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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Harper Lee"
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - The book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, which is one of the best books, is filled with incredible connections and fantastic foreshadowing. Once you pick up this book, you will need the key of being able to dissect the book in order to unlock its full potential. Through the three-and-a-half year-long journey that is To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee takes Jeremy Atticus Finch and Jean Louise Finch through a never-ending pile of events. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is about Jem and Scout Finch and their childhood in Maycomb, Alabama....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Harper Lee] 2691 words
(7.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - In the classic 1960 novel of To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee uses irony to reveal Maycomb’s true colors of prejudice, racism, and hypocrisy. The “tired old town” seems ideal and peaceful on the surface, but as the story progresses, it becomes evident that the town is a biased, racist community. (p. 5) The author’s irony helps the reader interpret the actual hypocritical views of the story’s characters. Simon Finch, Miss Merriweather and the Missionary Society, and Miss Gates all show the existence of discriminatory and impartial views that surround the town....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Harper Lee] 700 words
(2 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee is novel set in a three year period through the ‘great depression’. Atticus Finch (Jem and scouts father) is originally portrayed as a friendly and understanding person, though when he attends court defending a ‘black man’ as his job, suddenly he and his family begin to suffer racial hatred from their community. The story features on the themes of racism, community morals and the realisation of certain truths whilst growing up. It is a fascinating novel with a great storyline full of drama and unexposed realities....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 1077 words
(3.1 pages)
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Hope in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is extensively a story of hope. Hope is to wish for something with expectation of its fulfilment and to have confidence; trust. This is shown through the themes, issues and the characters in the novel. Atticus represents hope, he is optimist. He is from the higher class and defends the lower class and still has the anticipation to win. The Finch family has hope as Atticus has taught his children to be accepting and have open-minds. Racism and prejudice, give people the hope for change....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 925 words
(2.6 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In To Kill a Mockingbird, we are told the story of the lives of the Finch family through the eyes of one Jean Louise “Scout” Finch. She is around the age of eight years old, so she is very young. Essentially, she has always wanted to go to school, but when she gets there, she finds that her education level surpasses that of the first grade. Her father forces her to stay in school. That summer she meets a peculiar person who calls himself Dill, although his name is Charles Baker Harris. Scout and her brother, Jem, quickly befriend him....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 862 words
(2.5 pages)
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Atticus as a Hero, in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Although they are critiqued, some people do whatever they can do to improve our society. In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch proves himself to be a hero. This small-town lawyer exhibits bravery, strength, and modesty when faced with objection during Maycomb’s quarrel for justice. Without a doubt, Atticus proves that anybody can stand for what he or she believes is right. Throughout the novel, Atticus reveals his bravery. He demonstrates this quality by killing Tim Johnson, the rabid dog....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 978 words
(2.8 pages)
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Response to Questions on Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - 1. Allusion: The name of the father, Atticus, probably comes from the Roman orator Titus Pomponius Atticus, who was known for never taking a side in political struggles but rather staying neutral. This is characteristic of Atticus Finch who, despite being severely criticized for defending Tom Robinson, tells his children to ignore what people have to say. 2.Characterization: characterization would be when Boo Radley is described as ghost like, or a hermit. They think that he is insane. 3. Static character: Atticus is a man who has demonstrated that he is totally balanced in his approach to humankind....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 890 words
(2.5 pages)
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Prejudice in Harper Lee´s To Kill a Mockingbird - Life is like a thrill ride; one never knows what will be in store for them. Many characters in the story To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee feel the same way about life, having experienced many surprising and unexpected turns of events. This story is about a sleepy southern town filled with prejudice, and a lawyer’s quest, along with his children Scout and Jem, to take steps in ridding the town of its prejudiced mindset. Atticus, the lawyer, defends an innocent black man, Tom Robinson, accused of raping a white woman, Mayella Ewell, despite being a white man....   [tags: hypocrisy, Harper Lee]
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978 words
(2.8 pages)
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Courage in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is a timeless novel that has been both accepted and refused by many readers. To Kill a Mockingbird took place is a town called Maycomb. It is narrated by a young girl named Jean Louise Finch, otherwise known as Scout, who learns how to deal with many things in her life. While learning to deal with racism, injustice, and criticism, she also finds courage being showed by many of her role models. The theme courage is best depicted through Boo Radley, Scout and Atticus....   [tags: Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, ] 715 words
(2 pages)
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Gentleman of the South in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - True role models are those who have the qualities that we would want to have in the near future and those who make us want to be a better person. They teach us more about ourselves and encourage us to make better choices. A role modle is not just someone who is successful, but someone who has had similar experiences that we have had. In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee demonstrates that Atticus Finch is a true role model. Over the course of the novel, Atticus stands up for his beliefs, respects everyone regardless of who they are and behaves as a true father....   [tags: heroes, To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee,] 955 words
(2.7 pages)
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Atticus the Hero in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Martin Luther King and Gandhi are one of the few people who changed society, and stood on their own. They were individuals who didn’t worry what other people thought. They decided to bring a change in the society. King and Gandhi fought for their own rights and freedom. Lots of people get influenced by a person and make him as a leader, So he can do all the work for them while others were lazy. So this shows that a person can change a society. In “To kill a mocking bird” by Harper lee, in the county of Macomb, Atticus a lawyer defending a black man at that point of the time is changing the society....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, heroesw,] 928 words
(2.7 pages)
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Courage Demonstrated by Atticus, Boo and Scout in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, is a moving story about courage set against the prejudice in a small, Alabama town. Atticus tells his children that courage is standing up for what you believe in, even if you know you will lose. Atticus, Boo, and Scout show courage through standing up for what they believe in, even if they might lose by doing so. When Atticus chooses to defend Tom Robinson, he knows he will most likely lose the first trial. His friends and colleagues will talk behind his back for defending a black man under a capitol defense....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 566 words
(1.6 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Would you rather read a boring novel that contains static characters or would you want to read one that takes you on a journey through a dynamic character's life. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Scout's personality greatly changes as she matures and learns more about life. This novel takes place in the 1930's in a typical southern society. Once Atticus chooses to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, Scout faces many challenges and she discovers numerous facts about life. Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird Scout grows up and learns that one should not be prejudiced toward others, the true meaning of courage, and that it is wrong to harm the innocent and kind....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird] 1137 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Mockingbirds in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The significance of the store To Kill a Mockingbird is the expression mocking bird appears in the story lots of times. Also the most significant novel in this whole book is the mockingbird symbol. Another significant part of the story is the definition of a mockingbird and it is a type of Finch, it’s also a small bird who likes to sing. It got the name mockingbird because when it sings it is mocking other birds. (http://www.allfreeessays.com/essays/The-Significance-Of-The-Title-Of/21174.html) The mockingbirds in the story were Tom Robinson, Calpurnia, and Boo Radley....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, symbolism, ] 679 words
(1.9 pages)
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Atticus Finch in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In to Kill a Mockingbird, Jeremy Atticus Finch, also known as Jem, a small town boy begins as an ignorant, intolerable, naïve, and gullible young boy who has no perspective or interest in the world around him. Jem begins to go through a change of state and mind, which will affect in all aspects of the human world. The story takes place in 1933, the depth of the great depression. As Scout, Jem’s sister describes, “there is nothing to buy and no money to buy things with.” Scout and Jem live in the town of Maycomb, Alabama, a town of prejudice, poverty, and of troubled citizens....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 1087 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Mockingbird Theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - This novel by Harper Lee has a seemingly curious title to a reader who looks at it in a literal way. Someone may argue that there are no mockingbirds in To Kill a Mockingbird but I beg to differ. An actual mockingbird may not play a large role in this story however the idea and connotation of a mockingbird becomes evident throughout the story in many characters. This is a major theme in the story and is shown through the characters Boo Radley, Mr. Raymond, and Tom Robinson all connected in the fact that they are innocent good hearted people corrupted by the evil surrounding them....   [tags: Harper Lee]
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1037 words
(3 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a highly regarded work of American fiction. The story of the novel teaches us many lessons that should last any reader for a lifetime. The messages that Harper Lee relays to the reader are exemplified throughout the book using various methods. One of the most important and significant methods was the use of symbols such as the mockingbird image. Another important method was showing the view through a growing child's (Scout Finch) mind, eyes, ears, and mouth....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 1401 words
(4 pages)
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Scout's Childhood Simplicity in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - The adult world is a cold and terrifying place. There are robberies, shootings, murders, suicides, and much more. If you were to be a small child, perhaps age 5, and you were to look in at this world, you would never know how bad it actually was, just from a single glance. Children have a small slice of ignorant bliss, which helps to keep them away from the harsh of reality. It isn’t until later, when they encounter something that opens their eyes and shows them, that they truly start to understand the world we live it....   [tags: Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird, childhood,] 634 words
(1.8 pages)
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Jem's Growth in Harper Lee’s Novel, To Kill a Mockingbird - Jeremy “Jem” Finch is a leading protagonist in Harper Lee’s novel “To Kill a Mocking Bird” published in 1960. Jem matured greatly throughout the duration of the book, starting to resemble and idolize his father, achieves the status of a guardian to his sister and introduces a whole new set of ideals in his lifestyle. He embodies the themes of growth. Throughout the novel we see how perceptions of things such as courage, respect, tolerance, and cruelty changes Jem as he matures. Courage Conceptions Jem’s perception of bravery has changed throughout the course of the book....   [tags: Harper Lee, To Kill a Mocking Bird, ] 1278 words
(3.7 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird "To Kill a Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee was published in 1960 and was adapted into a play by Christopher Sergal and published in 1980. It tells the story of a court case when a black man gets accused of raping a white woman. The black man, Tom Robinson is defended by the a lawyer called Atticus Finch. Atticus is one of the few people in Maycome who have a bit of money an can read and write very well. The inevitable outcome of the case was that the Black man was sentenced to death....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 2334 words
(6.7 pages)
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Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Racism was a very large part of society in the south during the 1930’s. Many colored people were thought of as less than their peers. Whites were considered better than African Americans were, and almost every white person accepted the unjust judgment. Racial discrimination hit hard in the south. Many of the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird were impacted by racial discrimination, including Calpurnia, Scout, and Tom Robinson and his family. One of the more “accepted” sorts of racism in the 1930’s was in the home....   [tags: Harper Lee]
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1486 words
(4.2 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird In the novel by Harper Lee named, To Kill a Mockingbird, there is one main tragic event that occurs. The feelings and expressions dealt with in the novel are seen through the eyes of the main character, named Scout. In the novel Tom Robinson is a black male accused of rape in Maycomb County. During the same time period as the novel there were many historical events that were almost identical in setting and conclusion. There were many things that happened leading up to the court case that foreshadowed Tom Robinson’s inability to be found innocent of the charges....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Racism Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1376 words
(3.9 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Courage is the quality of mind that enables one to face danger with confidence, resolution, and gain a firm control of oneself. Many of the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird showed courage in their own way. Courage can come in many different forms: physical, mental, emotional and moral. Courage is not the only main theme displayed in To Kill a Mockingbird; prejudice and education are also very important themes exhibited throughout the progression of the novel....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird Harper Lee Essays Courage] 1052 words
(3 pages)
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Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee is a story of national magnitude that contains complex characters. Harper Lee deals with the emotions and spirits of the characters insightfully. A few of these characters display courage at one point or another in the story. These flashes of courage come during turbulent times of the story, and often led to success. Atticus Finch displayed courage on numerous occasions. Without his wife he had to raise Jem and Scout alone for most of their lives....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee Essays] 1327 words
(3.8 pages)
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Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was written by Harper Lee in 1960. Nelle Harper Lee was born on April 28, 1926 in Monroeville, Alabama, a city of about 7,000 people. She studied law at the University of Alabama and one year at Oxford University. After giving up working as a clerk for an airline she moved into a cold-water apartment in New York to concentrate on writing. She first handed this book to a publisher in 1957 but it was rejected so she took two further years to rework it before it was published as ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ in 1960....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 6279 words
(17.9 pages)
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Cultures in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ is a brilliantly written novel by Harper Lee. The novel is set in Alabama, USA, in the 1930’s and tells the story of a lawyer who defends a wrongly accused black man while trying to raise his two children, Scout and Jem, as they go through childhood and adolescence, life’s most active learning stages. The book is written through the eyes of Atticus’ naïve young daughter, Scout, and southern ways enhance the plot of the story to give it a realistic and historical perspective....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 4930 words
(14.1 pages)
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Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill A Mockingbird is a novel which can deceive the reader into thinking that it is very simple. However, if the reader delves beneath the surface, she may find that there are a number of complex themes running through the novel. One of the central themes in this novel is the prejudice that was characteristic of southern town in the 1930?s. A variety of prejudices combine to form the character of the town of Maycomb. The three main prejudices encountered are those of race, class, and sex....   [tags: Harper Lee Mockingbird Race Essays] 928 words
(2.7 pages)
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Jem's Maturing in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Jem's Maturing in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird When children grow up, they face difficult problems, and. they learn to cope and take responsibility. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is a flashback about two kids that spans over a few years. Jem ages from ten to thirteen over the course of the novel, and undergoes much change, as his sister describes him. Over the years, he is exposed to issues adults face, and eventually shows an understanding of racism and innocence. As Jem grows up, his view on courage also changes....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird] 1007 words
(2.9 pages)
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Power Hungry in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Power Hungry in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Society is unwilling to become aware and understand before it judges. This idea has a lot of effect on the plot of To Kill A Mockingbird. In this particular situation, these problems are initiated by prejudice. These circumstances become an issue when morality is questioned. The mockingbird is a reoccurring symbol that denotes the idea of the exploitation of blameless beings by those of higher influence. The prominent theme in To Kill A Mockingbird is that the innocent are often taken advantage of by those with more power....   [tags: Harper Lee Mockingbird] 1547 words
(4.4 pages)
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Maturation of Jem and Scout in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Throughout To Kill a Mockingbird Jem and Scout change tremendously. They do not change physically, but rather mentally. Their maturation can be seen as the novel progresses and by the end of the story they seem to be two completely different people. As the novel goes on, the reader can see that Jem and Scout mature even when the rest of the town does not. In part one, Jem and Scout are terrified of Boo Radley because of stories they have heard. They have never actually seen or talked to him and yet they are still children and believe most of the things they hear....   [tags: Harper Lee] 585 words
(1.7 pages)
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Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee The mockingbird is a major symbol in the book, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Harper Lee chose the mockingbird for both the title of her book and as a symbol in her book. I believe she selected it because the mockingbird is a creature that is loved by all for its singing and mocking, for which it gets its name, and how it never intends to harm anything or anybody. Atticus Finch says to Jem, ??but remember it?s a sin to kill a mockingbird.....   [tags: Papers Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 643 words
(1.8 pages)
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A Good Parent: Atticus in Lee Harper's To Kill a Mockingbird - Mrs. Alexandra, from my understanding, a good parent is one who creates a safe nurturing environment for a child to grow up in, displays characteristics of a positive role model, and is an active part of a child’s life. (Atticus, look at Scout and Jem affectionately ) Good parents provide moral guidance, sets limitations, and implements consequences for a child’s behavior. (Atticus, use a ruler and slap it in your hand looking at Scout and Jem symbolizing a Spanking as punishment) Atticus is a very effective parent to Scout and Jem....   [tags: Parents, Lee Harper, Kill A Mockingbird, reinterpr] 567 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, portrays an influential period of the protagonist, Jean Louise “Scout” Finch’s life. Narrated from the perspective of Scout as an adult, she writes about her experiences between the ages of six and nine and how she reaches maturity through various, momentous situations and experiences. Several of Scout’s learning experiences occurred due to the small town life she lived in Maycomb, Alabama. The atmosphere of racial relations exposes genuine injustice and prejudice, of which she does not understand; however, because of the ambiance of Maycomb County, Jean Louise “Scout” Finch grows in her understanding of her world and develops her own perspective throug...   [tags: Literary Analysis, Lee] 2732 words
(7.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird Research Paper In To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee it is very evident that her life experiences when paired with the era in which she lived helped her develop this piece of iconic American literature. The themes and subtle critiques of the society she grew up in are reflected in To Kill a MockingBird, which is what made this book one of the greatest literary works of all time. She grew up in a time of great social inequality and prejudice towards African Americans.This is one of the many examples of her life that formed a major theme in this book, her foremost popular work....   [tags: Author's Background] 1323 words
(3.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Harper Lee is an American novelist that was born in Monroeville, Alabama in 1926. She was born to her mother, Frances, who was a homemaker and her father, Amasa, who was a former newspaper editor and proprietor that also practiced law and served in the Alabama State Legislature from 1926 to 1938. Harper Lee was the youngest of four children. She was a tomboy and an advanced reader as a child. Her best friend was her schoolmate and neighbor, Truman Capote. She went to the Monroe County High School, and it was at this location that she found her love for literature....   [tags: american novelist, Atticus Finch]
:: 2 Works Cited
1382 words
(3.9 pages)
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The Life and Writings of Harper Lee - Nelle Harper Lee, the famous author of the worldwide bestseller To Kill a Mockingbird, was born April 28th, 1926, to Amasa Coleman (a lawyer) and Frances Lee. At the time, the family lived in Monroeville, Alabama. Harper’s family was somewhat wealthy, and they lived in upper middle class society most of their lives. Harper’s birth name, Nelle, was her grandmother’s spelled backwards (Ellen). However, in her publications, she took her middle name, Harper, to avoid being known as “Nellie”. But what numerous people have never heard - and many would be shocked to know - is that one windy, rainy night, Harper threw all her unpublished manuscripts of To Kill a Mockingbird out the window....   [tags: Biography]
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1046 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird takes place in a Maycomb County, a Southern community in Alabama. The story is based in the poverty stricken time of the 1930's, where most of Maycomb's populace was still suffering from the Great Depression. To Kill a Mockingbird, is narrated by a young girl named Jean Louise, ( better known as Scout), when she was aged six to eight. She and her brother Jem were the only children of a widower Atticus Finch, a respected gentlemen, who was one of Maycomb County's few attorneys....   [tags: Character Analysis, Jean Louise, Jem] 1096 words
(3.1 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird is a brilliant novel by Harper Lee that engraves moral lessons within its pages. The novel has many themes such as the true meaning of courage, the importance of education, and that a child’s perception is wiser than an adult’s. Throughout the novel, Harper Lee uses skillful language to tell her story and connect to her audience. Harper Lee utilizes literal language, symbolism, and imagery to bring the meaning of To Kill a Mockingbird to life. Lee manipulates literal language, such as dialogue and dialect to fundamentally relate her meaning to readers....   [tags: courage, education, symbolism]
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1400 words
(4 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Even though every human living in America is entitled to a fair trial, the legitimacy of the trial can often lean to one side based on the prejudice of race. As children age, they begin to apprehend these social inequalities and lose their innocence. In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird , Harper Lee portrays life in a suburban town, Maycomb, through the lives of several families during the Great Depression and how they each have individual qualities that differentiate them. Scout and Jem, two young children, are victimized by this loss of innocence along with their friend Dill....   [tags: story and character analysis] 948 words
(2.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a fascinating story that has captured the hearts of many readers. The main character and narrator Scout Finch, or otherwise known as Jean Louise Finch, speaks the voice of a young girl who grows up in a small town called Maycomb County in the 1930’s. Her father, Atticus Finch, is a non-racist lawyer in a very prejudice town. Throughout the novel, Harper Lee includes many themes, but one of the most important one explains the loss of innocence and growing up....   [tags: Loss of Innocence]
:: 5 Works Cited
749 words
(2.1 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - ... After the children speak with him, they finally realize that the man who they and the town considered a monster to be a good man after all. They get to realize the true degree of society’s harsh and incorrect prejudiced judgements, and because of that, they loose their innocence. In addition, socio-economic statuses of the town are another part of society that strips away the children’s innocence. One example is when Scout asks whether or not she can bring Walter Cunningham home to play with....   [tags: childhood innocence, character analysis] 1389 words
(4 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - In the time around 1931, slavery had been abolished for almost seventy years, and many Black were living in society just like everyone else because they had the right to. Still, people didn’t treat them like they belonged, despite the government officially declaring it so. The majority of Whites made sure they had nothing to do with Blacks, for they might also face being disrespected or looked down upon. In To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, many outcomes may have resulted differently because of people of the town of Maycomb’s racism towards Black....   [tags: slavery, blacks, unfair system]
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520 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - ... This moral growth was evident in her response to a classmate calling her father a disgrace for defending Tom Robinson, a black man. Scout narrated, “I drew a bead on him, remembered what Atticus had said, then dropped my fists and walked away, ‘Scout’s a cow-ward!’ ringing in my ears. It was the first time I ever walked away from a fight. Somehow, if I fought Cecil I would let Atticus down. Atticus…rarely asked Jem and me to do something…I could take being called a coward for him” (102). Although she remained fiercely dedicated to her family, Scout no longer felt compelled to fight those who sought to defame their reputation....   [tags: aggression, reputation] 795 words
(2.3 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill a Mockingbird, written by the very talented and influential author Harper Lee, was published in the 1960’s. This novel was immediately successful. It won the Pulitzer Prize, and has become a popular book read throughout American literature. Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird tells the story of a family growing up during the Great Depression through a series of symbolic events. “Symbolism is, indeed, used extensively by Harper Lee in her timeless classic, To Kill a Mockingbird. The symbolism reveals the prejudice and narrow-mindedness of the common citizens of Maycomb County, the fears they have, and all of the immoral things they do” (Symkowski)....   [tags: stroy and character analysis] 1627 words
(4.6 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Do people ever really grow up. In all sincerity, do they ever truly grow up, or do they only grow older. Nonetheless, it is a very difficult task, growing up. Most of the time, no one ever really wants to until they are absolutely forced to. Well, that is what happened to Jem Finch. Who is Jem Finch. He is a very prominent character in a very prominent book: To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Harper Lee does an exemplary job of displaying different character dynamics, like growing up (of course), through many of her younger characters, and especially through Jem Finch; although one may argue he seemed to change at a rather exaggerated pace in the book, it is quite evident that he still ma...   [tags: Character Analysis, Jem Finch, Literature]
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1220 words
(3.5 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Harper Lee grew up in Alabama in a time when racism was rampant and the people were merely sustaining an adequate life due to the Great Depression. The story is set in the rural town of Maycomb, which is a place where, “there was no hurry, for there was no place to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with...” Maycomb is a slow paced, hot, poverty-stricken Alabaman town with outdated infrastructures where people had old-fashioned values and traditional views. These factors then spread an outbreak of fear, which dramatically steers the course of the novel....   [tags: Conflicts, Fear, Racism] 842 words
(2.4 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - As children grow up, they open their eyes to the harsh truths in the world around them that they once did not understand or question. This is experienced by the main characters of Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. The story is of a girl called Scout and her older brother, Jem, who go through the trials of growing up in the fictional small Southern town of Maycomb, Alabama in the 1930s. Racism is rampant in the mindset of the townspeople, shown when the children’s lawyer father, Atticus, takes the case of an obviously innocent African-American man and they convict him in their hearts before the trial even starts....   [tags: Character Analysis, Scout, Jem] 1486 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ is a novel written by Harper Lee. It is set during the early 20th Century in the fictional town of Maycomb. Lee has decided to write the novel from a child’s point of view because a child is innocent but as the novel progresses the narrator, Scout, loses her innocence as she deals with the complications of her father being a lawyer. The novel revolves around racism and Scout sees discrimination wherever she goes whether it is racial or social prejudice. The town’s people agree with the idea that whites are superior to blacks....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 545 words
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To kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - In the town of Maycomb, the residents have a very small intolerance for other people that they are not familiar with. There are many commonalities between people who accept others, such as Atticus and Scout. Atticus has discussed with Scout to put yourself in their skin and understand how they feel. So one commonality they have is they put themselves in your place and judge how you live and what decisions you will make. Another commonality is a strong sense of justice between people who accept others and the people accept others not because of their skin but for their morals....   [tags: racial discrimination, maycomb, hate]
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - If a poisoned seed is planted, an unhealthy plant will grow. Its offspring will be rooted in poison, and if it is not destroyed nothing healthy will grow. Maycomb is like a venomous plant, raising its young to hate one another and divide themselves among castes. The town is unwilling to destroy the old, to create beauty and peace from the ruins. Harper Lee’s 1960 Pulitzer Prize winning historical fiction novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, describes the life of a young southern woman in the 1930’s, and the many obstacles she and her family face....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 2482 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Many view America as a land of opportunity, one that preaches freedom and has specific laws to ensure the equality of this pursuit of freedom. Despite the intention of promoting freedom and equality, many American laws transcend these values and mirror the true sentiments of our nation’s constituents. These laws cannot serve to uphold equality if that intention does not come to fruition in their practice and application to societal issues. In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Tom Robinson, a black man in a mostly white community, faces accusations and a subsequent trial for the rape of Mayella Ewell, a white girl of the town....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - “To never go a day without learning, this is my prayer” (Unknown). Little Jem seems to be subconsciously living by this creed. Jeremy Atticus Finch is one of the leading protagonists in the potent Bildungsroman “To Kill a Mockingbird” written by Harper Lee, and published in 1960. This influential coming-of-age story depicts various analogies of growth by morphing individual accounts of development into a bigger portrait. It displays the improvement as well as the need for improvement in society as a whole....   [tags: Character Analysis, Literary Essay]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - ... She deals with Bob Ewell harassing her father, the dark times of the Tom Robinson trial, and Atticus getting ganged up on. The scene when Mr. Cunningham and others are surrounding Atticus, Scout seamed to be confused onto what was happening. In the middle of the scene Scout comes forward to Mr. Cunningham and says, " I go to school with Walter... a real nice boy. We brought him home for dinner one time" (Lee 205). Mr. Cunningham's reaction to this is to clear out and leave Atticus and his kids alone....   [tags: story and character analysis] 565 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In her novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee creates an abundance of unforgettable characters as the novel progresses. Although there are many significant characters, Atticus Finch is most important and impactful. As many traits are displayed by Atticus throughout the story, it is his compassion that is most impressive. Atticus shows compassion in the novel when he represents Mr. Cunningham against an entailment without cost. As Scout attempts to inform Miss Caroline of Walter Cunningham’s financial situation, Scout shares with the readers Atticus’ consideration towards Mr....   [tags: story and character analysis] 515 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Literature often questions the moral nature of human beings: whether humans are born an innocent, blank slate that is fundamentally good but the world’s tribulations harden their hearts and minds creating complex creatures of both good and evil, or whether humans are born purely evil and society helps mask the evil with superficial decency. The novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee approaches this question by skillfully dramatizing Scout and Jem’s evolution from lighthearted childhood naivety to a more austere adult perspective....   [tags: Novel Analysis] 766 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Life Lessons Throughout their lives, individuals learn many valuable lessons that help them to grow and mature as human beings. This is evident numerous times throughout Harper Lee’s fictional novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Individuals in this novel learn these amazing lessons through Atticus Finch’s extraordinary teachings of morals. Atticus goes on to further teach valuable lessons of courage. Lastly, Atticus continues to teach valuable lessons, about sacrifice. Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch is portrayed as an extraordinary character who teaches valuable life lessons about morals, courage, and sacrifice....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The reference “Raised by an irresponsible mother during the Great Depression in the Jim Crow south, my father was on his own from the age of 13” shows both the racism and the economic collapse occurred in the nation during the 1930s. The 1930s was a difficult time for most people in America. It was the era of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl, which cost many workers their jobs and many farmers their farms. The 1930s was also a time of pervasive and sometimes violent racial prejudice....   [tags: story and character analysis] 1173 words
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Comparing the Works of Harper Lee - Both To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck are classic novels in literature that portray major topics such as early Southern life, racial injustice, and the importance of innocence and compassion. The unique and successful authors Steinbeck and Lee both share common characteristics in their most famous and well recognized books. The setting, major themes and symbols to personify innocence are literary similarities between the two stories. Although Of Mice and Men takes place in California, it is in the southern part of the state....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Innocence Within Thoughts are like seeds that take root in our minds. They spawn feelings and more thoughts that can have powerful consequences. In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the views of the townspeople in the 1930’s Southern town of Maycomb greatly impact the lives of two innocent men. The people make false accusations against Tom Robinson and Arthur “Boo” Radley because they are different. These characters are representative of the author’s reoccurring symbol of the mockingbird, which signifies innocence, and subjects them to vulnerability....   [tags: Innocence, Novel Analysis] 1187 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - In Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Jem and Scout grow up learning how people in Maycomb treat one another. In a large portion of the novel, characters of the rich and the poor are involved in Tom Robinson’s case. Some characters are mockingbirds (someone or something that only does good), but nobody was able to see how they could be. Maycomb is infected with racism and prejudice affecting how people view one another including the mockingbirds and the innocent: Mr. Dolphus Raymond, Mayella Ewell, and Walter Cunningham....   [tags: the rich, the poor, mockingbirds]
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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - ... Especially a great English literature teacher. A ‘good’ English literature teacher will teach their student the basis of grammar, composition, and structure then application of English writing. But a great English literature teacher will forever have a lasting impact upon their disciple, a great teacher will be able to provide their students with genuine interest in the mechanics of English literature. A English teacher has the benefit of possibly motivating their students into becoming one of the worlds next best influential speaker, writer, poet, celebrity or artist....   [tags: english literature, ideologies, philosophy] 695 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Controversial subjects and events have arisen since time began. When these topics are emerging, developing, and being discussed, the perfect opportunity arises for people to formulate their opinions and support and develop them based upon their current knowledge, values, beliefs, and morals. There are always people who tend to voice their opinions louder and more obnoxiously than what is necessary or appropriate; conversely, there are also people who develop their own opinions and feel just as passionate as the loud people but don’t know how to go about expressing their opinions and, therefore, remain unheard....   [tags: literary analysis]
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To kill a mockingbird by Harper Lee - Mood helps in creating an atmosphere in a literary work by means of setting, theme, diction and tone. Throughout the book To kill a mockingbird the author wanted the mood to be sorrowful or vexed or just fret about how the people are acting because seeing how things were being treated or how people acted would be enough to make you feel angry or sad or worried for the people who were in the book. You always wanted to know what was going to come next or how something would end. Vex was a very prominent mood in this story and is definitely the most relevant....   [tags: mood, tone, vexing]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - During the 1960s, there was a very strict social order system in the Southern United States. This caste system was based on race and social inequality. In To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee the main character and narrator is Scout Finch, a naïve but insightful young child. Through the help of her father, Atticus Finch and her brother Jem Finch, she learns about human nature and starts to mature to see the world differently while Lee delivers a brutal and thorough social critique on the existence of social inequality, Innocence and Experience, and the coexistence of good and evil through the eyes of an innocent child....   [tags: literary and character analysis]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The most essential responsibility of a parent is to keep their children safe; most will not intentionally but their children in harm’s way. Harper Lee writes about a parent whose children are endangered and altered because of a decision that he makes. In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, Atticus Finch chooses to represent Tom Robinson in court, putting his children in potential danger, earning respect from numerous people surrounding him, and teaching his kids valuable life lessons; if individuals always chose to do what is right, instead of settling for the easy solution, difficulties could be often eliminated....   [tags: Novel Analysis, Summary]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The Character of Calpurnia in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird Calpurnia is a central and flat character in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. She is an African-American woman who serves as a maid and cook, of the characters Jem, Scout, and Atticus. The audience learns about her through her interactions with her family. Lee portrays this character as being a mother figure, a non-racist individual and non-confrontational. In the novel, the readers first see Calpurnia as a mother figure. For example, Atticus says to Aunt Alexandra, “I have no intention of getting rid of her, now or ever....   [tags: character analysis] 563 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee introduces two families that reside on the outskirts of Maycomb County. The Ewells and the Cunninghams, two of the poorest families in Maycomb, despite their physical similarities are two very differently viewed families. The Ewells are despised because of their physical and behavioral filth while the Cunninghams are respected by the inhabitants of Maycomb County. They are both part of the lower class but they portray themselves differently, this is because they have different moral codes....   [tags: literary analysis]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - ... I heard her say it's time somebody taught 'em a lesson, they were gettin' way above themselves, an' the next thing they think they can do is marry us. Jem, how can you hate Hitler so bad an' then turn around and be ugly about folks right at home-' ” (Lee 283). This is regarded as one realization of reality for Scout because she is perplexed of how someone feels that it is wrong to discriminate against the Jewish people, but not wrong to discriminate against the black people in her hometown. Scout feels offended in how her teacher, Miss Gates, acquires such acrimonious comments about African Americans after Miss Gates jested support for the Jews that were also being persecuted just like t...   [tags: literary analysis]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The quote “The real hero is always a hero by mistake” by Umberto Eco can be described in two different works of literature, the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and the play Twelve Angry Men by Reginald Rose. This quote means that people who become heroes by mistake at first don’t want to be heroes. Both of these stories have characters in them who become heroes completely by mistake. In To Kill a Mockingbird the character who becomes a hero by mistake is Arthur “Boo” Radley and the character in the play Twelve Angry Men who is the hero is juror #8....   [tags: critical lens, story and character analysis] 609 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Stand on the Porch Modern Literature         Throughout the events of the trial in Maycomb, Atticus’s most important advice for Scout is that “you never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” (Lee, 30)  As the society’s prejudices surround Scout and Jem, Atticus encourages them to cultivate respect within themselves; not only for other races, but for everyone.  Throughout “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Harper Lee traces out Scout’s growing respect for outsiders, for her aggressors, and eventually for Boo Radley....   [tags: modern literature, story/character analysis]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - ... Tate, he can tell you his name.’ [Scout], ‘Hey, Boo,’ [Scout] said. ” (Lee, 362). This was the last and final instance of Boo Radley’s kindness that made Scout realize that Boo Radley is not such a bad person after all and all the rumors about him being a bad menacing person were fake. She expresses her understanding at the end of the book, when Atticus was putting Scout off to bed and she rambled on about a book Atticus was reading to her beforehand, “ ‘An‘ they chased him ’n‘ never could catch him ’cause they didn’t know what he looked like, an‘ Atticus, when they finally saw him, why he hadn’t done any of those things… Atticus, he was real nice…’ [Scout] ” (Lee, 376)....   [tags: becoming a good person, story analysis]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - “Real courage” is when you fight for what is right regardless of whether you win or lose. Atticus Finch defines “real courage” and demonstrates it in several ways throughout the novel. At first glance, it may seem as though Atticus Finch’s courageous acts are really acts of cowardice, however as one continues to look into his patient and passive aggressive attitude, it becomes clearer that what he is really displaying would be signs of courage. This shows that Atticus’ actions of displaying courage differently than others are not displayed as one would normally expect, and so he demonstrates it in a more affective manner....   [tags: courage, Atticus Finch, character analysis] 865 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee did not originally write To Kill a Mockingbird for adolescents, yet it has become a novel that is used in American high schools across the nation and is considered literature with a capital L. In the novel, Lee lays a foundation of moral instruction, living history and character development providing a great deal of moral insight for the reader. Her use of first person narration and an adolescent protagonist create a strong tie with the adolescent reader and make it fun to read. With an underlying theme of movement from childhood to adulthood, Lee’s children in the book learn a valuable lesson, and the students reading it also get that message....   [tags: story and character analysis] 931 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - ... That’s what I don’t like about it’” (Lee 218). These men show their prejudices throughout that scene, most of their comments being their disapproval of the situation of the case and Atticus’s role. Their last appearance is them purposely being the first to climb the stairs to the balcony and not allowing the group of African Americans to go ahead of them. Following the final verdict in the Robinson case, Bob Ewell does pulls two stunts to show his disapproval with the trial’s outcome. At first, Bob is seen spitting in Atticus’s face and threatening him....   [tags: racial discrimination, character analysis] 1461 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - ... Aunt Alexandra and her ideas are what stood out the most to me while reading To Kill A Mockingbird. She continually and publicly disapproved of Atticus’s parenting style, specifically with Scout. Scout’s behavior bothered Alexandra so much that she came to live with them, which made me wary of her character. Alexandra was raised a lady, and she valued the domestic roles expected of women. Her (and everyone elses) narrow-mindedness led her to believe that the only thing girls could and should do, was be a lady....   [tags: character analysis]
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - A person's actions can greatly affect the lives of the people around them. In Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird, Atticus is an only parent and a role model for his kids Jem and Scout. Although his choice to oppose the communities way of life has a strong affect on his family, to Atticus doing what is right means the world to him and he's willing to let his family suffer a little for what he thinks is the greater good. Atticus's choice to live a life without prejudice and racism affects the way the community looks at and treats his family; Scout is the one who is mostly affected....   [tags: story and character analysis] 580 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In the last century, there have certainly been many "greats" - novels, books and stories that impress, amaze and make one think. Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird", however, is unique among all these poignant pieces of literature in that the novel solely develops Lee's idea, brought out by Atticus in the novel, to "...shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird" (90). This phrase is expounded by the character Miss Maudie when she says "...mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1325 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the main characters: Atticus, Scout and Jem were faced with many losing battles such as Tom Robinson's case, the "mad dog incident" and Mrs. Dubose's addiction to morphine. This builds on the theme of there are things in life that won't go your way. The book takes place in the 1930's or 1940's in a small town in Alabama called Maycomb. The novel takes us through the life and perils that the main characters undergo and teach us about growing up and being mature....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1481 words
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Harper Lee's to Kill a Mockingbird - In the book, To Kill a Mockeningbird by Harper lee, Charles Baker Harris, also known as Dill, is one of the most important character. He’s curious, wants attention, and he can be dishonest. One of the first characteristics seen in Dill is his curious nature. For example, the reader sees curiosity first when Scout and Jem are talking to Dill about the Radley’s, “The more we told Dill about the Radleys, the more he wanted to know, the longer he would stand hugging the light pole on the corner, the more he would wonder.” (15) By using this quote it shows how Dill’s curiosity struck by hugging the pole and starting to wonder, so now by them telling Dill more about the Radely’s it began his cu...   [tags: character analysis] 592 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - [Insert Title Here] Helen Keller, a deaf and blind writer and lecturer describes life as “a succession of lessons which must be understood.” A person will always continue to learn lessons throughout his life that will stay with him forever. In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee describes Jean Louise “Scout” Finch’s struggles with prejudice and injustice during the Great Depression and how she and her brother Jem learn valuable lessons from people in Maycomb. They learn to not judge someone before considering what they have experiences, to assist innocent people instead of attacking them, and to have the determination to do what is morally right....   [tags: life lessons, story analysis] 985 words
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