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Your search returned 196 essays for "Deng Xiaoping":
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Deng Xiaoping's Economic Reform in China - The goals of Deng Xiaoping’s economic reform were the ‘Four Modernizations’. This Four Modernization refers to the reform of agriculture, industry, national defense, and science technology. These reforms were to solve the problems of motivating workers and farmers to produce a larger surplus and to eliminate economic imbalances that were common in command economies. Deng Xiaoping felt that the quickest way to build a better China was to improve living conditions immediately, to give people the level of morale they need for further development....   [tags: world history, chinese]
:: 2 Works Cited
1712 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Legacy of Deng Xiaoping - The Legacy of Deng Xiaoping Deng Xiaoping was born is 1904 in Sichuan Province. He died in 1997. He was the General Secretary of the Communist Party. He went to France for higher education. He was a short man, gentle looking and intelligent. He was tough and soft-spoken. He was a chain smoker and he loved playing mahjong. He became the leader of China after chairman Mao. He was in power from 1978 till 1997. He married three times and had five children. (Three daughter, two sons) Deng made three major policies while he was in power....   [tags: Papers] 721 words
(2.1 pages)
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Deng Xiaoping - Deng Xiaoping China has a long history with several great leaders, but none of those leaders have even come close to being as great as Deng Xiaoping. Deng Xiaoping was a loyal communist who sacrificed his own life so his people could have a better one. During his long political career, he served as a Communist politcommissar of the 129th Division (Liu-Deng Army) from 1929 to 1949. As politcommissar, he bravely and successfully fought the Nationalists. In 1945, he was elected to the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party....   [tags: essays research papers] 1623 words
(4.6 pages)
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Deng Xiaoping - Introduction “I don’t care if the cat is black or white, I just want it to kill the mice.” - Deng Xiaoping. Deng Xiaoping has been the individual with the most impact on China since the 1970’s. Along with Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai, he is looked at as one of the key figures in evolution of communism in China . Deng Xiaoping will be remembered as a national hero, but this was not always the case. The real story of Deng includes the fact that, on more than one occasion, his peers ostracized him. During his lifetime he has been a part of the many changes in China throughout the twentieth century....   [tags: China Chinese]
:: 8 Works Cited
2169 words
(6.2 pages)
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Deng Xiaoping's Massive Reform Set China on a Sky-rocketing Course - ... His other economic policies eased the government control over economics and it resulted in a large boost of economic growth, this economic growth extended even past the time he resigned in the 1990s. For instance the GDP (Gross Domestic Product, a determiner of the quality of life) per capita in 1978 was 154.07 billion U.S dollars (World Bank), just 30 years later the Chinese GDP per capita in 2008 skyrocketed to 3,170 billion U.S dollars (World Bank). This increase from 154.07 billion U.S dollars to 3,170 billion U.S dollars represents an approximate whopping 20.57% increase in its GDP in only 30 years after Deng implemented his reforms and policies....   [tags: poverty, revolution, communist] 1764 words
(5 pages)
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The Modernization of China - In 1978 Deng Xiaoping became the leader of China and began an ambitious program of economic reform. Under Deng Xiaoping’s modernization policies, the country was opened to the outside world that foreigners were encouraged to bring technical information and managerial knowledge to China. The new policies encouraged private and collective business, so that higher skill levels of workers were needed to develop the new China. My grandfather, Shidao Liu, is an exemplar of rural people who obtained opportunity to gain a satisfactory job during Deng’s era....   [tags: Deng Xiaoping, modenization policies]
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1746 words
(5 pages)
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The pre-Deng China - At the geopolitical level, China saw Africa in the immediate post-colonial period as a continent that offered it the geographical reach in developing its claim as the global champion of the Third World. China portrayed itself, especially in the pre-Deng Xiaoping period, as engaged in a struggle against hegemonies’, and sought to develop stronger political ties with newly independent African countries to enhance its global reach and influence. China’s Africa policy touched on enhancing ties between Africa and Asia (Afro-Asian relations), as well as China seeing itself as the world’s largest country reaching out to a continent with the largest number of developing countries....   [tags: third world, foreign market, UN] 786 words
(2.2 pages)
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Deng Xiaopeng - Deng Xiaopeng Deng Xiaopeng was a good leader for China though at times Deng hit some bumpy roads and was said to infringe some of the Chinese rights still Deng controlled China with order and efficiency. Deng raised China’s economy to national high all around. Deng also strengthened its political status up to that of a very powerful country. Though Deng did things bad his achievements rose above his failures. As newfound leader of communist China after Mao’s death Deng’s first goal was to raise the technological status of China to standards that could possibly rival those of the west....   [tags: essays research papers] 515 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Chinese Capitalist - ... Deng was forced to flee. After leaving the army of Feng Yuxiang, he found himself in the city of Wuhan, an area where the Communists had their headquarters. It is at that time he began using the nickname "Xiaoping" and began rising through the ranks of the Communist Party. Also In Wuhan, Deng first established contact with relatively unvalued Mao Zedong. From 1927 to 1929, Deng lived in Shanghai. Here, he aided protests that would be strictly suppressed by the KMT. At this time, Deng moved quickly up the ranks partly as a result of many militant Communist deaths....   [tags: political power, economic failure] 2512 words
(7.2 pages)
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The Impact of China's One-Child Policy - The Chinese population has been growing since the beginning of Chinese civilization, but never as rapidly as when the People’s Republic of China was formed. Mao Zedong believed that expanding the population would lead to a spur in economic growth. The People’s Republic of China provided improved sanitation and medicine, which helped facilitate the growth of the Chinese population. The encouragement of population growth was soon ended after both the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution because China was unable to support such a large expansion of the population....   [tags: China's One-Child Policy]
:: 11 Works Cited
2181 words
(6.2 pages)
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China’s Economic and Political Power - During the 20th century, the world believed that the renowned cities of the United States would provide modern spectacles emanating with futuristic qualities. However, within the past decade, the influence of China has creeped into the party of global dominance, establishing their footing on an international scale at a significantly alarming rate. In China, you can now experience the tallest skyscrapers, the newest airports, the fastest highways, and the best electricity grids in modern technology (Roasa)....   [tags: China, economy, politics, expansion, growth]
:: 13 Works Cited
1599 words
(4.6 pages)
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Mao vs. Deng - Mao vs. Deng China's transition from the leadership under the iron fist of Mao Zedong to the more liberal Deng Xiao Ping gave the People's Republic a gradual increase in economic freedom while maintaining political stability. During Mao's regime, the country focused on bolstering and serving the community, while subsequently encumbering individual growth and prosperity. Deng advocated a more capitalist economic ideology, which established China as an economic force in the global community while endowing its citizens with more liberties and luxuries than previously granted....   [tags: Papers] 1077 words
(3.1 pages)
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Taiwan, Taipei: Why Does the Chinese Communist Party Place so Much Emphasis on Naming the Island? - Taiwan, Taipei: why does the Chinese Communist Party place so much emphasis on naming the island. To attempt to answer this question, first the origin of the conflict has to be analyzed. Beginning in the 1940’s, the CCP’s victory over the Kuomintang symbolized the beginning of cross-strait issues. However, it wasn’t until 1992 when George Bush Senior decided to announce that the United States would sell D-15 fighter jets to Taiwan. This action caused cross-strait tensions to reach an all time low between Taiwan, China, and the United States....   [tags: successful island nations, international relations] 3074 words
(8.8 pages)
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Ti Yong Distinction - With the Industrial Revolution and Age of Imperialism intensifying among Western nations in the 19th century, China faced an impending threat to its ancient cultural values. Pressured to adapt to the changing global environment but fearful of losing its traditional identity, China and its reform leaders have since attempted to incorporate a “ti-yong” distinction between utilizing Western function and preserving Chinese values, most notably in the Self-Strengthening movement beginning in 1860 and Deng Xiaopeng’s economic reforms of the 1980s....   [tags: China, modernization, Qing, Deng, economic reform]
:: 7 Works Cited
1965 words
(5.6 pages)
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Chinese Religion: Tolerating Religious Freedom Under Modernization - B. DENG Xiaoping (1982-1987): Tolerating Religious Freedom Under Modernization After the death of Mao, Deng Xiaoping bought an end to class struggle and mass movement but adopted pragmatic governance to modernization and economic development. He realized China had eroded into a poverty-stricken society and stagnated economy as he acknowledged, “In a country as big and as poor as ours, if we don't try to increase production, how can we survive. How is socialism superior, when our people have so many difficulties in their lives?” In face of the urgent need to revive eroded public confidence, Deng adopted a more liberal and subtle version of religious freedom policy to unite people from al...   [tags: religious freedom, non-communists]
:: 39 Works Cited
1198 words
(3.4 pages)
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Buddhism and Ecotourism - Following Mao Zedong’s Communist forces victory over the Kuomintang forces of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, “Mao declared the founding of the People’s Republic of China on October 1, 1949.” (History of PRC) This marked the beginning of the socialist transformation under Mao’s rule in which he planned to unify China and raise the standard of living through the development of China’s infrastructure, industry, healthcare, and education. Mao’s two main campaigns during his time in power were the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution....   [tags: Negative Capitalist Impacts, Recovery, China]
:: 13 Works Cited
1059 words
(3 pages)
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Lack of Rule of Law in China - Aristotle once stated, “The rule of law is better than that of any individual.” The essential characteristics of rule of law are: the supremacy of law, meaning both the government and individuals are subject to the law; a concept of justice that emphasizes interpersonal adjudication, based on importance of standards and procedures; restrictions on discretionary power and exercise of legislative power by the executive; independent judiciary, judicial precedent and common law methodology; prospective, not retrospective legislation; and underlying moral basis for law....   [tags: International Law]
:: 11 Works Cited
2069 words
(5.9 pages)
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History and Culture of the People’s Republic of China - The People’s Republic of China is a country with one of the richest cultural backgrounds and the largest population in the world with 1,338,612,968 people. It holds “1/5 of the world’s population” (Banister 2). Located in eastern Asia, it is the fourth largest country with a total area of 9,596,960 sq km and the second largest electricity consumer and exporter after the U.S. The vast amount of natural resources make China one of the leading manufacturers of the worlds products from raw materials such as steel and iron to finished goods as toys, various machinery, textiles and electronics....   [tags: Chinese Culture, ] 1624 words
(4.6 pages)
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Business in China: History, Culture, and Influence - 1. What role does cultural heritage play in China’s view of business. China’s view on business can be linked to its three general areas of religious beliefs: Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. A brief description and there relationship to business practices are discussed below. Confucianism is a Chinese ethical and philosophical system developed from the teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius (Shubro). The core being humanism, is believing that human beings are “teachable, improvable and perfectible through personal and communal endeavor especially including self-cultivation and self-creation.” ("Confucianism,") Confucianism emphasizes the importance of the family, reverence for e...   [tags: chinese religious belief, confucianism, taoism]
:: 4 Works Cited
962 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Impact of China’s One Child Policy - China’s One Child Policy is still a current issue today. Before the policy was created, Mao Tse Dong, was China’s communist leader, who believed in planned births. He wanted the country to go by the slogan “later, longer, fewer.” This encouraged families to have fewer children, to space the births out longer, and to have them at a later age in life (Nadia 295). He believed that once people’s education increased so would the practice of birth control. This would help lower fertility rate and could bring some people out of poverty....   [tags: population control, Mao Tse Dong]
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1290 words
(3.7 pages)
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China’s Outward Foreign Direct Investment -   Table of Contents Foreword 1 History of China’s Outward FDI 1 Changes in Policy and its Effects on OFDI 1 Stage 1: “Cautious internationalization” (1979-1985). 2 Stage 2: “Government encouragement” (1986-1991). 2 Stage 3: “Expansion and regulation” (1992-1998). 2 Stage 4: “Implementation of the 'go global' policy” (1999-2001) 2 Stage 5: Post-WTO period (2001- present) 2 Exhibit #1 3 Geographical and Sectoral Distribution of Chinese OFDI 3 Investing Actors 4 China’s influence in Central Asia 4 President’s visit 4 The economic dimension 5 China gathers up Central Asian gas, and reverses the directions of oil export 5 China – Africa Relationship 7 The Development Path of China’s OFDI to Afric...   [tags: FDI]
:: 10 Works Cited
2778 words
(7.9 pages)
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Democracy Movements in China - Democracy Movements in China Democracy Movements in China Democracy Wall In 1978, stimulated by the opening of China to the West and also by the "reversal of verdicts" against the 1976 Tiananmen protesters (These demonstrations against the gang of four had been condemned as counter-revolutionary at the time but were now declared a revolutionary act), thousands of Chinese began to put their thoughts into words, their words onto paper and their paper onto walls to be read by passers by. The most famous focus of these displays became a stretch of blank wall just to the west of the former forbidden city in Beijing, part of which was now a museum and park and part the cluster of residences for...   [tags: Papers] 3693 words
(10.6 pages)
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China's Survival of Crisis Due to Economic Reforms - China's Survival of Crisis Due to Economic Reforms In the years before 1976, many unwise policies were carried out which brought China into a crisis of communism, or a state in which communism was threatened. The Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution were specifically the main causes of the crisis of communism and the mastermind between these two movements, Mao Zedong, can be held responsible for their initiation. The Great Leap Forward was a great economic failure....   [tags: Papers] 1017 words
(2.9 pages)
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Agriculture in China - A. Plan of Investigation The investigation will attempt to answer the question, “To what extent did Chinese agricultural reforms between 1978 and 1982 enable the success of the four modernizations?” Research will primarily be gathered on the nature of these reforms, how they compared to the agriculture policy of Mao during the Great Leap Forward and how Deng’s reforms enabled the possibility of economic growth and reform in the private sectors of China. Primary source such as official statistics of agricultural production kept in villages will be analyzed to determine the impact of overall government policy in villages and other agricultural centers....   [tags: agricultural reform, China, investigation]
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1882 words
(5.4 pages)
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America's Open Door Policy - ... It felt debilitated by different powers' much bigger ranges of prominence in China and stressed that it may lose access to the Chinese business sector ought to the nation be divided. As a reaction, William Woodville Rockhill detailed the Open Door Policy in intend to protecting American business chances and different hobbies in China. In September 6, 1899, U.s. Secretary of State John Hay sent notes to the significant forces, such as France, Germany, Britain, Italy, Japan, and Russia, requesting that them announce formally that they might maintain Chinese regional and managerial trustworthiness and might not meddle with the free utilization of the bargain ports inside their authoritative...   [tags: US international relations]
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976 words
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Harmed or Harnessed? The Effects of Capitalism on China - Since implementing capitalistic reforms in the 1970s, the gross domestic product of China has risen by an average of 9.5 percent each year. This growth is expected to continue at this breakneck pace, and China is estimated to overtake the United States as the world’s largest economy by 2026 (Ding 6). This influx in wealth has catalyzed advancements in Chinese technology, has enabled better access to education for millions of people, and has increased the overall standard of living for over a billion people....   [tags: Chinese economy after captitalistic reforms]
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1805 words
(5.2 pages)
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The Causes of the Tiananmen Square Massacre - The Causes of the Tiananmen Square Massacre I have been asked to look at the Tiananmen Square massacre and to find the long and short term causes for the unfateful event in which thousand of people were killed. The main political party in china was the Kuomintang this was a nationalist party who supported capitalism. In 1935 Mao Tse Tung became the chairman of the communist party. By 1946 conflict between the communists and the Kuomintang (the party that was ruling) turned into a full-scale civil war....   [tags: Papers] 1371 words
(3.9 pages)
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China's Population Control - China, being a country that has all eyes on them have become one of the most prominent countries in the world recently. Development within the country has by far surpass the expectations of the people all around the world. Despite all that, China face some of the world’s biggest problems for instance overpopulation. The meaning of overpopulation is the excessive population of an area to the point of overcrowding, depletion of natural resources, or environmental deterioration. And with that, the one-child policy was introduced to control the population of People's Republic of China (PRC) or more commonly known as China....   [tags: Ethics ] 1596 words
(4.6 pages)
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Confucius in Modern China - Every culture is composed of many philosophical ideologies that comprise the ever-changing nature of said nation. Many cultures do not have a monolithic, nor static nature; ideas such as Maoism, Daoism, Christianity, etc., challenge the preexisting notions that are part of a culture. Even though the Chinese government has established a strong strand against Confucianism, it is still a part of the Chinese culture in socio-political, economic, familial, and individual levels. Confucianism is still prevalent though business, education, the Confucian revival, the previous ties China had with Confucianism, and a return to old traditions as a default....   [tags: philosophical ideologies] 1725 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Pro-Democracy Movement of the 1980's - The Pro-Democracy Movement of the 1980's Communism took over China soon after the second world war. Mao Zedong, the leader of the communist party who came from the country, remained paramount until his death on the 9th of September 1976. During his rule, he modified Marxist-Lenonism to suit China's population of peasants, and went through many "leaps" to try and revolutionise China's economy as he had done with the political system. But in the end, Millions of Chinese men, women and children died....   [tags: Papers] 666 words
(1.9 pages)
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Emotion of Death in A Mother in a Refugee Camp, Rember and Do not Go Gentle into that Good Night - 10. Chinese Civil War after World War 2: Following World War II a Civil War broke out in China, between the Nationalists and Chiang's militia. The United States saw the Nationalists as the legitimate government in China, at which the United States aided the Nationalists in battles. The Chiang militia kept moving from capital to capital, and in 1949 they decided to flee the country into Taiwan, which they catches and declare the Republic of China, and the Nationalists proclaimed their region as the People's Republic of China....   [tags: attitudes, strong vocabulary, chinua achebe] 1513 words
(4.3 pages)
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The Role and Image of Accountants in the Globalized Era - The Role and Image of Accountants in the Globalized Era Introduction As a partner of the Big Four firm Ernst and Young we have a goal of developing and expanding an already prominent area of service further. This particular service is Assurance. Assurance services can include; auditing both internal and external, Actuarial assurance, Corporate reporting, IFRS reporting and many more. Last year assurance, ‘our largest practice, delivered a positive year growing revenues by over 4% to US$10.9bn.’ (Ernst and Young, 2013)....   [tags: china, public accounting, auditing]
:: 18 Works Cited
3000 words
(8.6 pages)
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Mao Cultural Revolution - A. Plan of Investigation In 1966, Mao mobilized the Chinese youth to initiate the “Cultural Revolution”, a violent process eliminating old Chinese culture, customs, thoughts and habits, purging “counter-revolutionary” party members, and heightening Mao’s personality cult. I will summarize evidence collected from textbooks, official documents, biographies and eyewitness reports about the events between 1959 and 1966. I will describe the failure of the Great Leap Forward, Mao’s resignation as president, his power struggle with Liu Shoaqi and Deng Xiaoping and the propagating of his personality cult....   [tags: Reasons Behind the Revolution] 1850 words
(5.3 pages)
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Adam Smith and Globalization: China’s Economic Evolution - Globalization is not a new concept – trade, migration, market integration and capital flows have been practiced in various forms dating back centuries. China is at the epicenter of our globalized world and their success is attributed to the tenets of Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations. However, opponents of the globalization believe if Smith were alive today, he would be repulsed by our modern day international business strategies. The general consensus among dissenters of globalization is the misguided belief that capitalism at any level is missing the moral sentiment espoused by Smith’s philosophical viewpoints....   [tags: Globalization Essays]
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964 words
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Adam Smith and Globalization: China’s Economic Evolution - Globalization is not a new concept – trade, migration, market integration and capital flows have been practiced in various forms dating back centuries. China is at the epicenter of our globalized world and their success is attributed to the tenets outlined in Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations. In the last fifteen China has become one of the fastest growing economies in the world, rapidly building a strong export and outsourcing industry. Opponents of the globalization believe if Smith were alive today, he would be repulsed by our modern day international business strategies....   [tags: exports, capitalism, trading] 1162 words
(3.3 pages)
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China’s Nuclear Force Modernization - The sole reason for Chinese nuclear force was to deter a nuclear attack on China. The development of U.S. missile defense systems, however, has compelled China to take an offensive reaction to this and began to advance its nuclear force. Now, there are two main reasons why a U.S. missile defense system would influenced China’s nuclear force modernization. First, a U.S. missile defense system undermines China’s nuclear minimum deterrence. Second, China continues to view the United States as its main potential enemy because of U.S....   [tags: United States, missile defense system]
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967 words
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Chinese Economic Reform - Chinese Economic Reform Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the "Great Leap Forward" and the "Cultural Revolution" which had had as their bases ideas such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978, China’s leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems. Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP (Chinese Communist Party) leader after Mao's death, had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao....   [tags: Economics Economy China Essays]
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2528 words
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The Massacre at Tiananmen Square - The Massacre at Tiananmen Square The protests in China during 1989 were for a good cause, but were ended in the worst possible way. Mao Zedong brought Communism into china with violence and even after his death, with a new leader, the violence continued. The Chinese Government made a huge mistake by using force to end a peaceful protest. “After the 1912 revolution, two groups began to compete for the leadership of China. One group, the Nationalists, was led by Chiang Kai-shek while Mao Zedong was the head of the second group, the Communists....   [tags: World History] 861 words
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What The Dog Saw and the Rise of the Global Market - History is an odd thing. History last forever but events in history start and end. History sometimes repeats itself and other times it is considered myth because it never happens again. Luckily for the 20th century almost everyone remember it and are aware of what occurred. An example of current history is “globalization”, the UN’s intervention in Kuwait, China’s economic reforms, the rise of technology, and the rise of the global market. Yet, out of all these historical changes I believe that the rise of the global market has been the most significant due to the constant tug-of-war it has caused....   [tags: literary analysis, malcolm gladwell]
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1079 words
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The Positive Impact of Globalization Upon China and India - To globalize means to “to extend to other or all parts of the globe; make worldwide” (Dictionary.com, 2010). While globalization is a fairly ‘new’ term, it is actually as old as our ancestors. The process was longer back then but, as they were discovering new foreign lands, they were bringing commerce and culture with them. Silks, spices and crops were traded along trade routes and opened new worlds of luxury and taste. Today, globalization has influenced our modern world far beyond those predecessors’ wildest dreams....   [tags: International Trade, Global Commerce]
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1403 words
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Will China's Authoritarian Model Will Dominate the Twenty-first Century? - Introduction In 1966 Mao Zedong chairman of the Communist Party of China kicked off a Cultural Revolution to enforce communism. This movement was intended to revive the revolutionary spirit of China, but instead left China in a state of poverty and isolation from the world. Most say and refer to the Cultural Revolution as the “Ten lost years” because China had no economic or political stability and growth due to the isolation. Mao Zedong’s death on September 9, 1976 also brought the end of the Cultural Revolution....   [tags: The Beijing Consensus]
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2102 words
(6 pages)
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China's Way to Condemn Western Political Model: The Tianamen Incident - 1. Introduction The following paper focuses on the Tiananmen Incident and the China’s way to condemn Western political model in its aftermath by describing and applying the Asian values. Even though protesters were demanding only anti-corruption officials and more economic transparency West defines the issue as people were demanding the democracy and more political rights. While Chinese officials were suppressing the issue very harsh, Western powers put sanctions over China. Then Chinese officials become tenser against West and in their White Paper describe the western values as a threat and describe their own values....   [tags: Asian values, communist political system]
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1493 words
(4.3 pages)
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The Environment and Economy: An Emerging Balance in China - Since the very inception of China’s history, economic progress has been the nation’s top priority. The Chinese government has always stressed to its citizens that they will be rewarded with perpetual economic growth insofar as social stability and respect for the party-state are maintained. While this system has enabled China to develop further, bringing about many shared benefits, it has also proven to have detrimental impacts on the environment. For some time, the issue of environmental degradation was of no concern because the nation was experiencing such tremendous growth and as a result, a higher standard of living....   [tags: Pollution Problems, Institutional Reforms]
:: 15 Works Cited
963 words
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Evolution of Newspapers, Journalism, and Its Censorships in China - Evolution of Newspapers, Journalism and its Censorships in China As we have read many articles on the past, we have been reading about different censorships that are happening in China. It is very important to understand where China came from and how the country has developed their government, and how the totalitarianism government is and has been playing a role in the case of journalism. There are many scholars who have been studying the situations and evolutionary developments of newspapers and journalisms within China and it is important to see how these situations have developed over course of time....   [tags: government, journalism, ideologies, publications] 1611 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Environment and Economy: An Emerging Balance in China - Since the very inception of China’s history, economic progress has been the nation’s top priority. The Chinese government has always stressed to its citizens that they will be rewarded with perpetual economic growth insofar as social stability and respect for the party-state are maintained. While this system has enabled China to develop further, bringing about many shared benefits, it has also proven to have detrimental impacts on the environment. For some time, the issue of environmental degradation was of no concern because the nation was experiencing such tremendous growth and as a result, a higher standard of living....   [tags: Renewable Energy, Quality of Life]
:: 15 Works Cited
2113 words
(6 pages)
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The Largest Population in the World: Changed Forever - Today in China, most women would reply, “It’s a rather common occurrence, (like eating) an ordinary kind of food. There’s nothing worth talking about. It’s a very natural thing, like eating and drinking. It’s not against the law. And it’s quite safe to have (an abortion)”, if asked about the topic of abortions and China’s one-child policy. This shows how greatly the policy has affected Chinese and become a part of their daily life. While being controlled by a policy that limits couples to only one child, China faces new issues....   [tags: China, women, abortions, one child policy]
:: 10 Works Cited
1306 words
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Overpopulation and Over- Consumption in India - ... Many countries, especially less developed ones, prioritize males over females because of this reason. Lastly, unwanted pregnancy contributes to overpopulation because of the overall lack of knowledge about sexual relations and birth control in most societies. Consequentially, overpopulation has many negative effects. Most of the critical environmental issues today are a result of over-consumption, which coincides and is caused from overpopulation. Issues like air and water pollution, global warming, resource depletion, and the biodiversity crisis are caused by overpopulation....   [tags: countries, issue, standards, living] 744 words
(2.1 pages)
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An Alternate China - An Alternate China The obituaries that marked Deng Xiaoping's death on February 19, 1999 were extremely outspoken in their praise of the economic reforms he had unleashed on China. However, while getting rich has been glorious for many Chinese, a much larger number, although enjoying some of the reform's benefits live a less capital existence. We must start back a few years for a proper analysis. On June 4, 1989, there was a massacre that took place in Tinanmen Square in Beijing. It was a military suppression of students and others of a democracy movement....   [tags: Papers] 931 words
(2.7 pages)
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Ideologies of the Democracy Movement in China - Ideologies of the Democracy Movement in China After Deng Xiaoping gained power in 1978, a new political atmosphere was promised for the Chinese people. A promise of a free land with a modern economic state was made by Deng in order to gain public support. During Deng’s reign, a series of economic reforms were made. These reforms had major impacts on both the economy and the society of China. Although it has been argued that Deng was leading a totalitarian regime, historians tend to overlook the idea that the Chinese have different ideologies and morals than people in the west....   [tags: Politics Political]
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3349 words
(9.6 pages)
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Chinese Politics: Changing Conditions - Changing conditions The suppression of the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989 wrecked public confidence in the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). The CCP asserted harsh tactics to crush the opposition and influence the people to believe it had not lost its position. Other Chinese citizens believed that the CCP could be defeated because of the distrust the citizens had in the government. It led to a divide in society. The economic growth experienced in the 1990s led the people of China to forget about the politics and focus on material gains....   [tags: political activism, China, economics, CCP]
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2268 words
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Chinese Society - There is no doubt today that the nature of Chinese society is distinctly similar to the society under the Mao era and even under the Deng Xiaoping era. Many attribute this change to the reform and opening that had occurred in China under Deng Xiaoping. The emergence of the internet coupled with sociological shifts has created a China that is closely relatable to the U.S society. This paper will discuss how society has changed through various topics such as, migration, dating, media, youth and religion....   [tags: Migration, Dating, Media, Youth, Religion]
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2272 words
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Free Trade With China - China will continue its efforts to enter into the World Trade Organization (WTO), Chinese Minister of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation Wu Yi said in Beijing on April 21 during her talks with Renato Ruggiero, director-general of WTO. Wu said that although China hopes to solve this problem as soon as possible, it is prepared for new difficulties and obstacles it will face in the entry process. No matter what the outcome, she said, China will not stop but rather speed up its reform and opening drive....   [tags: essays research papers] 439 words
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Social Protests in China and Its Implications on The Autocratic Chinese Communist Party - Topic: How do social protests emerge in China and what are their implications on the autocratic rule of the Chinese Communist Party. 1. Introduction Social protest has been increasingly prevalent in China since the early 1980s despite the restrictions on the freedom of speech and association. Groups of Chinese citizens, from unsophisticated villagers to state-owned enterprise workers and students, have been staging protests across the country to air their grievances and seek redress. The routinization of social protests has attracted international media coverage as China has a storied history of mass movements....   [tags: international media, rural protests]
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2975 words
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The Causes and Future of Taiwan and Hong Kong's FDI in Mainland China - ... The building industrial parks, and other transfers of economic development experience, have showed the Mainland Chinese a viable model for economic development and technological advancement, which have significantly contributed to China’s unprecedented economic growth. Another way in which China specifically tried to attract engagement with Taiwan, Hong Kong and other ethnically Chinese regions was through the creation of Special Economic Zones (SEZ). SEZs helped facilitate economic investment and FDI from Taiwan, Hong Kong and overseas regions with ethnic Chinese minorities....   [tags: foreign direct investment, global finance]
:: 6 Works Cited
858 words
(2.5 pages)
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Influence of Collectivist and High Power Distance in the Process of Organizational Learning - 1) Background Organizations evolve and develop by the combination of the knowledge, skills, and abilities of its member intending at the corporate objectives in order, to gain competitive advantage, increase their market share, augment performance, foster creativity, improve financial results, and a multitude of other dimensions to maintain their sustainability. One of the essential elements to permit the growth of the organization and its personnel is to foster the sharing of tacit and explicit knowledge in an environment favourable to the transfer of know-how and the attainment of ultimate organizational learning....   [tags: education environment inside mainland China] 1193 words
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A Rising China Will Benefit the US and its Allies - As an American who grew up in California during the 1980s, my initial perception of modern China was primarily shaped by the standard history book narrative of the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1949 and the first few decades of communist rule that followed. However, my views were radically altered in the summer of 1989 when dramatic media images of the student led protest movement in Tiananmen Square dominated the nightly news. For the first time, I became aware that there were many Chinese people who wanted the same basic human rights and civil liberties that Americans enjoyed....   [tags: Chinese Trade Practices, Economy]
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The Criticism of the Cultural Revolution and the Maoist Regime - Dai Sijie was sent to a re-education camp in Rural Sichuan from 1971 to 1974 because he was born into an educated family. Due to this experience, Sijie wrote Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress which tells the story of two boys undergoing re-education during the Cultural Revolution. The creation of Scar Literature began following the end of the Cultural Revolution and the death of Mao Zedong.(“Post-Mao Years”) “Scar Literature was intended to be cathartic…[and] contained depressing or horrific accounts of life during the Cultural Revolution…[and] each personal story effectively constitutes a criticism of their policies” (“Scar Literature”)....   [tags: Dai Sijie, chinese seamstress, Scar]
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A Rising China Will Benefit the US and Its Allies - As an American who grew up in California during the 1980s, my initial perception of modern China was primarily shaped by the standard history book narrative of the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1949 and the first few decades of communist rule that followed. However, my views were radically altered in the summer of 1989 when dramatic media images of the student led protest movement in Tiananmen Square dominated the nightly news. For the first time, I became aware that there were many Chinese people who wanted the same basic human rights and civil liberties that Americans enjoyed....   [tags: international relations and commerce]
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China´s Period Prior to the Economic Reform and Trade Liberalization - Proposition: Despite the OECD's (and others') rosy predictions for China's growth between now and, say, 2060, it is entirely possible for China's economic juggernaut to run off the rails, and to remain relative to the now rich countries in a state of disrepair for a long time. Introduction – China’s Economic Background 34 years ago prior to the economic reforms and trade liberalization, China had a different background to today’s economic development. The government supported policies that kept the country centrally controlled, inefficient and relatively isolated to the world economy....   [tags: economic policy, market reforms] 2605 words
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Ignorance Is the Lock, Knowledge Is the Master Key - Throughout childhood to adulthood, one may oftentimes hear the quote “knowledge is power”. It is a quote usually drilled into the heads of elementary to college-aged kids in order to encourage his or her pursuit of an education. As much as privileged students roll his or her eyes at the utterance of this quote, it is hard to deny the weight of truth in this quote when examining the history of many countries. This is especially true during times of oppressive rule. Freedom of press, information, and lines of communication are usually the main thing to be restricted when there is a hunger for complete control over a group of people....   [tags: Law]
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Has Economic Reforms Only Brought Positive Effects on China? - Has Economic Reforms Only Brought Positive Effects on China. The first speech delivered by Xi Jinping, the new head of the People's Republic of China, mentioned the Chinese (people's) Dream. The Chinese Dream is about "better education, more stable jobs, better income, more reliable social security, medical care of a higher standard, more comfortable living conditions, and a more beautiful environment" (BBC News) for the people and more. However, have all the economic reforms and modernization started by Deng Xiaoping in 1980 brought China closer to the Chinese Dream....   [tags: Chinese Dream, economy, modernization]
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The Senkaku Islands Territorial Dispute Between Japan and China - The Senkaku island group is consisted of eight islets that are located in the East China Sea. Also known as the Diaoyu Islands by the Chinese, these uninhabited islands and rocks add up to a total land area of a little more than 6 kilometer. Given the relatively small size of the islands, it may seem paradoxical that they have been raising humongous tensions between Japan and China and can potentially be a source of war in East Asia. The two great powers in the region share a long history of fighting over the sovereignty of the islands, and the fragile balance between them was seriously challenged in 2012 when Japan decided to bring three Senkaku islets under state ownership....   [tags: Sino-Japanese ]
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Impact of Globalisation on The Chinese Economy - Globalisation is a process that refers to the increased integration between different countries and economies as well as the increased impact of international influences on all aspects of life and economic activity. Over the last 50 years, globalisation has had a tremendous impact on the Chinese economy. The impacts brought forth by globalisation can be both positive and negative and effect both economic performance, economic growth and the development of China’s economy. Globalisation is the main factor responsible for China’s significant growth that has taken place over the last two decades....   [tags: Globalization Essays]
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How Huawei Technologies Succeed in Global Competition - Huawei, a Chinese telecommunications equipment and services company established in 1987 in Shenzhen, China, has drawn worldwide attention in the recent years. Although many people have not heard of it or even pronounce its name right, the fact that Huawei has become the largest telecommunications equipment maker in the world cannot be overlooked. Benefiting from the Chinese economic reform led by Deng Xiaoping, Huawei gained the opportunity to develop its overseas markets; however, it was not enough for a small company like Huawei to achieve incredible success....   [tags: huawei, telecommunications, mao zedong]
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The Effects of Population Growth in China - Thesis statement : Since the population has grown rapidly since in the past Fifty (5) years, how did the Chinese government deal with the population explosion in the past and how will they deal,with it in the future. Though China is the world's fifth-largest country in terms of area and the second largest country in Asia, it is the most populous country in the world. There is over one billion Chinese people which is 19 percent of the world's population and the population still keeps growing. From 2000 to 2010, Chinese population growth is about 6.2% and if we compared the population from 1960 with 2010, the population had grown more than 100%....   [tags: population density, one child policy]
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Effects of One Child Policy in China - ... Branigan states that, “forced abortions and sterilizations are illegal,” in the article “China’s One- child Policy’s Human Cost Fuels Calls for Reform” (Branigan). Though forced abortions are illegal, according to “China’s One- Child Policy Turns 33 as Forced Abortions, Female Infanticides Continue,” forced abortions can happen up to the ninth month pregnancy, be extremely violent, and possible kill both the mother and baby (Ertelt). The government administers forced abortions to make the idea of having a second child unappealing to families....   [tags: abortions, family, fines] 847 words
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Reflections on Peter Hessler´s Country Driving - In Peter Hessler’s Country Driving, Hessler embarks on a voyage across China along the Great Wall. He also spends a significant amount of time living in various areas of China that reveal the culture and lifestyle of the people of China. The book takes place during the boom of the automobile industry as wells as the rise of the factory industry. The effect of both of these industries on the Chinese people is very interesting. The Chinese people undergo a transition that Hessler observes throughout the book....   [tags: China, Chinese culture, history, journey]
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Internet Censorship and Education in China - The Internet is a key to innovation. In the United States, the Internet has had a positive effect on education. It has widened the amount and type of resources available for research, provided students with effective methods of collaboration (discussion boards and forums), and has allowed for social networking to become less formal and more widespread. This has not happened in China. The “Great Firewall” is inhibiting China and thus curbing its innovation. Academic freedom is a First Amendment right that is recognized by the American government; however, China’s academic freedom is “constrained by the Communist Party’s monopoly on power, which is enshrined in the Constitution, and by the...   [tags: Internet Censorship in China]
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American Electoral Democracy versus Chinese Communism - ... To show, in 64 years of running the largest country in the world, the range of the policies has been wider than any other country in recent memory, from radical land collectivization to the Great Leap Forward from the Cultural Revolution and Deng Xiaoping's market reform. On the contrary, the USA with its bipartisan system isn’t close enough match to the modern realities as Democrats and Republicans have different interpretations of the constitution, which causes ideological divide in the society....   [tags: legitimacy, self-correction, way to power] 661 words
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China's Spectacular Success in Recent Years - China's development is praised by the whole world. Its developments are not only in the economic aspect, but as well in its foreign affairs. Compared with other developed countries, China is a relatively young country. It began constructing itself in 1949. After 30 years of growth, company ownership had experimented unprecedented changes. On the whole, non-state-owned companies can now be more involved in sectors that used to be monopolized by state-owned companies. Its phenomenal success is because it developed some suitable public policies, which were fit for the situation of China....   [tags: suitable public policies, Asian development] 1061 words
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Population Control: Should Families Be Limited? - Should Families be limited on how much they are. Population control is a very dangerous and serious case. Population control is controlling parents to not have a lot of children for the problem of population. This is important because it helps the country the country to decrease its population. Population control is actually a great crises that a lot of countries now a days have and try to solve it. Population control is a huge problem because it increases the country’s population and makes the countries recourses way more available to poor people....   [tags: familiy planning, china, one child] 799 words
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Shanghai and China´s Economic Rise - Dong’s book Shanghai introduces us Shanghai, a city born in greed and humiliation. Shanghai was like “the ugly daughter grew up in the shadow of celestial Empire’s defeat by outsiders in the opium war. (p.2, Dong)” From late 1800s to 1949, “in Shanghai, more than anywhere else in China, progressive-minded Chinese recognizes the need for China to adopt modern enterprises and technology. (p.66, Dong)” Shanghai, a treaty port ruled simultaneously by three separate municipal regimes, in the first half of the 20th century rose to become China's largest city for many important functions, such as trade, financing, manufacturing, journalism, publishing and education....   [tags: China, politics, economics, Dong]
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Ai Weiwei´s Art and Censorship - Ai Weiwei’s art vs. Censorship “I don’t want to be part of this kind of denying reality. We live in this time. We have to speak out” (Klayman). Ai Weiwei is an internationally known Chinese artist as well as activist, and his motivation and determination can be summed up by this quote. In all of his pieces, Weiwei critically examines the social and administrative issues facing China today. Many of his works exhibit multiple themes that can be interpreted in various different ways. This lends itself to the universal appeal of his art and makes it a more effective medium of conveying his messages to viewers....   [tags: art, world, activist, beliefs] 1742 words
(5 pages)
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Chinas growing economy - After North America, Europe, and Japan, the area of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong "is a fourth growth pole in the world economy" (Jue 108) which in 1994 was expected to double in size by 2002. Today, the growth rate is still on track to fulfill that prediction. Recent Chinese economic policies have shot the country into the world economy at full speed. As testimony of this, China’s gross domestic product has risen to seventh in the world, and its economy is growing at over nine percent per year (econ-gen 1)....   [tags: essays papers] 2711 words
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The Great Leap Forward - The Great Leap Forward (1958-1960), was an economic and social plan initiated by Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung), with the intent of radically increasing agricultural and industrial production in the People's Republic of China, and of bringing China to the brink of a utopian communist society. The Great Leap Forward was a reaction to the Hundred Flowers Campaign, a more moderate development program in China in 1957. In this earlier program, Mao Zedong tried to win the support of Chinese intellectuals by calling for their constructive criticism of the policies of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)....   [tags: Mao Zedong Mao Tse-tung] 618 words
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China's One Child Policy - Many of us in the United States get a chance to choice our rights of the number children we conceive, but many other countries and cultures have different views of on children how they are treated. I will explain, China and India then go into detail on what I believe will be best for India’s future. After the growth of more than 1.2 billion people, China became the largest population in the world. (8) In 1979, Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping limited Chinese population by enforcing the One Child Policy....   [tags: Population Control in China] 693 words
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China's One Child Policy - According to the U.S. Census Bureau the world’s population consists, of more than 7 billion people. China resides as the world’s leading populated country with more than 1.3 billion people. Because, of this over population it maintained fears of their food, resources, and living spaces (International Data Base). The Chinese government then implemented the one-child policy to slow their growing population. The one-child policy has prevailed effectively in slowing down the population growth, but it has caused great anguish among Chinese families....   [tags: Population Control in China]
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China's One Child Policy - One Child Policy Over population has been a global issue for decades. Medical advances have made it possible for people to live longer and have multiple births, which are just some of the factors contributing to this social problem. Many countries have attempted to battle this issue, but none as intensely as China. China allows the government to have full control over family planning to help reduce the population. In 1979 China created a policy called the "One Child Law" which limits couples to only one child....   [tags: Population Control in China]
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2616 words
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Chinese Schools of Thought - The concept of Confucianism is regarded as a way of life which was highly held and taught widely by Confucius in period of 5th - 6th Century BC. The Chinese have ardent believers, followers and practitioners of the Confucianism from time immemorial, estimated to be dating as far back as two millennia. The formation and foundation of the movement has been accredited to K’ung Fu-Tzu which means “master king”, over the years. The basics of Confucius are based on the retrieval of meaning of the ancient rituals which seem to have been pushed to the oblivion by the changing world and ways of life coupled by intermingling of people with different backgrounds....   [tags: Religion]
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1049 words
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Foreign Trade with China - From the 1970s, there has been a wave of liberalization in China, which was introduced by Deng Xiaoping. This is one of the key reasons to the rise of China to be one of the economic giants in the world. In the last 25 years of the century, the Chinese economy has had massive economic growth, which has been 9.5 percent on a yearly basis. This has been of great significance of the country since it quadrupled the gross domestic product (GDP) of the country thus leading to saving of 400 million of their citizens from the threats of poverty....   [tags: US-China Commercial Relations]
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