse's Demian After Jane Burnham's first meeting with Ricky Fitts in American Beauty she responds by saying, "He's so confident. That can't be real." If it isn't real, is it a dream. If it is a dream, is it Jane's dream. If it is Jane's dream, is this her unconscious wish for pleasure or happiness...to be like Ricky Fitts. There seems to be a theme running through the movie American Beauty where we see people looking to other people as a source to receive their own sense of confidence, or ultimately, happiness....   [tags: Comparison Comapre Contrast Essays]
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Review Of Demian By Hesse - How to be Enlightened A Review of Demian, by Hermann Hesse How does one become enlightened. Some would say, deep meditation, others would say, some long mystical journey that involves some spiritual guide. I think that the best person to study for that question would be Hermann Hesse. Hesse has written many books, involving profound ideas on the subject of enlightenment. One great book is Demian. I found three ways to become enlightened. The first is that we must look at the bible/religion as a whole....   [tags: essays research papers] 358 words
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Herman Melville's Billy Budd - Billy Budd as Allegorical Figure - Billy Budd as Allegorical Figure An allegory is a symbolic story. Herman Melville's Billy Budd is an example of an allegory. The author uses the protagonist Billy Budd to symbolize a superior being who has a perfect appearance and represents goodness. Melville shows the reader that a superior being can be an innocent victim of evil and eventually destroyed. In, Melville's Billy Budd, the main character is an allegorical figure who symbolizes all goodness in men....   [tags: Herman Melville Billy Budd Essays] 623 words
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Experiencing the Magic Theater - After reading Herman Hesse’s “Steppenwolf,” one probably notices the main character in this novel, Harry Haller, is in a constant internal battle, where there is a “continual and deadly enmity” (41-42) between two natures, one where he claims to possess and the other to be divided by “a human and a wolfish one” (41). Although one can gain many insights from reading Steppenwolf, I believe Haller seeks to conform to the bourgeois in every aspect of his life. However, he belatedly realizes how he actually despises the bourgeois for its complacency and conformity....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Harry Haller] 667 words
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Influence of Societal Expectation in Hunger and Siddhartha - Societal expectations play momentous roles in character development in Hamsun’s Hunger and Hesse’s Siddhartha. Societal expectations derive from the origins of the individuals in the society who create authority and code of conduct for the people to obey and follow (based on their own morals). Both novels uncover the character development of the protagonists yet the authors approach these themes in different manners. Hamsun follows the hero’s path through an unforeseen destiny of solitude and weariness allowing the hero to find no place among the society....   [tags: Knut Hamsun Herman Hesse] 1588 words
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Siddhartha’s Influences - Siddhartha’s Influences In the novel Siddhartha, Herman Hesse used other characters to let Siddhartha grow both intellectually and spiritually. During the course of his journey, Siddhartha encountered many people and experienced different ways of living and thinking about life. Each person taught him something about himself and the world around him. Siddhartha’s childhood friend, Govinda, educated him about the importance of choosing a path in his own life. Govinda had always been a step behind Siddhartha, following every decision he made....   [tags: Siddhartha Herman Hesse]
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Steppenwolf - Steppenwolf Steppenwolf opens with a preface by a young businessman, who introduces a sheaf of notes left behind by a lodger in his attic rooms several years before. This young man, the landlady's nephew, describes the eccentric lodger, Harry Haller, who called himself a Steppenwolf, meaning in German a wolf of the steppes, or plains. The narrator finds this an odd but apt description of the shy, lonely wanderer who revealed little about himself but left a haunting memory. The preface recounts Harry's arrival and the narrator's several encounters with him- on the stairs, at a concert and an art lecture, and in a tavern....   [tags: Free Essays] 408 words
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Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse - Out of the Dust is a 1934 historical fiction novel written by Karen Hesse. The setting of the novel is in a struggling farm in Joyce City in Oklahoma. The novel talks of the challenges faced by Billie Jo a 13 year old girl and her family. It tells of Billie’s struggles a she grows up in Oklahoma Dust Bowl during the depression. Billie’s father was a farmer but his crops fail to nourish because of the drought but Billie is determined to make a better life for herself. Billie was a pianist and got a chance to travel around town with other aspiring performers but her mother never gave her the support she desperately needed....   [tags: literrary analysis]
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Analysis Of Steppenwolf Disease - Steppenwolf The disease in Steppenwolf is a disease that, as stated in the book, “….affects not only the weak and the worthless but also the strongest in spirit and the richest in gifts.”. This disease is loneliness. Some would not call this a disease, they would call it a feeling. It, in fact, really is a disease affecting the thoughts, feelings, and actions of a person, and in this case Harry Haller, or the Steppenwolf. This disease, which affects the innermost parts of a person’s soul, has affected Mr....   [tags: essays research papers] 1091 words
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An Evaluation of Hesse’s Portrayal of India’s Caste System in Enlightenment, Siddhartha - In his novel Siddhartha, Hermann Hesse used the story of a young Indian Brahmin searching for insight to explore different means of achieving inner peace. Siddhartha attempted to use both asceticism and the life of the wealthy to experience illumination. He fluctuated from rich to poor multiple times before he reached enlightenment. However, Hesse did not always accurately portray the most essential piece of Indian culture—the Caste System—perhaps because he wanted to appeal to a western audience that had little knowledge of the system....   [tags: Siddhartha Essays]
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The Life and Career of Herman Melville - Herman Melville during his time was known as the greatest writer. He was the author of many novels such as, Moby Dick, and Bartleby the Scrivener (Allen 9). Herman Millville stories were based on factual aspects in his life and the world surrounding him. Through his literature he expressed his feelings on certain political or economic issues that were occurring during the nineteenth century. In this essay I will be discussing Herman Millville’s life, his literature works and how it relates to him....   [tags: writer, Moby Dick, literature, American writers]
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The Life and Writings of Herman Mellville - Herman Melville Early experiences in Melville’s life influenced many of his writings and the themes of his stories. As you know all of this began in a particular way, just like everybody else’s life. Somewhere in New York City lived Allan and Maria Gansevoort Melvill. On august 1, 1981, Allan and Maria welcomed their 3rd son to the world and named him Herman. Herman was born into a very, history filled family. His elders were of Scottish and Dutch heritage. Herman had two grandfathers who were a big part of the American Revolution and the Boston Tea Party....   [tags: literary legacies] 906 words
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