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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Faulkner"
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Dysfunctional Love in the Works of Carver and Faulkner - The instability of emotions caused by love is a proven threat in many instances, but specifically when untreated individuals are ignored or fail to seek appropriate assistance. The result of love lost is sometimes the harnessing of pain or anger, which could lead to fatal endings. Raymond Carver and Faulkner represent these entities in both the male and female counterparts. These insights are valuable in that they point to a greater truth about life and about the human race's inability to cope with several obstacles involving love, which both Carver and Faulkner represent perfectly in their short stories....   [tags: Carver, Faulkner] 967 words
(2.8 pages)
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A Rose for Emily, by William Faulkner - People often stick to tradition, but does that mean tradition is proper. Throughout time, many things in life change, but sometimes things stay preserved. The past is the past and cannot be altered, but things can become spoiled, whether by nature or by man. Gender representation has come a long way in the past few hundred years. To this day life is still not equal for either group. The genders have portrayed for millenniums certain duties and created imageries people associate with both, and will not go away overnight or in a century, possibly not even in a millennium....   [tags: a rose for emily, william faulkner]
:: 4 Works Cited
860 words
(2.5 pages)
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Faulkner’s River of Time - William Faulkner envisioned time as something purely subjective, violently turbulent and yet that which could grant hope and redemption. Time became something that above all else (as it was to embody modernism’s study of medium rather than object) was definitive in understanding man’s approach to the world. Such was Faulkner’s idea of time’s consequence that he let it come sweeping down through the Compson siblings’ lives in his novel, The Sound and the Fury, hurtling Caddy, doomed, toward “dishonor and shame,” leaving Benjy, “neuter… eyeless…groping,” wandering lost in the past, unaware of any future, driving Quentin toward “oblivion,” letting Jason seethe in an endless rage, and finally p...   [tags: William Faulkner, Literary Analysis]
:: 8 Works Cited
3550 words
(10.1 pages)
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Faulkner's Use of Foreshadowing in A Rose For Emily - In William Faulkner’s short story A Rose for Emily the order of events, though ordered un-chronologically, still contains extensive uses of foreshadowing. Faulkner Foreshadows Emily’s inability to perceive death as finality, Homer Baron’s death, and the fact that she [Emily] is hoarding Homers dead body. Faulkner also uses precise detailing and dynamic repetition in certain areas that contain foreshadowing, to grasp the reader’s attention. At the beginning of the short story, Faulkner does not elude too much to the coming events in the story....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 777 words
(2.2 pages)
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As I Lay Dying: Faulkner’s Aggressive Humor - In William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying, Faulkner portrays the death of Addie Bundren and her family's quest to honor her dying wish to bury her in the town of Jefferson. Faulkner utilizes humor in the novel to lighten the mood of death and as an act of transgression against the orthodox Christian views of death as it relates to good souls dying and becoming angels. Addie Bundren’s son, Vardaman, relates to the orthodox Christian views of death, and the synonymous use of humor with these views ultimately creates an idea about humanity’s perception of death and how they should live, which is enhanced through John Morreal’s “Humor in the Holocaust: Its Coping, Criticizing, and Superiority” and “...   [tags: William Faulkner]
:: 4 Works Cited
544 words
(1.6 pages)
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Conflicts in A Rose For Emily" By William Faulkner - A Rose For Emily is a short story that was written in 1930, by William Faulkner. It is considered to be among the greatest piece of literature that has been interpreted many times. This is a story about the life and death of the protagonist Emily Grierson. The story is arrayed in five sections. First, it starts with the death of the protagonist, and her encounter with the tax officials when they came to inquire bout her tax payment. Next, is her father’s death followed by Emily going to a local store to buy poison for an unknown reason that the author conceals....   [tags: Faulkner, Grierson, literature]
:: 6 Works Cited
1351 words
(3.9 pages)
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Use of Stream of Consciousness in Faulkner and Salinger - Use of Stream of Consciousness in Faulkner and Salinger How does an author paint a vivid picture of a character’s thoughts. Stream of consciousness, an elaborate, somewhat complicated technique of writing, is a successful method of getting inside of a character’s head. It is not only seeing their actions and environment, it is also understanding their entire thought process through what seems to be a chain reaction. While a character is performing actions and taking in surroundings through senses, thought flows through his or her mind mimicking the mind of a real person....   [tags: William Faulkner, Salinger, Literary Analysis]
:: 11 Works Cited
1752 words
(5 pages)
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The Mystery of the Rose and the Narrator in A Rose for Emily by Faulkner - While one of the most traditional interpretations of “A Rose for Emily” is the variety of meanings for the “rose” presented in the title and how the “rose” fits in with the story. Laura Getty states in her article many varied perspectives that many could ponder when identifying what the “rose” stands for. She states many possible theories that depict what the “rose” means, including theories of other writers that help support her own theory and also that adds another way that most might not consider at first....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 1178 words
(3.4 pages)
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Central Themes in As I Lay Dying by Faulkner - Irony and inversion mark the central themes to As I Lay Dying. Faulkner uses these significant themes to challenge the classical quest and invert characters and events to the opposite of what readers would cfonsider normal. The basic plot of the Bundren family travelling from their home to Jefferson portrays as a pointless and destructive quest. Many readers may expect the characters to reach a goal such as finding a valuable treasure or receiving a prize at the end. But in this novel, the quest remains pointless and destructive as the characters bury a dead body....   [tags: irony, inversion, william faulkner] 668 words
(1.9 pages)
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William Faulkner's Use of Shakespeare - William Faulkner's Use of Shakespeare Throughout his career William Faulkner acknowledged the influence of many writers upon his work--Twain, Dreiser, Anderson, Keats, Dickens, Conrad, Balzac, Bergson, and Cervantes, to name only a few--but the one writer that he consistently mentioned as a constant and continuing influence was William Shakespeare. Though Faulkner’s claim as a fledgling writer in 1921 that “[he] could write a play like Hamlet if [he] wanted to” (FAB 330) may be dismissed as an act of youthful posturing, the statement serves to indicate that from the beginning Shakespeare was the standard by which Faulkner would judge his own creativity....   [tags: William Faulkner]
:: 12 Works Cited
5391 words
(15.4 pages)
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The Illusion of Love in Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily - William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” takes the setting of an old shabby house, in which Emily poisons her lover to death. Though some people suggest the house should be a symbol for isolation, I believe the house, like the rose, is the emblem of love. Both of the two symbols are meant to be of promising connotation, but egoism takes happiness away from love. House is commonly referred to as another word for warm home and love. Since the house Emily lives in is the only property her father leaves her with, memories and love of his father must be sealed in the house....   [tags: William Faulkner, A Rose for Emily] 510 words
(1.5 pages)
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William Faulkner And Barn Burning - "Rebellion, against not only rationalism but also against all traditional modes of understanding humanity, is the attitude forming the artistic backdrop as the twentieth-century begins. The perspective of the 'modern' and of modernism in literature is that the rationalist project fails to produce answers to the deepest human questions, is doomed to failure, and that we are on our own for seeking answers to questions about human meaning." (Mr. John Mays) Sarty Snopes in William Faulkner’s Barn Burning, explores these questions of human meaning, which ultimately classifies this modernistic short story....   [tags: William Faulkner] 1336 words
(3.8 pages)
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Faulkner's Writer's Duty In Growing Up - On December 10, 1950, William Faulkner delivered his Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Today his speech is considered one of the most brilliant and inspiring speeches ever to be read at the Nobel ceremony. Faulkner stressed the "writer's duty" to write only of "the old verities and truths of the heart." He spoke of avoiding writing anything that is not worth writing about. He felt concerned about new writing where authors gave in to America's shallow desires to read "not of love but of lust, of defeats in which nobody loses anything of value, of victories without hope and, worst of all, without pity of compassion." Faulkner wanted his optimistic views on life to be reflected in all writing and...   [tags: William Faulkner] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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Setting in William Faulkner's Barn Burning - Critical Viewing on Barn Burning William Faulkner’s use of a setting in a short story, such as “Barn Burning”, effected the entire outcome of the story from start to finish. In “Barn Burning”, a young boy must face his father and face the reality of a harsh world. He must also discover for himself that his father is wrong and learn to grow up the right way in a racial environment. Faulkner’s setting is one of the most important literary elements that help the audience understand the story....   [tags: William Faulkner ]
:: 2 Works Cited
1596 words
(4.6 pages)
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A Rose For Emily, by William Faulkner - Both of the stories that will be compared in this paper, William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, are very demented novels that contain central premises very estranged to most readers. Though Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" is a short story, the depth and description contained inside its brief text give it the ability to be compared to a novel such as Frankenstein; primarily it's ability to explain the factors relating to Miss Emily's obsession for keeping her loved ones around after they have deceased....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 1625 words
(4.6 pages)
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A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner - “A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner Respect, admiration, and fame from the general public can come at somewhat of a cost. The cost can be anything from a decrease in privacy to an actual effect on ones mental state. In this essay I will use the short story “A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner to describe how general fame, no matter how large or small can be uplifting, but at the same time extremely destructive. Emily is the most renowned lady in the town. Since she carries this type of status there is a strict reputation she must keep....   [tags: A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner] 421 words
(1.2 pages)
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Insanity in Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - In the short story “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner the main character Miss Emily, a so-called monument amongst the towns’ people, lives a rather peculiar life. She comes from a well respected family and remains the last living member of noble decent. A woman whose life is restrained to see love because of her father’s strict ways. She was never able to experience the companionship of another besides that of her own father. The silhouette of her father clutching a horsewhip was hung on the wall, as one was to enter the house (31)....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner]
:: 1 Works Cited
1051 words
(3 pages)
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William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily In the story “A Rose for Emily”, William Faulkner, the author talks about a life of a woman and the town she lived in. The story begins just when miss Emily died. The author doesn’t tell us much about that time except that many people were interested to see what was in her house. As the story progresses, the author decides to jump all the way to the beginning when miss Emily was still a young woman and her father was still alive. During that time, the town felt bad for poor miss Emily and thought that she was going to die with out a husband by her side, since her father didn’t like any men that liked his daughter....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
:: 1 Works Cited
674 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Narrator In A Rose For Emily By Faulkner - The essay that I´m going to do is about A Rose for Emily, which was written by William Faulkner and was it was his first work published in a national magazine. In the introduction of the essay I´m going to stablish the context in which we can find A Rose for Emily. It is a short story included in the collection called the Village, collection that also includes several works like DRY SEPTEMBER, HAIR OR THE EVENING SUN. The works in this collection have three things in common, the community, which as we are going to see a very important character as a whole, the solitude of human beings which in the case of Miss Emily is what makes us sympathize with this woman, but also is what makes us see h...   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 1215 words
(3.5 pages)
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Bitterness in Faulkner's A Rose For Emily - Essay a rose for Emily In William Faulkner's short story "A Rose for Emily," Emily's lack of social skills, exclusiveness and bitterness display Emily's refusal to adapt to the present. In the short story "A Rose for Emily", Emily displays her lack of social skills when the other ladies in the story try to call for her and she refuses to see them. Emily was not very social with the other towns. people. When the town gets the mail system for free, Emily refuses to let the towns. people put a mail box or postal number letters outside of her home....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 635 words
(1.8 pages)
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A Rose For Emily by William Faulkner - In the story “ A Rose for Emily”, by William Faulkner the narrator introduces the reader to Emily Grierson, a sheltered southern woman who while alive struggled immensely with her sanity and the evolving world around her. Emily's father, a very prestigious man is the cause of Emily's senseless behavior. He kept her secluded from the rest of the town “We remembered all the young men her father had driven away...” (Page 3.) If Emily had been allowed to date and socialize with people her own age would she had turned out differently....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner]
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1556 words
(4.4 pages)
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William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily I. Implied author of the story „A Rose for Emily”, a story of horror first published in 1930, is considered by many scholars one of the most authentic and the best narratives ever written by William Faulkner. It is a story of a woman, Emily Grierson, and her relationships with her father, the man she was in love with and the community of Jefferson, the town she lived in. While discussing any narrative text it is crucial to mention the implied author of a text....   [tags: Faulkner Rose Emily Essays] 4808 words
(13.7 pages)
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Biography of William Faulkner - Biography of William Faulkner William Faulkner was an enormous man in literature despite the fact that he stood less than five foot six. He reshaped the way in which the world views literature today. Faulkner was one of the greatest influences to American culture of his time. In fact, his influence spread throughout many years to come. Faulkner started out as a child with a dream, and with this dream he redefined the literary society of America. William Cuthbert Faulkner was born on September 25, 1897, in New Albany, Mississippi....   [tags: Biography Faulkner Writer Author] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"      “A Rose for Emily,” is the remarkable story of Emily Grierson, whose death and funeral drew the attention of the town. The bizarre outcome is further emphasized throughout by the symbolism of the decaying house, which parallels Miss Emily’s physical deterioration and demonstrates her ultimate mental disintegration. Emily’s life, like the house which decays around her, suffers from lack of genuine love and care.      The characteristics of Miss Emily’s house, like her physical appearance, are brought about by years of neglect....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner] 650 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Relationship Between Father And Son in William Faulkner's short story "Barn Burning" - Normally in life, you look up to your father to be the care taker and to encourage you to make your own decisions on what is right and what is wrong. You figure your father should have your best interest at heart and to show compassion for you. In William Faulkner's short story "Barn Burning," Abner is the opposite of the normal father figure you would see. Rather than encouraging his son, Sarty, to make his own decisions on what is right and what is wrong, Abner wants Sarty to lie for him to protect his freedom, so Abner won’t get caught for burning barns....   [tags: William Faulkner, Barn Burning] 719 words
(2.1 pages)
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William Faulkner and History - William Faulkner and History In order to fully understand importance of history and the past in Faulkner’s writing, it is first necessary to examine the life he lived and the place that shaped it. William Cuthbert Falkner (the “u” was later added via his own accord) was born September 25, 1897 in New Albany, Mississippi (Padgett). Named for his great-grandfather Colonel Falkner, young William was told countless stories as a boy of the old Colonel and other great heroes of the South. Faulkner himself described the process of embellishment subjected to one story told by his Aunt over time: …as [Aunt Jenny] grew older the tale itself grew richer and richer, taking on a mellow splendor like w...   [tags: William Faulkner Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
2059 words
(5.9 pages)
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Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - 1. - Theme. 2. - Conflicts, tensions and ambiguity. 3. -Symbolism. 4. - Narrative elements: point of view, tone and narrative structure. 1. - Theme. The main theme of the Faulkner's short story is the relationship between the past and present in Emily Grierson, the protagonist. She did not accept the passage of time throughout all her life, keeping everything she loved in the past with her. The story shows Emily's past and her family story. This information explains her behaviour towards time. Firstly, her father's lack of desire to move on into the future and his old-fashioned ways kept Emily away from the changing society and away from any kind of social relationship: "None of the young m...   [tags: American Literature William Faulkner]
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2362 words
(6.7 pages)
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Joe Christmas by William Faulkner - Studies have shown that people who have been physically or mentally abused as a child are more likely to have an abusive personality as an adult. The cognitive mind is influenced the most as a child for a mind that has not matured yet is susceptible to take in anything that is thrown at it. William Faulkner shows that the events of one’s youth have many effects on behavior as an adult, through the protagonist, Joe Christmas, in his novel Light in August. Joe Christmas did not have the perfect childhood....   [tags: Faulkner Joe Christmas] 1040 words
(3 pages)
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William Faulkner's Snopes Trilogy - William Faulkner's Snopes Trilogy The mere name Faulkner often strikes fear into the hearts of readers of American literature.  His constant variation in his prose style and sentences has baffled minds for nearly eight decades.  Long sentences, which sometimes run for pages without punctuation of any sort, are his trademarks; he tried to express each idea to the fullest in his sentences.  Oftentimes, the sheer difficulty encountered when reading his literature has turned many a reader away.  Somehow, despite this, William Faulkner has been recognized as one of the greatest American writers of the Twentieth Century.  He won the Pulitzer Prize for two of his novels, A Fable (1924), and The R...   [tags: Faulkner Snopes Trilogy Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
2300 words
(6.6 pages)
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William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! - William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" William Faulkner’s novel entitled Absalom, Absalom. is a book which systematically utilizes the concept of discovering the past in the present. Faulkner’s use of the past in the present is pertinent in both the construction of the plot of Absalom, Absalom. as well as the extension of its interpreted meanings. Furthermore, Faulkner’s writing of Absalom, Absalom. appears to have been motivated by the great ills and conflicts of the American South, which was most poignant during the American Civil War, while the title, as well as its implications, was simultaneously conceived in Faulkner’s mind....   [tags: Faulkner Absalom Essays]
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1431 words
(4.1 pages)
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William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" As any reader can see, " A Rose for Emily" is one of the most authentic short stories by Faulkner. His use of characterization, narration, foreshadowing, and symbolism are four key factors to why Faulkner's work is idealistic to all readers.      The works of William Faulkner have had positive effects on readers throughout his career. Local legends and gossip trigger the main focus of his stories. Considering that Faulkner grew up in Mississippi, he was very familiar with the ways of the South....   [tags: William Faulkner Rose Emily Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
1538 words
(4.4 pages)
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The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner - The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury is a novel that depicts the loss of traditional Southern values after the Civil War. This corruption is shown through the Compson family, whose notions of family honor and obsession with their family name are the driving force in severing all the ties that once held them together. Mr. Compson tries to instill these notions into his four children, but each is so occupied by their own beliefs and obsessions that this effort results in a house that is completely devoid of love and consumed by self-absorption....   [tags: Sound fury william Faulkner Essays] 445 words
(1.3 pages)
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William Faulkner's Barn Burning - William Faulkner's Barn Burning William Faulkner, recognized as one of the greatest writers of all time, once made a speech as he accepted his Nobel prize for writing in which he stated that a great piece of writing should contain the truths of the heart and the conflicts that arise over these truths. These truths were love, honor, pity, pride, compassion and sacrifice. Truly it would be hard to argue that a story without these truths would be considered even a good story let alone a great one....   [tags: Faulkner Barn Burning]
:: 1 Works Cited
1247 words
(3.6 pages)
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Light in August by William Faulkner - Light in August by William Faulkner Light in August, a novel written by the well-known author, William Faulkner, can definitely be interpreted in many ways. However, one fairly obvious prospective is through a religious standpoint. It is difficult, nearly impossible, to construe Light in August without noting the Christian parallels. Faulkner gives us proof that a Christian symbolic interpretation is valid. Certain facts of these parallels are inescapable and there are many guideposts to this idea....   [tags: Light August william Faulkner Essays] 1234 words
(3.5 pages)
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Interpretations of William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - Interpretations of William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" has been interpreted in many different ways. Most of these rely solely on hints found within the story. I believe that his life can also help one analyze this story. By knowing that Faulkner's strongest influence was his independent mother, one can guess that Miss Emily Grierson's character was based partly on Maud Falkner. William Cuthbert Faulkner was born in New Albany, Mississippi on September 25, 1897....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
:: 5 Works Cited
1529 words
(4.4 pages)
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Faith in Faulkner's Light In August - Faith in Faulkner's Light In August Religion is a big part of the southern world that Faulkner creates in Light In August. It is also a major theme of the novel. Most characters seem to use “Lord” and “God” very often in their dialogue, which shows that religion is never forgotten by the members of this society. Light in August portrays a type of religious fundamentalism. In this fundamentalism, among the people of the south, there is only one proper way of following and implementing religion in one’s life....   [tags: Faulkner Light August Religion Essays]
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1642 words
(4.7 pages)
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William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! - William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" When asked by his Canadian roommate, Shreve, to "[t]ell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all", Quentin Compson chose to tell the story of Colonel Thomas Sutpen (142).The previous summer, Quentin had been summoned by Miss Rosa Coldfield, the sister of Sutpen's wife, to hear the story of how Sutpen destroyed her family and his own. In Miss Rosa's home, he sat "listening, having to listen, to one of the ghosts which had refused to lie still even longer than most had, telling him about old ghost-times"(4)....   [tags: William Faulkner Absalom Essays] 1875 words
(5.4 pages)
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William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily In William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”, the narrative voice is a detached witness to the events in Miss Emily’s life. This is portrayed through its limited omniscience, its shifting viewpoint and its unreliability. The narrators’ limited omniscience is seen through their inability to see into the depths of Miss Emily and her personal life; to see her thoughts, feelings and motives. No one knows the reason that she cut her hair, all that happened between her and Homer, and why she locked herself in her house for such a long time....   [tags: William Faulkner Rose Emily Essays] 669 words
(1.9 pages)
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William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" - William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner is set in a small Southern town during the post-Civil War era. The story revolves around the strange and tragic events of Miss Emily Grierson’s life. At first glance, Emily seems like a lonely woman with little self-confidence and low self-esteem that seems to stem from her upbringing by her father. There seemed to be some kind of abuse by her father and the fact that she had seemed to have lived such a sheltered life....   [tags: William Faulkner Rose Emily essays] 724 words
(2.1 pages)
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Importance of Faulkner's Diction in A Rose for Emily - Importance of Faulkner's Diction in A Rose for Emily What is the difference between a small child and a child that is puny. Technically, puny and small are synonyms, but the imagery that each conveys is vastly different, and therefore the meaning of each is altered. An author's choice of words can have a massive effect on the reader's interpretation. Someone who realized this and manipulated it to his full advantage was William Faulkner. One way that an author can increase a reader's enjoyment of his work is by choosing language which creates suspense and mystery....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
:: 4 Works Cited
1247 words
(3.6 pages)
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Predatory Men in William Faulkner’s Novel, Sanctuary - Predatory Men in William Faulkner’s Novel, Sanctuary William Faulkner’s novel, Sanctuary, is replete with subtlety and symbolism. En route to Old Frenchman’s Place, Temple Drake thinks of baseball players in the Saturday game she is missing as “crouching, uttering short, yelping cries like marsh-fowl disturbed by an alligator, not certain of where the danger is, motionless, poised” (37). In creating such an image of predation, Faulkner prepares the reader for Temple’s arrival at Old Frenchman’s Place —the prey/predator metaphor lending itself perfectly to Temple’s situation vis-à-vis the men there....   [tags: Faulkner Sanctuary] 676 words
(1.9 pages)
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Analysis of A Rose For Emily by William Faulkner - Analysis of A Rose For Emily “A Rose for Emily”, by William Faulkner, begins and ends with the death of Miss Emily Grierson, the main character of the story. In the story William Faulkner uses characterization to reveal the character of Miss Emily. Faulkner divided the story “into five sections, the first and last section having to do with the present, and the now of the narration, with the three middle sections detailing the past” (Davis 35). Faulkner expresses the content of Miss Emily’s character through physical description, through her actions, words, and feelings, through the narrator’s direct comments about her, and through the actions, words, and feelings of other characters....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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1295 words
(3.7 pages)
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Sanity and Insanity in Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury - Sanity and Insanity in Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury Quentin Compson, the oldest son of the Compson family in William Faulkner's novel, The Sound and the Fury, personifies all the key elements of insanity. Taking place in the imaginary town of Jefferson, Mississippi, the once high class and wealthy Compson family is beginning their downfall. Employing a stream of consciousness technique narrated from four points of view, Benjy, the "idiot child," Jason the cruel liar, cheat, and misogynist, Quentin the introvert, and the author narrating as a detached observer, Faulkner creates the situation of a completely dysfunctional family....   [tags: Faulkner Sound and the Fury Essays] 1202 words
(3.4 pages)
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Images of Blood in Faulkner's Light in August - Images of Blood in Faulkner's Light in August          "Blood" is considered by many to be one of the most important ties between human beings; it is therefore frequently used as an image that defines a character or a relationship between characters in a novel. For example, a prince might be defined by his "royal blood," or a weak man described as having "thin blood." Close friends may be "blood brothers," or families may have a "blood feud." In William Faulkner's Light in August, the image of blood permeates the themes of sexuality, race, and religion....   [tags: Faulkner Light August Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
2148 words
(6.1 pages)
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Foreshadowing in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - Foreshadowing in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily William Faulkner paints a tragic tale about the inevitability of change and the futility of attempting to stop it in "A Rose for Emily". This story is about a lonely upper-class woman struggling with life and traditions in the Old South. Besides effective uses of literary techniques, such as symbolism and a first plural-person narrative style, Faulkner succeeds in creating a suspenseful and mysterious story by the use of foreshadowing, which gives a powerful description about death and the tragic struggle of the main character, Miss Emily....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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797 words
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The Corruption with Modernization in Faulkner’s The Country - The Corruption with Modernization in Faulkner’s The Country The disruption of traditional values and ways of life that accompanied the modernization of the U.S. seems to be a common theme throughout the “Country” section of Faulkner’s Collected Stories. In “Barn Burning” Abner Snopes seems to feel that the world is against him: “Don’t you know all they wanted was a chance to get at me…” (8). He sees fire as “the one weapon for the preservation of integrity” (8), and it is apparent that he feels the disparity in standard of living between farm owners such as Major de Spain, and workers like himself to be an injustice and an injury to him (but then again, maybe he’s just plain evil, as Faulkn...   [tags: Faulkner Country Short Stories] 476 words
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Critiques of Faulkner’s Sound and Fury - Critiques of Faulkner’s Sound and Fury After reading through a large chunk of criticism, it seems clear to me how David Minter, editor of our edition, hopes to direct the readers’ attentions. I was rather dumbstruck by the number of essays included in the criticism of this edition that felt compelled to discuss Faulkner and the writing of The Sound and the Fury seemingly more than to discuss the text itself. Upon going back over the essay, I realized that Minter’s own contribution, “Faulkner, Childhood, and the Making of The Sound and the Fury,” is a prime example of such “criticism of the text” that focuses on the author, his creation of the text as a process, and the author’s self-profes...   [tags: Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury] 864 words
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William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying      In his book, As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner pioneers new and interesting literary forms. His most obvious deviation from traditional novel writing was the new style of narration in which he used all the main characters as the narrator at one point or another. This allowed the reader to gain insight into the character’s thoughts, and also to prove very interesting and entertaining. Faulkner also ignores all boundaries that sane people have placed upon the English language to keep it readable....   [tags: Lay Dying Faulkner Essays] 986 words
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The Scrambling of Time in Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - The Scrambling of Time in Faulkner's A Rose for Emily In, A Rose for Emily, Faulkner uses the element of time to enhance details of the setting and vice versa. By avoiding the chronological order of events of Miss Emily's life, Faulkner first gives the reader a finished puzzle, and then allows the reader to examine this puzzle piece by piece, step by step. By doing so, he enhances the plot and presents two different perspectives of time held by the characters. The first perspective (the world of the present) views time as a "mechanical progression" in which  the past is a "diminishing road." The second perspective (the world of tradition and the past) views the past as "a huge meadow which...   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury - William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury In William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, the image of honeysuckle is used repeatedly to reflect Quentin’s preoccupation with Caddy’s sexuality. Throughout the Quentin section of Faulkner’s work, the image of honeysuckle arises in conjunction with the loss of Caddy’s virginity and Quentin’s anxiety over this loss. The particular construction of this image is unique and important to the work in that Quentin himself understands that the honeysuckle is a symbol for Caddy’s sexuality....   [tags: Faulkner Sound Fury Essays]
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Concepts of Masculinity in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished - Concepts of Masculinity in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished In The Unvanquished, the reader assumes that the narrator is Bayard Sartoris, a boy born to John Sartoris and his now deceased wife. Bayard's gender is not immediately apparent, though remote understanding of southern customs and common boyhood activities encourages one to guess that he is male. First, Ringo is more easily identified as a black boy, and by the age of twelve, black boys and white girls would likely not be permitted such intimate and unsupervised interaction....   [tags: Faulkner’s The Unvanquished Essays] 507 words
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Clinging to the Past in Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - Clinging to the Past in Faulkner's A Rose for Emily     The end of the American Civil War also signified the end of the Old South's era of greatness. The south is depicted in many stories of Faulkner as a region where "the reality and myth are difficult to separate"(Unger 54). Many southern people refused to accept that their conditions had changed, even though they had bitterly realized that the old days were gone. They kept and cherished the precious memories, and in a fatal and pathetic attempt to maintain the glory of the South people tend to cling to old values, customs, and the faded, but glorified representatives of the past....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner] 1553 words
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The Maturation of Bayard in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished - The Maturation of Bayard in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished William Faulkner tells his novel The Unvanquished through the eyes and ears of Bayard, the son of Confederate Colonel John Sartoris. The author’s use of a young boy during such a turbulent time in American history allows him to relate events from a unique perspective. Bayard holds dual functions within the novel, as both a character and a narrator. The character of Bayard matures into a young adult within the work, while narrator Bayard relays the events of the story many years later....   [tags: Faulkner’s The Unvanquished Essays] 640 words
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Foreshadowing in William Faulkner's A Rose For Emily - In the story, A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner the chronology of the story is chopped into pieces and moved around for the reader’s viewing pleasure. William Faulkner demonstrates how giving away part of the ending before the story has begun obligates the reader to investigate the story in order to get the rest of the ending, all the while building suspense for the reader, and building the storyline. The story starts off with part of the ending, which pulls the reader into the rest of the story....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 674 words
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William Faulkner's "Uncle Willy" - William Faulkner's "Uncle Willy" "I know what they said. They said I didn't run away from home but that I was tolled away by a crazy man, who, if I hadn't killed him first, would have killed me inside another week. But if they had said that the women, the good women in Jefferson had driven Uncle Willy out of town and I followed him and did what I did because I knew that Uncle Willy was on his last go-round and this time when they got him again it would be for good and forever, they would have been right....   [tags: William Faulkner Uncle Willy Essays] 1123 words
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Stream of Consciousness in Faulkner’s Barn Burning, All the Dead Pilots, and Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye - How does an author paint a vivid picture of a character’s thoughts. The answer is stream of consciousness. Faulkner and Salinger both used this literary technique but suited it their individual tastes. The purpose of this paper on the comparison of the use of stream of consciousness in the works of two American authors, William Faulkner and J.D. Salinger, is to define stream of consciousness, explain the use of it in Faulkner’s “Barn Burning,” “All the Dead Pilots,” and Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, compare the stream of consciousness in both writers’ literary work, and examine the influence their writing had on others....   [tags: Argumentative, Faulkner, Salinger]
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2083 words
(6 pages)
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Southern Masculinity in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished - Southern Masculinity in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished The narrator of Faulkner’s The Unvanquished is apparently an adult recounting his childhood. The first person narrator is a child at the story’s outset, but the narrative voice is lucid, adult. Telling the story of his childhood allows the narrator to distinguish for the reader what he believed as a child from what he “know[s] better now” (10). The difference affords an examination of dominant southern masculinity as it is internalized by Bayard and Ringo, and demonstrates the effects on the boys of the impossible ideal....   [tags: Faulkner?s The Unvanquished Essays] 877 words
(2.5 pages)
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Analysis of The Barn Burning by William Faulkner - Analysis of The Barn Burning by William Faulkner The short story “Barn Burning” by William Faulkner is about a ten year old boy, Sarty Snopes, who has grown to realize that his father, Abner Snopes, provides a life of “despair and grief” as he refuses to accept the “peace and dignity” generated by the ties with other people. In essence, Sarty is faced with the dilemma of choosing between his family (his blood) and moral conscience of what is right and wrong. Jane Hiles interprets this story to be about blood ties through Sartys character in dealing with his internal conflict with his father....   [tags: The Barn Burning William Faulkner Essays] 995 words
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Intriguing Use of Plot in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - Intriguing Use of Plot in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily The plotline of standard narratives would most aptly be diagramed as a triangle, with the rising action on one side, the falling action on the other side, and the climax marking the angle at the apex. The diagram of the plotline of William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily," however, would look like a simple line with a positive slope. The story's chronology is abandoned in favor of a simpler and more effective geometry. Faulkner discards the method of unfolding events in the order of their occurrence....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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1266 words
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The Southern Dialect as Seen in the Works of William Faulkner - The Southern Dialect as Seen in the Works of William Faulkner In the writings of William Faulkner, the reader may sense that the author has created an entire world, which directly reflects his own personal experience. Faulkner writes about the area in and around Mississippi, where he is from, during the post-Civil War period. It is most frequently Northern Mississippi that Faulkner uses for his literary territory, changing Oxford to “Jefferson” and Lafayette County to “Yoknapatawpha County,” because it is here that he lived most of his life and wrote of the people he knew....   [tags: William Faulkner Essays]
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William Faulkner's Race - William Faulkner's Race Works Cited Missing William Faulkner, the eldest son to parents Murry and Maud Butler Falkner, was born in New Albany, Mississippi in 1897. Although Faulkner was not a keen student in high school, which eventually lead to his dropping out before graduation, he was very enthusiastic about undirected learning. After years of studying independently, Faulkner allowed a friend of his family, Phil Stone, to assist him with his academic vocation. This relationship inspired Faulkner and after a short period spent with the Royal Air Force in 1918 he decided to go to university where he began writing and publishing poetry....   [tags: William Faulkner Author Gender Papers] 1352 words
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The Perspective of a Child in William Faulkner’s The Unvanquished - The Perspective of a Child in William Faulkner’s The Unvanquished In the novel The Unvanquished, by William Faulkner, the story of a child’s journey from boyhood to manhood is told through the perspective of an adult reflecting upon the past. Faulkner uses the narrator of the novel, Bayard Sartoris, to recall numerous experiences and portray intricate details that involve time, place, and setting through several techniques of writing. Language, empirical knowledge, and tone play a major role in the readers understanding of the perspective of which the story is told....   [tags: Faulkner’s The Unvanquished] 524 words
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The Importance of Plot in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - The Importance of Plot in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily In “A Rose For Emily”, by William Faulkner, plot plays an important role in how the story is played out. Faulkner does not use chronological order in this short story. Instead, he uses an order that has many twists and turns. It appears to have no relevance while being read, but in turn, plays an important role in how the story is interpreted by the reader. Why does Faulkner present the plot of this story in this manner. How does it affect the reader....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying Works Cited Missing      Fulfilling a promise they had made to their mother, Addie, Cash, Darl, Jewel, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman, in William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, journey across the Mississippi countryside to bring her body to be buried in Jefferson, alongside her immediate family. Each one, in turn, narrates the events of this excursion as they are perceived. Though all of the family members are going through the same experiences, each one expresses what they see and how they feel by exercising their individual powers and limitations of language....   [tags: Lay Dying William Faulkner Essays] 1179 words
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Importance of Human Interaction in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - Importance of Human Interaction in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily Are human beings responsible for the well being of others that they come into contact with. William Faulkner's story "A Rose for Emily" considers the significance that human interaction has or does not have on people's lives. Faulkner creatively uses a shocking ending to cause readers to reevaluate their own interactions with others in their lives. Throughout the story, Faulkner uses characters that may relate to the readers more than they want to admit....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner] 1375 words
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Racism in Faulkner’s Dry September - Racism in Faulkner’s Dry September When summer turns into autumn everyone knows that changes will occur. People start to wear heavier clothing, the leaves change colors and the most noticeable difference is the weather transformations. Dry September is a fitting title to this short story because numerous changes happen throughout the story as well as during the season. The imagery created provides a solid background for a reader to understand exactly what is going on during this time period. Racial tensions were obviously prevalent and disrespect towards black people was an everyday occurrence....   [tags: Faulkner’s Dry September Essays] 874 words
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The Psychosis of Emily Grierson in A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner - The Psychosis of Emily Grierson in A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner Through the use of third person point of view and elaborate, repetitive foreshadowing, William Faulkner describes how numerous elements contributed to Miss Emily's deranged behavior in the short story, 'A Rose for Emily.' Not only does Faulkner imply paternal oppression, but there is also a clear indication of insanity that is an inherent pattern in the Grierson family. The shocking conclusion of 'A Rose for Emily' could be the result of a number of circumstances, but is most likely due to the years of isolation and the overbearing upbringing Emily experienced with her father....   [tags: Rose Emily Faulkner Essays]
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The Nature of Time and Change in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - The Nature of Time and Change in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily In "A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner's use of language foreshadows and builds up to the climax of the story. His choice of words is descriptive, tying resoundingly into the theme through which Miss Emily Grierson threads, herself emblematic of the effects of time and the nature of the old and the new. Appropriately, the story begins with death, flashes back to the near distant past and leads on to the demise of a woman and the traditions of the past she personifies....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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The Alcoholic Father Revealed in the Film, William Faulkner: A Life on Paper - The Alcoholic Father Revealed in the Film, William Faulkner: A Life on Paper While listening to William Faulkner’s daughter, Jill, attempt to describe her father’s personality, I recognized the desire to defend and protect the memory of a provider who was ultimately unknowable to her. It seemed as if each phrase was tentatively spoken as a way of avoiding being untruthful. Mostly, I recognized the inability to truly know an alcoholic parent. I repeat the word ‘recognize’ intentionally. I lived with an alcoholic until I was ten....   [tags: Faulkner Moses] 665 words
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Faulkner's Rose For Emily is a Portrait Of The Post War South - William Faulkner’s "A Rose for Emily" is perhaps his most famous and most anthologized short story. From the moment it was first published in 1930, this story has been analyzed and criticized by both published critics and the causal reader. The well known Literary critic and author Harold Bloom suggest that the story is so captivating because of Faulkner’s use of literary techniques such as "sophisticated structure, with compelling characterization, and plot" (14). Through his creative ability to use such techniques he is able to weave an intriguing story full of symbolism, contrasts, and moral worth....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 1943 words
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The Cemetary and Loss in Faulkner’s The Sound and Fury - The Cemetary and Loss in Faulkner’s The Sound and Fury On the sixth page of the novel The Sound and The Fury, Caroline Compson informs her son Jason that she and her other son Benjy are "going to the cemetery." The sense of loss that runs through much of Faulkner's work, especially The Sound and The Fury, can be found in the quiet, black-and-white world of the dead. In a cemetery one is reminded of lives lost and lost lives. Faulkner honors both in his novel. The story reveals a multilayered cacophony of loss....   [tags: Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury] 510 words
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Sarty's Transformation in William Faulkner's Barn Burning - Sarty's Transformation in William Faulkner's Barn Burning    In William Faulkner's story, "Barn Burning", we find a young man who struggles with the relationship he has with his father and his own conscience.  We see Sarty, the young man, develop into an adult while dealing with the many crude actions and ways of Abner, his father.  We see Sarty as a puzzled youth that faces the questions of faithfulness to his father or faithfulness to himself and the society he lives in.  His struggle dealing with the reactions that are caused by his father's action result in him thinking more for himself as the story progresses....   [tags: Faulkner Barn Burning Essays]
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Society’s Expectations of Manhood in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished - Society’s Expectations of Manhood in Faulkner’s The Unvanquished In The Unvanquished, William Faulkner casts the narrator of the novel as an adult looking back on his boyhood. Early on, the author takes for granted that the actions he describes at the beginning of the story are recognizable to his audience as things boys do. Then, five pages into the novel, the narrator tells us his age at the time the story occurs, that he is a boy on the cusp of becoming a teenager. Using this narrative strategy allows Faulkner to view the Civil War from the perspective of a son whose father is a Confederate officer and plantation owner....   [tags: Faulkner’s The Unvanquished Essays] 562 words
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William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily is a Gothic Horror Tale - William Faulkner is widely considered to be one of the great American authors of the twentieth century. Although his greatest works are identified with a particular region and time (Mississippi in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries), the themes he explores are universal. He was also an extremely accomplished writer in a technical sense. Novels such as The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom. feature bold experimentation with shifts in time and narrative. Several of his short stories are favorites of anthologists, including "A Rose for Emily." This strange story of love, obsession, and death is a favorite among both readers and critics....   [tags: A Rose For Emily, William Faulkner] 1833 words
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Racial Theme in Faulkner’s Light in August - Racial Theme in Faulkner’s Light in August One theme that I really noticed was stressed throughout Faulkner’s Light in August was the theme of race. Joe Christmas’ mixed race is a central issue all through the novel. The reader is continually brought back to the fact that he is half black, especially during his affair with Johanna Burden. Johanna (and Faulkner) always makes his racial status known while Johanna and Joe are making love by Johanna’s gasping “Negro. Negro. Negro!” (260). It is intriguing that while Johanna’s father believed that the white race was cursed by the ‘White Man’s Burden’, the duty to help lift the black race to a higher status, and that blacks would never be on the...   [tags: Faulkner Light in August] 643 words
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Snapshots of Miss Emily in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - Snapshots of Miss Emily in A Rose for Emily “A Rose for Miss Emily” by William Faulkner is a story of quiet lonliness and tragedy. The story ends on a surprising note, but one for which the reader is not totally unprepared. Faulkner very cleverly uses changing pictures of Miss Emily’s physical state to give the reader a clue as to what is transpiring inside her. The picture or “tableau” of Emily in her childhood gives us our first clue into her strange personality. She is “a slender figure in white in the background, her father a spraddled silhouette in the foreground, his back to her and clutching a horsewhip, the two of them framed by the back-flung front door.” The scene almost b...   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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Narrators in Faulkner’s Barn Burning and The Unvanquished - Narrators in Faulkner’s Barn Burning and The Unvanquished “Barn Burning” and The Unvanquished present very different ways to tell a story. In “Barn Burning,” Faulkner uses a third person, limited omniscient point of view that allows him to enter the mind of the story’s protagonist, Colonel Sartoris Snopes. In this point of view, the narrator establishes that the story took place in the past by commenting that “Later, twenty years later, he was too tell himself, ‘If I had said they wanted only truth, justice, he would have it me again.’ But now he said nothing” (8)....   [tags: Faulkner Barn Burning] 531 words
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The Symbol of the Rose in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - The Symbol of the Rose in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" In William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily," Miss Emily Grierson is a lonely old woman, living a life void of all love and affection; although the rose only directly appears in the title, the rose surfaces throughout the story as a symbol. In contemporary times, the rose also symbolizes emotions like love and friendship. The rose symbolizes dreams of romances and lovers. These dreams belong to women, who like Emily Grierson, have yet to experience true love for themselves....   [tags: William Faulkner A Rose for Emily]
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Theme of Isolation in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - The Theme of Isolation in A Rose for Emily As an author establishes the characters he simultaneously attempts to develop the theme of the story. An author uses various elements such as point of view, the setting, and symbols to work toward the expression of one central idea. In looking at "A Rose for Emily." a short story by William Faulkner, it is evident that Faulkner successfully carries one main idea throughout the piece, the idea of being isolated from society. One of the most effective elements that Faulkner uses in his development of this main idea is the use of imagery....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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Symbolism and Theme in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily - Symbolism and Theme in William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily    In William Faulkner's short story "A Rose for Emily," a series of interconnected events collectively represent a single theme in the story. Symbolism is the integral factor involved in understanding the theme. "A Rose for Emily's" dominant theme is the search for love and security, a basic human need which can be met unfavorably in equivocal environments. Faulkner's use of symbolism profoundly develops the theme of the story, bringing to light the issues of morality that arise from a young woman's struggle to find love....   [tags: A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner]
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