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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Euripides Electra"
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An Overview of Euripides’ Electra - An Overview of Electra Euripides' play Electra, produced in 415 b.c.e., starts with a peasant recounting past events: Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus murdered Agamemnon and took the throne of Mycenae. Agamemnon's son Orestes escaped and has been raised in Phocis. Daughter Electra, when marriageable, was forced to wed this peasant instead of any noble, whereby Aegisthus' rule might be endangered. The marriage has not been consummated. "If any man thinks me a fool, for harbouring / A young girl in my house and never touching her, / He measures what's right by the wretched standard of / His own mind" (107)....   [tags: Euripides Electra Essays] 580 words
(1.7 pages)
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Deceitful Clytemnestra of Euripides' Electra - Deceitful Clytemnestra of Euripides' Electra Agamemnon returns from Troy, a victorious general, bringing home spoils, riches and fame. He is murdered on the same day as he returns. Clytemnestra, his adulterous wife, has laid in wait for her husband's homecoming and kills him whilst he is being bathed after his long journey. During the Agamemnon, large proportions of the Queen's words are justifications for her action, which is very much concerned with the sacrifice of Iphigenia to the gods, in order for the fleet to set sail for Troy....   [tags: Euripides Electra Essays]
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1773 words
(5.1 pages)
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First Impressions of Clytemnestra in Euripides’ Electra - First Impressions of Clytemnestra in Euripides’ Electra       The play begins with the dreary-eyed watchman, scared stiff ("old comrade, terror" 17) of the Queen ("that woman - she manoeuvres like a man" 13) and her tyrannical rule. He says that he cries  "for the hard times" that he endures.  We are very sure from what he says that the House of Atreus is in cruel hands and he clamours for the return of his "loving" King. Clytemnestra is never mentioned by name, as the sentry is afraid of punishment for saying too much ("I never say a word")....   [tags: Euripides Electra Essays]
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853 words
(2.4 pages)
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Euripides’ Electra and Aristophanes' Clouds - Euripides’ Electra is a tragedy that encourages readers to consider the problematic nature of humanity’s response to injustice: its quest to make fair that which is unfair, to correct unjust actions, and to mark the fragile border between what is ethically correct and morally wrong. Aristophanes’ Clouds is a tragedy disguised as a comedy that illuminates Strepsiades’s profound disregard for justice, conduct, and the establishment of civilization. Underneath Aristophanes’ comedic approach lies a dark conclusion that alludes to a problem that civilization faces today: ignorance and its resistance to evolution....   [tags: euripide, electra]
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1334 words
(3.8 pages)
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Sophocles's Electra vs. Euripides's Electra - Euripides and Sophocles wrote their own versions of the Electra story. The basic plot is as follows: Agamemnon is killed by Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus after he returns from the Trojan war to reclaim his sister-in-law Helen from the Trojans. Electra and her brother Orestes plot to kill their mother and her lover to revenge his death. Both authors wrote about the same plot, but the built the story very differently. Sophocles focused on Orestes, and Euripides focused more on the life of Electra....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 582 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Redeeming Features of the Characters in Electra - The Redeeming Features of the Characters in Electra     In Euripides' 'Electra', there are a number of parts, speaking and non-speaking, that reveal the redeeming features of the otherwise pitiful characters. This essay will consider the roles of Orestes, Electra, Clytemnestra, the Peasant and Aegisthus (whose actions are only reported to us).   It is arguable that the characters are not redeemable due simply to the plot of the play: a son returns, kills his father's unworthy successor, his mother (with the aid of his sister) and was sent away at the end of the play by divine judgement....   [tags: Euripides Electra Essays]
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2463 words
(7 pages)
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Vengeance and Dramatic Conflict in Electra and Orestes - Introduction:- Since Sophocles and Euripides’s tragedies Electra and Orestes got so much success, name and received great critical acclaim they have been extensively approached and discussed in terms of characterization, themes, symbols, plot, incestuous love, demolition, betrayal and especially lamentation. For instance, Vengeance is the soul of the both plays and it is largely discussed as major themes of the play. But its connection with the tragedy of characters is far away better to be discussed....   [tags: Sophocles and Euripides Greek tragedies]
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1837 words
(5.2 pages)
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Euripides: A Greek Playwright - Euripides: A Greek Playwright Euripides is a keen witness to the human character and the father of the psychological theater. His plays were modern at the time compared to others because of the way he focused on the personal lives and motives of his characters, in a manner that was unfamiliar to Greek audiences. His plays have often been seen, in simple terms, bad because critics have been unable to comprehend his visions....   [tags: Greek Play Euripides Biography] 1192 words
(3.4 pages)
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Suffering and Salvation in Electra and Matthew - Injustice and justice balance out. One might even go so far as to say that the two are one and the same, that they are two sides of the same coin. But why are they so important. Why have wars been waged over instances of injustice. Why are the two usually thought of as being separate. Both Euripides' Electra and the King James Version of Matthew suggest that justice and injustice are important and distinct because one brings about salvation, while the other is itself a sort of salvation. Injustice leads to the instance of justice—of salvation....   [tags: injustice, justice, murder] 908 words
(2.6 pages)
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Women Behaving Like Men in Antigone, Electra, and Medea - Women Behaving Like Men in Antigone, Electra, and Medea Throughout Antigone, Electra, and Medea, many double standards between men and women surface. These become obvious when one selects a hero from these plays, for upon choosing, then one must rationalize his or her choice. The question then arises as to what characteristics make up the hero. How does the character win fame. What exactly is excellent about that character. These questions must be answered in order to choose a hero in these Greek tragedies....   [tags: Antigone Electra Medea]
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855 words
(2.4 pages)
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Comparing the Portrayal of Clytemnestra in Agamemnon and Electra - Comparing the Portrayal of Clytemnestra in Agamemnon and Electra In both Electra and Agamemnon, Euripides and Aeschylus have chosen to represent Clytemnestra as a complex character being neither all bad nor all good - the signature of a sophisticated playwright. In Agamemnon, Clytemnestra is a morbidly obsessive woman, utterly consumed by the murder of her daughter for which the audience cannot help but sympathise; she is capable only of vengeance. In the Electra, Clytemnestra is placed in an even more sympathetic light, victimised by her own daughter who in turn is driven by an obsessive desire, similar to that of her mother's, to avenge her father's death....   [tags: Papers] 1441 words
(4.1 pages)
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Ancient Greek Drama: A Comparison of the Euripides and Sophocles - Theater was an important part of Ancient Greek Civilization. History of Greek theatre began with religious festivals which aim to honor Dionysus, a god. During the festivals some citizens sing songs and perform improvisation plays and other participants of festivals judges this performances to decide which one of them was the best. These plays form the foundation of the Greek Theatre. Because of the competition between performers to create best performances, plays gained an aesthetic perspective and became a form of art....   [tags: history of Greek theater]
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952 words
(2.7 pages)
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Sophocles vs Euripides - Sophocles vs Euripides Sophocles’ and Euripides’ versions of Electra carry, among many similarities, a central theme of revenge. The characters, Electra and Orestes, must reunite to avenge their father’s murder. Misfortunately, in both versions the just solution leads the siblings to destroying their own mother. Both versions of Electra can be compared to Aeschylus’ Libation Bearers. However, they are both more dramatic, and more similar to each other than if each Electra was individually compared to the play by Aeschylus....   [tags: Papers] 1219 words
(3.5 pages)
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Euripides was accused by his contempories of being a woman hater. Why - Euripides was accused by his contempories of being a woman hater. Why do you think this was so, and how justified do you think the accusation was. Question -------- Euripides was accused by his contempories of being a woman hater. Why do you think this was so, and how justified do you think the accusation was. In your answer you should consider not only how Euripides portrays his female characters, but also the sentiments expressed in the plays and the contempory view of women. Answer ------ Euripides definitely had an opinion on woman that was not shared by many other play writes....   [tags: Classics] 1705 words
(4.9 pages)
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Importance of the Tutor in Electra - Importance of the Tutor in Electra When delving into a novel, drama or other character-based text, analysts often focus their search around the supposed "major characters" who seem to most directly affect the work. In considering Electra, however, just as valuable as Orestes, Clytemnestra or Electra herself is a somewhat minor character, the Tutor. This attendant of Orestes emerges only three times and is on stage for less than twenty percent of the spoken lines, yet his role in driving the plot is as great as any....   [tags: electra]
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1607 words
(4.6 pages)
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Euripides' The Medea: Medea and the Chorus - Medea and the Chorus The exchange that takes place between Medea and the Chorus serves several purposes in Euripides' tragedy, The Medea. It allows us to sympathize with Medea in spite of her tragic flaws. It also foreshadows the tragic events that will come to pass. Finally, it contrasts rationality against vengeance and excess. The Chorus offers the sane view of the world to the somewhat insane characters of Medea, Jason, and Creon. As the passage begins on page 176, the leader of the Chorus reveals that she has high regards for Medea despite the fact that she is "savage still." She acknowledges Medea as a foreigner and an outsider and yet is sympathetic towards her....   [tags: Euripides] 292 words
(0.8 pages)
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Public Validation of Gender in Euripides’ "The Bacchae" - This distinction between men and women is emphasized in Euripides’ The Bacchae. It is the women, and not the men, who are allured to follow Dionysus and practice his rituals: dancing, drinking, etc. It is seen as problematic to Pentheus and something must be done: “Women are laving home / to follow Bacchus, they say, to honor him in sacred rites. / Our women run wild upon the wooded hills, dancing to honor this new God, Bacchus, whoever he is” (215-218). There is a sense of lost, a need to retrieve the women, and return them to their place....   [tags: Euripides, Bacchae, gender, sociology,] 956 words
(2.7 pages)
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Does Euripides’s Medea Meet the Criteria for a Greek Play? - Euripides’s Medea, a fine example of a Greek play. The entire course of the play takes place within a single day, making it a precedent play in more than one way. We study it in college courses around America, but does a really meet the criteria for a Greek play. Could it possibly, be the exact opposite of what is described as a Greek play. Does Euripides’s Medea contain the necessary dramatic components that Aristotle outlines in The Poetics. In Aristotle’s The Poetics, he states that the most important part of any tragedy is plot....   [tags: Euripides Medea]
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826 words
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Struggle over Dominance in Medea by Euripides - Marriage – the union of two imperfect souls to form an affectionate and beautiful relationship – is exceptionally intricate and delicate. Two different people with different insights come together to form a harmonious bond. Power, or control, is a chief concept that can “make or break” the affiliation. Distribution of the ruling is frequently divided into males versus females. This partition leads to many conflicts and tribulations. In the catastrophic Greek play Medea, by Euripides, the liaison between Medea and Jason demonstrates how both males and females assert power in the relationship and how incorrect usage of this supremacy leads to dilemmas....   [tags: Medea, Euripides, relationships, male, female, dyn] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
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Feminism in Medea by Euripides - Feminism in Medea by Euripides The play Medea by Euripides challenges the dominant views of femininity in the patriarchal society of the Greeks. While pursuing her ambition Medea disregards many of the feminine stereotypes/ characteristics of the patriarchal Greek society. She questions the inequality of women in a patriarchal society, contradicts Jason?s chauvinist beliefs, challenges the stereotype that women are weak and passive and completely disregards the feminine role of motherhood....   [tags: Feminism Euripides]
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1004 words
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Otherness in Euripides' Bacchae and Soyinka's The Bacchae of Euripides - Otherness in Euripides'Bacchae and Soyinka's The Bacchae of Euripides   Both Euripides and Wole Soyinka are focused on a fundamental ethical imperative in their plays: welcome the stranger into your midst. Acceptance of Dionysus as a god, as "an essence that will not exclude or be excluded", is stressed (Soyinka 1). Pentheus is punished severely for excluding, for refusing to acknowledge or submit to, Dionysus' divine authority. In order to carve out a place for himself (in the pantheon, in the minds of the people), Dionysus' divinity manifests itself in an overtly political manner: its effect on those who worship him....   [tags: Euripides Bacchae Essays]
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793 words
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Representation of Society in Euripides' Medea - Representation of Society in Euripides' Medea During the time of Euripides, approximately the second half of the fifth century B.C., it was a period of immense cultural crisis and political convulsion (Arrowsmith 350). Euripides, like many other of his contemporaries, used the whole machinery of the theater as a way of thinking about their world (Arrowsmith 349). His interest in particular was the analysis of culture and relationship between culture and the individual. Euripides used his characters as a function to shape the ideas of the play (Arrowsmith 359)....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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533 words
(1.5 pages)
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Essay on the Gods in Euripides' Medea - Antigone Medea has just killed four people which are Creon the king of Corinth, the princess whom Jason is in love with, and her two little children. Jason then prays to gods, especially Zeus, father of all gods, to punish Medea for her crimes. From the context of the quote, the chorus is addressing the audience about the unexpected and unbelievable end of the play. Medea then gets away to Athens with a chariot lent to her by Helios, the sun god and her grandfather. Euripides always uses this kind of conclusion to end most of his works....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 567 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Role of Chorus in Euripides' Medea - The Role of Chorus in Medea In section 18 of the Poetics Aristotle criticizes Euripides for not allowing "the chorus to be one of the actors and to be a part of the whole and to share in the dramatic action, . . . as in Sophocles." Aristotle may be thinking of the embolima of Euripides' later plays (satirized also by Aristophanes), but he is certainly wrong about the Medea. Its choral odes are not only all intimately related to the action but are also essential for the meaning of the play, particularly because here, as elsewhere (e.g....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Love and Deception in Medea, by Euripides - Love and Deception in Medea, by Euripides There are many pieces of literature that may entail more than one theme throughout the story. The tragedy, Medea, by Euripides is very good example of this. Throughout this story, the themes of betrayal and love, revenge, and women’s rights arise. Euripides brings these points up to help the reader to realize that women are powerful.      Betrayal is a very important theme throughout this story. Her husband Jason betrays Medea, when he abandons her and her children for another woman....   [tags: Euripides Medea Grrek] 515 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Representation of Femininity in Euripides? Medea - The Representation of Femininity in Euripides' Medea Works Cited Not At the time Euripides wrote Medea, Ancient Greece was a patriarchal society: women had little or no rights, and were treated as the weaker sex. Women were expected to stay at home and bear and care for their children, while men went to work ?wives to produce true-born children and to be trustworthy guardians of the household. (Resource Book 3, D5b . Demosthenes 59.122). Men made the rules, while women were expected to be passive and weak, and were thought to be ?silly creatures....   [tags: Portrayal Women Euripides' Medea] 754 words
(2.2 pages)
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A Close Reading of Euripides' Medea - A Close Reading of Medea Medea's first public statement, a sort of "protest speech," is one of the best parts of the play and demonstrates a complex, at times even contradictory, representation of gender. Medea's calm and reasoning tone, especially after her following out bursts of despair and hatred, provides the first display of her ability to gather herself together in the middle of crisis and pursue her hidden agenda with a great determination. This split in her personality is to a certain degree gender bias....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 650 words
(1.9 pages)
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Gender Roles in Euripides' Medea - In Euripides' Medea, the protagonist abandoned the gender roles of ancient Greek society. Medea defied perceptions of gender by exhibiting both "male" and "female" tendencies. She was able to detach herself from her "womanly" emotions at times and perform acts that society did not see women capable of doing. However, Medea did not fully abandon her role as a woman and did express many female emotions throughout the play. In ancient Greek society, murder was not commonly associated with women. Throughout the play, however, Medea committed several acts of murder....   [tags: Euripides essays research papers]
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771 words
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Medea: Euripides' Tragic Hero - The rhetorical devices that Euripides uses throughout Medea allow Medea to become the poem's tragic hero. For Medea is not only a woman but also a foreigner, which makes her a member of two groups in Athenian society who had nearly no rights. Thus, the Athenian audience would have automatically aligned their sympathies with Jason instead Medea, and Medea would have been labeled the villain from the start. This would have negated Euripides' literary cause and given the play little dramatic merit....   [tags: Medea Euripides essays]
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1457 words
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Justice in Euripides' Medea - Justice in Euripides' Medea How do we define reason as just. When asked this question, it really makes you begin to wonder how to depict what one might think is just. In the story of Medea, reason is what drives many of the characters actions. For example, the reason that Jason leaves Medea for Creon's daughter is for his own benefit. Is that just. Medea then kills Creon and his daughter for revenge against Jason. Is that just?. Throughout the whole story, you are torn with emotions between the characters....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 434 words
(1.2 pages)
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The Wicked Character Medea in Euripides' Medea - The Wicked Character Medea in Euripides' Medea The character Medea is disliked by many that read Euripides' Medea. She is not really given much of a chance. It is difficult to read the tragedy without having negative feelings towards the main character. Some readers are content to just hate Medea, while others want to know what would compel a mother to come to be able to commit these crimes. Sara Warner writes, "Transgression must be built into any system in order for it to survive. For example, patriarchy, for lack of a better word, could not and would not exist if it simply operated on the brutal oppression and domination of the female sex" (Warner p....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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727 words
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Strategic Use of Dialogue in Euripides' Medea - Strategic Use of Dialogue in Euripides' Medea Euripides employs the technique of dialogue between two solo actors on stage throughout Medea to dramatize the core values underlying these conversations. In particular, through the conversations that Medea holds with three different males, she shows herself to be a person of great intellect. Females were rarely valued for their intelligence because the Athenians had a "complacent pride in the superiority of the Greek masculinity" (page 641 ). Men and women were considered to have very different roles in society with men being the far superior species....   [tags: Medea Euripides Essays] 1399 words
(4 pages)
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Medea, by Euripides - Constructing Medea’s Compelling Persona - Medea, by Euripides - Constructing Medea’s Compelling Persona In the play Medea, by Euripides, many techniques are incorporated to augment the compelling persona of the protagonist, Medea. She has an overpowering presence, which is fashioned through the use of imagery, offstage action and language. Dramatic suspense, employment of the chorus and Deus Ex Machina also serve to enhance the intense persona assumed by Medea. Medea is frequently associated with images of violence and rage. “She’s wild....   [tags: Medea Euripides] 1192 words
(3.4 pages)
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The Evil Character Medea in Euripides' Medea - The Evil Character Medea in Euripides' Medea Euripides created a two-headed character in this classical tragedy. Medea begins her marriage as the ideal loving wife who sacrificed much for her husband's safety. At the peak of the reading, she becomes a murderous villain that demands respect and even some sympathy. By the end, the husband and wife are left devoid of love and purpose as the tragedy closes. In Medea, a woman betrays her homeland because of her love for a man. Jason is the husband that she ferociously loves and makes sacrifices for....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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579 words
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The Character Medea's Revenge in Euripides' Medea - The Character Medea's Revenge in Euripides' Medea Medea is a tragedy of a woman who feels that her husband has betrayed her with another woman and the jealousy that consumes her. She is the protagonist who arouses sympathy and admiration because of how her desperate situation is. I thought I was going to feel sorry for Medea, but that quickly changed as soon as I saw her true colors. I understand that her emotions were all over the place. First, she was angry, then cold and conniving. The lower she sinks the more terrible revenge she wants to reap on Jason....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays] 757 words
(2.2 pages)
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Euripides' Medea - Euripides' Medea Medea is the tragic tale of a woman scorned. It was written in 431 B.C. by the Greek playwright, Euripides. Eruipides was the first Greek poet to suffer the fate of so many of the great modern writers: rejected by most of his contemporaries (he rarely won first prize and was the favorite target for the scurrilous humor of the comic poets), he was universally admired and revered by the Greeks of the centuries that followed his death('Norton Anthology';). Euripides showed his interest in psychology in his many understanding portraits of women ('World Book';)....   [tags: Medea Euripides Essays] 1034 words
(3 pages)
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Women in Euripides' Alcestis, Medea, Andromache, and Bacchae - Euripides portrayal of women in his plays has been somewhat bizarre. His female characters kill out of revenge, kill out of jealousy and kill because a god possessed them too. In Alcestis and Andromache Euripides does produce classic heroic female characters. The women in Medea and The Bacchae are not your typical heroines but serve to show the same theme of female liberation as the women in Alcestis and Andromache. While Alcestis is straight forward with its message, the other three plays mask their true intentions from the people they are created to oppose....   [tags: Females Euripides Plays] 2893 words
(8.3 pages)
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Loyal Disobedience - A Social Tract of Euripides in Medea and Helen - Loyal Disobedience-A Social Tract of Euripides       In ancient Greece the females were considered to be conniving and deceiving whisperers, and men almost never trusted their wives.  The ideal woman was an obedient and placating wife.  They believed that the female should be strong but still yield to the power of the male in charge, whether it was older brother, father, or husband.  Euripides often used females in uncommon ways; he did not simply show them as complacent animals.  Women in Euripides' plays were used for social commentary.  They were not just simple characters; they could be both agathos and kakos.  The females in the works of Euripides were extremely strong and devious an...   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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1753 words
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Jason Brings His Own Downfall in Medea, a play by Euripides - In Medea, a play by Euripides, Jason possesses many traits that lead to his downfall. After Medea assists Jason in his quest to get the Golden Fleece, killing her brother and disgracing her father and her native land in the process, Jason finds a new bride despite swearing an oath of fidelity to Medea. Medea is devastated when she finds out that Jason left her for another woman after two children and now wants to banish her. Medea plots revenge on Jason after he gives her one day to leave. Medea later acts peculiarly as a subservient woman to Jason who is oblivious to the evil that will be unleashed and lets the children remain in Corinth....   [tags: Medea Euripides] 783 words
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Medea as Woman, Hero and God in Euripides' Play - Medea as Woman, Hero and God In Euripides' play the title role and focus of the play is the foreign witch Medea. Treated differently through the play by different people and at different times, she adapts and changes her character, finally triumphing over her hated husband Jason. She can feasibly be seen as a mortal woman, Aristotle's tragic hero figure and even as an exulted goddess. Medea's identity as a weak woman is emphasised at the very start of the play. It is made very clear that she has come to misfortune through no fault of her own and is powerless in her problem ("her world has turned to enmity")....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
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2136 words
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Euripides' Medea - Euripides' Medea I see Medea as a woman who took a chance and stood up for herself. The kind of behavior that Medea displays was very rare for these times: she doesn?t accept the dramatic change in her life; she does something about it. On the other hand, Medea becomes so obsessed she loses herself to revenge. Medea is only heroic to an extent. Medea?s thirst for revenge begins when she finds out about her husbands unfaithfulness. Medea?s husband Jason decides to marry the princess Glauce to establish a position of power in Corinth....   [tags: Papers Medea Euripides Essays Papers] 761 words
(2.2 pages)
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Pages 20 through 25 of Bacchae by Euripides - Pages 20 through 25 of Bacchae by Euripides The reason that Bacchae by Euripides was chosen as a set text to be examined on is because it is a classic ancient Greek performance. It offers us a look at how the Greeks lived in a completely different culture to ours. It also shows us how important religion was to them and how they worshipped different gods to us; it is very interesting because this is how theatre started off in ancient Greece. From choosing a piece of drama this old, we can see how our theatre today has developed from previous ideas and techniques....   [tags: Bacchae Euripides Greek Plays Essays] 1580 words
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Incest In "Mourning Becomes Electra" - Eugene O'Neill, an American play writer, is the author of Mourning becomes Electra, one of the most controversial plays in American history. O'Neill had been happily married at one time, but his marriage fell apart and it ended in divorce. During this time, O'Neill became enthralled with the psychoanalytical view on life, which continued to haunt him for most of his life. After the divorce, O'Neill remarried, but was still fascinated with psychoanalytical views. His obsession with such views became bluntly palpable with the publication of Mourning Becomes Electra, where he "compasses the Oedipus complex, the Electra complex, female sexuality, penis envy, castration anxiety, the uncanny, and...   [tags: Literary Analysis ] 1311 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Bacchae by Euripides - One of the most well-known pieces of Greek tragedy is Euripides’s The Bacchae, a tale which chronicles the life and ultimate revenge that the Greek god Dionysus would take out upon his mortal family. Through this tale Dionysus can be viewed in multiple lights. He varied his appearance from that of a great leader, to that of a master of the great art of manipulation. With that said, no image was grander than how he showed that the great Greek gods are not known for being forgiving creatures. Dionysus proved this by being utterly brutal and relentless....   [tags: acient Greek tragedies] 837 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Importance of the Role That the Chorus Plays in Euripedes’ Medea - The Importance of the Role That the Chorus Plays in Euripedes’ Medea The Chorus is very much an important part of Euripedes’ Medea, and indeed many other works written in the ancient Greek style. In this play, it follows the journey Medea makes, and not only narrates, but commentates on what is happening. Euripedes uses the Chorus as a literary device to raise certain issues, and to influence where the sympathies of the audience lie. In the list of characters at the beginning of the play, the Chorus is stated to be a chorus of Corinthian Women....   [tags: Euripedes Medea] 1154 words
(3.3 pages)
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Electra by Sophocles: Chrysothemis The Forgotten Sister - In the story of Electra, Chrysothemis “is in many ways the invisible woman” (Choate 183). As stated by Amber Jacobs, “her name has been committed to our mythical corpus, yet with a seeming insignificance” (Jacobs 179). Sophocles is the only Greek playwright who mentions her in his version of Electra’s tale. As the tale goes, Chrysothemis was viewed as the obedient daughter, and in an effort to uphold the story of Electra as well as the social norms of the time, Sophocles depicts Chrysothemis as the perfect daughter — dainty, modest, and obedient....   [tags: freedom, obedience, hero]
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1129 words
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Satire in the Tragedies of Euripides - The world of Euripides' tragedies was one that espoused ancient ideas of religion. The belief in ancient legends that formed subject material for the tragic drama had passed. The crowd that attended the theater at this time did so as a sort of religious celebration. It was under these circumstances that Euripides had to bury what might have been his true beliefs, and instead replace them with ideas that would relate to his audience. This did not mean that Euripides had to forgo his beliefs entirely....   [tags: Ancient Beliefs, Human Nature]
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Medea and Other Plays by Euripides - A hero is person who is willing to sacrifice themselves for the betterment of society. In contrast to a hero, a villain is a person who inflicts harm upon society for their own sake. In Euripides’ play “Medea”, Medea is a character that fits into the characteristics of a villain. After her husband Jason betrays her, Medea undergoes a transformation from a helpless woman to a sadistic killer. Though she does display a positive role upon society with her fight against male dominance, Medea is a true villain with her ability to manipulate people and her thirst for vengeance....   [tags: hero, gods]
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1248 words
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Analysis of Medea by Euripides - Marriage – the amalgamation of two imperfect souls to form an affectionate and beautiful relationship – is exceptionally intricate and delicate. Two different people with different insights come together to form a harmonious relationship. Power, or control, is a chief concept that can “make or break” the relationship. Distribution of the ruling is frequently divided into males versus females. This partition leads to many conflicts and tribulations. In the catastrophic Greek play Medea, by Euripides, the liaison between Medea and Jason demonstrates how both males and females assert power in the relationship and how incorrect usage of this supremacy leads to dilemmas....   [tags: Greek Play, Play Analysis, Marriage Dominance] 764 words
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Gender Roles in Medea by Euripides - Centuries of traditions has enabled men and women to define gender roles in society. Although some critics declare gender roles do not exist today, others believe they do. In society, men and women are defined by gender roles throughout their activities and emotions. A doctor is typically portrayed by a male while women rear the children and cook for the men. However, although still in existence, today these roles are less obvious but tend to have similar meaning when compared to the past. In ancient Greece, women suffered great hardships....   [tags: Gender Roles in Greek Society] 1283 words
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Sophocles´ Antigone and Euripides´ The Bacchae - Sophocles’ Antigone and Euripides’ The Bacchae are indubitably plays of antitheses and conflicts, and this condition is personified in the manifestation of their characters, each completely opposed to the other. Both tragedians reveal tensions between two permanent and irreconcilable moral codes; divine law represented by Antigone and Dionysus and human law represented by Creon and Pentheus. The central purpose is evidently the association of law which has its consent in political authority and the law which has its consent in the private conscience, the association of obligations imposed on human beings as citizens and members of state, and the obligations imposed on them in the home as mem...   [tags: conflicts, divine law, nature law] 1058 words
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The Decision in Medea by Euripides - In life much of our future rest upon our decisions. These decisions come in all different shapes and sizes, and some have the potential to thrive our futures into greatness, while others can destroy our lives to the point of no return. In the play Medea, by Euripides he provides his audience with a dramatic story of a woman who will stop at nothing, to reach her goals of revenge. In Medea there are many significant decisions made throughout the story. The decision by Medea to let her desire for revenge rule her life, I believe is the most important....   [tags: revenage, tragedy, destruction] 972 words
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Medea by Euripides: A Woman Scorned - ... This injustice seems exceptionally hard for Medea to accept as bearing children and playing a complacent wife are not Medea’s idea of a good time. She declares that she would “rather stand three times in the battlefield than bear one child.” (785, 228-229) By her vocal protestations Medea is going against the boundaries that patriarchal Greece adheres to. She is loudly condemning Jason and the royal house, something that would not come without consequence at the time. After Medea bemoans her situation to the women of Corinth, the Chorus readily agrees with Medea that she is well within her rights to seek revenge on Jason for what he has done to her....   [tags: human condition, struggle] 1322 words
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Athenian Tragedy, Hekabe by Euripides - Today, I went to the theater and saw the play Hekabe by the playwright Euripides. I very much enjoy going to watch plays because the playwright can script the production with a different perspective that is sometimes not an agreeable one in regards to how things are done governmentally here in Athens. Although impermissible scenes were in this tragedy, it is nice to grasp a political outlook that I am not normally able to bring with me to any assemblies concerning battle. Euripides writes about extreme mourning for a loved one lost because of war....   [tags: death, hero, war]
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Understanding the Oedipal and Electra Complex - Understanding the Oedipal and Electra Complex Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic theory on human sexuality introduces the Oedipal and Electra complexes as a psychological approach in understanding the origins of sexual orientation. Most people disagree with his theory and throw out the concept of the Oedipal and Electra conflicts altogether. This is because many are misinformed about the subject or do not completely understand it. Both the Oedipal and Electra complex play a vital role in the psychoanalysis of human behavior and appear in myths, fairy tales, and contemporary films....   [tags: Papers] 643 words
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Electra - The House of Mannon Eugene O’Neill’s Mourning Becomes Electra is a play of revenge, sacrifice, and murder conveyed through visible references to Aeschylus’ House of Atreus. O’Neill alludes to The House of Atreus in order to ground the play; attaching the plot to well-known aspects of history. As well, it brings a certain significance that otherwise would be neglected if their underlying manifestations went unnoticed. The most prominent of these allusions is that to Aeschylus’ House of Atreus. O’Neill specifically modeled Mourning around Aeschylus’ work, modernizing it, applying it to a new generation of readers....   [tags: essays research papers] 1351 words
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Medea Written by Euripides - ... Once Jason won the fleece, she ran away with him overseas. Jason provided Medea with a home in Hellas, a civil land (Ancient History). This land was foreign to her because her homeland was barbarian, men didn’t have justice, and ruling was dealt with an iron fist. Jason uses his upcoming marriage as a way to protect Medea and their children and make life more comfortable (Ancient History). Medea was madly in love with him for she did anything he asked, such as making his father young again using her powers (Galileo)....   [tags: jason and medea´s marriage] 1004 words
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Oedipal and Electra Complexes - Oedipal and Electra Complexes In Rebecca female sexuality is explored through the heroine’s symbolic development of a negative Oedipal complex followed by an Electra complex. Although avoidance of incest was believed by Freud to be the impetus for normal sexual development, the film explores the abnormal outcome of a negative Oedipal/Electra complex, i.e. replacement of the mother by the daughter as the father’s heterosexual love interest. The heroine is torn between her desire to merge with Rebecca and to separate from her due to this combination of negative Oedipal and Electra complexes....   [tags: Sexuality Heroine Freud Psychology Essays] 1138 words
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The Role of Minor Characters in Medea by Euripides - ... Despite the children’s fundamental role in the play, they are rarely seen on the stage and have very few lines. This may be due to the fact that children are very hard to control on stage, in most cases they simply do not have the level of discipline required to act. Euripides makes up for this by manifesting the presence of the children by always referring to them through other characters. All of these minor characters encourage sympathy from the audience. The Chorus portrays their compassion towards Medea as they say, “I heard her voice, I heard that unhappy woman from Colchis” (p.21), they chiefly portray the extreme sadness and discontent which Medea experiences and the extent of pas...   [tags: empathy, women, slaves, classes] 1262 words
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A Comparison of Vengeance in Electra, The Bacchae and Frankenstein - Vengeance in Electra, The Bacchae and Frankenstein      In today's world, vengeance is still in existence, bubbling below our calm facade, waiting for the catalyst it needs to break loose. Evidence can be seen right now in the reactions of the American people towards Bin Laden. He destroyed so many lives, and now, there is probably not one American that would not love to get their minute alone with him. The American people want to hurt him the way he and his followers hurt their fellow Americans, their family....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Delineating the Role of Women in Euripides' Medea - ... Medea accomplished that by giving birth to two children for Jason. As the play slowly unraveled, it plainly displayed that she was faithful towards her husband, but being an ideal Greek wife was not her factual nature. She was independent and her qualities made her different from the Corinth women. In the opening sequence, the nurse introduced Medea as a frightening woman when someone wronged her. “Her temperaments are dangerous and will not tolerate bad treatment. For she is fearsome. No one who joins in conflict with her will celebrate an easy victory”, the nurse presented (page 2, line)....   [tags: greek, betrayal, revenge]
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Comparing the Themes of Vincenzio Bellini’s Norma and Euripedes' Medea - Comparing the Themes of Vincenzio Bellini’s Norma and Euripedes' Medea Vincenzio Bellini’s opera Norma is considered by many to be a reworking of Euripedes' classic Greek tragedy Medea. Both plots have many identical elements of Greek tragedy such as a chorus, unity of location, and a human decision and action culminating in tragedy. Richard Wagner greatly admired Greek tragedies, believing them to be “The highest point ever reached in human creative achievement…” (Wagner 1). In his essay Theories of Art, Wagner gives five reasons for this “artistic perfection:” 1....   [tags: Vincenzio Bellini Norma Euripedes Medea]
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Life of Euripides - Life of Euripides Euripides, the last of the great tragedians, lived a life filled with controversy and moral issues that influenced, as well as appalled, many people of his time. Throughout the centuries he has gained more acceptance in the literary circles as well as in the eyes of the public. It is difficult to write about his life only because he lived so long ago and there are many different opinions and theories as to what is factual and what is not. What is known about his life, and how he lived it, has remained an interesting topic....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays] 922 words
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The Role of Vengeance in Euripides’ Medea and Bacchae - Medea and Agaue, the tragic heroes of Euripides’ Medea and Bacchae, represent similar ideas. For both plays, the plot focuses on those two characters’ attainment of vengeance, so that their desire for a form of retribution is the primary driving force behind the plays’ conflicts. In each case, the revenges taken by Medea and Agaue are the results of their acting on their most basic, instinctual emotions without the self-control given by a more reasoned nature. Accordingly, the women and their pursuit of revenge become representative of the emotional side of human thinking....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Greek tragedy] 1943 words
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Comparing the Tragic Heroes in Medea by Euripides - The play Medea is written by Euripides, and it mainly centers on the action of tragic heroes and their lives as they unfold into a state of conflict. The main beginning of the play starts with conflict itself, where the main character Jason, has abandoned his wife Medea, as well as the two children. He basically wants to marry the daughter of Creon, who is the king of Corinth. Her name is Glauce. These are the parties who are the central characters of the play and the plan unfolds into their lives, as well as how the two characters of Jason and Medea turn out to be tragic heroes....   [tags: conflict, love, murder]
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Evaluation of Euripides - Evaluation of Euripides Euripides has met the conventions of Attic Tragedy up to a particular extent. Although he was often criticised for his work, he followed the structure and cycles of the traditional tragedy. However, his stance on the themes and ideas set him apart from the other writers. It is unreasonable to compare Euripides with the traditional writers of Attic tragedy without understanding his attitude and the reason for this attitude....   [tags: Papers] 945 words
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The Medea by Euripedes - During 431 B.C., Greek poet and writer Euripedes introduces his short play "The Medea," focuses mainly on the negative portrayal of women; the questioning of traditional mortality; and the role of a foreigner indifferent to conventional aspects of a new land. Within ancient Greek society, women were portrayed in the eyes of a male-predominated society in a unsubstantial role. Women were displaced in the gender system to a form of injustice that had developed against them. Greek society had disdain for their women, which is strongly represented in other ancient Greek poetry, writers and work of literature....   [tags: ancient Greek tragedy]
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Artistic Theme of The Bacchae of Euripides - My artistic theme is about the play “The Bacchae of Euripides” and how the god Dionysusis irrational behavior is in accord with that of Alcibiades in Plato’s Symposium. In both books the above named character’s behavior was reactive to their situations rather than proactive. In the Symposium, Alcibiade’s unrequited love, or rather lust for Socrates drives him to make a fool of himself at the “dinner party”. During his speech Alcibiades speaks of Socrates as if he were a superior being; he has a special hold or power over emotions of others....   [tags: essays research papers] 460 words
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Medea as a Heroine in Euripides - Medea as a Heroine in Euripides In Euripides' Medea, the main character of the same name is a controversial heroine. Medea takes whatever steps necessary to achieve what she believes is right and fair. She lived in a time when women were expected to sit in the shadows and take the hand that life dealt them without a blink of their eye. Medea took very radical steps to liberate herself and destroys the life of the man who ruined hers. She refused to accept the boundaries that a patriarchal society set upon her....   [tags: Papers] 344 words
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Women, Outsider and Barbarian in The Play Medea by Euripides - Personal Development, one of the core values at Saint Leo University, plays an important role in students’ daily lives. From the moment you step foot on campus to the day you graduate, you automatically become a different person. As a first year student, you are entering a new life and not knowing what to expect. Once you are in college, it is the start of a new chapter. You will become more mature and all the obstacles that you will go through will make you a different person. In order to have a successful Undergraduate experience, it is crucial to have a balance between personal life and school....   [tags: wrong relationship, magic tricks]
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Repression of Women in Euripides' The Bacchae - Repression of Women in Euripides' The Bacchae      Many different interpretations can be derived from themes in Euripides's The Bacchae, most of which assume that, in order to punish the women of Thebes for their impudence, the god Dionysus drove them mad. However, there is evidence to believe that another factor played into this confrontation. Because of the trend of male dominance in Greek society, women suffered in oppression and bore a social stigma which led to their own vulnerability in becoming Dionysus's target....   [tags: Feminism Women Criticism Bacchae Essays]
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Pentheus's Death in "Bacchae" by Euripides - "Bacchae", by Euripides, talks about Dionysus (also called Bromius, Bacchus, or Evius), son of Zeus and a mortal woman, Semele, who came back to his homeland of Thebes to show everyone that he was a real god. His mother was killed while giving birth to him and her sisters spread rumors that she lied about her pregnancy. Therefore his family does not know about his existence. Dionysus's cousin Pentheus was not convinced that he was god and argued with him in spite of everyone around telling him to stop fighting with Dionysus....   [tags: World Literature] 354 words
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The Character of Medea in Euripides - The Character of Medea in Euripides Medea was a very diverse character who possesses several characteristics which were unlike the average woman during her time. As a result of these characteristics she was treated differently by members of the society. Media was a different woman for several reasons; she possessed super natural powers , she was manipulative, vindictive, and she was driven by revenge. The life that Medea lived and the situations she encountered, (one could say) were partly responsible for these characteristics and her actions....   [tags: Papers] 368 words
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Comparing Revenge in Aeschylus' The Oresteia Trilogy and Sophocles' Electra - Revenge in Aeschylus' The Oresteia Trilogy and Sophocles' Electra   The act of revenge in classical Greek plays and society is a complex issue with unavoidable consequences. In certain instances, it is a more paramount concern than familial ties. When a family member is murdered another family member is expected to seek out and administer revenge. If all parties involved are of the same blood, the revenge is eventually going to wipe out the family. Both Aeschylus, through "The Oresteia Trilogy," and Sophocles, through "Electra," attempt to show the Athenians that revenge is a just act that at times must have no limits on its reach....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 843 words
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Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis - Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis There are obviously many obligations at hand in Iphigenia at Aulis. The one however that widely catches my attention is Iphigenia’s ending decision to accept her fate. Iphigenia’s fate of death is a sacrifice that her father Agamemnon has to uphold to his brother Menelaus. Agamemnon like any father would not willingly offer his child as a sacrifice, however he does so because of his “commander-in-chief” position and the oath he took on behalf of Menelaus. There are similarities and differences to Agamemnon and Iphigenia’s fate....   [tags: essays research papers] 483 words
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Setting of South Sea Islands in Mourning Becomes Electra - The South Sea Islands The carefree islands of the South Sea are a most desirable locale for a vacation or honeymoon. In the play Mourning Becomes Electra, by Eugene O'Neill, the islands are a place where sex is not seen as a sin and people live life freely, as nature intended people to do so. This play was written in a setting where such actions were frowned upon. It was also these islands where escaping to them with Christine Mannon, was a goal never achieved by two men, both who met a painful, vain death....   [tags: Eugene O'Neill] 1902 words
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Freudian Concepts in Stephenie Meyer's Twilight - In this essay I will apply some concepts of Sigmund Freud in Twilight by Stephenie Meyer. First I will discuss about Oedipus complex,which consists in the son’s desire to possess his mother and to be closely aligned to her.This idea derived from Oedip,who killed his father and married his mother. This concept I will apply to Edward Cullen,whose mother died before he became a vampire,because of Spanish influenza.He is tormented by the ideea that she left him so quickly,and Edward Cullen lost his fulcrum and his center of life.He can’t take any sexual relationship with Bella because of this unresolved feelings toward his mother,which were transfered in the vampirehood.Edward Cullen suffers a m...   [tags: Oedip complex and Electra complex]
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Play: The Clouds - In Clouds and Electra, Aristophanes and Euripides distinguish the evolution of maturity in Strepsiades, Orestes and Electra through each character’s response to preexisting misfortunes and the methods by which they acquire their education. While intertwining suffering and maturity develops each of these characters, not each character receives their education by means of suffering. Strepsiades receives his education through repeatedly failing to escape debts, Orestes receives his education by killing his father’s murderer and Electra acquires her education through continuous suffering....   [tags: Character Analysis, Learning]
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Euripides Support of Women’s Rights - Euripides Support of Women’s Rights       One can hardly deny that in Euripides’ plays women are often portrayed as weak, uncertain, and torn between what they must do and what they can bring themselves to do.  Other women appear to be the root of grave evils, or simply perpetrators of heinous crimes.  In a day when analysis of characters and plot had yet to be invented, it is easy to see why he might have been thought to be very much against women.  However, when looking back with current understanding of what Euripides was doing at the time, armed with knowledge of plot devices and Socratic philosophy, this argument simply does not hold up.  In fact, a very strong argument can be made t...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Christ of the Holy Bible and Dionysus of Euripides - Christ of the Holy Bible and Dionysus of Euripides   Christ resembles Dionysus in many ways. Is it possible that Christ is simply an extension of the Dionysian myth. Though the concepts of wine and faith unite the two, the idea of revenge compared to self-sacrifice separates the two deities. Dionysus fits the Greek understanding of vengeful and selfish God that bear more anthropomorphic traits than Godly traits. Christ, however, transcends human desires for revenge and acts in self-sacrifice....   [tags: Comparison compare contrast essays]
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