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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Hap by Thomas Hardy"
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Thomas Hardy’s poem “Hap" - Thomas Hardy’s poem “Hap" Poetry is ultimately defined as a major literary genre. How boring that is for such a beautiful literary form. I believe that poetry is a genre devoted to art, complexity, and precision. All in which the poet does more than just writing; he or she takes that which is indescribable and finds words for it through poetry. Granted, this leaves poetry vastly open to interpretation. After all, each and every poet expresses him or herself in a different way; with different meter, rhyme, mood, and meaning....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Hap Poetry Poem Analysis Essays] 2212 words
(6.3 pages)
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Comparing Hap by Thomas Hardy and The Second Coming by Yeats - Comparing Hap by Thomas Hardy and The Second Coming by Yeats      Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) was one of the great writers of the Late Victorian era. One of his great works out of the many that he produced was his poem Hap, which he wrote in 1866, but did not publish until 1898 in his collection of poems called Wessex Poems. This poem seems to typify the sense of alienation that he and other writers were experiencing at the time, as they "saw their times as marked by accelerating social and technological change and by the burden of a worldwide empire" (Longman p....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1417 words
(4 pages)
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Thomas Hardy - Thomas Hardy’s novels frequently shift on dastardly turns of chance. Wrong turns and minor mishaps on the way to churches, mistaken impressions of deaths, unexpected inheritances, and unreceived letters all affect the outcomes of the decisions made by the characters in Hardy’s fiction. These twists of luck outside the character’s control makes judging the morality of their actions more complex. Should Hardy’s characters be judged by their actions or their intentions. Chengping Zhang asserts in “Moral Luck in Thomas Hardy's Fiction” that Hardy uses “moral chance” to cause readers to question their moral judgments....   [tags: Writer, Writing Styles] 1192 words
(3.4 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's Views on Religion - Thomas Hardy's views on God and Religion<p> Thomas Hardy was born into a religious family and brought up with very Christian values and morals. As he matured and was exposed to the new ideas of the time, he became conflicted in his views about God and religion. He was criticized for writings that many of his peers considered to be obscene, immoral and blasphemous. Throughout his adult life, Hardy considered himself to be an agnostic. His poems show that he was much more complicated than that....   [tags: Poetry] 1136 words
(3.2 pages)
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Thomas Hardy and His Religious Beliefs - Thomas Hardy and His Religious Beliefs Thomas Hardy was born into a very active Christian family. He was the son of Orthodox Christians who made sure that he regularly attended services. Many of Hardy's relatives were involved in the church. Some were members of the clergy and some were musicians at the local church. Hardy, a member of the Stinsford parish, taught a Sunday school class when he was a young man. He even had aspirations of becoming a member of the clergy himself. He became very familiar with the teachings of the Bible and even memorized the psalms....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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713 words
(2 pages)
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The use of Irony in Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge - How important is the use of irony in Thomas Hardy's poetry and in his novel The Mayor of Casterbridge. Hardy's use of irony is clear throughout his work; The Mayor of Casterbridge1 (referred to from this point on as Casterbridge) clearly features many ironic twists in the plot, both obvious ones such as Henchard discovering Elizabeth-Jane's true parentage at such an inappropriate time, and more subtle uses of irony as when Mrs. Goodenough only betrays Henchard's past because Susan and Elizabeth-Jane remind her of it....   [tags: English Literature] 2134 words
(6.1 pages)
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The Life and Work of Thomas Hardy - Out of so many authors, writers, and poets, Thomas Hardy was far the most sincere and the most famous writer that made an impact in English literature during the Victorian times. He accomplished many things and wrote a lot of books, poems, and novels. Most of his stories were not really similar to the plot of his life, but his writing career lasted about fifty years long maybe more. At first publishers rejected some of his very first novels and poetry, but even though this occurred he kept doing what he did best and that was to write....   [tags: Thomas Hardy, authors,] 772 words
(2.2 pages)
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An Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d’Urbervilles - An Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d’Urbervilles Set in the late 1880s in a fictional county called Wessex, England, Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, is the story of Tess Durbeyfield, an innocent sixteen year old girl who grows into a complex women as the result of fate. The main theme throughout the novel is how accident determines the destiny of characters’, in particular Tess. Through fatalism, male dominance, and the views of social class, Tess of the D’Urbervilles exhibits the characteristics of literary naturalism, an outgrowth of realism developed in France in the late 19th century....   [tags: Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy, Summary, ] 670 words
(1.9 pages)
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Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy - Far From the Madding Crowd is considered the first great novel of Thomas Hardy. Margaret Drabble, editor and novelist, cites the novel as "the first of Thomas Hardy's great novels, and the first to sound the tragic note for which his fiction is best remembered" (Hardy xiii). Hardy was born in 1840 and began life as an architect. He wrote his first novel, The Poor Man and the Lady, in 1867. It was not received well. Four years later he wrote three more novels, two anonymously and one bearing his name; they were received slightly better then the first....   [tags: Thomas Hardy]
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1128 words
(3.2 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's Tess Of The Durbervilles - Thomas Hardy's Tess Of The Durbervilles In this essay I will contrast and explain the description of Flintcomb Ash and Tolbothays Dairy. These two places are very important, because each place shows an important time in Tess' life. Hardy uses Tolbothays Dairy to represent the love and happiness she found and the chance for a new beginning after what happened with Alec. Alec raped her, he saw her as an object of desire. He took away her innocence. This was replaced with the burden of a child that dies....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Tess Durbervilles Essays] 1778 words
(5.1 pages)
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Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - One of Thomas Hardy’s greatest works: ‘Tess of the D’Urbervilles‘ was first published in 1891, a novel set in the fictional county of Wessex, Britain. By the time of its appearance, Hardy was considered to be on of England’s leading writers and had already published several well known novels including ‘Far from the Madding Crowd’ and ‘The Woodlanders’ as well as numerous other short stories. However in spite of his reputation and fame, Hardy had immense difficulty finding a publication prepared to publish Tess when he offered it for serialization to London reviewers....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Tess Urbervilles Essays] 4992 words
(14.3 pages)
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Analysis of Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - Analysis of Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy The depth of artistic unity found in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles pervades every chapter of the novel. No one chapter is less important than another because each is essential in order to tell the tragic tale of Tess Durbeyfield. There is never an instance in Hardy's prose that suggests frill or excess. Themes of the Industrial Revolution in England, the status of women during Victorian England, Christianity vs. Paganism, matters of nobility, and the role that fatalism plays in life weave together with various symbols to create an amazing flow to his novel....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Tess of the D'Urbervilles Essays]
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3699 words
(10.6 pages)
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The Workbox by Thomas Hardy - The Workbox by Thomas Hardy I have to admit that when I first read this poem I did not understand that there were hints and clue suggesting possible hidden truths. When first reading the poem, I thought that it was coincidental. Reading this poem for a second time and researching it has shown that there are some suspicions. "The Workbox" by Thomas Hardy is about a man who may have known more than his wife thought he knew. I feel that the husband knew something about his wife's past. In stanza's one and two, the husband gives his wife a gift....   [tags: Poem Poetry Analysis Hardy] 1184 words
(3.4 pages)
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Michael Henchard in The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy - Michael Henchard in The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy Michael Henchard is a character with traits that have both a positive and negative traits effect on his life. I believe the characteristics that allowed Henchard to rise to social respectability and fall into destitution where the same. "Character is fate"(Plato) For example Henchard stubbornness and pride allowed him to keep his 21-year vow not to drink. This shows his stubbornness brought an aspect forbearance....   [tags: The Mayor of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy] 603 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Downfall of Tess in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles - The Downfall of Tess in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles Tess of the D'Urbervilles is considered to be a tragedy due to the catastrophic downfall of the protaganist Tess. From the early days in her life, her father John had begun to destroy her, which then led to Alex D'Urbervill and eventually finished with Angel Clare. Each dominant male figure in her life cocntributed to her tragic downfall which the reader encounters at the end of the novel. It is unfortunate how one woman can be ruined by the three most important and dominant people in her life....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Tess of the D'Urbervilles] 784 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Use of Nature in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles - The Use of Nature in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles In this essay I have explored Hardy's skill in creating mood through the use of nature in his novel 'Tess of the D'Urbervilles'. I start with an introduction to Thomas Hardy, the writer, and a brief discussion his life and his motivation for writing the Wessex novels. The three locations I have chosen to examine in this novel are Marlott, Talbothays and Flintcomb-Ash as I think these environments play an important part in the life of Tess, particularly as in regard to the changes that she undergoes....   [tags: Tess D'Urbervilles Thomas Hardy Essays] 5177 words
(14.8 pages)
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Use of Diction in Thomas Hardy's The Man He Killed - Use of Diction in Thomas Hardy's The Man He Killed         Poems are typically written in a distinctive way to convey a specific message to the reader. The words or diction construct a poem by depicting ideas, feelings, setting, and characters. Therefore, a poet must chose his/her words with great care to create the appropriate message and to allow the reader to comprehend the general meaning. Thomas Hardy composed The Man He Killed, a poem demonstrating the effect war has upon soldiers and how war changes friend into a foe....   [tags: Thomas Hardy The Man He Killed] 651 words
(1.9 pages)
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Human Destiny and Chance in Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge - Human Destiny and Chance in Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge Present readers might perceive that Thomas Hardy's viewpoint in the novel The Mayor of Casterbridge is severe and depressing. However, most people adored Hardy during his living years. In an era when the Industrial Revolution was bringing dramatic and sometimes disturbing changes to England, he celebrated the nation's roots in its rustic past. In an era when new ideas like Darwin's theory of evolution challenged long established religious beliefs, Hardy showed that even the simplest people have, at all times, dealt with comparable eternal questions: How are humans to live....   [tags: The Mayor of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy Essays] 1227 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Success of Thomas Hardy's Novel The Return of the Native as a Tragedy - The Success of Thomas Hardy's Novel The Return of the Native as a Tragedy On the first chapter of this novel Egdon Heath is presented as an untameable force "unmoved during so many centuries, through the crisis of so many things, that it could only be imagined to await one last crisis - the final overthrow". Thus, from the very beginning of the novel we can expect an outcome of tragic possibilities. Similarly to ancient Greek tragedies, the action in "The Return of the Native" takes place during a restricted period of time....   [tags: Thomas Hardy The Return of the Native Essays] 1709 words
(4.9 pages)
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Sue and Arabella in Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure - Sue and Arabella in Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure Thomas Hardy's diary contains an entry that explains how he will show the world something it needs to be shown in a story about a poor, struggling young man who has to deal with ultimate failure (Howe 132). This brief description of a story has turned into Hardy's phenomenal Jude the Obscure. Jude is emotionally torn between the two main women in the novel, Sue and Arabella, because each woman can only partially satisfy his urges. The stark difference in emotion, conversation, and sexual appetite make Sue and Arabella polar opposites in Hardy's Jude the Obscure....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Jude Oscure Essays]
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1419 words
(4.1 pages)
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Analysis of Characters from The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy - Analysis of Characters from The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy A young Scot who arrives in Casterbridge at about the same time as Susan and Elizabeth-Jane, Donald Farfrae becomes Michael Henchard’s business manager. He quickly becomes Henchard’s only trusted friend and, later, his adversary in both business and love. Hardy draws Farfrae as Henchard’s counterpart in every way. He is physically small, polite and charming, careful and controlled, forward thinking, and methodical. Whereas Henchard propels his fate through moments of rash behavior, Farfrae is cool and calculating in all he does....   [tags: The Mayor of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy Essays] 2110 words
(6 pages)
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Tony Kytes The Arch-Deceiver By Thomas Hardy and Seeing a Beauty Queen Home by Bill Naughton - In the story we have been studying, 'Tony Kytes the arch deceiver' and seeing a beuty queen home' we have found out that Tony Kytes is looking to marry, however Rudy is only looking for some female attention, we know this because a quote from the story says, "…it was soon said that they were engaged to be married." We know that Rudy just wants some female attention because he says, "we'd dance the ugliest girl in town as long as she could dance", which means that he just wants the women for this particular night....   [tags: Thomas Hardy] 865 words
(2.5 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd The name Thomas Hardy gives to the hero of his novel, Far From the Madding Crowd, is not merely accidental. Hardy deliberately means to associate Gabriel Oak with the Angel Gabriel. God's hero lit up the darkness, and it is important for the reader to note that when Hardy's hero saves a situation from having disastrous consequences, nearly every time he does so in darkness. Gabriel's name is very significant in relation to his character, but he is not just meant to be a holy saint, whose sole purpose is to pour oil on troubled waters....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Far from the Madding Crowd Essays] 3647 words
(10.4 pages)
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Analysis of Tony Kytes, the Arch Deceiver by Thomas Hardy - Analysis of Tony Kytes, the Arch Deceiver by Thomas Hardy The story is about a man who is unsure about how he feels towards his fiancé. The attitude shown towards love by Tony shows that he is uncommitted. Tony is unsure about his feelings for Milly; he is united with his former girlfriends Unity and Hannah. He then confuses himself about who he wants to marry. He does not love the girls for their inner beauty but only for their physical appearance which is not counted as love this is shown by him saying "I never knowed you was so pretty before" ....   [tags: Tony Kytes the Arch Deceiver Thomas Hardy Essays] 535 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy and Farthing House by Susan Hill - The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy and Farthing House by Susan Hill I am going to be comparing two short stories; The withered arm by Thomas Hardy, which was written before 1900 and Farthing house by Susan Hill which was written more recently. The themes in each of the two stories are quite similar. They are both based around women, their needs and their wants and illegitimate children. Both stories have obvious similarities especially with the types of women in the story. 'The withered arm' was a story written before 1900....   [tags: Thomas Hardy Farthing House Hill essays] 2650 words
(7.6 pages)
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Feeling Sympathy for Gertrude and Rhoda in The Withered Arm, by Thomas Hardy - Feeling Sympathy for Gertrude and Rhoda in The Withered Arm, by Thomas Hardy The Withered arm is typical of Hardy's novellas, as it is a tragedy. It involves two main characters, Rhoda and Gertrude. Rhoda and Gertrude both have their own different problems that the must face. Rhoda and Gertrude become friends after they first meet. Rhoda had an illegitimate child to farmer lodge who marries Gertrude. Before Rhoda and Gertrude meet Rhoda does not know what Gertrude is like so is bitter about the idea of her marrying farmer lodge who hardy hints Rhoda is still in love with....   [tags: The Withered Arm Thomas Hardy Characters Essays] 1522 words
(4.3 pages)
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To Fear, Or Not To Fear: How Yeats and Hardy Envision God - Within both Thomas Hardy’s “The Convergence of the Twain” and W. B. Yeats’ “The Second Coming”, the actions of God are extremely prevalent, though the timing of His intervention varies greatly. Though, both poems were published within a five year period (1914 and 1919 respectively), they convey significantly different perspectives on the actions of God, in relation to our actions as human beings. These poems were written less than a decade apart, but are separated by one significant event that changed the world: the First World War....   [tags: second coming, thomas hardy, god's will]
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2010 words
(5.7 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's The Convergence Of The Twain - Thomas Hardy's The Convergence Of The Twain The poem The Convergence of the Twain, by Thomas Hardy, is about the sinking of the Titanic. The title alone describes the ship and the iceberg meeting as one. By choosing this title, the author automatically conveys a seriousness of the poem. The author uses various literary techniques to convey his mockery and careless attitude towards the sinking of the ship. In the first five stanzas, the author discusses the already submerged ship. ?Stilly couches she,....   [tags: Sinking Titanic Poem Hardy Twain Essays Papers] 556 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Use of Folklore in Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native - The Use of Folklore in Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native Folklore is the study of culture, customs and beliefs based on the tradition of a society. In Victorian England an interest in folklore emerged with the official creation of The Folk-Lore Society, which published a journal and held meetings and lectures regularly. Although Thomas Hardy included folklore in his writing, there is no evidence of his affiliation with this society. Thomas Hardy's preoccupation with folklore came from his life and experience with rural life....   [tags: Hardy Return Native Essays]
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670 words
(1.9 pages)
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Women's Marital Rights in Thomas Hardy's The Woodlanders - Women's Marital Rights in Thomas Hardy's The Woodlanders Thomas Hardy's novels focus on the difficulties of relationships between men and women, especially married men and women. In his preface to The Woodlanders, Hardy poses the question of "given the man and woman, how to find a basis for their sexual relation" (Hardy 39). With this in mind, the reader meets Grace Melbury, a young woman of marrying age, who is betrothed by circumstances beyond her control, to a man named Giles Winterbourne. When the young and mysterious doctor, Edred Fitzpiers catches Grace's eye, Hardy's question of sexual compatibilities is addressed....   [tags: Hardy Woodlanders Essays]
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599 words
(1.7 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge and Frank Norris' McTeague - Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge and Frank Norris' McTeague Thomas Hardy and Frank Norris are artists, painting portraits of men filled with character, that is distraught with regression. The Mayor of Casterbridge, by Thomas Hardy is a powerful and searching fable. Frank Norris’ McTeague is a documentation of the animalistic pursuit of empty dreams. Both authors withhold the protagonists of their dreams, in a grotesque world, which provides no sign of escape. Each emphasizes themes of greed and devolution, while carefully detailing character portraits....   [tags: Hardy Casterbridge Norris Mcteague Essays]
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2055 words
(5.9 pages)
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Middlemarch by George Eliot and Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy - Middlemarch by George Eliot and Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy The Victorian era brought about many changes throughout Great Britain. Man was searching for new avenues of enlightenment. The quest for knowledge and understanding became an acceptable practice throughout much of the scientific community. It was becoming accepted, and in many ways expected, for people to search for knowledge. Philosophy, the search for truth, was becoming a more intricate part of educating ones self; no longer were people holding on to old-fashioned ideas....   [tags: Middlemarch eliot Jude Hardy Essays] 1445 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Life and Works of Thomas Hardy - “Beauty lay not in the thing, but in what the thing symbolized.” Thomas Hardy believed beyond the physical element of object, their lies a more important symbolic meaning. Thomas Hardy was a renowned transitional poet with a style between classicism and romanticism. He was born in the mid-1800s in Higher Bockhampton, an English village. Hardy’s upbringing contributed greatly to his views on the world around him, in a symbolic manner. His father was a stonemason and a violinist, and his mother encouraged him to follow his passions....   [tags: English Literature, Poetic Analysis]
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2826 words
(8.1 pages)
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Analyzing the Writings of Thomas Hardy - The overall aim of this research study was to establish an objective clustering of Thomas Hardy’s prose fiction texts as a basis for better understanding the associations between the texts, and the development of an objective thematic analysis of Hardy’s corpus that can address the problems of replicability and objectivity in non-computational thematic classification of literary studies. To achieve this, this thesis used vector space clustering based on hierarchical cluster analysis methods. The novels and short stories of Thomas Hardy formed the context of the study....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1214 words
(3.5 pages)
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Analyzing the Works of Thomas Hardy - Snell (1998) says that the term 'regional novel' refers to "fiction that is set in a recognizable region, and which describes features distinguishing the life, social relations, customs, languages, dialect, or other aspects of the culture of that area and its people. Fiction with a strong sense of local geography, topography or landscape is also covered by this definition" (1998:1). Novels belonging to such a genre, Duncan (2002) claims, are thus distinctive and familiar. distinctive in the sense that each is differentiated from the metropolis or from other regions within the nation, and familiar in the sense that they all have one thing in common 'the imagined community' of Anderson (Anders...   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1090 words
(3.1 pages)
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Analysis of the Works of Thomas Hardy - Hardy lived a great part of his life in the 19th century. That was an age where the development of Darwin's theory of species had shaken the faith and belief in God of many Christians. As a result, new materialistic and atheist ideas were developed supporting the ideas of Darwin in denying the role of God in the process of Creation. Indeed, the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species swept over England as a flood that paved the way for many liberal thinkers who rejected traditional religion in favour of materialism....   [tags: Text Analysis] 1326 words
(3.8 pages)
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Pessimism in Thomas Hardy's Novels - The purpose of this article is to elaborate Thomas Hardy’s pessimism .The three novels of his namely Far From Madding Crowd , Tess Of D’Urbervilles , and Jude The Obsecure have the reflection of his life and relationships. The major elements in his novels are fate and chance responsible for a character’s ruin. Inspite of this all his novels are not totally dark some ends with a hopeful note. Introduction : Thomas Hardy is regarded a major contributor to English novel , born in rural Dorchester ....   [tags: marriage, novels, philosophy, fate]
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3261 words
(9.3 pages)
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The Darkling Thrush, by Thomas Hardy - There have been a number of highly talented writers who contributed much to make the British literature of the modern times a notable one. The part played by Thomas Hardy can never be undermined in it. During the course of his literary career, he has produced certain notable works, both in fiction and poetry. However, he concentrated mainly on poetry during the final phase of his literary life. The poem, “The Darkling Thrush” is one such poem written when he has acquired a wide understanding on the varied nature of the world....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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915 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Ruined Maid by Thomas Hardy - Today’s society has changed monumentally within these last centuries. The differences in the way people dress, what people do for work and how nonchalant people are about their way of life. “The Ruined Maid” by Thomas Hardy is a great example of how things used to be in the eighteenth century; it shows how quickly things can change through two friends that happen to bump into each other. They start talking about their lives from when they were together and how things have changed. It is interesting because this woman mentions all the things that have changed with her friend....   [tags: The Ruined Maid Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1238 words
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Tragedy and Thomas Hardy Literature - Many critics and commentators think of tragedy as a broad thematic concept that covers the majority of Hardy’s work (Wright, 2003; Brooks, 1971; Goodheart, 1957; Lawrence, 1936; Johnson, 1923). D. H. Lawrence (1936) comments that tragedy is a central concept in many of Hardy’s novels and places Hardy as a great writer of tragedy at the same level as Sophocles, Shakespeare, and Tolstoy. The tragic approach to understanding Hardy’s work is very old. The first one to discuss it on tragic grounds seems to be Lionel Johnson....   [tags: Literary Elements] 749 words
(2.1 pages)
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Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy - Walking alone on the street, Claire stops to think about she’s going to do next. She thought of her day so far of hanging out with friends and wondered if there was anything she wanted to do. Not thinking of how other people perceived her or how she’s free to make her own decisions, she proceeded on with her day. A woman of her century, Claire doesn’t need to worry about status, who she is going to marry, or submit to someone else’s demands. In Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy, this is the opposite of what his characters Eustacia, Thomasin, and Mrs....   [tags: nineteenth century, women, freedom, marriage]
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1015 words
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Use of Poetic Devices in Thomas Hardy's Poem, The Convergence of the Twain - Use of Poetic Devices in Thomas Hardy’s Poem, The Convergence of the Twain Using distinctive diction, detailed imagery, and references to God, Thomas Hardy portrays his perspective of the sinking of “Titanic” in his poem, “The Convergence of the Twain.” Employing these poetic mechanisms, Hardy claims that the sinking of the Titanic was fate and meant to happen. The title furthermore portrays the coming together of the hemispheres as Titanic and God. Hardy uses strong meaningful diction to convey his thoughts of the sinking of the Titanic....   [tags: Hardy Convergence Twain] 413 words
(1.2 pages)
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Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - ... Angel Clare freely admitted to falling wayward from the path of righteousness, expecting full forgiveness from a woman. When Tess admitted to being raped, and therefore being void of her purity, Angel replied saying, “‘Forgiveness does not apply to the case. . . . How can forgiveness meet such a prestidigitation as that?” (223). This reveals the injustice for women, that women must actively guard their purity with their lives while men have the luxury of making mistakes. Furthermore, for women, it matters not if she is a victim of a crime, as long as a woman is bereft of her purity, she is unworthy to be wed....   [tags: double standard for women, story analysis] 1074 words
(3.1 pages)
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Tess of the D'Urbervilles by THomas Hardy - ... He "married down" because he was attracted to Tess's humble origins. Back then, men married down to lower classes if the women was beautiful because it would make the man look good. Obviously women were not well respected. But he is not prepared to accept the reality of her past. He leaves on a bizarre mission to South America. While he is on his mission to South America, Tess has to do rough manual labor for a few pennies an hour. She is eventually reunited with her cousin, who is not a complete bastard....   [tags: movie analysis, tess, victim, beauty] 704 words
(2 pages)
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Troyand Oak in Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy - Troyand Oak in Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy "Far from the Madding Crowd" is one of Thomas Hardy's most popular novels. Written in 1874, it was Hardy's last published work before his marriage. It was not, though, published in novel form at first but in instalments in the popular magazine "The Cornhill Magazine". "Far from the Madding Crowd" is a pastoral tragedy, a tale of romance, tragedy, loyalty and betrayal, involving four main characters, two of whom the essay is based on. Gabriel Oak, a steadfast farmer now working as a shepherd, is in love with his mistress, Bathsheba Everdene whose head has been turned by the handsome Sergeant Troy and it is these two, Oak and Troy, wh...   [tags: Madding Crowd Hardy Essays] 2107 words
(6 pages)
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The Ruined Maid by Thomas Hardy and Cousin Kate by Christina Rosetti - The Ruined Maid by Thomas Hardy and Cousin Kate by Christina Rosetti The poems that I studied are 'The Ruined Maid' by Thomas Hardy and 'Cousin Kate' by Christina Rosetti. 'The Ruined Maid' was published in 1901, and 'Cousin Kate' in 1879. These poems were both written in Victorian times, and they both reflect the attitudes towards women at the time. At the beginning of the Victorian period women's powers were extremely limited; they could not control their own money and were very much under the control of men....   [tags: Hardy Rosetti Essays Paper] 816 words
(2.3 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure - The disposition and temperament of a character is revealed to a reader by the author throughout any work of literature, but a vast portion of the characterization occurs in specific instances at certain key points in the plot of a novel or play. This excerpt about Jude and Sue, from Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure, exposes significant insights into their true intentions and emotions of themselves, others, and life in general. This author engenders a unique persona for each of the inhabitants of these two houses by utilizing a forlorn tone and gruesome diction, alongside symbolism that emulates the current situations in which the two characters find themselves ensnared....   [tags: Jude the Obscure Essays] 1123 words
(3.2 pages)
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Thomas Hardy - Thomas Hardy was a poet from the late 1800s. His career was being an architect and poetry was just an activity he would do on the side. He then realized he had a passion for poetry and made it his career. As he grew up he went through occurrences which lead him to becoming an atheist. He wrote many poems about how people suffer and questions why God lets that happen. In his atheistic poetry, Thomas Hardy states how God should not be in people’s lives. Thomas Hardy was a novelist and a poet. He was born on June 2, 1840 in Dorset, England....   [tags: Poet, Biography]
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1507 words
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Tony Kytes, The Arc-Deceiver by Thomas Hardy and Tickets, Please by D.H. Lawrence - "Tony Kytes, The Arc-Deceiver" by Thomas Hardy and "Tickets, Please" by D.H. Lawrence In this essay I will be discussing my views on the two short stories, "Tony Kytes, The Arc-Deceiver" by Thomas Hardy and "Tickets, Please" by D.H.Lawrence. "Tony Kytes, The Arch-Deceiver" was written in 1894, pre-first world war. "Tickets, Please" was written in 1922-24, post first world war. I am going to discuss how what happened between these years has affected how the stories have been told. During this time-space a lot happened; women became more independent and got the vote which was something they had been campaigning for many years....   [tags: Hardy Kytes Tickets Lawrence Essays] 1503 words
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Thomas Hardy - Thomas Hardy was a poet from the late 1800s. His career was being an architect and poetry was just an activity he would do on the side. He then realized he had a passion for poetry and made it his career. As he grew up he went through occurrences which lead him to becoming an atheist. He wrote many poems about how people suffer and questions why God lets that happen. In his atheistic poetry, Thomas Hardy states how God should not be in people’s lives. Thomas Hardy was a novelist and a poet. He was born on June 2, 1840 in Dorset, England....   [tags: Poet, Biography]
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Compare and Contrast A Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy and The Monkey's Paw by W.W. Jacobs - Compare and Contrast A Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy and The Monkey's Paw by W.W. Jacobs In this essay I am going to explain the similarities and differences between 'The withered arm' and 'The monkeys paw'. Both of these texts were written before 1914 by two different people. Thomas Hardy wrote 'The withered arm' and W.W. Jacobs wrote 'A monkeys paw'. The withered arm is a short story about a milkmaid who had an affair with a high class farmer. When the farmer gets a new wife, the milkmaid becomes jealous....   [tags: Hardy Jacobs Compare contrast Essays] 2677 words
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Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - ... Alec abandons Tess “upon the dead leaves” in The Chase, which is “one of the few remaining woodlands in England of undoubted primeval date” (Hardy). The fact that Alec takes advantage of Tess, who is described as “a figure which is part of the landscape,” in an ancient forest emphasizes how invasive the presence of industry, which Alec embodies, was becoming in the 20th century (Hardy). The exploitation of Tess parallels the abuse that modern agricultural technology was exhibiting on the longstanding farmlands of England....   [tags: scientific community, Dissonance]
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The Man He Killed by Thomas Hardy - ... He is conveying that if these men had met under different circumstances, "By some old ancient inn, (Hardy 2)," the relationship could have possibly ended in friendship. Hardy is able to create a deep contrast between why war exists and the senselessness of it. He does by giving a solider his own voice, someone who does not mind calling war “quaint and curious,” (Hardy 17) and someone who does not realize that he killed another man, ending his life. Throughout the poem, Hardy begins to show elements of irony....   [tags: the truth behind the kill, critical analysis] 711 words
(2 pages)
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Comparing The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy and Turned by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - Comparing The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy and Turned by Charlotte Perkins Gilman This essay is aimed at discussing the differences between two short stories, called ‘The Withered Arm’ by Thomas Hardy and ‘Turned’ by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. These stories have similar plots and both deliver and contrast these in their very own clever ways. They are both based on the idea of triangular relationships, involving two women and a man. In the story ‘Turned’ there is a couple named Mr. and Mrs. Marroner, and their employee who is a young and beautiful Swedish maid who goes by the name of Gerta....   [tags: Compare Contrast Withered Hardy Turned Essays] 2749 words
(7.9 pages)
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Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - A Patriarchal society is the social construction of male authority over women in an attempt to direct their behaviour. In Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy presents a story of pain and suffering caused primarily by men who bring about th demise of Tess Durbeyfield, an 'innocent country girl'. Similarly, in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, Patrick Süskind portrays Grenouille, a child of the market who is nurtured and dies in hate through social denunciation. Jack or 'Sir John' Durbeyfield, Tess' biological father and 'the head of the family', could be accused of being the root of her problems....   [tags: Patriarchal, VIctorian, Literary Analysis]
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Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - The struggle for power and domination between man and woman has been a problem throughout time. Men, often strong enough to overpower women, seem to take the “leadership” role in relationships. The way Thomas Hardy expresses the differences between males and females in Tess of the D’Urbervilles shows the unbalances in the novel. The men in the novel use their power to control the main female character, Tess. Alec Stoke- d’Urberville and Angel Clare make it clear that Tess has little power in the relationship....   [tags: empower woman, leadership, control]
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Hardy's Presentation of Bathsheba and Fanny's Experiences in Far from the Madding Crowd - Hardy's Presentation of Bathsheba and Fanny's Experiences in Far from the Madding Crowd How does this novel reveal the social reality of the time. In this essay I will look at Thomas Hardy's 'Far from the Madding Crowd' in the first section, I will look at the different ways Hardy portrays Bathsheba and Fanny's experiences. Since Hardy based this novel in the 1840s, and being true to history, it does reveal a lot about the social reality of the time. However, Hardy could have a different perspective, as he is writing in the 1870s, which may have affected his view on the 1840s social ideal....   [tags: Far from the Madding Crowd Thomas Hardy Essays] 1391 words
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Depiction of Class in Tess of the d’Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy - Contrary to Roland Barthes post-structuralist theory on The Death of the Author, the context of Hardy’s background is extremely relevant when critically evaluating any of his novels. Tess of the D’Urberville is saturated with examinations of the class issues of his contemporary society. It is clear he posses’ a strong sense of moral value toward the rural classes and Tess's own class issues ultimately determine her downfall. Most of Hardy's novels are very typical in depiction of the people, life styles, moral constructs and personal dilemmas of his contemporary society, especially regarding cross-class conflicts....   [tags: Tess of the d’Urbervilles Essays] 2548 words
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Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - The Victorian Age was a virtuous era, full of chaste women and hard-working men. As with any seemingly utopian society, there are the misfits: those who always seem to go against the grain. Hidden in the shadows of towns were bastardized babies and public outcasts. The flourishing literature of the era attacks the societal stereotypes and standards that make for such failures and devastating tragedies. In Tess of the d'Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy, Tess Durbeyfield's initial loss of innocence brings her down to an insurmountable low, and the victorian society, of which she is a part, dooms her to a horrible fate with its "normal" shunning of her innocent misbehaviors....   [tags: Literature Analysis Utopia] 1539 words
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The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy - The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy wrote the novel 'The Mayor of Casterbridge' in 1886. Two of the main characters, Donald Farfrae and Michael Henchard have a contrast in luck and Hardy uses characterisation, language, historical and social background and a craft in the structure of his novel to help bring across this point. During this essay I am going to comment upon how Hardy does this and further consider the view that, Farfrae's good fortune is a result of Henchard's ill luck....   [tags: Papers] 1518 words
(4.3 pages)
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The Convergence of the Twain by Thomas Hardy - The Convergence of the Twain by Thomas Hardy 'The Convergence of the Twain' by Thomas Hardy tells us about the sinking of the so-called "unsinkable" ship called the Titanic. When he first describes the ship he explains The 'Titanic' resting alone and still away from people. Here is an extraction from when he describes the ship, "Deep from human vanity, and the pride of life that planned her, stilly couches she." He not only describes her on her voyage but also the life inside the ship....   [tags: Papers] 438 words
(1.3 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's Tess Of The D'Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy's Tess Of The D'Urbervilles Tess Of The D'Urbervilles was written by Thomas Hardy, in 1891. This is a tragic victorian novel, in which Thomas Hardy has shown how fate, chance, and coincidence can affect a life and how much things can change. This novel depicts the story of Tess, a young girl who just turns into a woman, living in the Victorian lower class, as she moves through her life and what happens in between. Thomas Hardy has shown how class very much so affected life in Victorian Times, and he also showed how men used to dominate women, and the injustice of existence, and we shall explore this further later on....   [tags: Papers] 3964 words
(11.3 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'urbervilles - Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'urbervilles In Thomas Hardy's novel, "Tess of the D'urbervilles" the settings and surroundings of Talbothays Dairy and Flint Comb - Ash represent both the good and evil in Tess's life. Throughout the novel Tess is faced with absolute happiness and also total misery. As she moves from location to location the setting of these different places reflect her different emotions. Hardy also uses nature to help the reader identify with Tess's feelings. The natural surroundings and the different seasons are often in keeping with the events of the novel; literacy critics refer to this as the 'Pathetic Fallacy'....   [tags: Papers] 2139 words
(6.1 pages)
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Society in the Eyes of Thomas Hardy - How does Thomas Hardy present a picture of society at the time his stories were written. ================================================================== Thomas Hardy presents a picture of how society was by the language he uses and also what happens in the stories. The differences with today's society and Thomas Hardy's society are their everyday lives, social status, relationships, marriage, morals, superstitions and law and order. In Tony Kytes, life was very different from how it is today....   [tags: English Literature:] 1482 words
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Thomas Hardy's The Son's Veto, Graham Greene's The Basement Room and alan Sillitoe's Uncle Ernest - Thomas Hardy's The Son's Veto, Graham Greene's The Basement Room and alan Sillitoe's Uncle Ernest In each of the three stories, 'The Son's Veto' by Thomas Hardy, 'The Basement Room' by Graham Green and 'Uncle Ernest' by Alan Silitoe, the respective writer conveys a sense of isolation regarding the central character. There are numerous similarities between the characters based on their common plight, but each story differs in the portrayal of these characters. The writer's effectively present the characters using a varying range of literary styles....   [tags: Hardy Veto Greene Basement Sillitoe Essays] 1487 words
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The Withered Arm, by Thomas Hardy - Thomas Hardy was a famous author and poet he lived from 1840 to 1928. During his long life of 88 years he wrote fifteen novels and one thousand poems. He lived for the majority of his life near Dorchester. Hardy got many ideas for his stories while he was growing up. An example of this was that he knew of a lady who had had her blood turned by a convict’s corpse and he used this in the story ‘The Withered Arm’. The existence of witches and witchcraft was accepted in his lifetime and it was not unusual for several people to be killed for crimes of witchcraft every year....   [tags: Free Essay Writer] 1256 words
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Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'urbervilles - Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'urbervilles Thomas Hardy's novel "Tess of the D'urbervilles" is about three characters. Tess, Alec and Angel. Tess is a young country girl and the novel follows stages of her life. When we first see Tess, she is wearing white dress that shows purity. She is also the only one of the girls to be wearing a red ribbon. Hardy uses this colour to make us take notice of her. He also means blood, danger and passion. She acts according to nature but is also very aware of what society demands....   [tags: Papers] 506 words
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The Heresies of Thomas Hardy - The Heresies of Thomas Hardy     Thomas Hardy is widely recognized as a poet who went against the conventions of his contemporaries by calling religion into question. Hardy's writing style is so prone to allow random natural events to decide the course of his novels that he often seems to be asking why God, if he existed, would let such bad things happen to basically good people.   Another philosopher who expressed heretical views about conventional religion during Hardy's era was Auguste Comte, founder of positivism....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Analysis of Thomas Hardy´s The Mayor of Casterbridge - Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), native to Dorchester, England, was a novelist and poet that spent the majority of his life as a career writer. His crowning achievement was The Mayor of Casterbridge, which he wrote in 1886; it highlighted his signature style of tragedy and indifference towards its main characters. He spent the entirety of his childhood and most of his adulthood in his private study because of recurring unknown illnesses. As a result, he observed the countryside that surrounded him and implanted it into the geography of his novels and poems....   [tags: Poor, Suffering, Happiness]
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(4 pages)
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The Son's Veto by Thomas Hardy - Compare the way that Thomas hardy writes about the effects of marriage on his characters’ behaviour and lives in a selection of his short stories. Introduction Thomas Hardy was born in higher bockhampton Dorset in 1840. His first career move was an architect in London he then went on to be a short story novelist. He married twice his first wife Emma and second Florence.He him self being much like many of the characters being born and bread a country boy to grow up to be part of a working class family....   [tags: English Literature] 1309 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy - The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy What can we learn about Victorian society from the story 'The Withered Arm' by Thomas Hardy. Do you think that the story is relevant for today. Support your answer with relevant quotations from the story. The short story, 'The Withered Arm' by Thomas Hardy gives one a vivid insight of life of the rural working class during nineteenth century England and their involvement with the upper classes throughout the country. Both of the classes' hardship, superstitious beliefs and their attitudes towards women are displayed along with their lifestyle in the historical southern county of Wessex, allowing one to get different perspectives of...   [tags: Papers] 1591 words
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The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy - The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy “The Withered Arm” is a tragedy of fate and is a story of two women linked to one man. The nature of the tragedy is that the suffering is always a punishment that is disproportionate to the ‘offence’. In this story it is the innocent who are punished for the sins of others (Rhoda’s son, Gertrude). They exemplify the unfairness of existence. The story begins with a group of milkmaids gossiping about the farmer’s new, young wife....   [tags: Papers] 884 words
(2.5 pages)
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Under the Waterfall by Thomas Hardy - Under the Waterfall by Thomas Hardy Some people say that history finds a way of repeating itself. The same thing happened to poetry in the Twentieth Century era. Poetry returned to a metaphysical style, which concentrates on nature and the belief in the supernatural power of different things. You ask how is history repeating itself this way. It is like this because this is the style that Romantic Poets wrote. The main difference between the two completely separate eras is the poets in the Twentieth Century use more common events and common relationships....   [tags: Papers] 991 words
(2.8 pages)
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Emily Bronte's Remembrance and thomas Hardy's The Darkling Thrush - ... To begin, Hardy’s poem, Remembrance, has strong feelings for the loss of a loved one, and is able to start to come to terms with her loss. In line 9, the narrator says, “Cold in the earth, and fifteen wild Decembers From these brown hills have melted into spring.” This person lost their lover a full fifteen years ago. The internal conflict in this poem is intriguing, as it seems the person can’t decide whether to move on. Earlier on in the poem this person asked for the forgiveness of their lover if they were to let them slip their mind and seemed against it....   [tags: sadnesss, ] 620 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Darkling Thrush by Thomas Hardy - The Darkling Thrush by Thomas Hardy The poem entitled "The Darkling Thrush," written by Thomas Hardy, has a very appealing connotation. The work can be separated into two parts; the dismal part pertaining to the beginning of winter and the second part focusing on one small aspect of good in all of the dismal surrounding it. The general idea of the poem is that the dismal winter is approaching, but there are some incidences of goodness in this depressing time. The first part can be sectioned into the first and second stanzas....   [tags: Papers] 1019 words
(2.9 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's Views on Marriage - Thomas Hardy's Views on Marriage Thomas Hardy lived in a time when marriage was the expected practice for young men and women. He had a very distinct view of the institution and the implications that came along with it. He himself was married twice in his long life, both times not very happily, and had progressive views about the union of the sexes, most particularly regarding divorce. His ideas and opinions are not too carefully concealed in his literary works, though he contested that he kept his own views out of his fiction....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays] 1217 words
(3.5 pages)
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Drummer Hodge' by Thomas Hardy - Drummer Hodge' by Thomas Hardy Drummers were usually the very youngest of soldiers and were considered to be too young to fight. This instantly sets a very sombre tone as the reader realises the soldier was very young when he died. The word 'Hodge' is used to describe him and was once used as a derogatory term for a farm labourer however Hardy means no disrespect as he has openly showed his admiration for countrymen. This term is merely one of many techniques used to emphasis how foreign the Drummer is....   [tags: Papers] 834 words
(2.4 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's The Withered Arm - Thomas Hardy's The Withered Arm Introduction ------------ "The Withered arm" is a pre-twentieth century short story written by Thomas Hardy. This story was published in 1888 appearing in "The Blackwoods Magazine". The Withered arm forms part of a collection of short stories by Thomas Hardy referred to as the Wessex Tales. The withered arm is about a society in which an upper class man, Farmer lodge; a successful and wealthy man who appears to be in his 40-50s(it doesn't mention it in the story)has an affair with a lower class woman, Rhoda Brook; a poor and bitter milkmaid(30)....   [tags: Papers] 814 words
(2.3 pages)
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Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge - Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge. Sex is so intertwined in our society that it pervades each facet, including television, books, advertising, and conversation. Movies like The Matrix toss in gratuitous sex because the audience nearly expects it. Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge, therefore, is exceptional in its lack of sexual situations. The subject of sexual motivation and its inherent ambiguity with regard to Henchard's actions is a topic that caught my attention from the very first pages of The Mayor of Casterbridge....   [tags: English Literature]
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The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy - "The Mayor of Casterbridge" In The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy, a person’s future lies in the hands of his or her past actions. The intelligent or ignorant decision that they make places an immediate or long-term effect on the rest of person’s life. Michael Henchard, whose interactions with the people of Casterbridge lead to his demise, is only one of the people who decide their own destiny through their actions. The decisions that the residents of Casterbridge make affect the rest of their lives....   [tags: essays research papers] 636 words
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