Search Results

Free Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned over 400 essays for "Henry David Thoreau"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
Civil Disobedience, Henry David Thoreau - "That government is best which governs least." Or is it. Should the American people be free to rebel against laws they consider unjust. Henry David Thoreau addresses these issues in his essay, Civil Disobedience. Thoreau wholeheartedly accepts the declaration that the government is best which governs least, and would like to see it acted upon. One day, he hopes, we will be able to carry it out to the point where men can have a government that does not govern at all. Government "never of itself furthered any enterprise"....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Constitution] 1158 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and the Patriot Act - Henry David Thoreau questioned how an unjust law should be handled, should it just be followed, should action be taken to fix the law while still obeying it, or should it just be transgressed completely. The idea that one of these answers is correct is a fallacy, and a bad assumption. The answer depends on the situation at hand. Any law that tramples on the rites of a person or a group of people is a law that should be ignored and protested and actively broken. On the other hand a law that just lacks sense; is one that we could just live with or push to have fixed....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, laws, Patriot Act, ] 520 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Sociological Experimentation in Isolation - In Henry David Thoreau’s writings, he explores a different, more thoughtful way of life. Thoreau was a student of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson gave Thoreau the property on Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts; where Thoreau spent about two years living away from the society. Thoreau’s social experimentation required him to separate himself from the society, to be an individual, and to learn from his experiences. Henry David Thoreau was given a piece of property on Walden Pond by Emerson. Even though it was against Emerson’s beliefs; Thoreau separated himself from society by moving to the property on Walden Pond....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, isolation, Walden,] 662 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau Was a Fool - Lincoln has been credited as being a person that fought for equality between races, when he himself believed that African Americans were inferior, the image people give him is unreal, propaganda by the Radical Republicans in the reconstruction era. Many people have ideas that do not hold up when put to the test, or even their own reasoning. Henry David Thoreau’s ideas and ideals do not hold up when compared to reality. Thoreau believed that if a man did less work, the better it would be for the man and his community....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau Essays] 592 words
(1.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Integrity - Henry David Thoreau's Integrity Although his actions were admirable and act as evidence to integrity, the writings of Henry David Thoreau and Emerson reveal a haughty and pretentious individual. Thoreau's courage was noble. He was quick to immerse himself in his beliefs and abandon any obligation to social norms despite the risk in damaging his reputation. His rejection of societal limitations and steadfast individualism was truly commendable, however, his mannerisms were extremely rude. He cast aside all tact and consideration of others because he was so consumed with himself....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau Essays] 596 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Simplicity and Freedom in Walden by Henry David Thoreau - In chapter two of Henry David Thoreau's Walden, entitled "Where I Lived, and What I Lived for", there are two themes that run throughout the narrative. The key theme that emerges continually is that of simplicity with the additional theme being that of freedom. Thoreau finds himself surrounded by a world that has no true freedom or simplified ways, with people committed to the world that surrounds them rather than being committed to their own true self within nature. Simplicity is defined in the Merriam-Webster online dictionary as a simple state or quality; freedom from complexity; absence of elegance and luxury; uncomplicated....   [tags: Walden, Henry David Thoreau] 962 words
(2.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Where I lived, and What I Lived For - Henry David Thoreau's Where I lived, and What I Lived For I found Henry David Thoreau?s ?Where I Lived, and What I Lived For. made a very convincing argument. He has many examples to support his beliefs. Thoreau stresses the importance and value of living the simplest life nature affords, which I believe is as important now as it was in his day. ?Where I Lived, and What I Lived For. opens with Thoreau describing how he came to live in a small, dilapidated cabin near Walden Pond. He speaks of the many farms he imagines owning, yet never does....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau Where lived What For]
:: 1 Works Cited
932 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and the Counterculture - Transcendentalism is a literary and philosophical movement, associated with Henry David Thoreau and the Counterculture, asserting the existence of an ideal spiritual reality that transcends the empirical and scientific and is knowable through intuition. Imagination and individuality are associated with the term. Henry David Thoreau who was a leading philosopher and poet was a leading transcendentalist. He compiled a novel titled Walden, a non-fiction depicting his stay at Walden Pond where he truly explored nature and his transcendental quality....   [tags: counter-culture, transcendentalism]
:: 13 Works Cited
1342 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Biography of Henry David Thoreau - ... Thoreau was enriched by his findings and once he was satisfied with what he found, he felt like he could return to society (Shmoop Team, 1, 2008). While there, he learned to be pure in mind but tolerant to others (Kifer, 1, 2010). Thoreau thought life was not all about wealth, which was what everyone else believed it was. His basic philosophy on life was that life’s goal was to be the exploration of the mind and the world together (Kifer, 1). Through his eyes, life was not meant to be spent worrying over frivolous, pointless details, but on the important things....   [tags: american transcendentalist, philosophy] 755 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and Romanticism - Romanticism is an effect that emanated from the historic concept of Enlightenment, an idea that largely focused on logic and order. During the Romantic era, emphasis was laid on emotion, imagination, and intuition as the main features of writing. Most literatures during the time were sentimental in their content and written to try to transcend reality. Romanticism disregards civilization and instead attaches much significance to the common man, individualism, and most importantly, nature. This paper looks into the way in which the idea of nature is perceived by Romanticism and how the view is brought out in Henry David Theoreau’s book, Walden....   [tags: post-Age of Enlightment literature]
:: 4 Works Cited
542 words
(1.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and Transcendentalism - Henry David Thoreau was born on July 12, 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts. Thoreau ended up going to Harvard College and while he was there he studied Greek and Latin as well as German. During the time that he was studying he got ill and had to take a break from studying. In the year of 1837 he graduated from Harvard but after this he really did not know what he was going to do. Since he did not know what he wanted to do he ended up creating a school with his brother in 1838. Not long after John became ill and the school soon collapsed....   [tags: study, school, guity] 698 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Transcendentalism: Henry David Thoreau - ... Another theme of Walden is unity with God. Thoreau believed that God was unified with philosophy, nature, and humanity, an idea that stemmed from the Transcendentalist movement. The Transcendentalist movement was a religious movement characterized by the belief that religion was what was inside of you, not what other people told you (“Thoreau, Henry David”). Thoreau was a strong believer in what this movement stood for, and because of this, he immersed himself into nature to discover religion and God inside of himself....   [tags: waldo, writing, literary movement]
:: 4 Works Cited
1097 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Views - An American Author, Transcendentalist and tax resister, Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord Massachusetts, and lived there most of his life.  He was opposed to many of the things that went on in our society and debated many issues in his life. Two of these major issues are , the Mexican American War and the implement of Slavery in our society. This was the reason for many of his writings include “Slavery in Massachusetts” and “Civil Disobedience” where he wrote about his principles and views against the U.S government and their involvement in the Mexican American War and the evil of Slavery....   [tags: Mexican American War, Slavery] 1203 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Works of Henry David Thoreau - The works of Henry David Thoreau clearly show his belief in transcendentalism. The dictionary defines transcendentalism as any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material. "Walden", a story that describes Thoreau's experiences while living on Walden Pond, emphasizes the importance of individuality and self-reliance. Thoreau's essay, "Civil Disobedience", advocates the importance of prioritizing one's principles over the laws of the government. It also criticizes the American social institutions and polices....   [tags: Transcendentalism Thoreau] 1023 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Biography of Henry David Thoreau - Biography of Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau was born July 12, 1817. He was born in Concord, Massachusetts. He lived a wonderful life as a poet and essayist. Its sad to say that he pasted away on May 6, 1862 in Concord. The first year of his life his family moved away, but also returned five years later. He grew up in a village and later reached his manhood. His favorite thing about the village was the woodlands, streams, and meadows. He was the third child in his family. As his life was expanding meeting new people he grew into a friendship with Ralph Waldo Emerson....   [tags: Biography Thoreau Philosopher] 1078 words
(3.1 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - Biographical Summary Henry David Thoreau was born on July 12, 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts, and was the son of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar (“Henry…” Ency. of World). Growing up in a “modest New England family,” Thoreau was one of four children and was accustomed to living practically (McElroy). As his family was “permanently poor,” he came to accept a moderate lifestyle, which may have later influenced his thoughts on the necessities of life (“Henry…” Ency. of World). As a child, he enjoyed exploring nature and was fascinated by its beauty....   [tags: Biography, Transcendentalism, Grading System]
:: 7 Works Cited
1918 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Walden by Henry David Thoreau - Walden by Henry David Thoreau Walden, by Henry David Thoreau is written in first person about the events and ideas that came to the author during his time living at Walden Pond in the eighteen hundreds. Henry David Thoreau was a poet and a philosopher who lived a life of simplicity in order to make a direct connection between people, God, and nature. He viewed knowledge as an "intuitive force rather than a set of learned, logical proofs." His writing in Walden focused on many different themes, including the relationship between light and dark, the ideas and importance of nature, the meaning of progress, the importance of detail, and the relationship between the mind and...   [tags: Thoreau Walden Essays] 534 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - ... Although a decade apart, The Picture of Dorian Gray and Into the World There Came a Soul Called Ida bears many similarities and differences in subject matter and materials. For instance, when one first encounters the 142.9 x 119.2 cm piece of work entitled Into the World There Came a Soul Called Ida, 1929-30, an initial reaction may be one of confusion and disgust. In the painting what you see is not what you were expecting. The model is supposed to be a pretty young woman named Ida Rogers, yet Ivan chooses to depict her as a 1920’s risqué woman whose life has seemingly lended itself to death....   [tags: artist analysis, biography] 1573 words
(4.5 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and The Transcendentalist Movement - Henry David Thoreau once said, “Our life is frittered away by detail. An honest man has hardly needed to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest. Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity. I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumb nail” (The). This quote describes the attitude that Thoreau had toward life. He wanted to make life as simple as it could be, which he achieved throughout his lifetime....   [tags: criticism, writer, social norm]
:: 5 Works Cited
1228 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Walk to Wachusett by Henry David Thoreau - “It not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see” once stated Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau was not famously recognized while he was living; however, as his work matured he was noticed more and more as a prominent writer and is now cherished by millions of readers today. Thoreau's work reflected his rugged individualism and living close to nature, protesting America's move from an agrarian society to the Industrial Revolution, people who shared his concerns of a changing world were inspired and valued his work, therefore, flourishing his reputation....   [tags: american literature, waldo]
:: 7 Works Cited
1211 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau: The Grat Transcendentalist - Henry David Thoreau along with a select group of people propelled the short movement of transcendentalism during the 1830s to the 1850s and was later brought up during the Vietnam War. Many of the transcendentalist ideas came from student who attended Harvard University during this time period. Henry David Thoreau’s individualistic anarchist views on society were developed throughout his early life and later refined in his years of solitude; these views on society and government are directly expressed in much of his work....   [tags: Biography ]
:: 8 Works Cited
1929 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Henry David Thoreau Loves to be Alone - “I love to be alone.” It is one of the shortest sentences in the entire chapter, and yet it has so much to say. However, its simplicity is what makes it so complex. It is so short, that the reader cannot fully understand what Henry David Thoreau means by that. There are two basic things it could mean. More specifically, the usage of the word “alone” could mean two things. One meaning is that Thoreau loves to be alone from society, meaning people. The other is that Thoreau loves to be completely alone, away from both humans/society as well as nature....   [tags: Walden, Poet, Author] 571 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Benjamin Franklin & Henry David Thoreau - Benjamin Franklin and Henry David Thoreau have been thought of as two powerful philosophers in history. Both men were alive centuries ago, but their unique ways of life and ideas still exist in some of history’s most admirable figures. Each man had a judgment that went beyond the era they existed in, but is still obvious in today’s culture. Even though both men are credited for their wise principles, their beliefs do not always coincide with one another. However, one thing they do have in common is that they both revolutionized America through their thoughts, actions, and distinctive opinions on how to improve the world around them....   [tags: Similarities, Biography, Beliefs] 1056 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Civil Disobedience, by Henry David Thoreau - “Civil Disobedience” by Henry David Thoreau was a means of educating people on why they should not settle for a less than perfect government. Thoreau’s work is a reminder that it is our duty to throw off an unsatisfactory government, as stated by Thomas Jefferson in the “Declaration of Independence.” Civil Disobedience touches on the subject of why people choose to do nothing about a government they are unhappy with. People fear the consequences they might suffer if they do interfere with the current government....   [tags: Civil Disobedience Essays] 1167 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Civil Disobedience, by Henry David Thoreau - Henry David Thoreau was an American philosopher lived in 19th century, when young and feeble American society was not powerful as nowadays. His illustrious work called as “Civil disobedience” demonstrated his polar point of view towards unjust government. Objection to pay taxes, protests, follow own conscience are only some of the methods of disobeying. His main point is that any man, who treats himself as a conscience man, should differentiate laws in order to determine which law is right or wrong, and consequently no to obey that unjust law....   [tags: Conscience, Unjust Laws, Chaos] 749 words
(2.1 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Literary Experience - In “Civil Disobedience” Thoreau emphasizes the need for self-reliance (“Clendenning”). This statement is fitting because Thoreau was one of the most self-reliant men of his time period. He was an individual and enjoyed nature. Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) is closely related to the Transcendentalism movement, which lasted a mere ten years in the 1830s and 1840s. Transcendentalism is the belief of self-reliance, individuality, social reform, and relying on reason. Henry David Thoreau’s love of nature, languages, and contemporary English, as well as the growth of Transcendentalism greatly influenced the life of this great American Author....   [tags: Civil Disobedience]
:: 6 Works Cited
1043 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau: Transcendentalist Writer - Henry David Thoreau was a nineteenth century American author who lived during the height of Transcendentalism. He became an important contributor to this movement (“H. D. T.” Poetry Foundation). Thoreau received much information about this movement from Emerson, a noteworthy friend of Thoreau. Thoreau wrote many significant works in American literature, including Walden and “Civil Disobedience.” The works of Henry David Thoreau were strongly influenced by the Transcendentalist movement and centered around his stay at Walden Pond....   [tags: biography, civil disobedience, emerson ]
:: 10 Works Cited
2020 words
(5.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Civil Disobedience: Henry David Thoreau - Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was a philosopher and writer who is well known for his criticism of the American government during the time. During Thoreau’s life, there were two major issues being debated in the United States: slavery and the Mexican-American War. Both issues greatly influenced his essay, as he actually practiced civil disobedience in his own life by refusing to pay taxes in protest of the Mexican War. He states that the government should be based on conscience and that citizens should refuse to follow the law and has the duty not to participate and stay as a member of an unjust institution like the government....   [tags: individualism and skepticism] 781 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Walden by Henry David Thoreau - ... Repeating “Let us” instead of “you must,” he establishes a conversation instead of a lecture (49). In addition, Thoreau relies on pathos to achieve his rhetorical aims and get people to cleanse their life. Phrases like “sweet edge dividing your heat,” “rattle in our throats and feel cold in the extremities” attack the readers’ senses, and sweeping ideas such as “future ages,” “life,” “death,” and “eternity” lend the passage emotional appeal (49, 50). Thoreau also creates a stipulative definition of “reality,” giving a generally clinical word a more emotional meaning (49)....   [tags: story analysis] 565 words
(1.6 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and Transcendentalism - Henry David Thoreau and Transcendatalism Henry David Thoreau harbored many anarchist thoughts toward the American government of the decades before the Civil War, which he collected and wrote about in the essay, "Civil Disobedience", which, in fact was originally called "Resistance to Civil Government", giving the essay a powerful message that would not only reflect Thoreau's own views toward the Mexican war, but also give the essay a powerful anti-slavery message, as well as affect the whole idea of Civil Rights, as well as shape the leaders of Civil Rights....   [tags: Essays Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
668 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Incredible Henry David Thoreau - By the year 1840 the concept of Independence had been forever embedded in American tradition and American government. The value of freedom had yet to be accepted nor granted peacefully. The Revolution released America from the grasp of Britain and it would take yet another war to release the black man from the shackles of slavery. America was still in its infancy; the West was not yet settled, the South was still a confederacy and unity was just a dream. The country was torn by slavery. And some men began to question the integrity of their government....   [tags: Biography]
:: 4 Works Cited
1084 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau on Education - Henry David Thoreau on Education Thoreau's relation to the institution of education has been problematic. He entered the teaching profession early, as an undergraduate, and left it a few years later, when he closed the private school he had conducted with his brother. Although there were external reasons for this action, Thoreau's departure from teaching also resulted from disillusion with the conventional classroom, a growing sense that it prevented learning rather then fostering it. Despite having undergone a formal education at Harvard University, Thoreau challenged existing teaching standards and sought to implement idealistic educational principles....   [tags: Papers] 1452 words
(4.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and His View on Economy and Life - ... He started with no money and had to borrow an axe and some supplies from his neighbor to make his house. His main source of income was his bean plants that he plants and cares for them for two to three months. In the end of the experiment he had made nine dollars. This implies that if he could do it and then you could. The reason to live a simplistic lifestyle and living away from civilization is to find your spirituality. Now there are no luxury goods that you have to work for and you could finally think for yourself, since there are no one to influence or per sway you....   [tags: Lifestyle, Productivity, Isolation] 631 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Individualism of Henry David Thoreau and Chris McCandless - Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one.” In this quote, Eleanor is expressing that you should always take advantage of the universal human right to be an individual. From time immemorial, many of those who have led meaningful and enjoyable lives have shared one particular trait in common: individualism. Chris McCandless and Thoreau were no different, they both embodied individualism and as a result they have unknowingly inspired generations....   [tags: Waldon, Into the Wild]
:: 2 Works Cited
731 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Transcendentalism: Ralph waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau - Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote it and Henry David Thoreau lived it. Transcendentalism was a religious and philosophical movement developed approximately in the 1820s and 1830s. It began in the northeastern part of the United States. According to Paul Reuben, the movement began as a protest against spirituality and the intellectualism brought from England to the United States (Reuben). The movement’s core beliefs can be inferred in a single line, infixed good found in nature and people. They fought against the only two big institutions that influenced society in that time, the government and religion; which were said to pervert individuals....   [tags: Nature, Romanticism, Utilitarianism]
:: 5 Works Cited
1141 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Into the Wild: Henry David Thoreau and Chris McCandless - ... He burned the cash in his wallet, gave $25,000 to charity, abandoned his car, and abruptly left his family. He seemed to be replicating Thoreau's life of solitude within nature when he lived in a cabin for years and wrote Walden. Amidst Chris' journey he said, “I'm going to paraphrase Thoreau here... rather than love, than money, than faith, than fame, than fairness... give me truth. ” (142). McCandless' objective was clear, change his life and find truth in the world around him through the environment....   [tags: Transcendentalism]
:: 1 Works Cited
655 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Nature depicted in Walden, by Henry David Thoreau - ... In addition to this we see that Nature not only affects human life, but is also affected by human life. So in a sense the two are interdependent of one another. One example is when he describes the way men, or humans, exit their sense of discontent as the winter days leave and the spring days arrive. You can see how Nature’s seasons affect the way we feel in our environment. When the men felt the spring becoming more present, they were more motivated to reach for a utopia, Thoreau described this as their need “to rise to a higher and more ethereal life.” It is as if nature sort of motivates life to be active....   [tags: Existence, Utopia]
:: 1 Works Cited
576 words
(1.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Freedom in ivil Disobedience and Economy by Henry David Thoreau - When it comes to the topic of how Henry David Thoreau chooses the audience for his texts, many agree that the reasoning involved the writer’s longing for achieving results rather than convincing an audience. When this agreement usually ends, however, is the question of why Thoreau ignores people who support the Mexican American War and slavery and instead focuses on those who protest against those issues. His writing philosophy in the essays “Civil Disobedience” and “Economy” shows his favouritism towards the idea that individuals need freedom of exercising their conscience and that this leads to success....   [tags: minority, mayority, political system]
:: 2 Works Cited
1314 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Call for a New Ideology in Walden - As most naturalists do, Henry David Thoreau detailed his two-year nature experiment with extensive observations in his book Walden; Or, Life in the Woods. But Thoreau was far more than a common environmentalist he was a revolutionary. Through transcendentalism, simplicity and art Thoreau calls readers to contemplate a paradigm shift in their existence toward a genuine self. To do this, the individuals must remove themselves from a life that is defined by society and enter into a life that is true to them....   [tags: transcendentalist, nature, agriculture]
:: 1 Works Cited
969 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Conquering Sainte Terre in Walking by Henry David Thoreau - ... He treats nature as if it is the mirror image to of the soul and mind. Emerson believed that institutions diminished the values and passion of the direct experience gained from the real world engagement with society. The American scholar agrees with Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution. He then finishes his article on The American Scholar by giving a description of the scholar's prospects and duties. Robert Matuozzi article focuses on The American Scholar by Ralph Waldo Emerson. He quotes Emerson “Men have become the tool of their tools”....   [tags: american scholar, absolute freedom] 806 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau, Walden, and Transcendental Values for Education - Henry David Thoreau was testing transcendental values when he took up residence at Walden Pond in 1845. During his time of simple living at the pond, he studied nature and applied those observations to humans and everyday life. He was always learning from the woods, pond, meadows and animals in the natural world around him. Nature was his classroom and everything was an opportunity to learn. In Thoreau’s book, Walden , written at the pond, he theorized that education could come through an intimacy with nature and the end of education would come with death....   [tags: nature, nature education] 996 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Transcendentalism in Henry David Thoreau and Emily Dickinson's Literature - “If a person wished to know what transcendentalism was he should empty his mind of everything coming from tradition and the rest would be transcendentalism” (Boller 34). This literary period has dramatically shaped literature and religion, in America. Many writers like Henry David Thoreau and Emily Dickinson have been influence by transcendental ideas. It is astonishing how an inspiring literature movement can change so much of the world’s view and still is around today. Transcendentalism was an American literature movement urging people to look past everyday material life, and reach into their souls to find inner peace with themselves....   [tags: philosophy, american literature movement]
:: 8 Works Cited
992 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Themes of Transcendentalism in Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau - In the book Walden, or Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau, written in 1854, there is portrayed a strong philosophical theme on transcendentalism. This view on the world was a prominent New England philosophy during the author’s life, and had a great effect on him. This view has a very simple idea. It shows that people, men and women equally, have a knowledge about the world around them, as well as themselves, that goes beyond what they can they can see, smell, taste, touch, or feel. This knowledge is acquired through imagination and intuition....   [tags: knowledge, materialistic, philosophy]
:: 1 Works Cited
557 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Resistance to Civil Government: Henry David Thoreau - In his essay, “Resistance to Civil Government,” often times dubbed, “Civil Disobedience,” Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) argues against abiding to one’s State, in protest to the unjust laws within its government. Among many things, Thoreau was an American author, poet, and philosopher. He was a firm believer in the idea of civil disobedience, the act of refusing to obey certain laws of a government that are felt to be unjust. He opposed the laws regarding slavery, and did not support the Mexican-American war, believing it to be a tactic by the Southerners to spread slavery to the Southwest....   [tags: civil disobedience, minimum government] 1381 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Thoreau’s Journey: Problem, Need, Lifestyle, and Revelation - Walden; Or, Life In The Woods is a self-experiment that provides an ideal opportunity to evaluate the author’s philosophy. The book is an account of Henry David Thoreau’s journey of self-discovery as he attempts to live a life of simplicity and self-reliance in the woods of Massachusetts. His exploration of his two years and two months living in a cabin near Walden Pond is considered a seminal work of early American transcendentalism. Thoreau never explicitly reveals the spiritual truth at the end of his journey....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Life in The Woods]
:: 1 Works Cited
1286 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Pathos, Ethos, Logos: Thoreau’s Attempts at Persuasion to Action - Pathos, Ethos, Logos: Thoreau’s Attempts at Persuasion to Action Henry David Thoreau was a poet, social philosopher, and educator in the early to mid- 1800s (Hampton). He graduated from Harvard University in 1837 and, upon his return to his hometown of Concord, Massachusetts, befriended Ralph Waldo Emerson, also a philosopher and poet (Hampton, “Ralph Waldo Emerson”). Emerson was also the leader of the Transcendentalist movement which was based on the idea that people should lead by example -- social reform begins with the individual, not the government -- and that the movement should be peaceful (Woodlief, Ruehl)....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Poet, Philosopher]
:: 1 Works Cited
1244 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Back to Nature in Henry David Thoreau’s Walden - In Walden, Henry David Thoreau explains how a relationship with nature reveals aspects of the true self that remain hidden by the distractions of society and technology. To Thoreau, the burdens of nineteenth century existence, the cycles of exhausting work to obtain property, force society to exist as if it were "slumbering." Therefore, Thoreau urges his readers to seek a spiritual awakening. Through his rhetoric,Thoreau alludes to a "rebirth" of the self and a reconnection to the natural world....   [tags: Thoreau Walden Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
2042 words
(5.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Benjamin Franklin and Henry David Thoreau's Religions - Benjamin Franklin and Henry David Thoreau's Religions Benjamin Franklin and Henry David Thoreau are by no means religious in any traditional sense of the word. If, however, “religious” is taken to mean the “belief in any sort of supreme being...that obliges ethical or moral conduct”, then both Franklin and Thoreau fall into this category. Though the two are strikingly opposite in their manner and social interaction, they are both held to a religious and personal standard. Their individual spiritual beliefs, ethical codes, and their “quality of life”show that all of their actions and thoughts are held by themselves to a higher standard....   [tags: Franklin thoreau Reliigous Essays] 748 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Drive-by Shootings at Henry David Thoreau's Walden Pond - In Walden, Henry David Thoreau said, "I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, then I came to die, discover that I had not live." Perhaps the last part of that statement is the most difficult aspect of our lives. A plethora of philosophers and everyday people alike have maintained that you should live your life as if it were your last day. Few, however, have been able to adopt that philosophy....   [tags: Thoreau Walden Pond Essays] 610 words
(1.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau was a man who expressed his beliefs of society, government, and mankind while living under his own self-criticism. Thoreau believed he had many weaknesses which made him a failure. This strong disapproval of himself contrasted with his powerful words and strong actions. These contradictions led to some of Thoreau's greatest pieces of literature. Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12, 1817, in his grandmother's house. Thoreau believed that Concord was, "the most estimable place in all the world, and in the very nick of time, too" (Harding 4)....   [tags: Papers] 3356 words
(9.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - Henry David Thoreau was bon on July 12, 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts, on his grandmother’s farm. Thoreau was of French-Huguenot and Scottish-Quaker decent. Thoreau was interested in writing at an early age. At the age of ten he wrote his first essay “The seasons”. He attended Concord Academy until 1833 when he was accepted to Harvard University but with his pending financial situation he was forced to attend Cambridge in August of 1833. In September of 1833 with the help of his family he was able to attend Harvard University....   [tags: Biography] 763 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau, a name heard endlessly by American Literature students, has contributed his outrageous views to society even after his death. Lectures and texts let his perceptions live on through teachers and professors that are all agreed on the significance of his writing to the transcendentalistic period. Definitely worth the merit he receives for his contributions, Henry Thoreau's views are nonconformist and thought provoking. "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer....   [tags: Papers] 2711 words
(7.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - Henry David Thoreau is a man of many facets; a man who refuses to conform to what the masses believe is acceptable. He calls for the rejection of complexity and for a change in mankind’s view of life. Thoreau, in his many writings, demands change in a stagnant society. He emphasizes respect for nature, even to the point of blatant disrespect for humanity. Thoreau’s connection to nature was a key ingredient in his lifestyle. He studied ants closely; hoping to understand them like one understands the human race....   [tags: essays research papers] 476 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Enlightenment and Ideas - "Civil Disobedience" is one of Henry David Thoreau's most famous essays. One of the major problems most critics see with this essay deals with Thoreau's seemingly contradictory statements about society from the beginning to the end. Barry Wood, a well-known critical writer, attributes this change in beliefs to the enlightenment of Thoreau in jail. While I agree with Wood that Thoreau does achieve a form of enlightenment, I will show that Thoreau's views regarding the society he lived in never actually changed throughout the essay: the only aspect of the essay that changed was Thoreau's means of attacking his society....   [tags: Civil Disobedience Essays] 1364 words
(3.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Frederick Douglass and Henry David Thoreau - Frederick Douglass was an American slave. Henry David Thoreau was a writer from the 17th century. The narrative read about Frederick Douglass was about his life as a slave, and how it changed as time went on, including his eventual release from enslavement. The article about Henry Thoreau was in regards to the theory of Civil Disobedience, and his role in the creation of that theory. Frederick Douglass lived from 1817 until 1895. He was a slave in Maryland, and was under the custody of Mr....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays] 1531 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Personal Freedom and Independence: The Works of Benjamin Franklin and Henry David Thoreau - Personal Freedom and Independence in the Works of Benjamin Franklin and Henry Thoreau It is an undisputable fact that the contribution of such prominent philosophers, writers, political and social activists as Benjamin Franklin and Henry David Thoreau in developing American statehood is tremendous. The literary works of both men can serve as a manifesto of national and personal liberation, a call for building a better society, where each citizen can live and work freely. Indeed, both Henry Thoreau and Benjamin Franklin emphasize the independence and freedom of an individual, but they do so in significantly different ways....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
:: 5 Works Cited
1787 words
(5.1 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Unintentional yet Strikingly Identical: Henry David Thoreau and Douglas Coupland - July 12, 1817, a man by the name of Henry David Thoreau entered the world. His father was a manufacturer of lead pencils, and Thoreau made it a personal goal to make the best pencil possible. After accomplishing the feat of developing a better lead pencil, he swore to never make another pencil again (Emerson 654). Stating, “Why should I. I would not do again what I have done once” (Emerson 654). This led to his life studies involving nature, and his never-ending pursuit of personal perfection. In pursuit of self-perfection, H....   [tags: Walden, Generation X] 591 words
(1.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Transcendentalism Depicted in Henry David Thoreau's The Warmth of Other Suns - ... Many people in Pennsylvania are farmers, which may be the closest thing to what Thoreau was trying to achieve. Farmers, one with the land and nature in general, have a relationship with nature that not very many can duplicate. The true purity of nature can only be seen and experienced if a certain relationship with nature is formed. One of the main points in transcendentalism is nature should be cherished. Cherishing is the act of loving and protecting something. I think nature should be protected by maintaining safe trash removal practices and not using more then what is put back....   [tags: serenity, peaceful, nature] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Walden ; And, Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau - When one types “walden- genre?” into a search engine, the computed guess reveals wonders; “Best guess for Walden-Genre is Autobiography, Philosophy, Fiction, Nature”.Walden is less a novel and more an account of an unusual scholarly life with flourishes. Above all, its didactic tone imparts Thoureau’s view better than any straight manifesto could ever. The most emphasized Transcendental view in the book is the harmony of nature with human world views. Walden emphasizes nature’s ability to transform and impart wisdom and sprituality, much like its writer....   [tags: philosophy, fiction, nature]
:: 1 Works Cited
925 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Chris McCandless, Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson - Chris McCandless: a man so infatuated with nature, he practically committed suicide to bring himself nearer to it. This extreme liking for nature, along with other ideals, makes up the core tenets of the transcendentalist philosophy. McCandless demonstrates other tenets of transcendentalism as well, most notably the supremacy of the individual, by detaching himself from the mammon of this world. Another way he shows the supremacy of the individual, by the belief that one should not conform to the usual policies of life, causes him great trouble in some cases....   [tags: Into the Wild Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1198 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Self-Reliance and Good Citizenship in Henry David Thoreau's Essay, Civil Disobedience - ... He reinforces this point by likening those who submit without regard for their own consciences to “movable forts or magazines”. He further elaborates by saying, “ The only obligation, which I have the right to assume is to do at anytime what I think is right”(Thoreau 387). Thoreau places critical thinking and principle over blindly following what is dictated by the government. By taking control of their will, men make it impossible to be governed unjustly and can bring about a more just society....   [tags: obiligation, injustice, government]
:: 1 Works Cited
808 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Transcendentalist Writers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman - All young people dream of breaking away from their parents and building their own lives. They yearn to follow their dreams, no matter how wild and crazy, and eventually hope to piece together their true selves. When Christopher McCandless graduated from college and took to the road with no word to his family, he might have appeared to be just another regular kid with overly strong ambitions and an uncontrolled, insatiable thirst for freedom. However, McCandless was more than an average young man who was trying to escape his parents’ control and live recklessly on his own devices....   [tags: Christopher McCandless , ideologies]
:: 7 Works Cited
1447 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Transcendentalist Utopia in Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau - ... In other words, the Transcendentalist utopia portrayed a society of individuals who were self-reliant. They have absolute confidence that if an individual “advances confidently in the direction of dreams,” he will be greeted with unexpected success (Thoreau, 313). Transcendentalists believe that nothing is more “sacred but the integrity of [one’s] own mind” (Emerson, 4). Man should not meander from his own path to another; “envy is ignorance,” and “imitation is suicide” (Emerson, 2). With an “adopted talent of another[,] [one] has only....half [a] possession.” (Emerson, 18)....   [tags: religious, social, political, implications] 1121 words
(3.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Transcendental Movement: Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau - To trace the origin of the Transcendental movement one needs to go back to the city of Concord, Massachusetts. There during the early 19th century many well-known and world-renowned authors were following the practices of one man, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson, who was considered America's first philosopher, had earlier traveled to Europe and became fascinated by the concepts of one German philosopher known as Kant. According to Emerson's understanding of Kant, there were two pure objects in the world in which are the bases of everything, nature and soul....   [tags: Emerson and Thoreau Essays] 650 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Views of Slavery and Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau's Works - Views of Slavery and Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau's Works Two men, similar in their transcendentalist beliefs and yet so different in their methods of expressing their beliefs on handling the issues of society, were major voices in the anti-slavery movement. While their focuses are more on the subjects of morality and individual choice, they still reflect on how slavery should be addressed by the American people, American referring to the free whites who actually make the decisions....   [tags: Slavery Racism Emerson Thoreau Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1726 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Statement on the Classics in Walden - Henry David Thoreau's Statement on the Classics in Walden In the novel Walden, Henry David Thoreau states that the classics are the noblest recorded thoughts of man. He also believed that the written word is the work of art nearest to life itself. Walden fits this description through many elements in the novel including relevance, universality, and beauty. The novel is a collection of essays Thoreau wrote commenting on his experiment of living in the woods for two years. He lived in a hut off the shore of Walden Pond in Massachusetts between 1845 and 1847....   [tags: Papers] 496 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Justice in Henry David Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience - Justice Henry David Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience By definition justice means the quality of being just or fair. The issue then stands, is justice fair for everyone. Justice is the administration of law, the act of determining rights and assigning rewards or punishments, "justice deferred is justice denied.” The terms of Justice is brought up in Henry David Thoreau’s writing, “Civil Disobedience.” Justice has different standards for every group that it is presented upon. Thoreau’s opinions and criticism is strongly stated....   [tags: essays research papers] 934 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Political Thinking and Influence of Henry David Thoreau - The Political Thinking and Influence of Henry David Thoreau The extent and nature of Henry David Thoreau’s commitment to social reform has long been a matter of debate among scholars. Drawing on his well-know disdain for organized politics and his focus of self-reform, some have observed that "Thoreau was no social reformer" (Goodwin 157). On the other hand, such major anti-slavery statements as "Civil Disobedience," "Slavery in Massachusetts," and "A Plea for Captain John Brown," have been seen as evidence that Thoreau was deeply engaged in the "most important moral and political issues or his time" (Harding 418)....   [tags: Politics Philosophy Philosophical Papers]
:: 15 Works Cited
2099 words
(6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Problems in Society in Walden by Henry David Thoreau - Problems in Society in Walden by Henry David Thoreau Why do so few Americans not see all of the problems in society. Do they simply not care or are they not able to see them. With Thoreau's statement, "To be awake is to be alive", he implies that Americans have their eyes closed to these issues. They do not choose to overlook these issues but they simply pass them by because their eyes are shut. Some people are not able to grasp the concept in Thoreau's statement and find it to be foreign or subversive because it threatens the way the see the world....   [tags: Papers] 345 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau - Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau were both born in Massachusetts. Emerson was born in Boston in 1803. Thoreau was born in Concord in 1817. Emerson attended Harvard and then became a Unitarian minister just like his father had been. Thoreau also attended Harvard but upon graduating, became a teacher and opened up a school. Both Emerson and Thoreau gave up their careers to pursue Transcendentalist philosophy. Emerson was one of the first to start the Transcendental Club. Thoreau became Emerson's student after he had moved into his house....   [tags: essays research papers] 442 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing Henry David Thoreau And Herman Melvilles Writings - Comparing Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville's Writings Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville focused their writings on how man was affected by nature. They translated their philosophies though both the portrayal of their protagonist and their own self exploration. In Moby Dick, Melville writes about Ahab's physical and metaphysical struggle over the great white whale, Moby Dick, symbolic of man's struggle against the overwhelming forces of nature. Ahab's quest is reported and experienced through the eyes of Ishmael....   [tags: essays research papers] 1690 words
(4.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comments on Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau - Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau   Thoreau's essay entitled "Civil Disobedience" i was an excellent way of educating the public on why people should not settle for a less than perfect government. His belief in demanding a better government was a great reminder that Thomas Jefferson insisted that it was our "duty, to throw off"(2) an unsatisfactory government in the "Declaration of Independence" ii Thoreau's essay also explained why people choose not to do anything about it. Thoreau stated that people "cannot spare the protection of the existing government, and they dread the consequences to their property and families of disobedience to it" (25)....   [tags: Civil Disobedience Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
2052 words
(5.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience - In Thoreau’s essay “Resistance to Civil Government”, Henry David Thoreau outlines a utopian society in which each individual would be responsible for governing himself. His opposition to a centralized government is an effort to disassociate with the American government, which at the time was supporting slavery and unjustly invading Mexico. While the individual rule would work well for Thoreau who is a man of conscience, it does not account for the immoral, dishonest or overly ambitious people in the nation....   [tags: Civil Disobedience Essays] 396 words
(1.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Thoreau´s View on Nature and Human Necessities - Discuss what Thoreau considered to be important in life. Nature and the benefits of a simplified lifestyle were important to Thoreau. Thoreau makes the statement how “brute creation requires more than Food and Shelter. Even in a certain climate, Thoreau felt that a man’s necessities are Food, Shelter, Clothing, and Fuel. He states how cats and dogs require the same second nature. Liebig says, “ man’s body is a stove, and food is the fuel which keeps the internal combustion in the lungs. In cold weather we tend to eat more and in the summer, we eat less....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Waldo Emerson, nature] 1191 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - Although "speech is commonly recognized as the dividing line between humans and the rest of the animal world" (Amy Stafford, Chimpanzee Communication), studies have shown that chimps and other primates partially share that capability too. "Human language is used for expression of thought, for establishing social relationships, for communication of information and for clarifying ideas." (Noam Chomsky) "So by studying the communication abilities and development of language in chimps and other great apes, we can learn more about ourselves and our own language capabilities." (Amy Stafford, Chimpanzee communication) Chimps are able to deliberately communicate with others, and their comprehension...   [tags: Biography] 1307 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau - Germany On May 8,1945, the unconditional surrender of the German armed forces was signed by Field Marshal Kietel in Berlin, ending World War II for Germany. The German people were confronted with a situation that they had never before experienced: foreign armies occupied the entire German territory. The total breakdown of civil administration throughout the country required immediate measures to ensure the rebuilding of civil authority. After disposing of Hitler's successor as head of state and his government, the Allies issued a unilateral declaration on June 5, 1945, which proclaimed their supreme authority over German territory....   [tags: Papers] 1580 words
(4.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Turn of the Screw by Henry James, Arthur Conan Doyle and Henry David Thoreau - Throughout the Turn of the Screw, by Henry James, ambiguity is used purposely in respect to the reality of the ghosts. Without certainty the reader must guess and assume in order to determine if the ghosts are real or if they are conjured in the governess's mind. In this book there is more proof for the imagination of the ghosts. One source of evidence is the preparedness of the governess. At the beginning of the book the governess is being thrown into a situation that she is unprepared for. This unpreparedness was due to the life she lived before going to Bly....   [tags: ambiguity, story analysis] 821 words
(2.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Romantic Point of View in Walden, Life in the Woods - In my opinion, Walden, or Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau is an excellent example of a Romantic point of view. Thoreau successfully conveys his Romantic ideas through his literature, and makes clear where he stands. When one reads Walden carefully, one can find many of the characteristics of Romanticism in it. In from Where I Lived and What I Lived For the idea that Thoreau shuns the artificiality of civilization and seeks unspoiled nature is evident in that he seeks to live alone in the woods....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau] 629 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Action and Reaction: Henry David Thoreau's Influence on Edward Abbey - Walden and Desert Solitaire As similar as “Civil Disobedience” and The Monkey Wrench Gang are in terms of themes and activism, Thoreau’s influence on Abbey is most pronounced in the comparison of Thoreau’s greatest work, Walden, and Abbey’s personal desert meditation, Desert Solitaire. The publication of Desert Solitaire first drew critics’ eyes to Abbey’s connection with Thoreau, and it caused Abbey to be labeled “a road company Thoreau” by Clifton Fadiman (Cahalan 163). From that point in his career, Abbey was often equated with Thoreau, and though it took many years, Abbey “encouraged the use of ‘the Thoreau of the American West’ as a blurb on the hardback jacket of Beyond the Wall” (Cah...   [tags: literature, walden and desert solitaire]
:: 8 Works Cited
1656 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Justification of Defying Unjust Laws - Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Justification of Defying Unjust Laws In his famous essay, “Letter from Birmingham Jail,’’ Martin Luther King, Jr. cites conscience as a guide to obeying just laws and defying unjust laws. In the same way, Henry David Thoreau wrote in his famous essay, “Civil Disobedience,” that people should do what their conscience tells them and not obey unjust laws. The positions of the two writers are very close; they use a common theme of conscience, and they use a similar rhetorical appeal of ethos....   [tags: Compare Contrast, philosophy] 1828 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]


Your search returned over 400 essays for "Henry David Thoreau"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>