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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Emily Dickinson Loaded Gun"
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Emotion in Emily Dickinson's “My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun” - This poem was written by American poet, Emily Dickinson, who was born in the 1800. This was the period where art was based on emotion; the “Romantic Period”. She was also born in the Victorian Era, where women had to be shackled to their pedestals and most had to be married by age eighteen. They were not allowed to vote, or earn money. This information should help the reader better understand the poem. When writing the poem “My Life had stood—a Loaded Gun” Dickinson thought of what format to use to express her emotions; Quatrain (four verses)....   [tags: My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun, Emily Dickinson,]
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1101 words
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An Explication of Emily Dickinson's Loaded Gun - An Explication of Emily Dickinson's "Loaded Gun" Emily Dickinson's poem "My Life had stood-a Loaded Gun-" is a powerful statement of the speaker's choice to forego the accepted roles of her time and embrace a taboo existence, a life open only to men. The speaker does so wholeheartedly and without reservation, with any and all necessary force, exulting in her decision. She speaks with great power and passion, tolerating no interference, and wills herself to maintain this choice for her entire life....   [tags: Dickinson Loaded Gun Essays] 919 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Use of Compression in My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun by Emily Dickinson - The Use of Compression in My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun by Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson is quoted as writing to Samuel Bowles that "the old words are numb—and there a'nt any new ones" (4). This absence of variety in Dickinson's life urged her to redefine the words that already existed by creating more or less of an emphasis on certain words. She achieved this effect by omitting key words and dislocating punctuation in a sentence and therefore giving new meaning to them. In her poem My Life had stood—a Loaded Gun--, her use of compression gives more force to each fragmented sentence, breaking it up into almost metaphoric terms of the components of the gun itself....   [tags: My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun] 1016 words
(2.9 pages)
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My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun by Emily Dickinson - My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun by Emily Dickinson Today, few would deny that Emily Dickinson is an important figure in American literature. The numerous ways to interpret her poetry draws more and more readers into her publications. It's as if everyone could interpret Dickinson's poems into his or her personal life; seeing the poems the way they want to see it. This is the effect "flexible" poems have on people. In Dickinson's "My Life Had Stood—A Loaded Gun", I interpreted the poem literally, thinking the poem was really about a gun and the relationship with its owner....   [tags: My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun] 813 words
(2.3 pages)
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My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun by Emily Dickinson - Emily Dickinson: Insight into Her Works As Vincent Van Gogh once said, “If one is a master of one thing and understands one thing well, one has at the same time, insight into and understanding of many things.” Grippingly, this seems to be the case with a famous poet known as Emily Dickinson, since her passion for poetry led to her gaining insight into many topics. Born on December 10, 1830, in Amherst, Massachusetts, Emily Dickinson went on to drop out of school and live the rest of her days at home with her family....   [tags: metaphor, poem, criticism]
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1566 words
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Loaded Gun Symbolism Depicted in Emily Dickinson's Poem, 754 - In the beginning of Emily Dickinson’s poem “754,” the narrator immediately compares her life to a weapon, “My Life had stood -- a Loaded Gun --” (754). Usually, when one thinks of a gun, he or she might think of death instead of love. In most cases, when a person owns or has a possession of a gun, that person might use the gun for protection. A gun is an inanimate object that has the potential or power to take the life of a human. From analyzing the poem “754,” the narrator symbolizes a loaded gun, full of potential, full of power, waiting to be in the possession of its owner for protection just as a bride waits to be wedded by her husband....   [tags: 754, poetry] 2006 words
(5.7 pages)
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Emily Dickinson's My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun - ... In the fifth section, the gun comes to the peak of her power and sounds like she has autonomous agency, or as Vendler describes it, the gun takes a “grammatically independent action” (319). The speaker says that “I lay a Yellow Eye” as if she is doing something on her own. However, guns cannot kill people; they cannot pull their own trigger. In this gun/master metaphor, the wife/gun is an object entirely reliant on other people to give direction and purpose in her existence. Therefore, the action is only seemingly independent and is perhaps a sign a wishful thinking on the gun/wife's part to not view herself as dependent....   [tags: metaphorical objectification]
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967 words
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Emily Dickinson's Poem, My Life had stood---a Loaded Gun--- - There are dangers and risks if you are a woman and a poet. With a poetic voice comes a vast amount of power. The knowledge and power women gain from their craft can be dangerous. It is dangerous in terms of addiction, the inability to go back to a point when ignorance was available. There is a moment of recognition as a female poet who uses her words with effect, words that possess immense power, that despite this power, as a woman you are still incapable of controlling how your words will be directed....   [tags: male and female roles, poetry analysis] 1450 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Primary Literary Strategy in Emily Dickinson’s My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun - ... The gun is literally unable to express itself or act on its own because it is an inanimate object. By metaphorical extension, the poem is showing us how women are forced to become like inanimate objects, discouraged from expressing their desires, pleasure, will or power. Before the gun was “identified” and carried away by the hunter, it had waited in “corners” like a lonely wallflower (Estes). After the hunter “identified” it, he carried it away with him. This is like a young woman who waited until some man took notice of her and eventually swept her off her feet and carried her away as his bride....   [tags: women, power, desires, pleasures] 839 words
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Emily Dickinson's My Life Had Stood:A Loaded Gun - Emily Dickinson's My Life Had Stood:A Loaded Gun Emily Dickinson is a poet known for her cryptic, confusing language. Words are often put together in an unusual way and create deciphering difficulties for the reader. But behind all the confusion is a hidden meaning that becomes clear, and one realizes that all the odd word choices were chosen for a specific reason. The poem I will try to analyze is My Life Had Stood—A Loaded Gun, or number 754. I find this to be one of her most difficult poems to decode....   [tags: Literature Poetry Writers Papers] 2410 words
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Analysis of Dickinson's Poem, My Life had Stood a Loaded Gun" - “My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun” In the poem, “My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun,” published around 1863, Emily Dickinson effectively uses metaphorical language in making the speaker compare him/her self to a loaded gun. The speaker speaks as if he/she is a loaded gun waiting to expose their full potential. When reading this poem, one could definitely see religious connotations in that one cannot reach his/her full potential without The Master’s – God’s – help and direction. In “My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun,” the speaker speaks as if he/she is a loaded gun sitting in a corner until “The Owner” comes along and carries it away....   [tags: Poetry, Poem Analysis] 615 words
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A poem and a loaded gun - A Poem and a Loaded Gun The post civil war era was wrought with sexism and backwards thinking. Emily Dickinson was born in 1830, wrote 1800 poems in her lifetime. She has become known for unfolding the social boundaries surrounding women in this time period. Most of her life was shrouded in seclusion and mystery. In the realm of poetry, authors are creative with their usage of literary techniques in order to illustrate their point of view to the reader. Emily Dickinson is especially known for her precise diction, powerful imagery, and obscure timing or rhythm....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1105 words
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Uncovering Emily Dickinson - ... Undressing in the poem symbolizes metaphorically, the real Emily Dickinson, while the clothing symbolizes poetry itself. The speaker is actually the author of the poem. And he admires Dickinson’s privacy in the story while still metaphorically undressing her, due to the amount of respect he has for Dickinson. In an interview done by Collins he shows her respect for Dickinson. “She is iconic to serious readers of American poetry for two reasons," Collins tells Terry Gross. "One, the sheer, untouchable originality of her poems — to read her poems, it gives the feeling that no poems before her were written in English....   [tags: influential American poets] 616 words
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Emily Dickinson: Untitled, Unregulated, and Unchained - ... Most of Dickinson’s work relies heavily on the musical quality of her verse. One approach to organizing her poems was writing in the structure of the “fourteener”. This meter is the form of nursery rhymes, ballads, and church hymns. Ballads were originally used for storytelling, where the lyrics were set to music. When reading Dickinson’s poetry aloud, one can easily pick up on the rhythmic quality composing the images that tell the story. The provided example of Emily Dickinson’s poetry read aloud has no music, but the animation and gentle cadence of the speaker’s voice provide a melodic undertone for the story....   [tags: poet, life, nature, sexuality, identity] 940 words
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Bibliography Relation to Analysis of Emily Dickinson´s Writings - ... Additionally, Bouson expounds in depth many of Dickinson’s complex poetic techniques used in her poetic works. Some of the major themes in Dickinson’s After great pain, a formal feeling comes include the entities of identity and time. However, Dickinson does not used the typical techniques of time traditionally used, instead, she structured this poem by a “repetitive circulatory” sequence created by her lack of emotion (Bouson 151). As opposed to utilizing the conventional chromatic advance style, Dickinson devised a neoteric style of an ineffectual practice, known as repetitive circling....   [tags: Poetry, Literature] 2059 words
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The Life Of Emily Dickinson - The Life of Emily Dickinson Although she lived a seemingly secluded life, Emily Dickinson's many encounters with death influenced many of her poems and letters. Perhaps one of the most ground breaking and inventive poets in American history, Dickinson has become as well known for her bizarre and eccentric life as for her incredible poems and letters. Numbering over 1,700, her poems highlight the many moments in a 19th century New Englander woman's life, including the deaths of some of her most beloved friends and family, most of which occurred in a short period of time (Benfey 6-25)....   [tags: essays research papers] 803 words
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emily dickinson - Rip Biggs English 380 Powerful Weapon Emily Dickinson’s poem "My Life had stood—a Loaded Gun—" is a powerful statement of the speaker’s choice to forego the accepted roles of her time and embrace a taboo existence, a life open only to men. The speaker does so wholeheartedly and without reservation, with any and all necessary force, exulting in her decision. She speaks with great power and passion, tolerating no interference, and wills herself to maintain this choice for her entire life....   [tags: essays research papers] 720 words
(2.1 pages)
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Symbolic Images: The Poetry of Emily Dickinson - The poetry of the Imagists is short, simple, and quite literal in its meaning in order to create a vivid picture in the reader’s mind. When they describe an object, it means just what they say. A tree is a tree, a flower is a flower, and a bird is a bird. Imagists have little use for abstract words or ideas, and tend to shy away from them as much as possible. Emily Dickinson doesn’t fall under the same category as the Imagists, as she doesn’t use the same techniques as the Imagists. Dickinson’s poems center on very vivid images, with very different takes on them....   [tags: essays research papers] 1183 words
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Nature in the Works of Emily Dickinson - Nature is the most beautiful places for anyone to enjoy peace and stability in the human minds. Emily Dickinson is a naturalist poet that she wants the world to know that peace does exist in the human world and she wants to tell the world. Dickinson's poems are mostly written by "nature", "love", and "death" according to Anna Dunlap in her analysis. Dickinson's sister, Lavinia, is the one who published Dickinson's work, on her first attempt the editor that was responsible was taking her sweet time....   [tags: literary analysis, Emily Dickinson]
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1384 words
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Emily Dickinson's Faith and Daisy Miller by Henry James - American writers and poets of the 19th century created literature to criticize and detail the imperfections of society. Emily Dickinson, who retired from contact with the outside world by the age of twenty-three in favor of a life of isolation, can arguably be considered such a poet. Her untitled poem "Faith" can be interpreted as criticism of the masculine-dominated society of her time and supports themes in Henry James's work Daisy Miller: A Study, which also criticizes societal expectations and practices....   [tags: Henry James, Emily Dickinson] 1153 words
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Writing Techniques of Emily Dickinson - Emily Dickinson is one of the most interesting female poets of the nineteenth century. Every author has unique characteristics about him/her that make one poet different from another, but what cause Emily Dickinson to be so unique are not only the words she writes, but how she writes them. Her style of writing is in a category of its own. To understand how and why she writes the way she does, her background has to be brought into perspective. Every poet has inspiration, negative or positive, that contributes not only to the content of the writing itself, but the actual form of writing the author uses to express his/her personal talents....   [tags: Emily Dickinson]
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2099 words
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Identity and Ideology Beyond Death in Emily Dickinson's Poem “I Died for Beauty” - Emily Dickinson had a fascination with death and mortality throughout her life as a writer. She wrote many poems that discussed what it means not only to die, but to be dead. According to personal letters, Dickinson seems to have remained agnostic about the existence of life after death. In a letter written to Mrs. J. G. Holland, Emily implied that the presence of death alone is what makes people feel the need for heaven: “If roses had not faded, and frosts had never come, and one had not fallen here and there whom I could not waken, there were no need of other Heaven than the one below.” (Bianchi 83)....   [tags: identity, Emily Dickinson, ]
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Romanticism, Realism and Emily Dickinson - Romanticism, Realism and Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson wrote at the tail end of the Romantic period, and even though she was influenced by some of the ideals of Romanticism, is most commonly known as a writer from the Realist era. However, her writing embodies the defining characteristics that are identified with each of these periods. The main characteristic of Romanticism that Emily Dickinson portrays in her writing is the emphases of the importance of Nature to the Romantics. In most of her poems there is some mention or comparison to something found in Nature....   [tags: Romanticism Realism Emily Dickinson] 420 words
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The Poetry of Emily Dickinson - There are several important and interesting authors in the American Literature history to talk about in this paper. However, Emily Elizabeth Dickinson is one of the most fascinating authors that generates admiration by reading her life and poems. Even tough her poems were not completed and written on scraps of paper, she is considered one of the great geniuses of nineteenth-century American poetry. The main reason of this reputation is based on the fact that her poems are innovative. Her poetry is different because she uses different literacy aspects from her contemporary writers....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Essays]
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Emily Dickinson on the Addictive Process - Emily Dickinson on the Addictive Process Awareness of Emily Dickinson has grown and deepened over the course of the twentieth century such that the "delightful" andplatitude-laden verses, as they were initially viewed, have provento be rich, often ironic, highly complex explorations of one poet'ssubjectivity. Dickinson's poetry today challenges us to confrontaspects of our own inner processes in relation to psychologicalpain, death, the world and possible -- though not undoubted --transcendence of it, and frustrated desire, to name just a few ofthe themes....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Authors Writers Essays]
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Parallels between Emily Dickinson's "39" and the Biblical Book of Job - In one of my favorite poems by Emily Dickinson, ‘39’ or [49] published in 1858, she almost parallels the life of Job in the Bible who lost all he had, but because he was faithful all of his loss was restored; I like that there are so many ways to interpret the loss and blame in this very short poem; for example, her loss could be a loss of possession or a loss of a child because “in the sod” could refer to either to an actual plot of land with its crops and the possessions that would come with it or to burying deceased children; to be a beggar could mean that she is literally poor and landless, which would mean that she had no way to provide for herself, or that she had no children and praye...   [tags: Emily Dickinson, Job, Bible, poetry,] 527 words
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Pain and Sorrow in the Works of Emily Dickinson - Introduction Almost unknown as a poet in her lifetime, Emily Dickinson is now considered as one of the most mysterious and original American poets of 19th century for her innovation in rhythmic meters and creative use of metaphors. Her poems were rarely published in Russia because most of them had religious content (to express religious feelings was restricted in Russia for almost a century). However, some poems that I read impressed me at the first glance. Dickinson’s poems spoke powerfully to me about meaningful events in living....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry]
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Emily Dickinson's Use of Humor and Irony - Emily Dickinson's Use of Humor and Irony While much of Emily Dickinson's poetry has been described as sad or morose, the poetess did use humor and irony in many of her poems. This essay will address the humor and/ or irony found in five of Dickinson's poems: "Faith" is a Fine Invention, I'm Nobody. Who are you?, Some keep the Sabbath Going to Church and Success Is Counted Sweetest. The attempt will be made to show how Dickinson used humor and / or irony for the dual purposes of comic relief and to stress an idea or conclusion about her life and environment expressed by the poetess in the respective poem....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem Poetry] 1318 words
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Emily Dickinson - Her Life and Poetry - Emily Dickinson - Her Life and Poetry Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born December 10, 1830, into an influential family in Amherst, Massachusetts. Her father helped found Amherst College, where Emily later attended between 1840 and 1846. She never married and died in the house where she was born on May 15, 1886. Emily Dickinson’s reclusive life was arguably a result of her proposed bi-polar disorder. This life and disorder unduly influenced the themes of her poetry. She chose not to associate herself with society and volumes of her poems, published posthumously, examine this idea as well as the themes of nature and death....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry] 629 words
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Hope by Emily Dickinson - Hope by Emily Dickinson As a literary woman of the nineteenth century, Emily Dickinson wrote, . ?Hope. is a things with feathers- that perches in the soul- and sings a tune without the words- and never stops- at all.. Are you listening. Does your soul too sing a melody, an ongoing tune to which you delicately move, and never stop. Here Dickinson suggests an aspect of life, a struggle for spiritual freedom, that applies to many women within the nineteenth century, as well as the women of today. My consciousness speaks to me; a spark of hope rests inside my soul, hoping to emerge into the sunlight of each new day....   [tags: Papers Emily Dickinson Hope Essays]
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Emily Dickinson's Obsession with Death - Emily Dickinson's Obsession with Death Emily Dickinson became legendary for her preoccupation with death. All her poems contain stanzas focusing on loss or loneliness, but the most striking ones talk particularly about death, specifically her own death and her own afterlife. Her fascination with the morose gives her poems a rare quality, and gives us insight into a mind we know very little about. What we do know is that Dickinson’s father left her a small amount of money when she was young. This allowed her to spend her time writing and lamenting, instead of seeking out a husband or a profession....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry Poet Death Essays]
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Emily Dickinson's Works - Emily Dickinson's Works There is a life in Emily Dickinson’s poems, readers have found. Although one may not completely understand her as a legend, a writer, or as a part of literature books, she is considered one of America’s greatest poets. While unknown answers may not be revealed about her, secrets may not be told, nor any new discoveries made, evidence from books and articles showing Emily Dickinson’s experiences and hardships exists. Critic Paul J. Ferlazzo describes her writings: “Many students and casual readers of her poetry have enjoyed hearing tales about her which remind them of storybook heroines locked in castles, of beautiful maidens cruelty relegated to a life of drudgery...   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poet Essays]
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Emily Dickinson and Interpretations of Her Poetry - Emily Dickinson and Interpretations of Her Poetry During Emily Dickinson’s fifty-six years she was able to produce many complex poems that contained deeply hidden meanings. When I consider the life she lived, this is not surprising to me. She was not only talented, but she also was born into a family and time that would provide much of her inspiration. Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born into the Dickinson family on December 10, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts. Her parents, Edward and Emily Norcross Dickinson, were strict and cold like the Puritan religion they upheld....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poet Poem Essays] 1552 words
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An Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poem 670 - An Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poem 670 Have you ever been scared by your own shadow. Or have you ever been walking home at night, and nothing unusual is happening, but you can't shake this feeling that some mass murderer is following close behind, waiting to strike. Maybe you are crazy. More likely, though, you become scared by thinking of old tales or stories, like all the people who have gone into the woods and mysteriously vanished without a trace. I knew one girl who saw The Blair Witch Project and had to sleep with all the lights and the TV on that night, and still to this day won't go traipsing into the woods....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 670 Essays] 775 words
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An Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poem #315 - An Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poem #315 I believe that this poem can be interpreted in many different ways. Who is to say that there can only be one explanation or meaning to Dickinson's #315. Since being introduced to this poem, I have heard many different interpretations either from others in my group or from reading about it in web sites or books. In this close reading, I will concentrate on the very first word of this text: He. I will explain who I think this person is and how "He" is responsible for the actions in this poem....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 315 Essays] 836 words
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An Interpretation of Emily Dickinson's Poem #315 - An Interpretation of Emily Dickinson's Poem #315 Emily Dickinson had an interesting life, and is a profound woman in the history of America and literature. Emily wrote many poems. Some are titled, and many are given chronological numbers instead of headlining the main theme. I am interpreting Poem #315. I read the poem, and had to read it again and again. As with most poems, the meaning is always clouded from me and I need a little help to figure out the true meaning of the author's intentions....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 315 Essays] 921 words
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Emily Dickinson's Death Poems - Emily Dickinson's Death Poems Emily Dickinson's world was her father's home and garden in a small New England town. She lived most of her life within this private world. Her romantic visions and emotional intensity kept her from making all but a few friends. Because of this life of solitude, she was able to focus on her world more sharply than other authors of her time were. Her poems, carefully tied in packets, were discovered only after she had died. They reveal an unusual awareness of herself and her world, a shy but determined mind....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry Death Dying Essays] 3836 words
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Emily Dickinson's Fascicle 17 - Emily Dickinson's Fascicle 17 Approaching Emily Dickinson’s poetry as one large body of work can be an intimidating and overwhelming task. There are obvious themes and images that recur throughout, but with such variation that seeking out any sense of intention or order can feel impossible. When the poems are viewed in the groupings Dickinson gave many of them, however, possible structures are easier to find. In Fascicle 17, for instance, Dickinson embarks upon a journey toward confidence in her own little world....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Fascicle 17 Poetry Essays] 2582 words
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Emily Dickinson's God - Emily Dickinson's God Works Cited Not Included God, to Emily Dickinson, is seen in more than a church or a cathedral. God is seen in her poems in relationship to such themes as nature and the individual existence. These thematic ties are seen in such poems as "It might be lonelier," and "Some keep the Sabbath going to church." "Some keep the Sabbath going to Church" consists of the differences that exist between Dickinson's way of being close to God and many other people's ways of being close to God....   [tags: Papers Religion Emily Dickinson Essays] 3043 words
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Because I could not stop for Death, by Emily Dickinson - Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born on December 10,1830 in the quiet community of Amherst, Massachusetts (Davidson 247). She was the second born to Edward and Emily Norcross Dickinson (Davidson 247). Her older brother Austin and her younger sister Lavina lived in a reserved family headed by their authoritative father (Davidson 247). Emily’s mother was not “emotionally accessible,'; thought out there lives (Davidson 247). Their parents weren’t involved in their children’s lives....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Essays] 871 words
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A Slanted View on Religious Authority in the work of Emily Dickinson - A Slanted View on Religious Authority Emily Dickinson uses her poem, “There’s a certain Slant of light,” to express her view of organized religion. Almost the entire poem is written in a ballad stanza form, which is the same structure of a hymn. Yet, the intention is not to praise the faith taught by the church but to show that it distorts the true idea of God. Dickinson provides variety in this established structure with changes in form and rhythm, giving emphasis to her opinions and conveying an increasing distress and unfulfilled desire....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry Poem]
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Because I could not stop for Death, by Emily Dickinson - ‘Because I could not stop for Death—,’ A Poem of Both Marriage and Death When thinking of both marriage and death, the word “eternity” comes to mind. Marriage is looked at as a symbol of eternal love, and death is looked at as a state of eternal rest. Also, Christians consider life after death as an eternal state. In “Because I could not stop for Death—,” Emily Dickinson portrays death by describing an eternal marriage. On the literal level, the speaker remembers a time where she was carried off and eloped with a man called Death and his partner in crime, Immortality....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Essays] 1127 words
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Literary Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poetry - Literary Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poetry      Emily Dickinson is one of the most famous authors in American History, and a good amount of that can be attributed to her uniqueness in writing. In Emily Dickinson's poem 'Because I could not stop for Death,' she characterizes her overarching theme of Death differently than it is usually described through the poetic devices of irony, imagery, symbolism, and word choice.      Emily Dickinson likes to use many different forms of poetic devices and Emily's use of irony in poems is one of the reasons they stand out in American poetry....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poet Poetry Analyze Essays]
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Emily Dickinson - Emily Dickinson Breaking news revealing the truth about Emily Dickinson’s life has recently been uncovered. For the past hundred-plus years literary historians believed Dickinson to be a plain and quiet type of person who did not communicate with the public for most of her life. Her romanticism poetry drew attention from fellow literary legends. After corresponding with the well-known Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who showed interest in her work but advised her not to publish it, she became defiant to publish any of her work....   [tags: Author Biography Emily Dickinson Essays] 1012 words
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The Extensive Use of Symbolism in Emily Dickinson's Poem #315 - The Extensive Use of Symbolism in Emily Dickinson's Poem #315 As I had no prior experience with Emily Dickinson's work, I was unsure of what to expect from this assignment. I read the poem about fifteen or twenty times before I was even able to ask myself legitimate questions about Dickinson's thoughts as she composed this work over two hundred years ago. I couldn't even look to the title for guidance..."ugh, this is going to be tough" ran through my head over and over. I began by researching #315 on the Internet and in our library....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 315 Essays] 784 words
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Emily Dickinson's Because I Could Not Stop for Death - Emily Dickinson's "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" In Emily Dickinson’s “Because I could not stop for Death “ (448), the speaker of the poem is a woman who relates about a situation after her death. The speaker personifies death as a polite and considerate gentleman who takes her in a carriage for a romantic journey; however, at the end of this poem, she finishes her expedition realizing that she has died many years ago. The poem contains six quatrains, and does not follow any consistent rhyme scheme....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Stop Death Essays]
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850 words
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Exploration of the Brain in Emily Dickinson's Poem 670 - Exploration of the Brain in Emily Dickinson's Poem 670 The brain is one of the most complex organs of the entire human body. How many people over the course of time have explored and tried to explain the brain. Even with millions of peoples' opinions of how the brain works, we still do not understand the most intrinsic parts of it. The tricky part is the subconscious. We are able to hide things, even from ourselves, for years. How is it that we can bury so much information that becomes so hard to find....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 670 Essays] 822 words
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An Explanation of Haunting Thoughts in Emily Dickinson's Poem 670 - An Explanation of Haunting Thoughts in Emily Dickinson's Poem 670 Poem 670 is about the inner workings of your mind. The beginning of this poem addresses everyone. She does that by saying, "One need not be a Chamber....One need not be a House." This is saying whether you are small like a chamber or big like a house you will be haunted in your mind. The phenomenon of haunting thoughts, in your brain, exceed anything externally at that moment. Your mind becomes totally focused on the inner dealings that external people or actions are perceived as ghosts....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 670 Essays] 656 words
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Analysis of Emily Dickinson’s No. 657 and No. 303 - Analysis of Emily Dickinson’s I dwell in Possibility (No. 657) and The Soul selects her own Society (No. 303) 303 The Soul selects her own Society Then shuts the Door To her divine Majority Present no more Unmoved she notes the Chariots pausing At her low Gate Unmoved an Emperor kneeling Upon her Mat I’ve known her from an ample nation Choose One Then close the Valves of her attention Like Stone 657 I dwell in Possibility A fairer House than Prose More numerous of Windows Superior for Doors Of Chambers as the Cedars Impregnable of Eye And for an Everlasting Roof The Gambrels of the Sky Of Visitors the fairest For Occupation This The spreading wide my narrow Hands To gather Pa...   [tags: Emily Dickinson 657 I dwell in Possibility] 939 words
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Emily Dickinson's Use of Loss in Poem 67 and Poem 1036 - Emily Dickinson's Use of Loss in Poem 67 and Poem 1036 Many of Emily Dickinson's poems touch on topics dealing with loss. While loss is generally considered a sad or unfortunate thing, Dickinson uses this theme to explain and promote the positive aspects of absence. Throughout many of her poems, one can see clearly that she is an advocate of respecting and accepting the state of being without. Dickinson implies that through these types of losses, one can gain a richer and stronger appreciation for both success and belongings....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 67 Poem 1036] 815 words
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True Feelings in Billy Collins' Taking Off Emily Dickinson's Clothes - True Feelings in Billy Collins' Taking Off Emily Dickinson's Clothes Upon first look, Billy Collins “Taking Off Emily Dickinson’s Clothes” seems to be a wild fantasy for Emily Dickinson that he is entertaining. Upon closer examination, however, the poem reveals his subconscious desire to have sex with his mother and his frustration about his inability to do so, resulting in the displacement of his sexual desires onto Dickinson. From the beginning, Collins is very detailed with his description....   [tags: Billy Collins Emily Dickinson's Clothes Essays] 1252 words
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Emily Dickinson and Her Poetry - Emily Dickinson was ahead of her time in the way she wrote her poems. The poems she wrote had much more intelligence and background that the common person could comprehend and understand. People of all ages and critics loved her writings and their meanings, but disliked her original, bold style. Many critics restyled her poetry to their liking and are often so popular are put in books alongside Dickinson’s original poetry (Tate 1). She mainly wrote on nature. She also wrote about domestic activity, industry and warfare, economy and law....   [tags: Dickinson Poet Poetry Essays] 669 words
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Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Because I Could Not Stop for Death - Analysis of Emily Dickinson's "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" In regard to Emily Dickinson’s poem, “Because I Could Not Stop for Death,” Critic Eunice Glenn says: “In the first two lines Death, personified as a carriage driver, stops for one who could not stop for him. The word ‘kindly’ is particularly meaningful, for it instantly characterizes Death. This comes with surprise, too, since death is more often considered grim and terrible” (Glenn). Critic Charles R. Anderson says, “Death, usually rude, sudden, and impersonal, has been transformed into a kindly and leisurely gentleman” (Anderson)....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Could Not Stop Death Essays]
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Emily Dickinson’s Poem 67, Poem 1036, and Poem 870 - Absence and Loss in Emily Dickinson’s Poem 67, Poem 1036, and Poem 870 Emily Dickinson often refers to loss and absence in her poetry. It is not often seen as strictly negative though. It is, however, seen as inevitable. It is not always inevitable in the negative sense though. It is sometimes seen as necessary in order to understand life. There seems to be an overall theme of loss being a part of life. This theme can be seen upon examining poems 67, 1036, and 870. Poem 67 is a good example of Dickinson portraying absence as positive....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poem 67 1036 870]
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Emily Dickinson and Her Poetry - Emily Dickinson and Her Poetry Emily Dickinson is one of the great visionary poets of nineteenth century America. In her lifetime, she composed more poems than most modern Americans will even read in their lifetimes. Dickinson is still praised today, and she continues to be taught in schools, read for pleasure, and studied for research and criticism. Since she stayed inside her house for most of her life, and many of her poems were not discovered until after her death, Dickinson was uninvolved in the publication process of her poetry....   [tags: Poem Dickinson Poetry Biographies Essays]
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Emily Dickinson and Adrienne Rich - Emily Dickinson and Adrienne Rich The modernist period, stretching from the late 19th century to approximately 1960, is a very distinct phase in the progression of American literature, employing the use of novel literary techniques which stray away from the traditional literary styles observed in the time preceding the period. Modernist writers explore new styles themes, and content in their compositions, encompassing issues ranging from race (Kate Chopin) to gender (H.D.) to sexuality (James Baldwin), as well as many others....   [tags: Poetry Poets Dickinson Rich Essays]
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The Implicit Intimacy of Dickinson's Dashes - The Implicit Intimacy of Dickinson's Dashes The dash in Emily DickinsonÂ’s poetry, initially edited away as a sign of incompletion, has since come to be seen as crucial to the impact of her poems. Critics have examined the dash from a myriad of angles, viewing it as a rhetorical notation for oral performance, a technique for recreating the rhythm of a telegraph, or a subtraction sign in an underlying mathematical system.1 However, attempting to define DickinsonÂ’s intentions with the dash is clearly speculative given her varied dash-usage; in fact, one scholar illustrated the fallibility of one dash-interpretation by applying it to one of DickinsonÂ’s handwritten cake recipes (Franklin 120...   [tags: Emily Dickinson analysis Essays]
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Analysis of Emily Dickinson's The Bustle in a House - Analysis of Emily Dickinson's The Bustle in a House The Bustle in a House is a poem by Emily Dickinson about the painful loss one feels after the death of a loved one. Dickinson was quite familiar with the kind of pain expressed in her poem. Her father, mother, nephew, and three close friends, all died within an eight-year period. It is no small wonder that a common theme in Dickinson s poetry is death. She uses many literary devices, including structure, imagery, figurative language, sound devices, and capitalization; to convey the hurt one experiences when a loved one passes on....   [tags: Dickinson Bustle in a House Essays] 661 words
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Ideas of Gender and Domesticity in Leaves of Grass and Selected Emily Dickinson Poems - Ideas of Gender and Domesticity in Leaves of Grass and Selected Emily Dickinson Poems Though both Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson were highly self-reliant and individualistic, he found importance in the “frontiers” and believed the soul was only attainable through a physical connection with nature, whereas she chose to isolate and seclude herself from her community in order to focus solely on her writing. In this analysis, I will look at excerpts from Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and Emily Dickinson’s poems, “I’m ‘wife’— I’ve finished that”, “What mystery pervades a well!” and “I’ll tell you how the sun rose”, to contrast their representations of self-realization and domesticity and the...   [tags: Dickingson, Whitman, Poetry]
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Life vs Death and Human vs Nature in Dickinson´s poems - Emily Dickinson was an American poet from Massachusetts, who lead a strange but mysterious life. She was a very reluctant woman she stayed in her room and rarely talked to anyone, she had an amazing talent she could write poetry. Emily Dickinson wrote over a thousand poems throughout her life that later after her death were published. Dickinson’s poems were brought to life due to her weird but wonderful use of various literary terms. Majority of Dickinson's poems reflect her lifelong fascination with illness, dying and death....   [tags: poetry, American poet, Emily Dickinson]
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The Nature of the Being Emily - Before the sun you rise to great heights- showing your mighty trunk in brilliant shades of brown and gray. You take a bow, embracing the wind- enticed to join in- you begin to sway. Your prominent twisted chest, branches out with sounds of paper wax- whispering among the day. Your hollow heart stirs- pure with energy of life- in the moments beat; Your blood flows with the intensity of a river- from the dirt below to the blue above- stopping only to replenish its’ broken banks. You are a power to be reckoned with, but to fate… remain… merciful....   [tags: Dickinson] 1650 words
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Comparing Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson - Comparing Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson as Poets Often, the poets Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson try to convey the themes of the meaning of nature, or that of death and loneliness.  Although they were born more than fifty years apart their poetry is similar in many ways.  Both poets talk about the power of nature, death and loneliness.  However, Dickinson and Frost are not similar in all poetic aspects.  In fact, they differ greatly in tone. Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost both talk about the power of nature in their poetry.  Dickinson uses this theme in her poem " `Nature' is what we see -."  The power of nature is strongly portrayed in this poem by Dickinson's articulation of what...   [tags: Comparison Poetry Poems Frost Dickinson]
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Death in Emily Dickinson's Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died - Death in Emily Dickinson's Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died Emily Dickinson's two poems, "Because I Could Not Stop For Death" and "I Heard A Fly Buzz-When I Died," revolve around one central theme, death. Though the two do centralize around the theme of death they both have slightly different messages or beliefs about what is to come after death. By discussing both of the poems and interpreting their meanings, the reader can gain a fuller understanding of the message Dickinson is trying to send to her audience and a greater feel for what may lie ahead in the afterlife....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Death Dying Literature Essays] 962 words
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Comparing and Contrasting Dickinson’s Poems, Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz- When I Died - Comparing and Contrasting Dickinson’s Poems, Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz - When I Died Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born on 10th December, 1830, in the town of Amherst, Massachusetts. As a young child, she showed a bright intelligence, and was able to create many recognizable writings. Many close friends and relatives in Emily’s life were taken away from her by death. Living a life of simplicity and aloofness, she wrote poetry of great power: questioning the nature of immortality and death....   [tags: compare, contrast, Emily Dickinson] 846 words
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Emily Dickinson's Poetry About Death - Emily Dickinson's Poetry About Death "Emily Dickinson's Poems about death grew out of her reactions to the tragic events in her personal life." In three of her poems, her style of writing reflects her way of life. 'I heard a Fly buzz when I died', 'My life closed twice before its close' and 'I felt a Funeral in my brain' all reflect on Dickinson's feelings and emotions towards death. In 'I felt a funeral in my Brain', Dickinson describes her own funeral in perfect detail. As if she is an observer of the service....   [tags: Essays Papers Dickinson Poem Poem Essays]
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Conflict within Belonging in Dickinson´s This is My Letter to the World and The Saddest Noise, The Sweetest Noise - A sense of belonging is an innate desire to identify ourselves with groups whilst simultaneously as this is broken by choice we ultimately must ‘belong.’ Through Dickinson’s poetic representations in This is My Letter to the World and The Saddest Noise, The Sweetest Noise, she expresses the conflict within belonging by juxtaposing the futility of acceptance whilst forming her individual identity. In contrast, modern illustrations of belonging are adopting in Luhrmann’s exotic film, Australia, and Doris Lessing’s short story, Flight....   [tags: Emily Dickinson, individual identity, paradoxes] 966 words
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The Works of Emily Dickinson - ... Romanticism includes elements of imagination, emotion, nature, exotica, and individuality. Realism rejects heroic, adventurous, unusual, or unfamiliar subjects and focuses on truth and objectivity. The Realistic period has roots in the struggling aftermath of the Civil War. Dickinson embraced this period without intending to. Her personality caused her writing to reflect the period. Writers in this period were adjusting to new styles of writing. Their works were relevant but left interpretations to readers....   [tags: realistic perios, personal themes, death, God]
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Emily Dickinson: An American Poet - ... Emily Dickinson had many influences in her life to help inspire her poetry. During her early years of writing as a teenager, she was heavily influenced by family friend Benjamin Franklin Newton. Newton inspired her writing by discussing intellectual topics with a young Emily and sharing books of literature and poetry. He eventually introduced Dickinson to the poetry of William Wordsworth, whose romantic poetry inspired the young writer heavily. Other great influences on Dickinson were the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and William Shakespeare....   [tags: Author, Biography, Literature] 1804 words
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A Journey into the mind of Emily Dickinson - Born in Amherst Massachusetts in December of 1830, Emily Dickinson quickly became one of America's most prolific writers. Her poetry, which she never intended to be published, span her lifetime. Additionally, Emily wrote, in her life, over 1,700 poems, and many of which dealt directly with death and the subject of the afterlife. Of her most memorable poems, that related directly with the subject of death, “Because I Could Not Stop For Death” has remained a favorite of the literary world since it was first written in 1869....   [tags: Biography, Writer, Poet, Author] 900 words
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Emily Dickinson: Life and Literature - ... It is thought that Dickinson may have been engaged to Gould in the 1850’s. Some drafted letters written to “Master” by Dickinson have been found and they describe a passionate but changing relationship between her and the recipient. It is not known who these letters were supposed to be sent to. Later in Dickinson’s life, it seems that she had a romantic relationship with Judge Otis Phillips, who was a close friend of Edward Dickinson, Emily’s father. Lord and his wife Elizabeth visited the Dickinson’s household often, and it wasn’t until his wife’s death did Lord pursue a relationship with Dickinson....   [tags: notorious American poets]
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Emily Dickinson: Life and Literature - ... In her youth, Dickinson displayed a social side to herself that later retreated when she become older. She had many female friends, and though she never married she had many significant friendships with males. some of the men that she actively conversed with were, Benjamin Newton, Henry Vaughn Emmons, and George Gould. It is thought that Dickinson may have been engaged to Gould in the 1850’s. Some drafted letters written to “Master” by Dickinson have been found and they describe a passionate but changing relationship between her and the recipient....   [tags: writing, modernism] 1063 words
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Psychoanalytic Criticism on Emily Dickinson - Psychological criticism is known as the type of criticism that analyses the writer’s work within the realms of Freud’s psychological theories. Such approach can be used when trying to reconstruct an author’s position throughout their literary writings, as well as understanding whom the author was and how their mind created such works. When considering the work of Emily Dickinson, psychoanalytic criticism comes into play with the role of explaining the many meanings behind her poetry, as to make the reader relate to such poetry on a deeper level or not to who she was as a human being....   [tags: freud, poetry, meanings, desires, concepts]
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Emily Dickinson's Message to Readers - Emily Dickinson’s Message to Readers Emily Dickinson was a nineteenth – century American writer whose poems changed the way people perceive poetry. She is one of the most mysterious writers of all times. Her personal life and her works are still the cause of debates and are not fully solved. Her poems are dedicated to life and finding the real truth. Her two poems: “Tell all the truth but tell it slant” and “Much madness is divinest sense” represent Dickinson’s quest to reveal the mystery and truth of life....   [tags: nineteenth century poetry]
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Emily Dickinson's Capitalization and Punctuation - The poetry of Emily Dickinson is one of the most recognizable of the 19th century. Dickinson’s poetry stands out because of its unconventional use of capitalization and punctuation. Her poems contain capitalized words which are not normally capitalized. Her poems are noted for the frequent use of the dash. Literary scholars have attempted to interpret Dickinson’s unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Some believe that it was merely part of Dickinson’s penmanship (Weisbuch 73). They therefore edit Dickinson’s poetry and publish them in standardized form....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]
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The Madness Of Emily Dickinson - Is it madness that drove Dickinson to write or insanity. My poem is about madness versus sanity, individuality, rebellion, and feminism. Joyce Hart says, "Many literary critics and literary historians believe thst Ralph Emerson influenced Dickinson" (Hart 92). Joyce Hart also says, "Dickinson's poem "Much Madness is Divinest Sense," has Emerson's writting in mind, influences the reader to interpret this poem in a way that might illustrate a rebillious young poet" (Hart 92). Dickinson;s poem is written in iambic meter....   [tags: poetry, female authors]
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An Interview for Emily Dickinson - ... Emily: Yes. I don’t know where I would be without my friends. “My friends are my estate” (Dickinson, www.goodreads.com). Interviewer: Since you were close to your friends, I assume they were your inspiration for some of your writing and influenced it as well. Is that correct. Emily: Yes, they did indeed. Interviewer: Would it be safe to say that religion was another thing that influenced your writing. Emily: Yeah, that would be safe to say. I didn’t meet some of the religious standards people expected of me....   [tags: life, poem]
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Emily Dickinson's Living Death - Emily Dickinson was born December 10, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts to a governing father and an almost non-existent mother. Her father was a lawyer, a legislator and a rigorous Calvinist. Although her father had strong faith in God, Dickinson declined to pronounce herself as a believing Christian in her late teens. In her younger years Dickinson considered herself different because she was shy and sensitive (Emily Dickinson’s Life and Work). Dickinson and her younger sister Lavinia started their education at Amherst Academy....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]
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An Annotation of Emily Dickinson's The Last Night that She Lived - An Annotation of Emily Dickinson's The Last Night that She Lived Dickinson's The Last Night that She Lived presents a meditation on the reaction of the speaker and those with her while they are confronted with the death of a female friend. Strangely, in dealing with the subject of death, Dickinson steers away from the metaphysical aspect of such a heavy situation and remains firmly anchored in the tangible world. The speaker makes no references to God or the afterlife, and her allusions to nature are fleeting....   [tags: Poem Poetry Poet Essays Dickinson Last Night] 979 words
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The Poem Love by Emily Dickinson - In her famous poem Love, Emily Dickinson writes, “She rose to his requirement, dropped the playthings of her life to take the honorable work of woman and of wife.” The heroine of the novel Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet, chooses to stand up against society’s standards of a woman’s responsibilities and pursue happiness. The novel describes the hardships and romances of the five Bennet daughters: Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty, and Lydia. Both Jane and Elizabeth, the eldest daughters, combat to find true love amidst a society in which a woman simply marries for convenience....   [tags: hardships and romances, fairytale lives]
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Analizing Emily Dickinson's Poetry - Emily Dickinson’s poetry goes where most poets refuse to go: the fear beyond death. Being surrounded by death, due to the Civil War it comes to no surprise that Dickinson would express such a morbid topic. However, it is the way that she expresses death that is significant. Her writings tend to go against her Puritan heritage by not suggesting an afterlife. In Dickinson’s poems, “I felt a Funeral, in my Brain”, “I heard a Fly buzz—when I died” and “Because I could not stop for Death” oblivion is the object to fear, not death....   [tags: abstract concepts with concrete images]
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